Santa Cruz Nomad 4 - Review

Oct 16, 2017
by Mike Kazimer  


The Nomad has been in Santa Cruz's lineup since 2005, and while its appearance has evolved over the years, the intended purpose has remained the same. This is a bike that was designed to excel on the descents while still retaining a high level of pedalability – after all, not everyone is lucky enough to have easy access to a chairlift or a shuttle rig.

The latest version takes a step even closer towards becoming a full-blown downhill bike, with 170mm of travel, a 64.5-degree head angle (in the low setting), and a revised leverage curve that's designed to work well with either a coil or air shock.
Santa Cruz Nomad Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / mini-DH
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Rear wheel travel: 170mm
• 64.6º or 65º head angle
• Carbon frame, C or CC options
• Metric shock sizing
• Boost hub spacing
• MSRP: $4,499 - $9,399 USD ($8,399 as shown)
• Weight: 30lb / 13.6kg (size large)
www.santacruzbikes.com

The bike reviewed here is the $8,399 Nomad CC X01 Reserve; component highlights include a 12-speed SRAM X01 Eagle drivetrain, Code RSC brakes, Reserve carbon wheels with DT Swiss 350 hubs, and a Lyrik RCT3 fork. The base model carbon bike, the Nomad C R is priced at $4,499 USD, and comes with a 170mm RockShox Yari up front, SRAM Guide R brakes, and a SRAM NX 11-speed drivetrain.

Not quite ready to part ways with that much cash? Santa Cruz also offers an aluminum version of the Nomad, with prices starting at $3,599 for a complete bike.


Santa Cruz Nomad V4
The Nomad's cable routing is nice and clean, with tubes molded into the carbon frame to eliminate any installation hassles.
Santa Cruz Nomad V4
A small flip chip provides two different geometry settings.


Frame Details

We went over the specifics of the new Nomad when it debuted back in May, but it's worth going over some of the design highlights once again. To start with, it's the overall frame shape that's stirred up plenty of lively debates since the bike was released, both on the internet and in real life. For the record, I'm a fan of the new shape – there's a little bit of a Mad Max aesthetic to it, a bike built for post-apocalyptic freeriding. Plus, with so many bikes out there that look nearly identical it's nice to have something that stands out from the crowd.

The Nomad's design change wasn't done just to cause a ruckus – the goal was to give it a leverage ratio that mimicked that of the V10 downhill bike. As Jack Russell, Santa Cruz's Senior Industrial Designer said, “We knew the most uncompromised way to make this 'full DH bike feeling trail bike' work was to give it a V10 leverage ratio. The V10/N4 leverage ratio is a linearly-progressive line that works great with a coil or air, depending on how you want to the bike to feel and is always predictable, which is great for dialing in the tune. With all that leverage ratio stuff happening, we were able to give the bike the correct amount of anti-squat so you can still pedal it up a hill.”


Santa Cruz Nomad 4 review
The new suspension configuration keeps the bike's center of gravity nice and low.
Santa Cruz Nomad V4
There's enough tire clearance to run meaty tires, and a small fender to keep mud and gunk from getting on the shock.


The Nomad's shock is now mounted as low as possible, sitting just above the bottom bracket and running through a split in the seat tube. A long upper link connects the top tube to the seat stays, and the lower link runs from the chainstays to the shock.

The Nomad's additional frame features read like a must-have list for a modern mountain bike. Threaded bottom bracket? Check. Room for a water bottle? Check. Easy to use internal cable routing where it makes sense? Check. There's even a frame protector towards the upper portion of the down tube, the spot that tends to get rubbed raw when shuttling with a bunch of bikes draped over a tailgate.



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Santa Cruz Nomad 4 geometry


Specifications
Specifications
Price $8399
Travel 170mm
Rear Shock RockShox Super Deluxe (Coil or Air)
Fork RockShox Lyrik RCT3
Cassette SRAM XG1295 Eagle 10-50T
Crankarms SRAM X1 Eagle Carbon 30T (170mm)
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01 Eagle
Chain SRAM X01 Eagle 12 SPD
Handlebar Santa Cruz Bicycles AM Carbon Bar 35x800
Stem Race Face Aeffect R 50mm
Grips Santa Cruz Palmdale Grips
Brakes SRAM Code RSC
Wheelset Santa Cruz Reserve 30 Carbon
Tires Maxxis Minion 27.5x2.50 DHF 3C EXO / Maxxis Minion 27.5x2.40 DHR II EXO
Seat WTB Silverado Pro
Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth 31.6



Santa Cruz Nomad 4






Climbing

On mellow, rolling terrain the Nomad feels a little bored, and if bikes had thumbs this one would be twiddling them up a storm, dreaming of steep, rough trails. Sure, the climbing position is comfortable, and it does pedal very well – even with the compression switch flipped to the fully open position there's a minimal amount of pedal bob – but there's still no hiding the slack head angle and 170mm of travel.

Now, I don't want to sell the Nomad's climbing abilities short – I made my way up plenty of awkward sections of trail without any trouble, and the 30-pound weight is very reasonable, especially considering what this thing is capable of on the descents.

Santa Cruz Nomad 4 review
The Nomad's climbing performance isn't anything to scoff at, although it'd much rather be flying downhill.

All the same, this is a bike where climbing is more of a means to an end, and although it'll dispatch with big fire road grinds without putting up a fuss, at the end of the day, if you dream of cleaning technical uphill sections more than you do about boosting off big jumps and pinballing through rock gardens there are better options out there.

On the other hand, for anyone who's ever stuck a dropper post on a downhill rig, or to take a step back in time, installed a Titec Knock Scoper on a freeride bike, the Nomad is going to be an appealing option, one that goes a long way towards taking the sting out of the long approaches that often precede the best descents.



Santa Cruz Nomad 4
The payoff for a long climb is especially sweet aboard the Nomad.


Descending

The previous Nomad was no slouch on the descents – there's a reason it was our pick for Bike of the Year back in 2014, but version 4.0 takes things a step further. It may only have 5mm more travel than before, but the reworked kinematics make it feel even smoother when charging through the rough stuff. There weren't any strange hiccups or quirks as the rear end went through its travel, and there's just enough ramp up to avoid any harsh bottom outs on big hits, no matter if the air or coil shock is installed.

On the topic of coil vs. air, I spent time with the Nomad set up with a RockShox Super Deluxe Coil RCT as well as with a Super Deluxe Air RCT in order to compare the two options. When all was said and done, I preferred the Super Deluxe Air. Yes, the coil shock was extra plush, and made the bike feel a little more glued to the ground, but the air shock didn't give up much in the way of grip, while also making the bike feel livelier, especially when popping off the lip of jumps. If your sole focus is on bombing down rugged DH trails, I can see choosing the coil option, but the air shock makes the Nomad feel more energetic, and I'd say it's a better choice for all-around riding.


Santa Cruz Nomad 4 review

As far as the Nomad's geometry goes, it's modern, but not radical, which isn't a bad thing – there is a limit to just how long a bike can get before it becomes unwieldy. A 460mm reach for a size large has become fairly standard over the last few years, the 430mm chainstay length is short but not stubby, and even the 64.6-degree head angle in the low setting is slack, but not crazy slack.

What do those numbers equate to out on the trail? They give the Nomad a familiar feel, one that's intuitive from the start. Its cornering ability is especially noteworthy – that low center of gravity makes whipping around turns a grin-inducing affair; it's tough to beat the sensation of blasting into a sharp turn, feeling the tires hook up exactly where they should, then rocketing out the other end. Compared to the Specialized Enduro, another option in the 170mm bracket, the Nomad feels lower slung, and not as tall, which makes it easier to carve into turns and to keep it planted in the really rough stuff.

It's also worth mentioning just how well the Nomad handled long, blown out sections of trail, the conditions that prevailed for much of the summer in the Whistler Bike Park due to the unseasonably dry conditions. Doing a nonstop, top-to-bottom lap is a good way to determine the overall ride quality of a bike – is it Cadillac smooth or does it feel like riding a 2x4, with every impact being transferred into your body? There's a balance that needs to be achieved when it comes to frame stiffness, and the Nomad gets it right. It's incredibly comfortable and free of any harshness, which meant that my body, especially my hands, felt less fatigued at the end of a long day of riding.



Santa Cruz Nomad 4
The new Reverb remote is worlds better than the original plunger-style version.
Santa Cruz Nomad 4
Santa Cruz back's their Reserve carbon rims with a lifetime warranty, and if you do manage to break one they'll get a replacement headed out within 24 hours.


Component Check

• Reserve Wheels: Part of the reason I hung onto the Nomad for a little longer than usual was put the Reserve carbon wheels through the wringer. Remember, I'd cracked a rim on my first ride on the Nomad when I coming up short on a stepdown, an incident that was entirely user error, but I wanted to see how the replacement wheel held up. The good news is that after nearly a season's worth of smashing and bashing both wheels are still running true, and that time period includes multiple days in the Whistler Bike Park.

RockShox Reverb Remote: The new remote lever for the RockShox reverb is a dramatic improvement over the previous design. It's a much more ergonomic, with a shape mimics that of SRAM's shifter paddles. The lever and the post itself were both trouble free for the duration of the test period.

Frame durability: Crashes happen, and the Nomad saw its fair share of encounters with the ground, but it's held up extremely well, with only a few little scuff marks to be seen. Even after a muddy spring followed by a dry, dusty summer there haven't been any creaks or groans to deal with, and there's absolutely no side to side play at any of the pivots.

Code RSC Brakes: The Codes are an appropriate choice for the Nomad, and their powerful, consistent performance never faltered. Some riders may want to upsize to a 200mm up front, but for most locations running 180mm rotors front and rear will provide plenty of stopping power.




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe new Nomad's long-term performance matched our initial impressions – this would be an excellent bike for riders with easy access to steep, rugged terrain. In search of a bike that can handle bike park and shuttle laps without batting an eye, but that can still be pedaled uphill for unassisted missions? The Nomad is a very, very worthy option. Mike Kazimer










About the Reviewer
Stats: Age: 35 • Height: 5'11" • Inseam: 33" • Weight: 160lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Twenty-two years deep into a mountain biking addiction that began as a way to escape the suburban sprawl of Connecticut, Mike Kazimer is most at home deep the woods, carving his way down steep, technical trails. The decade he spent as a bike mechanic helped create a solid technical background to draw from when reviewing products, and his current location in the Pacific Northwest allows for easy access to the wettest, muddiest conditions imaginable.



387 Comments

  • + 172
 Dear Santa ...
  • + 335
 Sorry but Santa can't afford this
  • + 106
 His elves only use alu in the building process as they do not agree with the environmental impacts of Chinese carbon factories.
  • + 24
 @VPS13: well, there is an ALU version of this bike though... ; )
  • + 227
 My 13 yo daughter demoed the Juliana version at our local bike park and came back with evil grin on her face. I told her to get a damn job.
  • + 22
 Sorry, Santa isn't home right now, he went on a cruise.
  • + 14
 Its alot of money for a mass produced far eastern frame
  • + 67
 Dear Satan ... might help
  • + 20
 Only if his last name is Cruz
  • + 35
 @chyu: Satan Cruz... I like it
  • + 10
 @WAKIdesigns: Spend a weekday morning in the traffic around here and Satan Cruz has a true ring to it.
  • - 4
flag Jackson900 (Oct 16, 2017 at 10:24) (Below Threshold)
 Dear Santa Cruz....
  • + 12
 Am I the only one that scrolls right to the price and then just says "Ehh" and keeps moving?
  • + 4
 They make an aluminum version. Cuts the sting a little.
  • + 15
 @kamsbry: Finally! An example of proper parenting...
  • + 5
 @JaredHarzan: Checked out the base aluminum version at the LBS. It was a tank, even without the pedals.
  • + 4
 @preach: I go "nah"
  • + 0
 @McNubbin: The $8400 CC version they tested is 30 lbs. The aluminum base model (per their website) is 33.2 lbs. I think the bike is just a tank. No matter what material the frame is made out of.
  • + 10
 @JaredHarzan: If I lived anywhere near mountains taller than 500ft, I would never choose any other rubber than full DH tyres on a bike like Nomad. It's so easy to go flat out on such bike that putting anything thinner is counter productive. Hence I would easily get into 34 lbs area. This bike should indeed be built like a tank.
  • + 15
 @McNubbin: grow some money, or grow some muscle. It's not designed to be a xc bike.
  • + 9
 @JaredHarzan: 33 really isn't that heavy. I've gotten my Kona 4 down to 30 lbs from 33 (with pedals). The only time I really notice is when I'm putting it in the truck after riding it. On the trail, it hardly matters; I'm not racing and am not a KOM chaser.
  • + 16
 Santa buys at YT.
  • + 7
 @karoliusz: Damn, hes a gwin fanboy too?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: absolutely spot on.
  • + 3
 @chrismac70: I'm all ears for a better frame for the same money or a similar frame for less.
  • - 3
 @Fix-the-Spade: a gay cruise
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: hit the nail on the head there. I live in Nelson NZ... IE nomad Country and most people round here are running dual ply/dh/super gravity casings on their bikes. Even the short travel and xc bikes get doubledowns etc.
  • + 1
 @chrismac70: agreed a lot of money. Unsure it meets the definition of 'mass' produced. Would be interested to see just how many of these are sold.
  • + 3
 @JaredHarzan: ha! That makes me feel old. A 30lb freeride beast a 'tank'.
  • + 4
 @CanBLine: the moment they all went to produce in China and companies like YT and even Canyon started pumping out legit geometries, brands like Santa Cruz and Intense lost a lot of value, at least for me. Yeti is still holding up there, keeping their iconic design and having that ridiculous pivot. I personally see nothing in SC or Intense that could make me chose them over Trek or Scott. Especially in the pricier CC layup. It is Unno, Antidote, Geometron and Robot Co that took over the role of what Santa Cruz used to be. Well - the circle of life
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: True that!

Santa Cruz is bought by the owners of Gazelle ... the owners of PON ... the family that owns the Dutch rights for VW/AUDI and whatever falls under that umbrella...

In Holland we had this commercial of the brands VW where an owner of a VW Passat was telling proud that his car got status... so what does your car have.... .same goes for Santa Cruz now I gues... haha ...
  • + 2
 @spbike: easy. Ibis, yeti and intense if you want boutique. If you want mass produced like sc then yt, spesh, sctt and trek. All are made as well or better and cost less
  • + 1
 @CanBLine: sc are part of one of the biggest bike companies in the world. Pon holdings. Thier frames are made in the same Taiwanese factories as all the other mass produced brands. Nothing wrong with this just let's not pretend they are special like they were pre carbon and web they were an independent company
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I would still include intense in the special camp as they are still a small independent company doing their own thing.
  • + 1
 @chrismac70: there are many many other good boutique/small brands... Alloy mostly though..
  • + 1
 Santa is off riding his new Nomad. He's playing Sketchballs McHuckinstuff with Rudolph and the elves!
  • + 2
 @chrismac70: Honest question, but which Ibis, Yeti and Intense carbon bikes aren't made in China/Taiwan in the same (likely) factories as the "mass produced" ones, as you call it?
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Oct 17, 2017 at 4:37) (Below Threshold)
 @chrismac70: Intense went over the board after 2013-2014. I saw now a couple of them and they look like any other Enduro bike, they don't really look like Intense anymore and don't offer any new quality. Back in the days when a red, deep blue, white or raw mental Intense showed up on the mountain, everyone knew it's there. People were pissing their pants when they saw a red M6 in the same way people Jizz their pants when a red Ferrari passes by on the street. These days you'll have a problem differentiating it from a Focus or Radon if you don't come close. Yetis still have that, Trek got up there with their racing red and baby blue of their 9.9. Two weeks ago in Hafjell, Mille Johnston was there with her baby blue Trek, one glimpse and you knew it's something special. There's been some energy about her bike. There's also been this desert storm Nomad, dude was fast, but there was nothing else coming to my mind other than "meh". The only SC bike that can catch my attention is the vivid purple Bronson with yellow details. I got an orange 5010 as a warranty replacement for my Blur Trc and I didn't think for a moment to keep it. It was as meh as it gets. I sold it within a week and haven't missed it for a second.

Perhaps it's the fact that I've seen everything, I owned some flashy stuff. So if I am to pay 3K+ (Which I would never do) for a frameset I'd expect it to be something spectacular.
  • + 3
 @Lagr1980: Absolutely, I love my Canfeild, just amazes me more and more every time I ride it.
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: and Hope now, of course.
  • + 1
 @VPS13: Canfield is totally way up there, such an exotic brand. Zerode is fantastic too.
  • + 2
 @VPS13: Agreed! I have a 2016 Balance and I have the same feelings every time I throw a leg over it. Plus it's unique in that not too many people have one and it always turns a head when a group of SC's, Treks and Spec's ride by.
  • + 3
 @chrismac70: You are paying a premium for the brand name. Brand recognition has value.
  • + 0
 Santa Broke
  • + 1
 @fabiotto: Snap-A-Cruz
  • + 1
 @Lagr1980: Indeed there are. I was sticking to those who use carbon that I know of.
  • + 3
 @daddydonuts: Mojo's. The point I am making is that Santa Cruz are now part of a huge conglomerate and so cannot be called boutique. They are large batch pile them high manufactured. Not small production runs like the brands mentioned.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I disagree about intense. They still have their version of VPP and a distinct look. I agree its more watered down and not as distinctive as it used to be,
  • + 1
 @Lastpikd: I agree you are paying a huge premium for the sticker set and headtube badge with SC
  • + 2
 dear Tom Cruise,,,
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Sh*t, your problems are not even 1st world, respect!
  • + 1
 @chrismac70: True but bottom line is some of the best customer service around! I don't mind paying extra for that in my old age!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: @chrismac70:

No disagreement here. My next bike will likely be a YT or Canyon. Because I can't afford a Zerode.
Just wonder if we recognise correctly what a niche we are. And freeride is a niche within that niche.
And how many riders are splashing near 5 figures of their own cash on the Nomad?
They can't be selling heaps?
  • + 1
 in 2022 maybe i can buy one. it usually takes me 5 years to upgrade.
  • + 1
 @serbdog: how may I help?
  • + 0
 @preach: Haha, yup me too. Another review of a nearly $10,000 dollar bicycle NO ONE can afford or in there right mind would buy complete. Moving on....
  • + 3
 @lightsgetdimmer: i have no fricking idea why you guys keep repeating this self righteous bullcrap about pricing. Butthurt about state of you own economy much? There are many people who afford these bikes and buy them. For many of them the ratio of income to bike price is much better than for me. I personally wouldn't buy anything more expensive than 4k, but I feel no need for calling people stupid because that's fkng retarded. I do think that ENVE rims or Di2 are a waste of money but I'm not judging people who buy them. Buying a 5L diesel pick up truck in Europe makes no sense what so ever, I may want to shout "Short dick, wanker, Douchebaaaag!!!" in owners face sometimes but I bet he has more fun driving it than I do with my old Volvo.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: WTF are you talking about? Where in my comment do you see me calling anyone stupid for purchasing this bike? With that being said, the only person I would call stupid is someone who uses the term "retarded". Get a clue bud. Keyboard jockeys, sheesh!
  • + 2
 @chrismac70: Intense is not rare at all, or boutique, only once upon a time...
  • + 1
 @shmoodiver: Same thing in Nelson BC...
  • + 1
 @chrismac70: That's not true. Built in SCB's own factory that they own. They do this so they don't have to be beholden to "quality control" and schedules of factories that do pump out every other brand. It means SCB's IP gets kept to themselves and they can control 100% the conditions of production.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Apart from SCB own their own factory and so can control the conditions of production. QC and warranty returns are fractional with SCB. Oh, and lifetime warranty, lifetime bearing replacement, pivots and linkages that are easily serviceable, 10 year+ small parts inventory...
  • + 1
 @KhyberRye: unless you know about a new state of the art scb facility, i don't think you know how the biz works.
Do share if you have some excellent news!
  • + 1
 They actually own there own carbon factory @chrismac70:
  • - 1
 @KhyberRye: oh yeah? Google Luescher Teknik and You can find a cut out of Trek Madone 9.9 proudly made in US, in Treks state of art facility where they can control every step of the process. It ain’t pretty
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: You've hit the nail on the head with this - ive rode Intense bikes for the past 10 years and for me they have lost the prestige they once had.
  • + 1
 @JaredHarzan: or buy 3 or 4 Konas for the same $. Rides just as good or better.
  • + 1
 @properp: haha Smile
  • + 134
 That's a lot of words to say "climbs OK, descends great," just like every other big travel bike that's been released in the last 5 years and reviewed on Pinkbike. How about some comparisons to it's competitors? Things you don't like vs. it's competitors? If the Nomad is the best bike in it's category why not say what it is doing better than the Reign, Enduro, etc.? This review reads like another extended press release.
  • + 66
 That's tricky to do if you want all brands to advertise and promote products on your platform, and organize test trips at cool locations and so on. The best way is to go to a demo day anyway.
  • + 12
 Exactly, how does this compare to other models and brands in the climbing category.
  • + 17
 I agree but I'd compare it to similar bikes, not enduro race machines. I'll go for comparison against capra, radon swoop, banshee rune, canfield balance, pivot firebird, slayer, etc
  • + 6
 Yup, yup and yup.

I enjoy the flashy photos and "we're not paid to write this *honest* assessment..." articles, and the stuff about the 10%/pro/I'm kind of pro or here's a pro's bike/here's a dentist's bike... to a point though

Curious if there's a site that has reviews/coverage of everyday bikes, doing everyday stuff...? Scene reports without a ton of free sponsor shots?
  • + 18
 Maybe the following is not as in-depth as you'd like, but he did make a comparison to an Enduro:

"Compared to the Specialized Enduro, another option in the 170mm bracket, the Nomad feels lower slung, and not as tall, which makes it easier to carve into turns and to keep it planted in the really rough stuff."
  • - 26
flag oldtech (Oct 16, 2017 at 8:39) (Below Threshold)
 #FAKE NEWS
  • + 107
 I mentioned the Enduro briefly, and as for the Reign, I prefer the way the Nomad's geometry feels on the climbs - that steeper seat angle creates a more comfortable position.

I try to provide comparisons in reviews whenever possible - you can look back and find plenty of examples, but those comparisons only make sense if I've spent time on a bike. The Nomad sits in a fairly small niche - there weren't a ton of new 170mm, 27.5" wheeled bikes released this year, which is why I didn't have that many bikes that I'd ridden recently to use for comparison.
  • - 7
flag Richt2000 (Oct 16, 2017 at 8:46) (Below Threshold)
 Agree 100%.
This just reads like another santa cruz infomercial.
  • - 29
flag thedriftisreal (Oct 16, 2017 at 8:49) (Below Threshold)
 really tho... I'd rather read e-bike articles that were interesting than just more of this. well not really but
  • + 0
 With a flip of a compression switch, don't all bikes climb well now? Isn't the real difference between whether a bike gets you to the top ok VS being a rocket really come down to tire choice?
  • + 11
 @mikekazimer: I don't think the comment was specifically against this review or your style, it's just hard to get an idea since _all_ reviews for all bikes are quite the same lately.

There are poorly designed bikes out there, but no reviewer will ever say that for one reason or another, that's why it's frustrating. Some bikes are superior in one or many ways compared to others, but again, we don't get that from the reviews.

I attended a few test days/bike fests this year, certainly don't have the experience or skills any of the reviewers on Pinkbike does, but I did manage to find noticeable differences between similar bikes even after adjustments to fit my shape or style.
  • + 14
 @hamncheez, to a certain point that's true, but there's also the bike's geometry to consider - otherwise you could slap a climb switch on a V10 and use it as your trail bike. Also, even with a compression switch to flip, some bikes are more efficient pedalers than others.
  • + 12
 Yeah I'd like to see the aluminum version of the nomad compared to the new commencal supreme sx
  • + 21
 The Nomad doesn't need a review. You already know it's a beast.
  • + 4
 @Lagr1980: Which are all enduro race machines. Im not sure what this is for if the Hightower LT is their enduro bike I guess this is a DH bike for those who dont have an uplift
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Totally agree on that final statement. I have a decent hardtail that pedals like shit and went out on my Hightower yesterday for the first time and was blown away at how impatient it was to get to the top of hills.
  • + 4
 In terms of comparisons - I don't think it's as simple as saying that X bike is #1, Y is #2, etc. - I would like to see some sort of chart that has climbing abilities on one axis and descending abilities on the other, and then plot each bike in a certain category somewhere along the chart to see exactly where each lands. Then you can decide which bike is most suitable for the riding you do and your local terrain.
  • + 2
 @alsorl: You might need MBUK for this.
  • - 2
 I agree. + its a Santa Cruz seriously ... no one can afford that
  • + 1
 @High-Life: of course, its expensive and a crap colour - why wouldn't it be good.

(I actually think this is a huge improvement over the last Nomads crap suspension curve though)
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: do you feel that this nomad will come to the same fate as the previous model for racers as a glorified park bike?
Think about in the past few years how many pros were riding Bronson's and hightowers when the nomad was targeted as ultimate enduro machine. Even more so now as the hightower has been beefed up to 150mm.
  • + 11
 @felimocl: yes, if only because many of the EWS courses have awkward, tight corners, and punchy climbs. I could see this being a good choice for the Whistler EWS round, but the other tracks seem to suit slightly shorter travel bikes that are a little more maneuverable, or have bigger wheels.
  • + 2
 @chrismac70: exactly as Mike points out above... this is not the type of bike Pros are using year round as their enduro race.. if only a few full-DH rounds..I race a balance but more for fun and definitively 60% slower than pros...
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Think this kind of bike excels when basically riding chairlift/shuttleless DH. I usually ride DH worthy stuff often sessioning a section for a while before moving on to the next and couldn't wish for a more suitable bike than my Capra tbh..
  • + 5
 @mikekazimer: How does it compare to the Slayer?
  • + 5
 @bull-dozer: it's called a 'product selection matrix' and that's not an awful idea
  • + 3
 @jjwillTOmaui: I had the same feelings about my subscription to MBA. Then I picked up an issue of Bike. Much more enjoyable as a biking mag vs an advertising platform. Subscription purchased.
  • + 4
 @mikekazimer: How about Pivot Firebird, Rocky mountain Slayer
  • + 3
 @Milko3D: Interesting. If you can tell us the top 5 and bottom 5 bikes you've tested you could save us all a whole load of time.
  • + 1
 I agree 100% PB , your readers want comparisons.
  • + 2
 @bonkywonky: liftless/shuttleless DH? I think you're onto something. We were running out of marketing horse shit to fertilize the trolls.
Joking aside, it's a good name for what I usually find myself doing, but I'd never heard it put that way.
  • + 9
 For a $9000 bike you would EXPECT first class performance and LESS WEIGHT than 30lbs. It’s a given. At this price point reviewers really need to be much more critical.
  • + 5
 @Milko3D: Well from some brands, I expect their reviews to be consistently good because they don't make bad bikes. Santa Cruz is one of several companies that really do not have 'bad' models. But I think what you are saying is that sometimes reviewers might not be as open about shortcomings as they could be. The Nomad, Bronson, Hightower, 5010, etc are all consistently good at what they are built to do.
  • + 2
 @bonkywonky: shuttleless...that means With shuttle right?

#liftless
  • + 5
 @Milko3D: yeah, like pedalless clips.
  • + 0
 @BenPea: unfortunately my list isn't complete.
But sure, why not? There will be bikes I like more than others what's so strange? And some will be even objective, horrid pedal kickback, poor linkage/suspension unit pair, excessive chain drag on certain gears...

No need to be a nob just because I have preferences Smile
  • + 1
 @Milko3D: Sorry man, sounding sarcastic when I'm actually being serious is a habit I need to get rid of.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: you dont have to compare it to something new do you? actually even a better comparison to the nomad 3 would help and make sense at least.
it could be compared to something like the liteville 601 .
  • + 1
 @BenPea: don't sweat it, it's hard to tell in writing
  • + 1
 If we are talking comparisons, maybe a comparison of this 650b Nomad (or Capra, or Slayer) with an Evil The Wreckoning, or some other long travel & slack 29er. See if these new 29ers can hold their own on mini-DH
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer: new Jekyll is same kind of bike,launched 1 month early than the Nomad,almost any brand has launch a bike of this kind. But to be fair a review of any kind of bike or material from a well know brand who is a possible customer is anodyne,nothing new if you read car magazines or whatever magazine or even youtube channels.
  • + 3
 So true, would love to see it compared to the new Process 167.
  • + 1
 @felimocl: Obviously EWS level riders have a bit of choice but SC pushes their riders to be on their newest models and the Bronson 2.0 and Hightower have been the most recent rollouts. They were hooking me up for a while and sponsor a few of my homies as well and its always very much "this is whats new this year so this is what we're gonna send you."
  • + 1
 @CFJonny: word, thanks bro
  • + 1
 @foggnm: I dont like any of them. They are always too short for me. I have never understood why given their sponsored riders are all giants.
  • + 1
 @alsorl: If you compare it to the Slayer, the Slayer climbs better.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Ride the Slayer with its no. 4 pos. thru the Ride 4 geo. and you will fell the difference.
  • + 1
 @McNubbin: The Slayer is more better in uphill, Nomad ist better in descent, I took my friend Nomad for 3 days to compare with my Slayer and that what i have found.
  • + 1
 @blackthorne: I disagree, for the intended market segment the 30b weight is hilariously light. this isn't an XC bike. remember the old rule, LIGHT-STRONG-CHEAP, pick two...
on the other hand, my 2012 Reign aluminum is 27.0 lbs with only a carbon bar, but of course it would not come close to the abilities this new Nomad has in fast treacherous terrain. Its quite possible this Nomad is not your cup of tea. but at 30lbs with the capabilities it has, for the intended user it is a fantastic package!
  • + 0
 @jmrbauer: Not true. Racers get the choice, always.
  • + 60
 Dear @mikekazimer,

Please post a video of your riding to determine the worthiness of this review and whether or not some other guy should get to annoy you a bunch by starting a pointless argument. Also a picture of your haircut and the last girl you dated. Also your credit score.

Sincerely,

Some Pinkbike Nancy
  • + 3
 That's...that's actually a pretty good idea even if you are being sarcastic!

If a pro tells me 'this angle should be .25 degrees less' probably wouldn't matter to me, but if an average dude tells me 'it's hard to make the turns on this bike', I'd listen, why? Because I am an average rider! I can relate!
  • + 4
 @Milko3D: check the "Humbled by Brendog" thread brosef
  • + 2
 @Sweatypants: I have, loved it, but that's coaching not a review! Wink

And then again, I really don't need a coach of his caliber if we have to go there.
A guy who can bunny hop, manual, rail berms and do a whip would teach me plenty as long as he's a good coach. Catch my drift?
  • + 1
 This made me do an actual lol
  • + 1
 @Milko3D: you know that cool sound that the tires make right as somebody is launching off a huge kicker at warp speed? now imagine that a giant joke is riding that bike and you're standing right in the gap of the huge double, and the joke whisks right over your head. =)
  • + 4
 @Sweatypants: Hahaha, that was pretty cool, I'm not even mad!

I acknowledged that you were joking already though.
  • - 1
 @Sweatypants: what are you talking a about? Levy's never hit a kicker at warp speed. You didn't read that thread in detail.
Sorry Mike, you may be becoming a meme.
  • + 2
 If you follow him on strava you'll see that he's actually ridiculously fast
  • + 2
 @RRMonster: so not only did you not get the joke, but now you want me to defile myself into sinking so low as to use strava as well like some kinda peasant in Gangs of New York trading ears for a swig out of the All Sorts barrel?

have you no decency sir?
  • + 1
 @Sweatypants: Of course I got the joke.. I was simply saying he has fast times on strava.. Are you saying you're too cool for strava? Man I wish I was that cool, I bet @mikekazimer does too.

I have SO much decency!
  • + 1
 @RRMonster: i AM too cool for strava and my pants are too loose. for shame sir! FOR SHAME!
  • + 16
 When we arrive at this echelon of bike nirvana we must ask ourselves philosophically what interface with the known physical universe will derive us such great pleasure? Oh, that's right a beautiful woman....which will cost many times more based on most men's experience...therefore just eat the 8 grand and shut up already, there cannot exist a better value as we know it.
  • + 19
 how does it compare the rocky mountain slayer? would be nice to have a group test or at least a comparison of bikes.
  • + 1
 Group tests don't pay the bills... Because there are winners and loosers.
All these "reviews" are just another form of advertising.
  • + 16
 I've spent a couple months on the Nomad and I'm still blown away at what you can get away with on this bike. The Bike absolutely loves to launch it's way into the roughest sections of trail and is always asking for more. I've maybe found the limits to this bike a handful of times, the rest of the time it's just begging to be ridden harder. Awesome bike for bike park riding, shuttles, trail slaying and doing it all. Definitely confidence inspiring if your willing to send it... ... that being said, it is a lot of bike. Even if you think your trails may be rough or gnarly, this bike may tame those trails and take a bit of excitement out of them. Over the next few winter months I'm considering switching to a bike with shorter travel simply because this bike takes a bit of fun out of getting rowdy and playing around on trails. All around incredible bike, Santa Cruz really did an amazing job designing this frame and creating a bike that can truly do it all. If you're looking for that one bike that won't ruin you on the uphill and will be perfect for nearly everything on the downhill, this is your bike. Just got to really ask yourself, are your trails worthy of a bike that can handle terrain this well.
  • + 14
 Everyone I've talked to speaks to how well the Nomad 4 pedals compared to the Nomdad 3. I know that Mike says that he made it up awkward section without issue; but I'm not sure this article really conveys that is is actually a more capable climber and portrays it as just a fire-road crawler, with limited technical climbing ability. I know on my Wreckoning, the technical climbs are were it does very well...on fire roads and sustained climbs, it's kind of a slug, and I struggle to mash with my buddies. I imagine the Nomad 4 would be comparable to this.
  • + 5
 Defs the bike bro
  • + 1
 @mollow: Fershur
  • - 8
flag WAKIdesigns (Oct 16, 2017 at 9:49) (Below Threshold)
 @steveczech - thanks to latest shocks the only limit in bike climbability is tyres. However what I find silly with Nomad 4 is the intent of making it as close to a DH bike as it gets. Long travel 29ers are simply better at it. This Nomad may try to run with 29ers like your Wreckoning, but in the end it will come short. I rode my Carbon Jack which is in the same league as this Nomad, back to back on same trail, against the oldest and most basic Enduro 29 comp. on E29 I was braking less and rode more confident. Everything felt smoother and faster, more predictable. So if SC wants to make a climbable V.10 it has to up the wheelsize, otherwise don't bother and keep it playful / loose
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: The N4 being 275 was a let down.
Agree with @steveczech that my MOJO G16 29 is a slug on the fire roads but handles uphill single track much better than one would expect from a 175mm 29er.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm not sure climb-ability has as much to do with how good the shocks are, but the 29" wheels do roll right over everything quite well. There are a variety of other aspects that are contributors other than shock improvement (since lockouts have been available for such a long time now)--mainly geometry and linkage design. I was really worried about the slackness of the seat tube when I first got the Wreckoning, but it surprised me when I swung a leg over it.

Now, all that said, it will never climb as well as short travel XC machine...and I'm ok with that. There's just no such thing as a magic bike. I just wanted to point out that the Nomad is probably more capable of a climber than this article leads on.
  • - 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Oct 16, 2017 at 13:02) (Below Threshold)
 @steveczech: in the past majority of shocks that could be locked out were of likes of Float, Monarch and using one for a bike like Nomad is plain ridiculous, since you cut the downhill potential by a lot. I also mentioned tyres, because if you would put the same heavy knobby tyres on a XC bike as you would on Nomad, the field would get rather leveled. Especially considering the fact that in not so distant past XC racing bikes had seat angles around 71-72. So if we revert the situation and put XC tyres on Nomad, it would possibly climb just as well as XC racing bike from 2010.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: drank too much coolaid
  • + 1
 @gonecoastal: Curious what fork/travel/offset did you end up using on your G16 29er?
  • + 1
 @currently using a FOX 36 RC2 160mm 51mm offset. Need to source a fork with lower offset which is proving difficult/expensive at the moment. Looking MRP Ribbon and Formula Selva 46mm as possibilities.
Looking at the orange 36 29ers gives 170mm lowers which is Ann option I’m exploring. If MOJO builds a dual crown 36 Id be wiring them money tomorrow.
  • + 13
 The N4 is a killer bike and in my opinion SC has done a great job of offering a ton of different build packages for different price points.

I was in the market for a bike with 160+ mm travel as I needed something that would work for both trail riding and my occasional days in the bike park (no way I can afford to have two different bikes). I am an average rider that trail rides a majority of the time (~90% of my rides), but I also enjoy drops/jumps in the bike park (the biggest things I've hit are well-built bike park road gaps that are ~10' high measured vertically from the road to the launch, probably a 12-15' drop by the time you hit the landing). You aren't getting a carbon bike with 160+ travel without spending at least $4k, so to me the $5.3k price point was well worth the warranty and going through the LBS.

This bike climbs shockingly well for having 170mm of travel, sure it doesn't climb as fast as an XC bike, but there is very minimal pedal feedback and it can climb anything that I can thanks to the improved ST angle (I do not anticipate ever getting to the point where I have outpaced the ability of the bike to climb). My riding buddy who went from the N2 to the N4 says it absolutely climbs better than his old N2. I climb trails to descend (not the other way around), so I could care less if I get to the top a couple minutes faster or not, but I do like to be able to pedal up everything that my fitness level allows and the N4 does just that.

I personally find the bs regarding 'too much travel for my trails' to be just that... BS. The whole concept of a bike like this not being 'playful' enough for local trails is garbage (if your local trails are truly XC then that's another matter). I have a blast riding anything from smooth single track to the rough/steep/rocky terrain and this bike kills it at all of them. To each their own, but I will never understand the concept of why anyone would want to ride a 'playful' 120 mm bike over an N4 in any circumstance outside of the primary purpose of the bike being for flat XC trails.

On the rough stuff, the rear tire stays glued to the ground and you can go as fast as your ability/fear tolerance will allow (if your LBS has an N4, ask them to slam the rear wheel into the ground and watch how it doesn't bounce up like a DH rig would). On smooth single track or jump lines the suspension seems to read your mind as it is playful when you want it to be and the shock stays firm when you are compressing going into a takeoff, but is always ready to ramp up when you need it to on a big hit or drop (I have the air shock so can't comment on the coil version). My initial plan was to buy a coil shock this winter (the build kit I have doesn't offer the coil), but after spending the summer on the air shock I love the playfulness of it on local trails and it can still handle long sustained descents well enough that I have put my plans to change over to a coil on the backburner indefinitely.

The bike corners amazingly well, and I have had no problems negotiating switchbacks whether they are on the climb or the descents. The only negative that I can come up with after a summer of riding the N4 is that due to the low bottom bracket height if you are pedaling through rocky traverses or climbs that you will have issues with pedal strikes. This seems to be pretty typical of modern geometry bikes, but is worth stating nonetheless, as you will definitely be replacing pedal pins.

If you are looking for a 160+ mm bike that does everything well then you can't go wrong with the N4. Do not listen to the naysayers that say that this bike is only a park/shuttle rig as it is 100% untrue.
  • + 2
 Fairly spot on I would say I have one with an air shock and the only thing I can fault is the pedal strikes apart from that absolutely love it
  • + 1
 I understand what you're getting at with the "too much travel for my trails" BS. Maybe the better way to put it is the N4 is too much bike for "me" on my local trails. This spring I went to a lower travel trail bike with 125mm. The difference between my longer travel trail bike and the new shorter travel was pretty substantial, especially on Entertainment and Rent Money. Those two trails really came to life for me with the shorter travel bike. I didn't need to pedal as much and the rolling contours were much easier to play around on. For example, I used to case the first double on Rent Money pretty hard all the time, even with pedaling my butt off before the take-off. Now on my shorter travel bike, I may need to get one or two pedal strokes in to clean it. On Horse, the difference was not nearly as noticeable. The only difference I've really noticed is being able to pop out of the curves/corners before the meadow. My longer travel bike sucked them up. On the shorter travel bike, I pop out of them, which was a bit startling at first. For me, in Helena, the N4 would probably be too much bike and I would stick with a shorter travel bike. I also have a DH bike, so that plays a part in my thought process. I got 13 days in at Silver this summer. If I only had one bike, a 125mm would not be my first choice. Hell no.
  • + 0
 @RichPune: Totally get where you're coming from, and love that there are so many great options out there to the point that quality options are available across the travel range spectrum. If I had a DH bike I definitely would not have gone with the Nomad.

I demo'd last year's Bronson on Entertainment then ToW/Rent $ (definitely stretched my 'hour' demo a bit) so that's the closest thing I have to compare to a shorter travel bike, I personally wasn't a fan of the lesser travel, but could totally see where someone might prefer it on our trails in Helena.

I probably could have phrased the 'BS' comment a bit better - my main point was that people shouldn't write off a bike because it has more travel than what might be considered the 'ideal' trail bike for an area.

Cheers!
  • + 12
 Is climbing EVER more than just a "means to an end" ...at least for most of the PB readers?
  • + 33
 You telling me you don't climb a trail then shuttle back down for another run?
  • + 8
 @therage43
Is climbing EVER more than just a "means to an end" ...at least for most of the PB readers?

Nah. I love a good, difficult, single track climb. Having to navigate your bike over wet roots, up hill, off camber, whilst traversing a switchback is not only fun, but satisfying to pull off. It requires real finesse that you don't get when gravity is helping to propel you through the same. Not that going downhill doesn't require its own set of skills, but its just different.
  • + 3
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: Those are the best friends to have. The ones that shuttle retrieve on a CX bike.
  • + 11
 nice review. Would be really curious to see a comparison to the Capra CF Pro Race...more or less same bike/geo but 2K more for this thing.
  • + 28
 Well, the Nomad holds a water bottle, so that's one point in its favor. The Capra has a much more progressive suspension curve, which gives it a little poppier feeling, along with making it extremely hard to bottom out. The downside to that it that it doesn't feel as bottomless and plush in really rough terrain - the Nomad feels more like a DH bike in those instances compared to the Capra. The Nomad also has a longer reach and more BB drop, factors that give it a more stable, ground hugging feel. The Capra's still a good bike, but geometry has evolved slightly since it was released.
  • + 4
 @mikekazimer: Awesome, thanks man. Agree on the water bottle...totally drives me nuts and weird as it sounds will be a big factor in my next bike purchase. Cheers!
  • + 17
 I bought a capra about 8 weeks ago (fox suspension), got the bike it was replacing ready to sell (5010), ended up with a n4 as a replacement from santa cruz.

Plan was just to sell the n4 complete. Built it up, had to have a Go, then needed another go to be sure. Rode the capra again, rode the n4 again, then rode both again on the same loop, in the same conditions, with the same bars, stem and tyres.

Basically I'd describe the nomad as a capra on crack, find it much more engaging and playful, feels way more energetic.
  • + 20
 @mikekazimer: That's a better review than the one up top
  • + 1
 @FBM-BMX: Interesting. Same suspension?
  • + 3
 @MikeyMT: Capra with a coil and offset bushing (giving it 20mm bb drop, 64* h/a) is an absolute corner smasher..
  • + 9
 Styling wise I think Santa Cruz had the Nomad about right in 2016. Buy a Capra, Get Fox front and rear and go on three Holidays next year instead...
  • + 3
 Agreed. That link is ugly
  • + 5
 and get poor tolerances on pretty much every detail on the frame. There is a reason those are that much cheaper. in the same price range canyons have much better haptics.
  • + 4
 @jzPV: Hu kehrs?
  • + 1
 And snap three...
  • + 0
 @colincolin: everybody who wants to wrench on his bike, change bearings, and have a non-creaking frame. I mean, on the one I wrenched bearings fell out of their socket... no wonder why the press fit bb keeps creeping up to 5 mm out of the frame
  • + 3
 I don't know if the Tues is made in a different place, but I put a million vertical feet in the WBP on mine this year and it's been the best frame I've ever owned when it comes to maintenance. Just make sure you replace the headset on purchase.
  • + 1
 @ReductiMat: cool man, how it goes I guess.
I broke my first tues in whis and second one here in the uk.
  • + 2
 Agreed. Nomad 3 > Nomad 4.
  • + 6
 The N4 is hands down the best bike I've ever ridden so far by a wide margin. It sits high in it's travel with very firm mid-stroke support and insane traction, very supple and enjoyable to pedal with no pedal kickback, even over slow chunky terrain. Obviously not as much forward thrust compared to something like the new Giant Anthem 29er (a rocket) on smooth long climbs, but for everything else the limiting factor on the uphills is myself, not the bike. The suspension tracks very well, instead of skipping over, especially when braking. Cornering on this bike is so much fun, the rear end floats around quickly yet somehow always has traction when you want it. The front end feels very planted on high speed corners with no lightness or vagueness. After riding the N4 I realize how shitty feeling most other bikes are, including the N2, N3 and a number of other "high-end" bikes that I have either owned or ridden extensively. If you have not ridden one yet go do yourself a favor. Next level stuff for sure.
  • + 5
 All i have to said is demo one, I was going to buy a Bronson and decided for the hell of it to demo the N4. I am glad i did, In my opinion the Bronson climbs may be 10 %, but everything else i found the nomad better. Climbing I am able to keep up with my friends (are better riders than me) who ride stumpjumpers and intense tracers, on tech climbs i even pass them sometimes.

In return for That 10% lost climbing you gain an exponential return going down. This thing is on rails!!! corners great, Pedals good, a lot of fun, very poppy and agile. Negatives perhaps heavy for a carbon( i have the S kit with a carbon bar and mallets dh pedals, 31.6 pds) bike but again this is build like a mini DH, and pedaling on rocky stuff pedal strikes. I live in NJ and i cant said that we have 1k plus decents on regular trails but it is sure more fun blasting through every thing faster. I go to the bike park perhaps 15-20 time a year, so this bike made perfect sense as a one bike to do it all. Do yourself a favor and demo one, decide for your self, I am happy i did.
  • + 5
 It's a great bike. I use to have a TR250 and I liken this to a TR250 made by a bike company that actually engineers their stuff and that you can pedal.

That said, it's overkill unless you live some place where you can actually do a 500+ foot descent on a regular basis.

There is no hiding the length and the travel on your local XC loop.

Waiting to see someone put a dual crown on it and build it up as a proper mini-DH sled.

VPP with the shock driven off the lower link is so much better. Riding this back to back with my Bronson made me realize how VPP with the shock driven off the upper link is a dead end.
  • + 2
 Agree. But you can get the same kinematics driving the shock off the top link, but you won't be able to fit a bottle in between the seat tube...
  • + 3
 I asked about a dual crown on the N4 after its initial release. Never heard back on that so moved onto another frame. Having a V10C I saw a N4 with a lowered 40 to be a damn near perfect bike for myself.
  • + 1
 @fussylou: how would that work, out if interest ?
Thanks
  • + 0
 '500+ foot descent' surely a typo? I don't live anywhere super special and I have several 3000 foot descents within a half hour drive
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: in the UK we only have descents that are less than 3000ft!

We actually only have three mountains even theoretically big enough to have that much vertical...
  • + 1
 @gonecoastal: yes. Could theoretically put on a 5mm longer stroke shock, and get near dh bike travel on both ends.
  • + 2
 @fussylou: You can't. The best you can get off the top link of a VPP is flat then steeply rising rate, and most are falling, then flat then rising rate. Driving the shock from the bottom link allows a rapidly rising rate which continues to rise but more and more slowly - basically ideal for both coil and air shocks.
  • + 2
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: 170mm out back with 170-180mm dual crown is good enough for myself.
  • - 1
 @gonecoastal: yeah, and there would be tire rub with more travel :/
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: Utah is a pretty special place for riding Smile I rode TWE a few weeks back and did a 8000' descent
  • + 1
 @macming: Wheres TWE?
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: The Whole Enchilada
  • + 1
 @yzedf: Ah. Yes, great trail. The last time I rode it was years ago when I pushed my 45 pound DH bike up burro pass.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: I pushed my Nomad3 up too. There's no way I can climb that much at 12,000' up.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: I wish you were correct!, there is some flat earth out here! I have to drive 2+ hours straight west to find +500ft elevation.
  • + 9
 Those travel videos do something to me I shouldn't write about.
  • + 2
 It's perfectly natural
  • + 4
 Had a Nomad 3, tried the N4. Yes, it's a better downhill bike for sure. Is it a better all rounder? In my opinion no - although it was ok to grind to the top of trails it was more effort than the N3 and it seemed to need downhill trails to maintain speed, or at least required more pedalling effort than the old version anywhere that wasn't a downward incline. I wanted to love it, but its just not happening. Santa Cruz you have made me sad. Time to get an Evil..... (Disclaimer - I'm not a dentist!)
  • + 6
 ...or just stick to having fun on your Nomad 3. Best bike ever Smile
  • + 1
 @mannekepis: or get a bronson, i always thought the bronson and the nomad 3 were too similar
  • + 1
 @rabatt: Agreed, SC did make the two bikes very close, hence the N4 move to add some separation between models. I agree that both the N3 and Bronson are awesome bikes, im simply changing as i had a good opportunity to do so and we all like a change. Going for the N4 wasn't right for me and having tested a few Evil models I thought I'd try something different. However, you can t go wrong with any of the bikes mentioned, it's down to personal preference and more importantly, getting out and riding! :-)
  • + 4
 @mikelevy any chance you could talk to the other Mike @mikekazimer to give us some distinguishing ride characteristics between the Slayer and this Nomad? History suggests they are targeted toward the freeride market...and both look very tastey!! Wink
  • + 3
 Dear Mr. Danoff, I am withdrawing the mutual fund investment for my child's university education. I believe investing in a Santa Cruz Nomad is a better choice and sound investment............................... Sincerely, XXXXXXX
  • + 4
 I already own this and love it but I am curious how it compares to the Firebird. That’s probably the only other bike I see as matching it’s design. That and maybe the new Tracer with the JS link.
  • - 2
 Nothing designed by Intense will ever compare to a Santa Cruz.
  • + 1
 @skelldify: I wouldn’t be so sure about that and I’m an SC fan (6th time SC buyer). Classic upper link driven vpp is starting to get outdated and some other designs are getting better leverage curves. The JS enduro link looks to be a nice update to classic vpp with a better leverage curve. That said I’d take the n4 over the tracer (which I did) but tracer vs Bronson I’d probably go tracer. N4 is more bike than I need but it’s still great just would like to see an honest shoot out between those three as they seem to be the new modern crop of all mtn/freeride, maybe the slayer too.
  • + 1
 @Jesse221: there's more to a design than the linkage. Intense just doesn't put tune into details. I've owned both as well.
  • + 1
 @skelldify: you’ve owned the Bronson and new tracer or owned the nomad 4 and new tracer? Not clear what you mean
  • + 3
 I went for the aluminum version. Drastically different feel than the previous nomad. This one is definitely mini V10 not jumbo bronson. It eats big hits like a well set up dh bike. Weight isn't critical to me but the lighter options are certainly tempting. It's a mini monster truck for sure!
  • + 1
 talk about weight all you want, but my aluminium XL weighs in at 32.74 lbs (before Doubledown). That's not a lot of weight, especially if you get the eagle build
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: have you guys compared / demoed the carbon and aluminium version?
  • + 0
 @Jo2910: I haven't ridden the carbon one, nobody would let me ride their $8k baby. But I imagine its pretty typical, lighter, stiffer, carbonyer. One thing I don't like about the alu frame is the internal routing, its just loose so it rattles. Carbon frame has molded tubes for each line, so I think that would eliminate terrifying sounds.
  • + 5
 No mass-produced bike should cost that much. That's a 1-off price. Direct-sale bikes for me.
  • + 2
 This bike looks pretty good in person, this bike just doesn't photograph well. I like the move to separate the Nomad from the Bronson and create a new free ride design. The price is expensive, but you do get multiple life time warranties.
  • + 2
 While I'm very appreciative and enjoy PB content, when it comes to bike reviews, it reminds me of what the owner of a shop said to me years back in regards to brands. "Racers and magazines are PAID to "love" and speak highly of the bikes they
test or ride."

While PB may not be paid for their reviews, they do receive free bikes (or equipment) to test and they try to keep every brand happy as it would only take one review of "Bike brand A stinks when compared to brand B" to put them in hot water with brand B despite it being honest.
  • + 2
 I can't wait for the redesign of the Bronson if it's going to look like this!!! It'll be a bump eating machine that can still pedal great. With 150mm travel and 66/65 degree head angle, it'll be the perfect set up! I'm excited tup
  • + 5
 The real question is "Does it worth its price?"
The answer is once and for all: "No!!!"
  • + 0
 Nope...
  • + 3
 I've got the N3 - should I upgrade? Reading the review I'm still not clear. Would love a comparison with the RM Slayer - the other obvious option. Thanks for a great review.
  • + 1
 It depends what you're looking for. Do you want a plusher, longer, and even more DH-oriented version of your current bike? This version fits the bill. If you're looking for something that's a little more race-oriented, or more of an all-rounder, I'd look elsewhere. Unfortunately, I don't have any time on the Slayer yet, but you can read Mike Levy's review here: www.pinkbike.com/news/rocky-mountain-slayer-790-msl-review.html
  • + 2
 Nice ride indeed..

Thankfully in today's market, is flooded with amazing bikes at half the cost of this SC.
Just no getting away from the fact it's the rider that makes all the difference and not some botique bike.
So why pay more ?!
  • + 5
 wake me up when enduro bikes cost $2500 or less
  • + 2
 You can find awesome enduro bikes for $2k - $3,500, right here on pinkbike. They're just used, and usually less than a year or two. 29", 27.5", carbon, aluminum, 450+ reach, 66> head tube angles, 74seat tube angles, all the great modern geo's are there. But they're used. And upwards to 50% off new bike prices, and even beyond that. Most of us maintain our rides pretty well, the used option seems the way to go.
  • + 2
 Always been a big fan of SC and in particular the Nomad but I'll stick to my Enduro 29 with a coil and 170mm Lyrik. The thing is a beast going down but still pedals REALLY well.
  • + 4
 Brendog approves of this Mike looking ahead on the trail. Beer money saved.
  • + 1
 Come on folks, it's not the bike, but the rider. SC bikes don't break, if they do, SC has best in class warranty. Give me 1 hr on fill in the blank brand and model and I will rally the $hi7 out of it. So can you, unless all you do is hate on Pinkbike reviews.
  • + 1
 F¥?K it! I've been wanting this bike for a raccoons age. These 400 bemoans, accolades, and completely non-sensical blah blah blahs have not helped my decision if I'm going to throw down for this bike. In the end, I let chance decide and flipped a coin. Heads was a brand new N4, tails some other bike that is maybe as good, maybe not, maybe better. It's funny see so much passion, bullahit, and opinions on just one bike review. It must mean it's a damn good bike. Yep it looks weird, but so am I. It is not good at climbing, neither Ann I, but it loves the downville and oh so do I!

Thanks for all of your thoughts, bitch sssions, and I don't know what the hell you're saying things. It did really help my decision to go with the SC N4. See you on the trails, maybe:-)
  • + 1
 F¥?K it! I've been wanting this bike for a raccoons age. These 400 bemoans, accolades, and completely non-sensical blah blah blahs have not helped my decision if I'm going to throw down for this bike. In the end, I let chance decide and flipped a coin. Heads was a brand new N4, tails some other bike that is maybe as good, maybe not, maybe better. It's funny see so much passion, bullahit, and opinions on just one bike review. It must mean it's a damn good bike. Yep it looks weird, but so am I. It is not good at climbing, neither Ann I, but it loves the downville and oh so do I!

Thanks for all of your thoughts, bitch sssions, and I don't know what the hell you're saying things. It did really help my decision to go with the SC N4. See you on the trails, maybe:-)
  • + 1
 3600 euros for a frame with a "made in China" sticker on it... No thank you. That said, I'll be buying the aluminium Version of this frame, probably with the same sticker for 1900 euros instead. But hey, lifetime warranty on frame and bearings so that's great, I'll be buying Alu Version. This comment doesn't make sense but pffft whatever
  • + 1
 "The Nomad's additional frame features read like a must-have list for a modern mountain bike. Threaded bottom bracket? Check. Room for a water bottle? Check"

Modern mountain bike ? My 2012 26" enduro has a threaded bottom bracket and room for a water bottle.
  • + 1
 I have had this bike for about 2 months and I am surprised no one else has had this problem but... the rear shock eyelet bolt loosens up every ride. I have tried loctite and pipe tape and there is no remedy. Sucks when bombing downhill and the bike starts rattling. I have the air shock. I emailed SantaCruz about getting a coil shock since those utilize a bearing on the rear eyelet. SantaCruz only responded that the coil shock is OEM only and not available aftermarket.

My past couple bikes have been SantaCruz. I had a Nomad3. Started with size Large N3 because I always ride a large at 6’2”. It was tiny so I traded for XL which was better. XL Hightower was better still. So I went XL N4 and it is huuuuuuge. Incredibly stable at speed but not nimble at all. Great bike, wish there wasn’t such a large gap between L/XL. Wasn’t able to demo when they first came out so my fault.
  • + 1
 @pinkbike i've got a suggestion. I love watching the suspension action videos, and I know how they could be improved. They always show the frame coming down, not the wheel going up.

Yiu could either compress both the fork and shock at the same time, or better yet, fix a gopro onto a mount of some kind fixed to the front triangle. That way when you played it back it would show the wheel going up rather than the bb going down.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer Would love a really good comparison between this and the E29. Its really hard to gather enough info from a review like this other than both bikes are awesome. Don't take it personally, take it as a compliment that we want to know what you actually think!
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer you're responding to the trolls but how about my question?
  • + 4
 I touched on it briefly, but the Enduro feels taller, and not quite as ground hugging in the corners. On the flip side, even with the bigger wheels the E29 feels a little more maneuverable - it’s more of an all-rounder than the Nomad. It also has the SWAT box, which seems gimmicky, but it also pretty handy. For more DH-focused riding I’d go with the Nomad, but for rides that have a little bit of everything the Enduro would be my pick.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: thank you!
  • + 1
 Hmm I don't see my post.

Anyone compare a nomad 4 vs the firebird? Those are the two bikes that seems really to compete with each other. Possibly the new tracer as well.

Already have the Nomad and its great but those were my other two considerations.
  • + 5
 Hi Pinkbike,

How's that Spartan Review coming? Smile
  • + 1
 Its on it's way. The one who is reviewing it wanted to put some time on a couple other bikes for reference and comparison.
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: Fair enough, Thanks!
  • + 1
 Check it! I need some help.

I have had wet dreams about owning a Santa Cruz bike since I left college years ago. I suffer on uphills so I can bomb the downhills. I currently own a 2011 Transition Blindside and its totally awesome. Its weird, this bike has saved my ass on many of f’ed up jumps and I will never sell it! But, its time for an upgrade and I have been drooling over the delicious N4 Nomad. The reviews are stellar, but reading all of these comments makes me wonder. The bike is insanely expensive and it does look like a high school shop project gone wrong. Looking at other bikes in the same realm as the badass N4, I found a few that smee to fit the same mold and cheaper. But, they’re not a super sexy SC and maybe I just deserve my dream bike. Or, maybe I should save some bucks and buy my GF a bike with the savings I would get buying this bike.

Here is one that has my attention and almost half the price.

www.rosebikes.com/products/bikes/mtb/freeride/soul-fire

What would you buy??

Any help is appreciate!
  • + 1
 Nomad hands down. Test ride and you'll be sold. And for me, the warranty that comes with the Santa Cruz name is worth the price.
  • + 0
 You could get a YT Capra, they're 170 front and back, look incredible, and won't cost you nearly as much.
  • + 4
 DUUUUUUUUUUUUUDE!!! I'll gonna do MINI-DH from now!! Enduro is for oldies!!
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer have you ridden the Slayer or Firebird by the way? Can't remember who reviewed what.
What's your take on these two compared to the Nomad?
  • + 4
 I'm glad to see that their wheels lasted under the extreme forces of a 160lb rider
  • + 5
 I'm NO-MAD at this at all!
  • + 1
 When you see a photo of the entire bike, it's somewhat ugly... But when you have a close up shots of areas of the bike and especially the new suspension layout and link set up its very nice to look at. I can't see it being long before we see a few of these with a dual crown fork up front.
  • + 1
 I cringed when viewing the articulation video, rear brake hose is routed for lots of movement. gross imo cables should always route through the areas with the least amount of linear/angular change. seriously.
  • + 0
 This bike does look great, but everyone thinking it has been designed from the ground up is wrong, if you look up the Nomad 3 prototypes, an almost exact prototype was made that resembled the Nomad 4, but they ended up going with the VPP link because it apparently felt better. They just took the old design, made some geometry tweaks and added metric sizing. Not as much effort as everyone thinks this "new" bike took.
  • + 2
 If that is the case, then the CAD design and possibly molds for this model were already in place prior to production. Should be a cost saver that gets passed to the consumer, right?. *pfffft, hahahahahaha! Sorry, I almost was able to write that without laughing to myself.
  • + 1
 @Poulsbojohnny: They still didn't charge less did they ?and why did they go with something that did not feel good for them in the first place...
  • + 1
 Another bike not suited for most riders, not that should stop people from buying it. These niché bikes are intended for very specific purpose and nothing more. Though, I am a 40yr old man so WTF do I know.
  • + 3
 exactly what I think when confronted with an xc bike...
  • + 9
 Have you ridden one? Seems like quite a few people look at the spec's and weight, and shrug and assume it's a downhill oriented machines. I demo'd a hightower, hightower lt, and nomad and really liked them all, but the nomad edged them out. Sure it's a capable downhiller, but it also climbs the technical stuff better than the hightower (LT or not) . Seems like the VPP backed off a bit and the chain tension doesn't lock out the rear suspension as much. So when you lift the front to get over something on a climb the rear wheel comes over much easier. As a result I didn't have to sprint, lift, slow down as much.

Even on flat non-technical trails it was fun, active, tempting me to pop off the smallest of features. Sure it's 30 pounds, but I'm over 200 (and almost 50) and don't notice a few pounds either way on the bike. Sure if you are racing the clock there are faster bikes on the non-technical stuff.... but I'm more after fun than beating the clock.

The nomad 4 pedals well, climbs well, and is a huge upgrade from my 10+ year old SC Blur LT. I don't do bike parks, never taken my bike on a lift, and only very occasionally a shuttle (mostly downieville). The nomad is an awesome bike and I think quite a few people don't even give it a chance. Ride it and decide for yourself.

If you are looking for a single bike to do it all I think the nomad is definitely in the running. The hightower LT was a close second, very capable bike, a bit faster on the flats, rolls a bit better. But I can't quite pin it down, just not quite as fun for me.
  • + 1
 @spbike: Sorry, but I disagree as I have the hightower and before that the Tallboy LT and their wasn't anything I couldn't do on it. Enduro races are littered with the hightower and Bronson respectively. Maybe your more of a bike stud than I, but that amount of slackness does not lend to an all around bike. But again, it's just my opinion.
  • + 2
 @spbike: I couldn't agree more! I cant say I have spent a lot of time on the Hightower LT but here is my own experience for what its worth. At the SC demo day I test rode the LT and the Nomad with the intention of buying an LT. Both were fun bikes but the nomad just left a bigger grin on my face. It was fun, fast and poppy and pedalled to my surprise very well so much so that I purchased one a week later. Sure it has a slacker head tube angle but it still is a very capable climber. I don't shuttle and so far my nomad has climbed everything I have pointed it up that my previous SB6 was able to climb. All in all a great bike. Well done SC!
  • + 1
 im curios to know how it performs with a heave rider 220# + . The Nomad 3 seemed to work really well for me . there is a demo day nearby coming up , may have a chance to experience it myself hopefully.
  • + 1
 I'm 6'5" and 250#'s and love it. I have the air shock set at 250 psi (the max on it is 325 i think) and it works great for me, it was a good balance for me where it pedals/descends great but still uses the full travel on drops while being incredibly plush. Surprisingly enough, I don't even have air spacers in my fork (unless it came stock) and I only need to run 70-75 psi there to find that same balance point where it perfectly bottoms out on drops.
  • + 1
 @therev34: im also 6'5 250 ....... blowing through the travel on air shock is one of my concerns. what was your last bike?
  • + 1
 @AmericaOnline: 2008 Kona coilair so probably hard to compare (quite the upgrade for me haha). If you have the ability to, I'd recommend demoing one with the shock pumped up for your weight. I ride trails 90% of the time vs bike park so I was more willing to risk the air shock.

When i was considering buying one I demo'd a L frame and after launching it off some retaining walls near the LBS (I asked if they minded 1st) I was sold on the air even though I was skeptical initially. Another year or two on it and I could more confidently say how it will be longer term, but season 1 was great and the air shock felt bottomless even on bigger drops all year. Originally I had planned to buy a coil shock this winter, but I love the air version enough that it isn't worth the $ to me anymore.

That said, if I had been looking at the more expensive build kits at the time I was buying I definitely would have gone with the coil (I got the s-kit w/ the gx eagle so the coil wasn't an option - LBS did ask SC about swapping it for me but wasn't happening even though I would have been willing to pay a bit of an up charge)
  • + 1
 Curious if this January we'll see a redesigned Capra. the geo needs a refresh, boost axles, and maybe a metric shock, Would love to see how the next gen Capra would compare the Nomad V4.
  • + 2
 "...a bike built for post-apocalyptic freeriding..."

If ever I'd read hyperbole that means as little as those words. That statement equates to "tits on a bull".
  • + 38
 I dunno, if the apocalypse comes I'd rather have this bike than tits on a bull.
  • + 9
 Perhaps he's describing 'post-apocalyptic' looking landscapes which free riders can usually be found riding i.e. deserts of red sand with mountains and bizarre choose and crevices carved out by water long gone for thousands of years? Sort of Mad Max style? I see no need to nit pick a writer on points such as these as you'll always find someone who can interpret it like you have, negatively or like I have, normally.
  • + 10
 Pink bike poll, Santa Cruz nomad or tits? I think I know this crowd. @mikekazimer:
  • + 5
 @BlindDannyJohnson: You're absolutely right. No need to fall into "editor" mode when I'm not here for the journalism...

Consider that a lapse in judgement.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: Cant eat a bike....
  • - 1
 Industrial looking frame compared to the more clean lines of 99% of the current bikes out there suited for Redbull Rampage-ish drops into the abyss
  • + 5
 Freeride is back!
  • + 7
 It never left...
  • + 6
 mini-DH is just beginning
  • + 4
 just comes with a bottle cage now
  • + 4
 Cool bike, but my Uzzi is an even more capable climber.
  • + 27
 So is mine...... ......except when I'm on it.
  • + 4
 2012 Canfield One in 7" mode

:-)
  • + 2
 LOL True
  • + 1
 when they do those suss travel vids.......
I wish they would push the middle of the bike ,so the fork compresses too
really bugs me Big Grin
  • + 1
 Geometry is remarkably similar to the Radon Swoop 170, which has a superb ride at a much lower cost. That'd be a good head-to-head feature actually.
  • + 0
 Radon? Must be one of those Euro-only bikes. This side of the world (I can only really speak for canada) doesn't actually get that many options (propain, mondraker, canyon, merida)
  • + 1
 Not quite ready to part ways with that much cash? Santa Cruz also offers an aluminum version of the Nomad, with prices starting at $3,599 for a complete bike. ???? Cheap
  • + 2
 Just for Brits on here of a certain age: Yes it is the same colour as the Morris Marina. and I love that colour!
  • + 1
 This frame is radicaly different from the old Nomads. Lowering center of gravity by running the shock through a tunnel is smart. There is even an aluminum version.
  • + 1
 It was done to fix the leverage ratio rather than lower the COG.
  • + 1
 @AgrAde: But it does both, and very well at that!
  • + 2
 looks at Aussie pricing.

/spits out coffee

Starts @ $7399 and goes to $12449...
  • + 0
 Get alu?
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: Alu models not available in Australia.
  • + 0
 @darkmuncan: aw, those bastards!
  • + 1
 @darkmuncan: thats odd, isn't bauxite sourced there?
  • + 1
 Yeah Shimano has issues but there's a lot more options than sram and Shimano brakes and for 8-12k they should be specing hope or two not cheaper oem stuff.
  • + 2
 Man, that bike fell out of the Ugly Tree and didn't miss a branch all the way down.
  • + 1
 Who cares?
  • - 2
 @mollow: Someone who might spend their annual savings on a mountain bike...you realize the cost of this bike, right? It's like buying a Ferrari with Ford Mustang body kit. Still performs well, but yeah...you just dropped some serious cash for something that looks odd.
  • + 1
 @nicolai12: Wasn't sure about the looks or the colour... then I bought one, and all of a sudden it's not so bad.
Actually though, it looks way better in person. Especially the tan colourway.
  • + 2
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: I agree. It just looks like Toyota colorway matches SC 2017 bike lineup (I have the new Stigmata). I'm very surprised that the design engineer decided to opt for the updated linkage design to resolve a few issues with the old Nomad and didn't try to resolve the aesthetics of it. I am all for function over form, but I think it looks pretty odd.
  • + 3
 The Nomad is a DH eating beast now! So much want here Big Grin
  • + 3
 How they came up with the price?
  • + 5
 I think they decided to see how much they could get away with. Its massively expensive for a mass produced bike
  • + 3
 Now if only it came in 29.....
  • + 1
 This, I want this ^^^^
  • + 7
 They already make the Hightower 29 for you gimps. In a couple years, they'll likely convert most of their longer travel options to a similar linkage. 29 doesn't belong on a Nomad.
  • + 4
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: 29 is on the v10, how would it be out of place on the nomad? The hightower / LT rips.. but a nomad 29 would be a beast... you don't have to ride it but I would!
  • + 2
 @Leafs1: If you respond to him he gets what he wants... Lol he's a little troll doing troll things. Lol
  • - 1
 @Leafs1: v10 is a race bike, so is a ht/lt. Nomad is supposed to be fun, not fast.
  • + 2
 I'm curious how this compares to a Process 153. I have a '17 Kona but this bike excites me.
  • + 1
 This bike vs the mega and process please.
  • + 2
 $8400 and it comes with 350 hubs? Not knocking them as such, but that isn't a top end hub by any means.
  • + 1
 Hey @mikekazimer which way around did you have the flip chip? Did you switch from high to low mode or stick with just one?
  • - 2
 I'm SHOCKED!!!
You mean to tell me, all I need to do is pony up $8500 and I'll end up with a bicycle that will work well?
Wow!
When you consider for the same money, you could also buy a 450 mx bike-complete with A MOTOR(housing titanium bits), and forks that have REAL Diamond-Like Coating(what the black crap on MTB fork stanchions are mimicking), and chassis and suspension technology that will take another 10 years to trickle down to the MTB world- $8500 for a pedal bike ..?
What a bargain!
  • + 0
 Why would a larger rotor give more power? Wouldn't it just provide better cooling and thus less brake fade? The initial power should be identical no?
  • + 3
 No.

If you needed to do up a bolt really tight would you choose a long spanner or a short spanner?
  • + 1
 @AgrAde: less force for the same result.
  • + 2
 @choppertank3e:

So yeah, you have to pull less with your finger to get the same result. And if you pull the same amount as you did with the smaller brake then you get more braking.
  • + 2
 My frame came in yesterday. Smile
  • + 2
 Nomad has always been a staple for the go to Enduro bike.
  • + 2
 read carefully, this is all mountain and mini-DH, no enduro to be had Smile
  • + 6
 @VPS13: all mountain, mini dh, agreesive trail.... blah blah blah
  • + 1
 Just rode my pals xl, wow, just wow, fucking amazing, planted, love it... new reverb lever i hate it, awkward as fuck
  • + 1
 i miss the good ol' days where you could get a bullit or heckler frame for 900$ brand new
  • + 1
 What happens with these long term test bikes after the testing is done?? Sent to a nice farm?
  • + 1
 @pinkbike Any reviews coming on the new Transition bikes? particularly the Patrol and Sentinel.
  • + 1
 @wollybut Sentinel has been reviewed: pinkbike.com/news/transition-sentinel-review-2017.html
  • + 1
 @kwapik: Cheers! Now just need the Patrol review! Probably a livelier and flickable version of the Sentinel
  • + 2
 And...... It just went on sale.
  • + 0
 Stuck in the 90's throw back bike that sucks on the climbs but rips on the downs, and it's ugly??? hmm' I'll just stick to my Transition Patrol C thank you very much...
  • + 3
 hydrate or die on Aline
  • + 2
 If dis is good for Rat is good for me
  • + 2
 My Nomad 3 should last until the V4 becomes affordable.
  • + 1
 Doesn't mention how it performance on most enduro courses which are flatter, rough ad very pedally
  • + 2
 Intended use: ...Freeride!!
  • + 1
 Santa Cruz is like Apple. They could make a turd and people will still queue to buy it for the name and good looks.
  • + 1
 No mention about enjurow racing for this bike at all. Does this role now fall to the Bronson and Hightower?
  • + 1
 pretty sure anyone who rides this bike like it's meant to be ridden needs more than the EXO casing it comes with in the rear
  • + 0
 Want one? Raffle running now for any Santa Cruz Bike of your choice $5/ticket. Straight into legal trails in Santa Cruz CA

mbosc.org/anteup
  • - 1
 I'm sure it rides extremely well and it tickets all the boxes feature wise. But it's so ugly, I just can't get over it. Both the shock positioning and the color. Sigh.
  • + 2
 If you haven't seen one in person, wait until you do. The top link and overall proportions look great in real life despite not photographing well.
  • + 1
 My frame came in yesterday Smile Smile
  • + 1
 I only want it when it comes in Black or Red
  • + 1
 Your dream just come true in 2018.....
  • + 1
 what kind of sexy suspension
  • + 1
 Nukeproof Mega for 30% of the price seems like a better option
  • + 1
 The v10 29er will be on sale soon!
  • + 2
 No bubblegum flavour?
  • + 1
 buying lots tickets. my dream bike
  • + 1
 Why dont we get POV riding reviews like we do on motovlogs?
  • + 1
 Because... Budgets
  • + 0
 @raditude: I can guarantee that every pb reviewer has a gopro on hand. Who doesn't nowadays?
  • + 2
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: you make large assumptions that they have the time and resources to pull it off well in a way that adds value.

Personally i'd like to see them stop complaining about what grips come on a bike before i would want to see it in video format.
  • + 3
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: Also, i do not have a gopro. I don't want to subject people to watching poorly edited clips of shitty riding set to terrible music, all done at the cost of me enjoying riding
  • + 0
 @raditude: Are you a pb reviewer? Is you job to test various products for bikes? What's stopping them from just popping on a camera and talking to it for 20 odd minutes?
  • + 2
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: No, Sometimes, Ask PB
  • + 1
 170mm travel and exo tires?
  • + 1
 As much as I agree with you, 85% of people that buy this bike will be happy with their single plys...
  • + 0
 @AgrAde: Nobody should ever be happy with single ply on a 170mm ripper.
  • + 1
 Should be compared to the polygon 3act thing... thats the question.
  • + 1
 $9k for a bike with sram brakes? i scoff at this
  • + 1
 That's the first thing to go fo sho
  • + 4
 If you have $9000 to spend on a santa cruz surely you have some money kicking around to get some magura brakes
  • + 2
 Or Hope brakes!
  • + 1
 Coil yes!
  • - 1
 My 27.5 Intense Uzzi is made in good ol USA.. It has more rear travel and just plain rips!!! Or maybe it’s me that rips!?
  • + 1
 Can't improve on perfect
  • + 1
 looks like a GT.
  • + 0
 I can't get over how ugly that top hanger looks.
  • + 1
 Hope or trp*
  • + 0
 I am No(t)mad.
  • + 0
 650 urinal dildo
  • - 2
 The DH-Bike of the future!
  • + 3
 Nukeproof Mega...
  • + 0
 honestly surprised that nobody raced this at the lamer tracks this year. Would have smashed leogang.
  • - 2
 Hmmm...... Maybe it's time to get ride of the Canfield.
  • - 3
 "I prayed and prayed to God for a Santa Cruz... and that didn't work. So then I stole one and prayed for forgiveness."
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