Santa Cruz Nomad - Review

Jun 30, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  
 
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Santa Cruz Nomad review
REVIEW
Santa Cruz Nomad
WORDS: Mike Kazimer
ACTION PHOTOS: Paris Gore

Santa Cruz's new Nomad created quite a stir when it was introduced earlier this season, and the video accompanying the launch, which had Dylan Wolsky and Iago Garay channeling their inner caballeros and riding horses to the top of a peak in Chile, sparked plenty of good-natured comments, much of it related to the magenta and aqua frame color, a combination not seen since Don Johnson appeared sans socks in Miami Vice. Luckily, for riders who aren't quite ready to be seen on a bike that screams 'look at me', the Nomad is also available in stealth black, and comes with matching fork and shock decals that should help make it easier to fly under the radar.

With 165mm of travel, 27.5” wheels, and a full carbon frame, this bike was designed to excel on the most challenging courses of the Enduro World Series circuit, while at the same time being versatile enough to serve as a daily driver for riders whose terrain tends to be rough and rowdy. Santa Cruz isn't known for skimping on their build kits, and the Nomad we tested checks in at $9995, a hefty sum no matter how you look at it, but by forgoing the high zoot carbon wheels and dropping down to an X01 drivetrain from XX1, that price can be brought down to a slightly less wallet-emptying $6599, and there's also an X1 / SLX equipped version for $5899 USD. Santa Cruz recently updated their build kits for 2015, with Race Face's SixC carbon cranks now available as an option, along with Santa Cruz's own 800mm carbon bar and Palmdale lock-on grips.


Nomad Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Rear wheel travel: 165mm
• Carbon fiber frame
• VPP suspension
• RockShox Pike RCT3 160mm fork
• RockShox Vivid Air shock
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Colors: magenta / aqua, black
• Weight: 28 lb (size L w/o pedals)
• MSRP: $9995 USD



Frame Design

Work on the revised version of the Nomad actually began before the 150mm Bronson was conceived and released, but Santa Cruz wanted to make sure that the Nomad had a clear purpose, and wasn't just a set of slightly larger wheels slapped onto the previous frame design. Taking into consideration rider feedback and changes in drivetrain technology, the length of the bike's top tube and front center have been increased, and the decision was made to do away with a front derailleur entirely. This allowed for the aluminum lower link of the VPP suspension design to be tucked up even higher into the frame, protecting it from damage and making a lower bottom bracket height more feasible. As far as number go, on paper the Nomad looks ready to take on the burliest terrain around, with a slack, 65 degree head angle, low, 13.4” bottom bracket, and a relatively short 433mm chain stays. It wasn't long ago that these numbers would have been found solely on full-on downhill bikes, and in fact, the new Nomad's geometry numbers are reminiscent of those found on the Iron Horse Sunday. But the DH sleds of years past weighed 40 pounds and weren't meant to be pedaled uphill, while the Nomad tips the scales at 28 pounds and has a 74.2 degree seat angle for a comfortable pedaling position.


Santa Cruz Nomad Review
  The Nomad's frame is an exercise in aesthetic excellence - internal cable routing where it makes sense, plenty of tire clearance, a threaded BB shell, and a well thought out suspension design.


Aesthetically, the Nomad is incredibly clean looking – there's no rat's nests of cables, no convoluted rear suspension linkages, just smooth lines that are fitting for a carbon fiber machine of this caliber. Internal cable routing has come back in favor over the past few seasons, since enough time has passed that everyone seems to have forgotten about the headaches that a fashion over function approach can bring mechanics. Luckily, the designers at Santa Cruz remembered, and they have incorporated a continuous carbon tube on the inside of the frame. Simply feed the housing into the top tube opening and it will emerge low on the downtube, eliminating the fiddling about with flashlights and bent spokes that can happens with other internal routing designs. There's even room to mount a regular sized water bottle on the down tube, a nice touch, especially since this is typically a rarity on longer travel bikes.


Santa Cruz Nomad review
  The lower aluminum link has been tucked up and away into the Nomad's carbon frame, providing more ground clearance and allowing for shorter chain stays.


Suspension Layout

Santa Cruz's VPP suspension design has served them well over the years, receiving praise for its crisp pedalling characteristics, which is thanks to the two counter-rotating links that join the rear swingarm to the front triangle. The suspension layout on the new Nomad isn't drastically different than the previous version; it's mainly the location of the links that has been altered, with the lower link being raised up to provide more ground clearance and shorter chain stays, while the upper link has been shifted slightly backwards to allow for a lower top tube height. The Nomad uses Santa Cruz's collet type axle retention system, a design intended to keep the bearings running smoothly for as long as possible. In addition to being able to adjust the angular contact bearings if any play begins to develop, the lower link, the one exposed to the most possible contaminants, has a grease port that can be used to push old bearing grease out of all four bearings and new grease in.


Specifications
Price $9995
Travel 165mm
Rear Shock RockShox Vivid Air
Fork RocShox Pike RCT3 160mm
Headset Cane Creek 110
Cassette XX1 10-42
Crankarms XX1 34T
Rear Derailleur SRAM XX1
Chain XX1
Shifter Pods SRAM XX1
Handlebar Race Face SixC 35mm
Stem Race Face Atlas 50mm
Grips Lizard Skins Peaty lock-on
Brakes Shimano XTR w/ 180mm Ice Tech rotors
Hubs DT Swiss 240
Spokes DT Swiss Aerolite
Rim ENVE M70
Tires Maxxis Highroller II
Seat WTB Volt SLT TI
Seatpost Reverb Stealth 31.6 150mm
Santa Cruz Nomad review




bigquotesThe Nomad wants to be pushed to the ragged edge, urging you to carry just a little more speed into that steep chute filled with a lattice work of roots, or down that nearly vertical rock face that doesn't seem to ever end.

Climbing / Fit

With the recent increase in the number of bikes with longer front centers, it makes sense that Santa Cruz has been touting the fact that the new Nomad has an inch more room in the cockpit than the previous version. However, it's worth keeping in mind that Santa Cruz's bikes have traditionally run a little smaller than others, and the size large Nomad's 609.6mm top tube length and 437.8mm reach aren't as extreme as what's found on bikes like the Orbea Rallon or the Kona Process. That's not meant to take anything away from the Nomad's geometry, though, and with a 50mm stem and Race Face's 800mm wide carbon SixC handlebar, the cockpit felt spot on right from the beginning; we didn't need to make any changes to make the bike suit our needs.

The number of all-mountain bikes that are mediocre climbers and excellent descenders keeps growing, and looking at the numbers it'd be easy to lump the Nomad into that category. A bike with such a slack head angle and 165mm of travel isn't going to climb very well, right? Wrong. Even when equipped with the Vivid Air rear shock, which is oriented more towards downhill rather than climbing performance, all it took was adding a few clicks of compression to create a firm enough pedalling platform to resist the forces generated by out of the saddle cranking while still being able to respond to larger impacts. It's the VPP suspension design's pedal-friendly performance combined with the bike's 28 pound weight that makes the Nomad able to keep up with shorter travel trail bikes and then leave them in the dust once gravity takes over. Even on five or six hour outings with 6,000+ vertical feet of climbing, rides with enough pedaling where a trail bike would typically be the machine of choice, the Nomad did just fine, and was definitely worth it on the way back down. Its front end handling might not be the quickest when it comes to slow speed, technical bits of trail, but that never prevented us from being able to get up and over whatever tricky obstacles got in the way. The only small issue we ran into was that the 175mm cranks and the low bottom bracket height meant there were more pedal smacks than usual - we'd recommend that potential customers consider running 170mm cranks in order to save those pedal pins and crank arm ends from encounters with the ground.


Santa Cruz Nomad review test
  Whether it's popping over little rollers or hucking off big drops, the Nomad takes the concept of a do-it-all bike to the next level.

Downhill / Technical Riding

From Nevados de Chillan, Chile, to Whistler, British Columbia, our Nomad saw action in three countries and two continents over the course of the testing period. No matter whether it was pounding through dusty, volcanic soil or skidding through muddy piles of pine needles, the Nomad never missed a beat, consistently leaving us floored by its capabilities. We've mentioned multiple times how much fun shorter travel bikes can be, but there's still something to be said about having that extra bit of travel to really let you peg the fun-o-meter in steep, technical terrain. The Nomad has the feeling of a big bike, in that it can be ridden full speed into the roughest sections of trail and come out none the worse for wear on the other side, but it also has a nimbleness to it that you wouldn't typically expect from a bike with this much travel. It's a bike that wants to be pushed to the ragged edge, urging you to carry just a little more speed into that steep chute filled with a lattice work of roots, or down that nearly vertical rock face that doesn't seem to ever end. All manner of drops and jumps were handled without any trouble, and the Nomad's light weight made it easy to carry speed and pop over tricky gaps that usually take a full speed sprint to clear.

As adept as it is monster trucking down the trail in a straight line and lofting skyward off of the lip of a jump, the Nomad is quick through the corners as well, with no wallowing or feelings of sluggishness, just a satisfying forward surge when you power down on the pedals to accelerate out of a turn. That blend of quick acceleration and the ability to smooth out rough trails is what makes the Nomad stand out from the crowd - it's no one trick pony, and is just as capable on a smooth jump line as it is on the most heinously steep and rough portions of trail.

Santa Cruz Nomad review test
  It doesn't get much better than this. Roosting loam aboard the Nomad deep in the woods of the Pacific Northwest.


Component Check

• RockShox Vivid Air: We chose to go with the Vivid Air on our test bike, since it better matched our plans to take the Nomad onto the wildest terrain we could find. The small bump sensitivity and controlled stroke of the Vivid Air is excellent, good enough that we found ourselves wishing that more bikes (even trail bikes) came equipped with this shock. The highest praise for an air shock is usually “It feels like a coil shock,” but in the case of the Vivid Air, it feels even better, with a liveliness that makes it easy to preload and get airborne, while still maintaining the supple, bottomless feel to take the edge off harsh landings.

• ENVE M70 Wheels: At $2700 per set ($999 for each rim), the M70s are a large part of the reason why our test Nomad's asking price is situated in the stratosphere. On the trail, the M70's are as stiff, light, and responsive as ENVE claims, but they're not flawless. After hitting a small stepdown and landing into a rooty section of trail, the rim's sidewall cracked the whole way through with a loud 'snap' and a belch of Stan's fluid. The landing itself wasn't the smoothest, but it also wasn't hard enough that we would have even expected a flat tire, let alone a cracked rim. We spoke to ENVE, and they said they had determined that the stiffness of the spokes, DT Swiss Competitions, was causing more stress than the rim could handle under certain situations. We sent the wheels back to ENVE's Utah manufacturing facility, and they were returned laced up with DT Swiss's bladed Aerolite spokes. According to ENVE, once the issue was discovered, "We set out to find a solution immediately and ultimately made improvements in a running change to accommodate the added stiffness of the Competition spoke. The end result is a wheel that exceeds the performance criteria we’d established prior to the launch of the M-Series." We haven't run into any other structural problems on the new set of wheels, even after hitting the same small drop that did in the original set, plus countless other hard landings and rough trails.

It's also worth mentioning that the M70 wheels can't be trued without taking off the tire and rim strip, which is less than convenient, especially if you've set them up tubeless. ENVE says that using an internal nipple "produces a more consistent build, and a stronger structure. This process yields a superior build quality and virtually eliminates the need to true the wheel assuming the builder does a thorough and quality build." In the end, carbon wheels continue to be heralded as 'the next big thing,' but it's still a tough sell – the cost just doesn't seem to match the benefits, and if you're going to spend close to $3k on a set of wheels it'd be nice to at least be able to true them without taking off the tire. That being said, ENVE's wheels do come with a five year warranty and a lifetime crash replacement program, so it's not as if customers would be left high and dry if they ran into any issues.

Santa Cruz Nomad review
  The Nomad's cockpit is dialed in, as is the Vivid Air shock, but the ENVE wheels left us less than impressed.

• Race Face SixC 35mm handlebar, Atlas stem: There's usually something we can mention about the handlebar, stem, dropper post or brakes on a test bike that could be done better, since it's difficult to get all of the little details correct, but not on the Nomad. Race Face's stiff and wide SixC bar mounted to a 50mm Atlas stem, and the RockShox Reverb dropper post remote under the bar on the left hand side are exactly what should be found on the front end of a bike like this.

• SRAM XX1 rear derailleur: We didn't have any troubles with the shifting performance of the XX1 rear derailleur, but it did develop a nasty creak that took a full disassembly and rebuild to chase away. Our bike did see rather harsh testing conditions, but it still seemed like the creaking developed sooner than we would have liked.



Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesSanta Cruz has hit a home run with the new Nomad, blending big hit capabilities with excellent pedaling performance to create a bike that raises the bar in the all-mountain category. Of course, with our test bike ringing in at nearly $10k you would expect this type of top tier performance, but a good portion of that expense comes from the carbon wheels, which aren't a necessity to enjoy the Nomad's impeccable trail manners. The Nomad is a bike that would have been a daydream only a few years ago, when the technology didn't exist to create a 28 pound bike with 165mm of travel. Luckily, those dreams have come true, and the reality is even better than anyone could have imagined. This is a bike from the future, except that it's available now. - Mike Kazimer
Must Read This Week

389 Comments

  • + 94
 Someone screwed the pooch here, whether it's SC or Enve, because those spokes are coming stock on any SC sold with an Enve wheel upgrade, and the latter is saying that they're not right for their rims. Seems like something that someone should have caught long before any of the Newmads shipped out.
  • + 41
 i agree a running change isnt good enough, they need to recall them
  • + 60
 Haha somebody somewhere is in deeeeeeep sh!t
  • + 37
 If you buy Enve wheels with your own money, you don't ride, you simply look at the bike from behind your desk. Fucking lovely bike. Top of the list. I want one.
  • + 70
 Which is why I wouldn't buy these rims, even if I had the money. Imagine hearing a voice in the back of your head saying 'this can cost you $1000', every time you approach a rock garden.

Waiting for Ambatt to chime in with some angry and irrational reply..
  • + 8
 I have the old Enve AM wheels and did something similar in a rock garden. They came with the aerolite bladed spokes though. They replaced the rim but was told it was replaced in good faith and that it wasn't due to poor workmanship, etc. In my opinion if the wheels were alloy I would've rolled away without even a flat. I can't complain as they were free anyway. If I did have to pay anything it would've been half price due to Enve's crash replacement warranty. I think the price of Enve's must be because of the warranty...
  • + 71
 why not bying dtswiss ex471 aaron gwin used in leogang for 85€ ... they might last longer and just with 43gr penalty!
  • + 12
 I think your right about the price. Its high because of the warranty, which you'll probably use by the sound of things.

Like the article says "the cost just doesn't seem to match the benefits"

Enough said.
  • + 17
 Bought a set of ENVEs AM to go with my Bronson. Didn't crack them, but I get pissed off each time I need to replace a spoke or simply tension it. Maybe internal nipples are better from a structural point of view, but they are simply not worth the added pain. You can't true, you can't tension a spoke on the trail... I just imagine being in an Enduro race, and wanting to tighten a spoke between special stages:-(
  • + 1
 So its gonna be a Enve recal??? Or they know the spoke is shity and they gonna give a shit to the owners??? Braking a rim on a test ride??? Imagine that rim after a entire year or two will be useless 3000k. Sure this rims are for the ones that like to spend money and time doing waranty stuff. I love the idea of a superlight whees but a that price and with all that braking problems im will stay away from Enve wheels
  • + 138
 @mrciave: sounds like mariage... no acces to the nipples without a lot of work...
  • + 16
 Overpriced and underbuilt. I'm convinced carbon can be a great material for bikes but why not make parts that match the weight of top level alu stuff, while being a lot stronger? Nobody needs a sub 16 kilogram DH bike, while everybody benefits from having more reliable one.
  • + 2
 My m70's came as rim only and I've had to wait weeks to get correct spokes,in this case sapim cx ray's,as my wheel builder new not to use other spokes. Stupid that sc and enve should let bikes ship like this,a freind has the wrong spokes on his build. My previous am enve's however,I owned for 2 years before selling on,never went out of true or needed any attention,I'm sure the new rims built correctly will be the same if not better.
  • + 14
 ALL the people I know who have had ENVE's have broken them. That is at least 5...myself included. Got them with my V10, broke the rear rim and the awesome swiss Santa Cruz distribuitor had to wait almost 3 months to fix the issue with ENVE. Their customer care sucked. When I finally got the warranty rim I sold them. Thought it would be a different case with the new M70 rims...nope, friend of mine broke his rear rim after just a few rides...customer service is still sucking.
  • + 13
 I've read enoguh trustworthy reports about CF rims to not trust them. CF might be a great material, but it isn't perfect for all applications. Rims are one of these examples - they experience very short but high load peaks. Aluminium might be able to withstand such misuse without critical damage, whereas CF will develop a crack. And even though it might not break immediately, it will eventually. I think just about everyone here has dented the hell out of a Al rim before, but only very few have actually broken one. The few grams of weight penalty are well worth the drop in price and the peace of mind. 453g for a M70 in 27.5, 530g for a Flow EX. But you can replace the Flow EX ten times before you've spent the same money that the first M70 costs...
  • + 9
 True. A dented alu rim might have to be replaced eventually but it won't ruin a vacation or weekend like a cracked carbon rim would.
  • + 6
 That is one sexy bike
  • + 17
 No access to nipples makes Jack a dull boy...
  • - 18
flag TheFreney (Jun 30, 2014 at 6:25) (Below Threshold)
 Sorry but either you don't have Enves or your wheelbuilder is Shite because I'm running Enves 3 years without having to tension a spoke, I recently got a set of m series m60s and there still true.....
  • + 12
 I've been running LB carbon rims for a while now, 5' to flat pinchflats, 12' drops to transitions, many suspension bottom outs, and haven't even noticed the slightest defect in the carbon. I don't care how great the name ENVE is, I will never own their overpriced rims...
  • + 6
 One word: Spank
  • + 9
 Just buy the frame and build it up. That is a sick frame.
  • - 30
flag Caiokv (Jun 30, 2014 at 7:06) (Below Threshold)
 Wait, two continents? From Chile to Canada there is one continent, America...
  • + 6
 Bud. I'm sorry but that makes it quite clear that you aren't riding like some of us are.
  • + 6
 Let see what we have here, a cracked ENVE rim... Do you think ENVE is going to admit, (whether true or not), that their rim was not built/layed up correctly? Or do you think they would blame it on the spoke tension (a factor that is "supposedly" somewhat out of their control)?

While I am no wheel building expert, I do know marketing and PR quite well and this wreaks of a "distraction of the truth".. That being said, they will probably have no recall or running change for that matter, because it has nothing to do with the spoke tension....\

@manchvegas - I have the same LB chinese carbon rims, take a look at my album and see a carbon rim that was destroyed and SENT ME TO THE HOSPITAL at the first stage of the BME in Snowmass last week. I like LB rims and I have never had issues with them until now, but I can tell you that I have lost some faith in LB and their product after that and I wasnt even jumping the bike...
  • + 12
 I don't understand how the Enve wheels can be that costly.

Hope EVO Hubs: $300
Derby CF rims: $660
Sapim X-Ray Spokes: $150

That's a damn nice wide carbon wheelset comparable to the Enves in every way for about $1100. Thats just a bit more than ONE Enve RIM. And with this build, you don't have to remove the tire and tape to true it.

Enves warranty sound great. But at that price, you could buy TWO sets of the above and still have $800. Maybe even spend some if that cash on a set of Enve deals.
  • + 8
 I can't wait for Easton to come up with an updated rim----Wider, with a better hub. A lot fewer carbon rim failures with these...and the best thing of all? You can replace the spokes with the wheels still on the bike, and the tires inflated!
  • + 3
 @prestonDH. I have routinely dropped these rims off every drop we have around here.. some 12' to virtually flat overshooting the transition. And 5' to rock strike with pinch flat and not a scratch. Also a buddy is 260lbs and hucks everything under 5' and has never had a problem in 1000 miles on his 29er. The fact that your picture comments show that you "thought" it was a LB rim tells me you probably didnt order them yourself or spec a DH carbon layup etc.. take all the spokes out of the rim an put it on the scale.. if it weighs any less than 420g it never belonged on a DH rig in the first place. Just sayin..
  • + 3
 My dream bike...in a 26" version! Make it a reality SC!
  • + 8
 DT Comps are some of the most normal spokes around. God help the rims if ENVE had used Champs OMG WTF..... Such a cop-out.....
  • + 4
 Hey ukr77, do you know how long the spoke is on the Easton Havoc AM ?

I cant imagine dropping 3ft and have my $2700 wheelset blow apart ! hahahaha what a joke
  • + 3
 So... all my previous wheelsets have been shit because of Dtswiss Comp spokes and i should have bought them with more expensive and lighter (=flexier) spokes. Never thought of it that way before...
  • + 15
 I agree with bonkywonky, why have the most expensive part on your bike the part that often gets wrecked?

It's like having your balls on your knees!

For me, wheels are a consumeable.
  • + 11
 Let me get this right: I have not read a single test, where the enve rim did not crack.

But the marketing seems to work. Wink
  • + 3
 Enve's rely massively on correct spoke tension,it's super high and part of the reason bladed spokes should be the only option as they're less inclined to twist under high tension. I say again I've run the previous am rim for 2 years worth of heavy abuse and sold them after 2 years still spinning true as day one and without having a single problem. On the other end of the scale I have cracked their dh rim,after casing a double that would have seen any other rim fold,I rode it cracked for 3 days as on holiday without any further cracking. I sent the damaged rim back still built up and received a new rim built back up within 2 weeks. Never had a problem with their cs,but every case will be different.
  • - 5
flag themountain (Jun 30, 2014 at 12:36) (Below Threshold)
 Carbon wheels are for poser!
  • + 4
 For 10K you can updrade your current ride to your pleasure and buy a very good shuttle rig, win win !
  • + 1
 buy rovals from light-bicycle.com. They have stellar customer service, are around ~175 a rim and you can spec the lay up to your liking. There is nothing to envy about ENVE other than their decal.
  • + 4
 One of the claimed benefits of carbon rims is the stiffness but you have to run flexy spokes? Also I do not see how a thinner spoke affects the tension at the spoke hole.
  • + 2
 Take the cost out of the equation and how many of you would in honesty run them? I realise an honest answer on PB is an unlikely proposition.
  • + 10
 hilarious reasoning from Enve to blame the specific DT Swiss Comp spoke that has been widely used for many years by many wheelbuilders

I know I've built 100s of wheelsets using DT Swiss Comps and never had a rim fail that way for any of my customers?


I often hear how "stiff" a CF rim is reported to be, which concerns me as an experienced wheel builder because a wheel is the sum of all its parts

good wheels rely on 'flexure' to absorb impacts as the wheel as an overall structure is well balanced, and very dynamic when experiencing loads put into the wheel structure

any weakness in one of these parts (hub, spoke, nipple, rim) or a badly balanced wheel will cause a failure, even in normal use

if an overaly stiff rim requires more flexible spokes to maintain a sustainable structure, the rim designers have gotten their calculations very wrong, or are using the wrong material for the application?
  • + 6
 ...another crabon fibré rim bites the dust, literally...I just hope that all that thermo plastic crap is being recycled by Enve when it's sent back for warranty...what a joke !!!...
  • + 7
 ENVE is way up their own a$$ with those excuses. You'd think the world of cycling revolved around them (no pun intended but it rolls).

"Make sure you do this, and this, and this, and THEN your big dollar 'investment' might actually depreciate slower than stock in Zynga."
  • + 7
 Ratboy also had some problems with them...
youtu.be/1Dlsi1N7kPY
  • - 4
flag minty1 (Jun 30, 2014 at 14:12) (Below Threshold)
 And no other rim broke ever.
  • + 2
 Brilliant!
  • + 4
 Truew but if ENVEs are only a few grams lighter than DT's, the question is why buy them if they are $900 more expensive and can break as well..
  • + 4
 Light Bikes FTW
  • + 3
 There's a reason not to buy most things that we all do if you analysed closely enough,we spend cause we love all things bikes plus shiny plus light plus pretty,I'm a fan of enve as they have been nothing but awesome for me,anyone can make a judgment based on a couple of paragraphs online,there are some extremely positive reviews of these rims if you care to search them out. All I'm saying is you can't make an informed assessment of anything for yourself without trying first.
  • + 2
 Silliker269: not 100% sure but i think they are 292mm or something, same length for all sides front and rear. i bought a badly dented alloy haven wheel a couple years back and de-spoked it. now I have several good spares. the pricy bits are the nipples, but the spokes are standard straight pull. Because of the low spoke count I have to keep track of keeping even tension. If not spokes do break---the downside to low spoke count.
  • + 2
 Yeah, and you'll save a ton of money, and get exactly what you want.
  • + 0
 Ratboy had already blown through a few spokes before that happened, and there's no other time the Santa Cruz syndicate team has broken a enve rim.
  • + 1
 That is completely untrue. The part where they haven't broken any other rims.
  • + 4
 Light Bicycle rims from China FTW I own a set of LB and a set of ENVE, and I do not notice a difference in the ride. However, my entire LB wheelset cost about HALF of ONE of the ENVE rims.
  • - 3
 They've never cracked a set in practice or race ..... Except for when ratboy did.
  • + 3
 At least in the civil and structural engineering world, deflection prior to failure, also known as a serviceability consideration, is a very important design consideration. A high level of stiffness is not always a good thing. Ie your rim dented; fantastic, you know to do something about it... Your rim suddenly fails... Not good.
  • + 2
 read this article.
www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/article/fort-william-mtb-world-cup-downhill-pits-gallery-41274
Jason Marsh was uniquely lacing the spoke to help with flex in the wheel. Carbon rims are exceptionally stiff, which has both pros and cons, so adding some flex in the spokes can help balance it out - some flex is a welcome attribute on rough courses such as Fort William. So??
Does it means there's no exact way tp handle your enve rim??
Guess hope pro II and Flow EX all the way..
  • + 1
 TheFreney - stop talking rubbish - they have cracked & broken many Enve rims.
  • + 0
 You are completely misled
  • + 0
 That was a reply for thefreney
  • - 2
 When have you seen then crack them on a course ?
  • - 3
 Them* f*cking auto correct
  • + 1
 For starters the Syndicate mechanics have commented in the past about breaking/cracking the rims...
  • + 1
 @manchvegas - I never said they were DH rims, nor did I ever say they were on a DH bike. They were utilized on my all-mtn bike. I find it hard to believe you opr your buddy have put "1000's of miles on them" with out a scratch. And I ordered them myself from a wheelbuilder in canada, so oh please forgive me for not knowing EVERY single brand on my bike, like im sure you do...
  • + 0
 Horses mouth from couple seasons back...
Since the wheels first made their way onto the Syndicate’s rigs they’ve undergone major revisions, both in terms of profile and material. During the 2010 season, the Syndicate’s first on the carbon rims, they replaced 53 wheels, which was down from a reported 180 wheels per season when the team was on alloy. In 2011, the team had to replace just 11 wheels.

Over both seasons, ENVE say there wasn’t a single catastrophic failure. “It was only eight up until the world champs,” Jason Schiers, ENVE’s founder told BikeRadar. “We were hoping to keep it under double digits for the year, which would have been huge. Steve Peat raced the same set of wheels all year long, which was unheard of [he used a separate set of practice wheels].”
  • + 5
 Bring back tioga disc drive!!
  • + 2
 Haha Minty! Which professionals are we supposed to believe?!
  • + 0
 Exactly,it's the internet, take as many opinions as you can then throw them out the window and make your own 'informed' judgment. So much blah blah blah being said here. Wink
  • + 2
 I think with ENVE you're paying a lot for American manufacture. That's fine if you want to pay an American lackey instead of a Chinese or Taiwanese one. Just don't believe that the product you're getting is better because it's double the price. I've said it before and I'll say it again, Taiwanese manufacture is in most cases better than American or European manufacture.
  • + 3
 I took that gamble with carbon rims, and it didn't work for me, having wrecked an Easton Haven, Derby & 2 x Enve AM rims. That's a pretty impressive failure rate.

Back on good old alloy rims now!
  • + 0
 Hack??
  • - 1
 There's a lot that separating enve from other carbon rims not just the hands building them.
  • + 3
 Nope, I can count on one hand the non carbon rims I've wrecked. My own opinion is they are largely a pointless, waste of money on an MTB that gets used properly. There seems to be a lot of purchase justification surrounding them, people dribbling on about how they 'transformed their bike' etc. I went no faster when I put them on, and didn't slow down when I took them off. And they broke. A lot.
  • + 0
 I ran my first set for 2 years on a bike used 'properly' before selling them in perfect condition for about half what I paid for them,never had any issue whatsoever,I've had plenty of ruined alloy rims lasting nothing like that length of time. personally I notice a big difference between the 2 materials and am amazed you didn't.
  • + 2
 I have never said I've not noticed a difference, I could feel the increase in stiffness they offered. Whether or not that's a good thing is an entirely separate debate.

They didn't, however offer any increase in performance, or speed on the bike. I'm sure, as and when the Syndicate riders switch teams, or drop Enve as a sponsor, we won't all of a sudden see people's results drop accordingly Wink
  • + 1
 I noticed differences in speed,quicker pick up,stiffness,more direct/accurate,trail damping,vibration,they also sound nicer,no advantage but still a bonus in my book,made my bike lighter than with equivalent alloys,and needed no maintaining at all for 2 years, and who knows how long before they will need something,huge bonus,5 year guarantee,they also look the tits!!
All of these points make them a winner in my book.
As for wc racers being quick on anything well look at Gwin,top 10 women's time with no tyre,but does that mean we should now see racing without tyres? It's all about little advantages and advancing the sport.
Carbon rims have proved themselves and I'm obviously a fan,doesn't mean everyone will be,but I'd bet most given the choice would pick carbon over alloy nowadays.
  • + 3
 As a man who builds plenty of wheels i can honestly say over the 25 years building i have never had a catastrophic failure as a result of my handy work. In that time i have had many satisfied customers who have seen little deviation in the wheels i have built. Pretty much all my building has been on ally rims with varying combinations of rim hub lacing and so on and so on. I have never built onto carbon rims and in all honesty i dont think i ever will. If there is contention over critical spoke tension, issues with material corrosion and fatigue, hear say about failure rate, why would I leave my self wide open to foot the bill for a ridiculously priced rim failure of an unquantifiable nature. I am currently happy to stick with alloy rims.
  • + 2
 randybadger - Who wants rims that are that critical anyway? A day of DH riding could easily loosen the spokes a bit and having to run to the world's best bike shop to have the wheel sorted to ENVE standards could ruin a nice weekend..
  • + 1
 A day of dh riding only loosens poorly built wheels. But apparently it cracks enves...
  • + 1
 Hahah! You lot are funny. I've had months worth of riding dh on mine and still spinning true.
  • - 3
 You ride like a girl
  • + 1
 You must ride like a fat newbie you keep breaking stuff. Grow up.
  • + 2
 carbon is a great material to bring the weight down but I just can't justify bashing something this expensive in rock gardens...
  • + 1
 Normally I'd agree but their no questions warranty does give confidence. I've never shyed away from nasty looking rock sections and so far nothiing but good things to report on their performance. Everyone has their own preferences but I'd be willing to bet most people would be swayed after a few days running them.
  • + 1
 Even if you get a new one, breaking a rim could ruin a vacation or weekend, let alone the possibility of crashing because it explodes.
  • + 2
 No different to breaking any rim,I'd replace it with an alloy for the rest of the holiday. It won't f*cking explode,Jesus dyu see the syndicates wheels exploding? And pretty damn sure they ride harder than any of the pros talking wise words here.
  • + 46
 not even gonna lie, that price is a joke.
  • + 113
 Biggest joke is 9995 US Dollar equals 5871.19 British Pound Sterling (today's exchange rate) But when this bike hits the shops in England, it'll be 9995 (or close to it) in British Pounds which is slightly over 17000 US Dollar.
For that money, I'd fly over, buy one new, ride it in the US for a week and return home with my used bike, save on shipping, import duty and vat.
  • + 104
 Send me coin...I buy it for you, I ride it for you for a couple weeks...ship it to you with World Famous Kamloops dirt on it. Win win! I won't even charge a fee : )
  • + 7
 Top spec XX1 Nomad is £6200 plus of course the Envy wheel upgrade if you want them...
  • + 2
 still, there are people who will buy the Nomad in Europe, even though the final price is 17k. That strategy of being an exclusive brand has always worked very well over here.
  • + 18
 in Norway retail price for XO1 drivetrain, xt brakes and wtb wheels is 55 000,- wich is 8 968.90 us dollar. Please don't complain..
  • + 5
 I built one up with the same spec and LB Carbon 35mm rims for just over £4k it can be done you just need a friend in the US for a deal on the frame.
  • + 0
 We have customers from all over the world. Just saying
  • + 6
 You live in Norway tho. Snow, mountains, surf, epic trails and hot girls....
  • + 4
 Sc are working on cheaper carbon versions of each of their frames instead of ali. So soon you'll be able to buy a cheaper carbon version which will look the same just be a little heavier.
  • + 8
 6 G's for the base model...I'm still waiting for a used first gen Nomad to fall into my price range :/
  • + 2
 10k for a bike is ridiculous and then wheels that are extra that are worse might as well buy the wheels gwin runst they wont break
  • + 3
 The top nomad is 10k here too. Which I've never realized appears to be fantastic value.
  • + 6
 Such an enormous amount of money... Looking at these reviews, while illuminating for the new tech being utilized, is beginning to hurt. Most of these bikes won't be in my budget for many years. Thats where the market has taken us. I just feel left behind by it all.
  • + 3
 I was able to get rid of three bikes, all made obsolete by the lower spec Nomad w/ vivid air. To me that's a bargain.

Not only that, it weighs 15 lbs less than the bike I used to push to the top of DH trails. That means getting to the top quicker and less exhausted. That means more laps. That's what it's all about.
  • + 40
 If you have the money and want to spend 10g on a mountain bike - I'm happy for you. However, if you want to buy a mountain bike and can't afford 10g - you'll have plenty of fun on a steel or chromoly frame hardtail. I have no statistics to support this, but trust me - go ride a bike - any bike. You'll have a blast.
  • + 11
 Agree OzMike, I ride a 2011 Santa Cruz Chameleon on almost anything and love it. Would love a new Nomad when the Chameleon works every time .... 60% of the time.
  • + 6
 the other 40% of the times over-rated anyway mate.
  • + 7
 16% of the time it works every time
  • + 3
 Hell yes! Hardtails are so under rated- check out my haro thread photo album for proof. Also, Baxter! Bark twice if you're in Milwaukee.
  • + 3
 I love my Canfield Brothers Nimble 9 ( HT ), I built it up real burly with high/ mid end parts I only have $2500 invested.
  • + 1
 Agreed. My Banshee Rune is down for maintenance, so I've been riding my On One 456, which I haven't ridden ever. Built it up a couple years ago and never rode it until now. Completely different world, and so much fun to ride a steel hardtail.
  • + 36
 Capra *cough* Capra *cough*.
You can stick your Enve wheels up your ass as well. Oxidising nipples. Spoke issues. Cracks. Failures. Just stop eating pies rich folk and enjoy the ride, not the push home.
  • + 8
 totally agree! The capra is incredible
  • + 36
 Yo ENVE, i'm real happy for you and imma let you finish but aluminium is the best mtb wheel material of all time. Of all time.
  • + 10
 A lot of carbon wheel I have worked on at the shop seem to have issues with oxidizing nipples (aluminum), we now just replace them with brass nipples. So far so good.
  • + 1
 @ crazy-canuk: so you have to effectively negate the weight benefit of a carbon rim (40-60g saved over aluminum) by replacing the lighter aluminum nipples with brass nipples (which adds up to around 45-60g more per wheel)....go ENVE? lol
  • + 3
 Bingo. I don't ride carbon rims and don't intend to, but with customers who's nipples snap due to corrosion (while riding or truing) we typically replace them with brass nipples. That said we are going to try putting some oil on the eyelet of the rim before a wheel build with aluminum nipples to see if that works.
  • + 3
 A friend of mine at the shop I work at build up his own carbon wheels with some no-brand rims from China. The rims have lasted the past 3 years great, but he's had to completely rebuild his wheel each year due to his aluminum nipples corroding. Let me know if that helps, I'm quite interested.
  • + 1
 Will do. We will try it with linseed oil so it will actually stick around. Should know by the end of the season at least. PM me then cause I will definitely forget to reply here.
  • + 1
 brass nipples are 20g more per wheel Smile the advantage gets smaller and smaller
  • + 1
 You can't say for certain exactly what the penalty is for brass vs. aluminum nipples. It will depend on the amount of spokes in the wheel and the length of the nipples used, but on average a brass nipple is about 1-1.5g heavier than an aluminum nipple. Extrapolate that to anywhere from 28-36 spokes in the average wheel and the two "standard" length of nipples and you will get your range.
  • + 2
 Dude....you possibly made me wanna spend 4k on the "CAPRAAAAAAA"..WHICH BY THE WAY IN MY LANGUAGE MEANS LITERALLY "GOAT"
  • + 1
 It is indeed named after a goat
  • + 1
 We used to copperslip ally nipples on ti spoke builds.
Bi metalic corrosions issues with carbon wheels?.
  • + 34
 For those complaining about the price, buy a Banshee Rune.
  • + 6
 Agreed. Built mine up in March and it rips everything except for real pure flat XC where it becomes hard work. Saying that I've stuck the steep flip chips in and it's alot more responsive. Mine is built up around 32lbs and I reckon you could stick it in a DH race.
  • + 4
 Yes man. Love mine. Frame is only a pound heavier, more adjustable, can fit 650b wheels in the 26 dropouts (without buying the 650b dropouts) for chain stays as short as 16.7, and I bought mine as frame only(no rear shock option) and bought a next to new shock off Pb for $100 shipped. All toll , less than half the price of a nomad. Xc ing w the 66 head angle and riding full on dh trails in 65. Funniest bike evar
  • + 1
 Yeah!! Just bought one and it rips! And lets face it no one is in it to go fast uphills!
  • + 1
 I'm considering my next ride once I sell my Blur LTc frame. Rune has shown up on my radar but there are so many options in that aggressive trail riding category. Rune, Process, Slash, Mega, Slayer... Overwhelming number of options. Not sure where to shoot.
  • + 2
 I did this exact thing. Got it with the DB air, and just did a 40km XC loop in the slackest setting with no issues. Steep techie climbs too! Love the bike.
  • + 21
 Hope they would have an option for the frame only. This is the second time that enve rim has failed pinkbike reviews, enve is just a rip-off...
  • + 7
 They do have a frame option....
  • + 4
 check the website, you can buy the frame with a shock
  • + 15
 I was hoping no one would say anything about the price this time. You knew it was a 10k dollar bike when you clicked the review. Bike company's aren't going to change the price of their bike cause people complained and PB won't stop testing the top tier models because that's the perks of the job! So let's just talk about how this bike is a game changer in every way.
  • + 14
 I would seriously buy one of these if it came in a 26"option. Almost everything about this frame is bang on for me Except the 27.5" wheelsize. Dont get me wrong, Im not a 650b hater, I just dont like that company's aren't giving us buying options now.
  • - 1
 I can't see any reason why you couldn't slap 26" wheels on that frame? It's not like they wouldn't fit
  • + 3
 Because that would give you like a 12.8" BB....

Companies weren't giving you options before, now you can choose three different wheelsizes....
  • + 4
 There's no question I would have bought one sight unseen if it was 26.
  • + 4
 I think the route that the Rune took is wise, however I understand that there are slight tweaks in the geometry to accommodate larger wheels. Thats a compromise.
  • + 5
 I have a Rune with 27.5 wheels. It's design preceded the new Nomad by nearly 2 years yet the differences between the two are minimal at about 1/2 a degree and 0.4". I have to admit that the slightly higher BB on the Rune actually is just fine. I don't smack my pedals every other minute in the nasty terrain I ride and yes I ride 170 mm cranks. If you go back and read PB's review of the Rune www.pinkbike.com/news/Banshee-Rune-650B-Tested-2013.html it is eerily similar to what has been said about the Nomad. I think it is a more glowing and in depth review actually. The Nomad has the edge in weight, but at a significantly higher cost. My Rune weighs a notch over 31 lbs and is not built with silly lightweight stuff either. I had considered waiting for the new Nomad, but I am beyond stoked with my Rune and I have money left over for beer and more riding.
  • + 3
 Thanks hellbelly. The geo of the Nomad is what I'd like to be riding, but the cost is immense. Weight isn't thousands of dollars important to me, geo and build quality are prime factors for me. Also I'm steering away from the VPP (riding a Blur LTc) towards a NW or BC company that builds for the rocky rooty tech trails round here. The Rune, the Slash and the Slayer are my top considerations.
  • + 2
 Most likely 26 wheels would make it a better bike: 4lb less weight, stronger wheels, long wheelbase, a lower bb. The way it is now - not enough travel, crappy aircans - hardly the end of progress and obscenely overpriced.
  • + 0
 Pastafarion, the Rune is a killer bike. I have pedaled VPP's, Maestros, DW-link, FSR's, APB's and whatever acronym you can think of. The KS Link is superb and combined with the best shock available the DB Air, it is the best I have ridden. I cannot say how much the 27.5 wheels add to it, but it is significantly faster than any of the 26" bikes I have owned. There are at least four other guys around here that all ride Banshee's that could ride anything they want and they swear by them.

Moving on, I demoed a bike with ENVE AM wheels last year. yeah, they felt great, but not $2500 (now $3000) great. I have yet to meet a wheel builder that wasn't leery of the internal nipples. Sure, ENVE says it adds strength, blah, blah, blah however you are f#*ked if you go out of true trailside. This happens more than ENVE would have us believe. My money will go to either a set of Industry-Nine Torch wheels which are massively stiff, same weight, better hubs, less drama to repair them, local in NC and less than half the price or custom built Derbys. Party.
  • + 1
 Hellybelly. Are any of the guys you know riding their Banshee's in the 26" setup? I'd be interested to know. I have a Commencal meta am and am thinking about a change but with upgrades over time it's running Pikes and Enves and xx1 and like all things 2nd hand is worth nothing to sell. Banshee has just come to NZ and building one in 26" with my current spec and changing it up to 650b as time goes on is pretty appealing.
I'd love a yt Capra and have a friend in an EU country to ship to but the availability is too long a wait.
On Enve wheels, I have them and like them but broke 3 no name carbon rims before them so I'm kinda psychological scared re carbon rims, should have gone Stans flow again, if break an Enve I will, a set of Stans with hope hubs is cheaper than one Enve crash replacement wheel build without the mind f#*k.
  • + 1
 Matthill1971, I don't know anyone riding a 26'er Banshee save a friend that has their DJ bike. I can't imagine that all of the attributes of Rune's fantastic suspension and handling would not apply with smaller wheels though. I have no intentions of going with carbon wheels. I-9's are as stiff, light and much more user friendly not to mention esthetically interesting with all of the crazy anodizing options available. Finally, you never know what second hand things can be worth. Believe it or not, I funded most of the purchases for my new bike from selling a handful of old hardcore punk records that I have had lying around for over 30 years. My youthful delinquency finally paid off.
  • + 10
 i think that is settled. Not sure when the post was made on the previous generation of ENVE wheels but I remember they hardly cased a jump and cracked the rear wheel. When they called ENVE about it, they said it was a fluke and here again they point the finger. (i believe this is the article www.pinkbike.com/news/Enve-Composites-DH-Wheels-Tested-2013.html)

I think it is great that ENVE backs up their confidence with a great warranty and crash replacement and I think their wheels are awesome, but lets be real, no one likes to wait to have to ship out your wheels and have to sit and wait for them to come back to ride again.

Either ENVE keeps on getting bad luck on pinkbike reviews or they are not what they claim to be. Thoughts fellow pinkbikers?
  • + 9
 An American friend of mine bought Enve rims soon after they came out. Cracked it all the way through. Enve said "We've never seen this happen before."

As the Canadians would say "Hyeah, right..."
  • + 4
 There was a bike magazine review in Europe (German I think?) that cracked a rear wheel as well. Enve has slippery shoulders for sure, but they are gorgeous indeed!
  • + 1
 MTB-News.de cracked one on the Intense Tracer. Bike was tested for two months...
www.mtb-news.de/news/2014/03/19/intense-tracer-t275-carbon-test-review
fotos.mtb-news.de/p/1586461
  • + 9
 i like seeing this hot and crazy expensive bikes... BUT it would be cool if you could review more bikes that the avarage rider can afford and will ride.
like... at least 2/3 of the reviews should contain bikes that are under 3500USD.
not always bikes were i start reading and when i saw the price tag i stop reading and just look at the pictures and then skip...
  • + 3
 Go back into the archives, and read the reviews from 4 years ago. That is what the $3500 bikes are today.
  • + 2
 that is nonesense... i am reading a monthly mtb mag here in germany and they have lots of bikes to review that aren't this expensive and have modern tech and geo. maybe what you say is true only for north america. but i doubt that too. i'm not saying they should stop making reviews of bikes like this... but throw in some affordable stuff aswell.
  • + 3
 It would at least be cool if they did like a 'budget bike shootout' at some point. They've ridden all the best versions of everything, but as we all know there are lower spec versions that are in a more realistic budget. So take all the super expensive bikes they've reviewed so far, then see what you get for $3500 on the same frame and rank the bikes according to how good the spec and the ride are (assuming they ride the same as the high-end ones, which they prob do). Wouldn't be any extra riding tests, just some research.
  • + 3
 They did last week, the two 2015 Mongooses... people still whined about the prices.
  • + 8
 a shame that this was a nomad review and most of the comments are carbon rim or Enve haters coming out from whatever rock they were hiding under. manufacturer defects/designs happen, whether to expensive items or cheap items. i'm giving Enve alot of lattitude, but think about how many thousands of these rims have been sold, vs the failures that have occurred. i don't know of any personally, and have only read about 2 (both on pinkbike).

i think carbon is still a viable material for rims and in some cases superior to aluminum. and i also feel that Enve is at the top of the manufacturer list of carbon rims. they're not infallible, but i do think they back their products. i've had no ill experiences with their customer service. i own the 1st gen 27.5 AM rims, and i've beat the crap out of them. cased square edge rocks on low tire pressure, shove my wheel into more bombholes and sketch ruts than i can count. now i'm not hitting WC/Pro dh speeds but i've done some pretty bone-headed moves and these wheels have just shrugged them off.

i trust them. Did the Enves take a big chunk out of my wallet? Yup Are they gonna break sometime in the future? yup. Would i buy them again? Abso-fcuking-lutely.
  • + 2
 I think all the "Enve haters coming out from whatever rock they were hiding under" are simply normal Pinkbike users who spend $2,700 on a complete BIKE, let alone a wheel set. A wheel set that those same readers have seen fail in two separate reviews. A wheel set whose manufacturer has blamed spokes or the product being a prototype for the failures.

Good for you for being able to buy Enves, and being able to buy more when that set breaks. Must be nice to have that kind of cash to splash around. But don't try to convince the rest of us that they're worth it.
  • + 4
 in order to have the kind of cash to "splash around", i do something called "saving". When i get a my paycheck, i try to put alittle away for my bike addiction. over the course of a year of "saving", i end up with enough to buy what I want/need. It's cool, you should try it.
  • + 3
 Thank you for your condescending explanation of how saving money works. My original point still stands.
  • + 1
 Part of being a responsible adult with a reasonable job is the ability to afford nice things.
  • + 1
 @UtahBikeMike: I literally LOLd at that response after reading you last few comments.... Irony, much?
  • + 2
 It was completely ironic Wink

I'm one of those people who could buy a set, but I'm too cheap and feel the performance versus cost doesn't jive. I'll just ride my stan/hope setup and marvel at the 2k left in my account. I'm lucky enough to have a couple MTBs that are worth more than my car, but it goes back to being responsible and affording nice things because of wise financial decisions. I've ridden them and think they're worth $1,000ish for a 29er but I don't think I'd ride a set on my 26" bike unless I could get them for $800 or so with decent hubs.

I still laugh at all of these people marketing "affordable" bikes costing 3k and these wheels costing $2800. To each their own, though.
  • + 1
 I'm a civil engineer of 5 years in the work place and I think the ENVE wheels are ridiculous in all senses, especially cost. No matter what way you look at it, enthusiast or not, there are better value options, including better value high end wheelsets. Even considering ENVE's direct (or as close to direct as it gets) competition, the wheelset is ridiculous.
It amazes me that people are vain enough to buy their (ENVE) products, but I guess there is a market for it... Heck people buy super cars for normal road use. One thing is for sure... The ENVE marketing team deserve a raise because the business is still running.

As a side note, I really hope YT successfully shake the industry. It needs it to grow.
  • + 1
 @UtahBikeMike: Haha, awesome. You and I are on the same page. In fact I've got the same wheel set, and am happy that I can easily replace a rim for less than $100. Hell, I could have a complete second wheel set as a spare for less than ONE Enve RIM!

As a responsible, money saving adult with a family to provide for I can think of better, more responsible things to do than buy a wheel set worth more than my bike, and hope it doesn't break. I've read about way more failures than the two Pinkbike reviews...
  • + 9
 10k for a bike with 100% top of the line stuff is fine, leave it for people who can afford it or are sponsord riders. You know what the real joke is? Spending 6k for an SLX specced one.
  • + 12
 yes its 10k yes its a girly color but you know what? I want it
  • + 10
 And no chris king components for that ridiculous price?
  • + 5
 I bought the frame to build up... I love it!
I'm not rich... I work...
I've sold two 26" bikes I built up cheaply from used frames in the past that were getting no ride time and are putting any spare cash I have into building this new Nomad....
Just looking forward to getting out on the trails with it soon! Smile
  • + 5
 I have this bike. Even though the ridiculous nursery room paint job hurts my eyes whenever I look at it, it's still rad as hell.I agree with the review even though I do not have the Enve wheels. It demolishes my 2010 S-works Enduro and depending on the trails it's on par or faster than my Demo II. I built up the Nomad custom for about 5.5k, using Stan FlowEx rims and Hope hubs, XX1 group, RS Reverb, Monarch+, and Pike. The shop did a deal on a full build, discounting for the full package. I used a no-name saddle and old pedals. I don't think the $10k build is worth it personally.
  • + 7
 There must be a cusp were the bike only performs as good as the skills of the rider which I'm guessing you'd get similar performance from a much cheaper bike....
  • + 1
 Think you're right...I've had a full range of bikes over the years from top of the range to budget second-hand self builds and everything in between and the main difference is sizing, suspension set-up and tyres. Great to see a large number of LT and trail light bikes coming through though
  • + 4
 I ran Enve's on my old santa cruz and cracked one in the same situation but on a XC ride.
They were three rides old and were sent back to the UK distributor. They took all week to respond and then said that it was crash damage and I could pay half price for a replacement.... Thanks, that's only £400 plus the rebuild cost !! Luckily I had the whole thing on my gopro and sent them the video of the exact moment and terrain I was riding when it broke, they still wanted my money under the crash replacement scheme.

I have never been so angry and ended up having to rely on Tweek cycles where I bought them to deal with Enve direct in America. They were both brilliant and it was rebuilt and replaced under warranty. I had no bike in the middle of summer for 4 weeks and spent almost everyday on the phone and emailing.

I sold then straight after at a considerable loss.... Lesson learnt.
  • + 6
 I have a Black Frame got it on 0% Finance, just waiting on a few more parts. "should be here tomorrow" Selling my Ibis to fund the parts.
  • + 3
 I have bought this frame but hate being 275ed. So one idea popped up in my head and I put 26 wheels and a 26 Fox 180 with the frame. Haven't tried in dirt yet but it doesn't look bad despite an even lower BB. The pavement test ride feels great. Anyone else tried to install 26 wheels onto a 275 frame? I call it 276, hahahah.
  • + 1
 Probably not a good idea. The frame is specc'ed for a certain length fork, anything longer will raise the BB AND slack out the HA, which might cause more stress than intended on the headset and head tube
  • + 1
 I actually will put on a 15 Fox 36 275, it's just not arrived yet. Regarding the wheels size, 26 is just a bit smaller and lower, shouldn't affect that much on the geometry.
  • + 1
 not a smart move, the bike is designed for 275. It also voids the warranty.
  • + 7
 Bike = Amazing, Price = Absolute Joke. Did someone say Capra?
  • + 6
 capra is the real deal, or Canyon's new strive cf
10k good joke. I can buy a DH rig and a carbon enduro rig at YT for that price Big Grin
  • + 1
 Test the Capra and compare it to the Nomad as it looks like the Nomad is the benchmark right now.
  • + 5
 Initial tests rate the Capra very highly so I think the benchmark you speak of is the big buck price tag. Its a benchmark I can happily do without.
  • + 2
 The Capra at less than half the price is where my money goes, especially as it had none of the issues in this test, or in the test in July 2014 Dirt mag. Obviously that doesn't help those who can't get a Capra but European riders have the choice. There is also the GT Sanction and the Canyon....need to start saving
  • - 2
 Well YT Capra is a wait until at least half November... not a real choice then
  • + 4
 Yeah, lets all just buy a 10k Nomad then.
  • + 2
 Yeah the capras do look good on paper.... but you do need to keep in mind a few things.
I bought a wicked ltd off yt last year so here's my two cent.
If you can afford to then pay on a credit card then do, as if your selling your bike to pay you might be bikeless for a very long time while you wait for it to turn up.
Be mindful that your warrenty is basically 'send back to Germany and wait' and that applies to all the components as well (ie BOS suspension).
I don't know if the Capra is different but the build quality of the frame isn't as good as your boutique brands, the paint flaked off my rocker link quite badly.
  • + 1
 Wish they were available in the US. Sweet bike.
  • + 2
 If you shop arround you can get a nomad for alot less then 10k
  • + 3
 Also yt larges ain't big and they don't do XL so if your tall you're out of luck too
  • + 4
 To all those who can't seem to use a currency converter.

The prices below are in Canadian dollars.

Yt capra pro is $5839.71

Similar specced Santa Cruz Nomad is $6599
  • + 1
 Edit* $6599 use

My apologies
  • + 2
 Yt with xx1 and bos shocks and reverb comes in at nearer $5500 against 9995 rrp on nomad, not sure where your prices come from?
  • + 3
 whats freaking me out these days is that bike technology has made it so mediocre riders are able to rail out on bikes like this! just let go of the brakes and the bike does the rest.
  • + 2
 This bike kicks ass I love my stealth black one it's so fast up and down. I got the frame and vivid + pikes full saint e13 lg1+ rims on hopes. If a I was gonna go carbon and I will in a few months I'd look at derby rims 40mm wide or light bicycle rims 35mm wide hookless so the sides are a lot thicker and stronger both get amazing reviews with only a few failures out their compared to enve
  • + 2
 Ehhh. I'm a Santa Cruz fan boy. I rode one of these at Sea Otter and wasn't super impressed. The bike felt like it was too tall, and while I almost never strike my pedals on the trail, I bashed them five or six time on a 15 minute test ride...AT LAGUNA SECA!!!! It climbed pretty well though. I'll stick with my Nomad 2 until it dies.
  • + 2
 If only there was an X-Y graph displaying the "fun factor" of a bike versus "cost" of said bike. I rode this bike this past weekend at the Annual Bike Week in Crested Butte, CO. Verdict = Fun Bike. Price = Ridiculous. I would never consider it for more than $6,000 retail, and probably never personally pay more than $4,500 considering what kind of 1 year old carbon 27.5 that can yield me these days. Thanks for attempting to set another ridiculous quality benchmark though SC. However, I'll stick to my cheap, yet well-modified, 3 year old aluminum ripper.
  • + 1
 Mavic wheelset anyone ?
To be honest the WTB ST i23 wheelset seems more than legit enough.

Buying a nomad at £4k with an SLX / X1 setup is more than enough component check for most riders i'd imagine.

More upto a XO1 / XX1 gets insanely expensive to service as well.

Compared to a high end 26" 150mm trail bike, this bike rils up and down. Period.
  • + 2
 matte black with magenta decal is the boss , whilst no bike is really worth this sort of cash to a non-pro rider , i have had mine for a month now and have seen big gains in performance and results
  • + 1
 At Park City a few weekends ago I demoed this bike but with a fox 34 and a debonair monarch. I also demoed the remedy 29er, bronson, and sworks Enduro 29er.

This is a very good bike, anyone who can tell the difference between 650 and 26 in a double blind test must be spiderman with a spider-sense.

Also, the enduro 29er simply handled better. A well built 29er makes 650b pointless. The Enduro 29er did just as good in the rough and steep, but gripped better even though it had small, faster-rolling tires than the Nomad. This was especially true in the loose and steep, and big, banked turns. It struggled on some of PCMR's smooth, tight switchbacks compared to the nomad, but who cares about switchbacks?

If you're going to divorce your wife so you can buy a $10k bike, the enduro 29er is better in my opinion. It handles so well that it makes 650 just pointless.

Note: I rode Lower Empire, Moose, and Redbull, all off Cresent
  • + 2
 Really? I kinda felt the Enduro 29er handled like shit compared to the Nomad.... puts you waaaaayyy too far back and those chainstays are so short they loose stability in high speed corners.
  • + 1
 What frame sizes were you on?
  • + 1
 Large on both. Stem was 50 or 55mm on the Nomad, 60mm on the Enduro, both with 760mm wide bars.
  • + 2
 I have the s-works 29 enduro and rode the Nomad last week down Bobsled (in SLC) and didn't like it all. I don't see what all the hype is about the new Nomad other than the paint job with matching ENVE wheels.
  • + 1
 I didn't think the Nomad was bad, and the Bobsled isn't the greatest trail on the planet, but I agree the 29er Enduro has spot on geometry. Best I've ever ridden.
  • + 4
 And the XL is still smaller than a lot of companies larges....kinda a slap in the face to everyone over 6 foot
  • + 3
 I'm 6'1'' and the Large (not even XL) felt spot on to me. Maybe a slap in the face for anyone over like 6'5'' but I think the majority of riders will be very happy.
  • + 2
 I have a large and I'm 6'2 and it feels spot on
  • + 1
 Im 6" and my XL feels a little short for me. I still love her though.
  • + 3
 I'm 6'5 and ride the XL, it is plenty big enough with the long top tube and a reverb and inch or two out the frame…I don't feel particular slapped
  • + 1
 How tall is Mike Kazimer?
  • + 2
 Doesn't change the fact that its much smaller than many of its peers in the same size. when you look at average heights a medium should fit up to 5'11" a large should be up to around 6'3" and the XL should be for people above that.
Santa cruz aren't the only company undersizing bikes. Treks come up really short too in my experience.
Some people might be OK with a shorter top tube but personally I like having a long enough reach that I'm not sat bolt upright like a granny heading down to the shops without having to run a long stem.
  • + 1
 Sick bike. Sc still run small. You may not realize it until you ride a kona, gt, mondraker,...
Ya at 6'2" sc/intense larges too cramped (modern bikes shld fit w/55or less stem), and the xl usually too long as they're for 6'3"+.

I'm waiting for the slash carbon, altho slash al is pretty light.
  • + 1
 Myself being only 5'2", bikes in size "small" from most companies are still to big for me. Talk about a slap in the face. Go get a woman's bike they always tell me. Ok, find me a womans bike that can handle this type of riding.
  • + 2
 At 6'1"=185,5cm ordered L at first but then changed it to XL and hopefully getting it this week. Previously I've been running Nomad mk2 in XL too. I like the stability offered by a longer wheelbase for higher speed descents.

If you compare Nomad's geometry for example with Kona Process, GT Sanction, Lapierre, Canyon Strive etc you instantly notice that SC's are "one size smaller". Of course choosing frame size is always a question of personal preference and body measurements. Capra is actually pretty close to Nomad in the geometry.
  • + 2
 Yes, but how tall is he? It's good to hear that he settled nicely on a large bike with 50mm stem but useless if you do not know his height.
  • + 1
 The nomad has a long top tube, longer than my XL (22") cube had, just lower seat tube.
  • + 1
 cube come up small too.
  • + 3
 you are not alone with these ideas benners. being 6'1" i have ridden a large thinking it was fine for me... then i tried a longer bike with a reach of 450mm rather than 430mm. it makes such a difference. i personally believe that bike manufactures get the size spot on for shorter riders (size small) but then they just don't make the differences big enough between each size. so if they want to keep the gaps the same they need to start making xxl and xxxl's
  • + 1
 @matt5311 manufacturers definitely do not have it spot on for "smaller riders". Like I stated above, even size small is too big for e from most manufacturers, and even less shops stock those frames that do fit me. I can never demo new bikes because shops are not willing to order the bike in my size and risk it not fitting me. So, long story short (pun intended), tall and short people both get screwed for sizing.
  • + 1
 Ok I take it back. It would seem Manufacturers don't really know what to give to the public. Tho I think the market is geared more towards the more sedate riders (people who actually buy most new bikes) who don't fully appreciate longer bikes due to never reaching speeds where it's an advantage.
  • + 0
 I'd disagree, I'm 6'4 and the XL Nomad is perfect in terms of length, stand over is low so on a long trail ride then I have the seat post out super high but otherwise it is perfect. The old XL spesh enduro was spot on as well. Cube stereo in XL was good too, just looked silly as it was huuuge
  • + 1
 What did you guys run for psi and rebound in the suspension? I have a new Nomad and have been struggling to get the suspension feel right. It always seems as though I am using travel too quickly despite having the correct or less than advised amount of sag. Interested to see how you had the fork and shock setup.
  • + 3
 $2700 for a wheelset, and it comes with Competition spokes? And I make that two sets of Enves reviewed by PinkBike, and two sets cracked.
  • + 1
 How to get the most of your future consumers are constantly talking about your product without spending one damn euro on advertising? Ask YT, they own the magic formula.

At this point, seeing the success of all these German online retailers, I'm surprised no one is planning on starting up the same business in America. If all Americans who say they'd buy the Capra, buy a similar bike in his country, that sort of business would be a success for sure.
  • + 2
 America has a couple, but not quite the high quality and gravity-oriented style of YT. Fezzari makes some decent looking bikes, and bikesdirect has some awesome xc hardtails, but I don't think most ppl know about them. I would love to have more online options though. My gf and I both own cyclocross bikes from online retailers (bikesdirect) and they're incredible for the money. My gf got Mavic Aksium wheels, SRAM Rival, Avid Shortys, and Conti race tires for $1k, and for less than a $1k you can get Ti or carbon.

Anyway, we have some of that kind of thing here, but it's not geared towards AM/DH riding usually. And bike shops hate you if you bring them in.
  • + 1
 I have the s-works 29 enduro and rode the Nomad last week down Bobsled (in SLC) and didn't like it all. I don't see what all the hype is about the new Nomad other than the paint job with matching ENVE wheels.
  • + 1
 I'm getting the nomad with x01 and ENVE rims at trade price on 0% finance and I don't care about the price! If you want something you should have it! (Even if I have to live on biscuits and water) ! Mountain biking is my passion,hobby, work and life! Why not have a bikeporn ride!!
  • + 1
 I think SC has realized that most users are on to their marketing strategy that's why they have recently come out with lower grade carbon versions of the same bike for less. This is seriously a rad looking bike but there are some really nice options out there that would make you think twice about buying a Bromad. Reynolds has a no questions asked 2 year crash replacement on all their carbon rims and that's extra assurance for the customer. Imagine the price tag on a fully specd XTR DI2 rig in the near future. Will SC be charging 15k or more for this?
  • + 1
 Had a Bronson before. Compared to the new Nomad the Bronson is a large trail bike. The steep 31.6 seattube, slack HA and short rear end convinced me, that the Nomad would be a perfect upgrade for enduro styled riding in steep terrain and after some testing I can say, that it is. But if the trails are slower, the terrain has more up and over stuff and you want to pump every little turn and drop without having a lot of speed, I would still prefer the Bronson. Choose your weapon...
  • + 1
 I seem to remember the recent review of the mongoose bikes that were entry level price to help riders out so they can afford to ride. I think i will take a complete bike over a crazy high priced wheel set any day. I remember when you could get top of the line mavic deemax for around 650$, i had the cheaper deetraks for 300$ which where great wheels. I had a friend on deemax wheels and he never took care of them or his bike and those wheels lasted, they took his dumb street hucks to flat and all that crazy riding. What happened to the bike market? no more affordable bikes or higher end parts. the bike industry needs to bring back better pricing on things. When its time for new wheels i am going to go with something way cheaper than the envy so i can have a strong wheel set and a clear head space when riding. who wants to have high price wheels in the back of their mind when they are riding keeping them from going strong and hard on the trails, just holding them back thinking about all the crazy money they will be using when they destroy their parts.
  • + 2
 If this is a Large, how tall were the testers who felt comfortable on it? Just looking to buy a Nomad frame and cant decide on Large or X large. An Idea of how tall the guys who found the Large OK are, would be a great help.
  • + 1
 Had a creaking noise in my type 2 rear mech, esp. when shifting into low gear. Decided the clutch tension was too high. You gotta remove the little round plastic cover on the clutch body and then turn the torx style nut inside to the left to loosen it. Wonder if that was the problem all along.
  • + 1
 That's one beautiful bike. Love the angles of a rideable iron horse sunday. But yeah, thanks for the technology Enve but I don't work in the criminal banking sector so I'll have beautiful hand built alu ones (that weigh somewhere between a shit and a haircut more than their carbon counterparts) and a fat wallet. All I need to read is one review exclaiming loss of traction in chattery turns and I'm like huh? They have problems? I don't want to pay enough for a boat on a set of wheels and have problems. That's ludicrous. Happy to hear from enve owners about their positive experiences of their own personal bankraid.
  • + 1
 I tested SC Nomad X01-build (RS Monarch Plus), Specialized Enduro 29 S-Works and Specialized Enduro 26 Expert. All 2014.
Before I thought Nomad would be the winner with no chances to others.
After – I don’t know.
I don’t like 29er, so Enduro 29 is not for me.
If I try to think about ride quality - Nomad wins. If I don’t think but ride - I like Enduro 26 more.

I am strange)
  • + 1
 Santa Cruz has built a really good bike here.

However, they already have a very similar, seriously good bike that comes in at half the price of the SLX kit, and it has the SLX kit too.


The Bronson is going to be the biggest competitor to this bike, because it can be purchased at $3500.

There is no way that a nomad is worth twice the price of the Bronson .


Although I could never ride this bike, my legs aren't strong enough for a one -by set up.
  • + 1
 For ten grand you can get a motorcycle. This is getting rediculous now. Is it really necessary to spend ten grand on a bicycle. Professional race bikes where you make a living riding I'd one thing but really 10 grand for a bike is just not necessary.
  • + 5
 I would rather have 3 YT capras for that money.
  • + 9
 Hopefully YT will burst that bubble so violently, that other companies will rethink their business model. But that is up to the people to choose right, people must WANT to choose right products. Average large wallet Joe must skip the ego of his wallet.

Previously you had folks like Canyon which maybe was dead cheap, but to this day has a messed up geo and quality issues. They used to be fugly to top it all. YT is a different, new breed. Spot on Geo and authentic price. Their bikes aren't made in any different way than the ones of the top dogs. This is just going for way too long. A Giant XTC hardtail aluminium frame made for less than 10$ and sold for 300$... the more someone tries to reason it, explaining the whole chain of getting the product from production line to clients hands, the more delusional he is.
  • + 1
 Agree, its time to change our shopping habits...Problem is as enthusiasts we will always seek the best deal and assemble a bike happily. Not so the rank and file bike buyer.
  • + 1
 Agree with you. Giant have a very profitable business model, given they make a large proportion of the frames in the market, including for some of the other big name brands. YT's model works but it does mean most people need to buy before they try and manage their own warranty back-up, something a lot of people won't want to bother with.
  • + 1
 Warren 569 - yes that exposes our weakness, the price we are willing to pay for our insecurities. We are up for paying for the luxury to be taken care of in the shop, then we want that thread of security that someone will clean the sht if something goes wrong with the bike. (and I do not despise nor condemn anyone, just stating it). I buy most of the stuff second hand, and I do not think it is the best idea ever. I say: I buy second hand, and please don't do like I do, please go and buy a new bike in the shop because doing so, you will contribute to the development of the sport. One might find it hipocritical, i find it reasonable and logical thing to do from my stand point to not encourage people to follow in my path.
  • + 0
 I prefer the Nomad, I can't understand the rationale behind the 49mm head tube and IS rear brake mount. They said the brake mount was because most people run an adapter anyway... well guess what, with IS mounts you have to. If it was 180 post mount, I bet the majority would run a 180 brake just for the clean lines if they weren't going to anyway. As for the 49mm head tube, quite simply what is the point? You can run a tapered steerer in a 44mm head tube with the external cup. The industry standard has been 56 for about three or four years, so why does this brand new for 2014 model have a bloody 49mm?

Aside from that, I still want one. I'd love to see a DVO Jade option too.
  • + 2
 Jaame: You do realize that you can buy a complete Capra for the price of Nomad frameset, and you loose nothing?
  • + 5
 That's great, but I'd quite like to ride the bike I've bought, not wait 6 months for it to show up. Oh, and they don't make them big enough.
  • + 1
 @ jaame, which industry standards are you referring to? proprietary headsets, BB, heat tubes, mounts, dropouts ... everything. Compatibility is not what it used to be. One is planning to upgrade/change his frame and needs to double his budget because the previous fork doesn't fit and the new one will need different wheels.
I salute SC for their frames layouts for setting up a bike, the most straight forward build for me. Why IS in the rear? because I stripped the PM threads on my frame and now I need a descent fix or a new rear triangle with IS I would only need just a new adaptor. I prefer an extra adaptor than damaging a 1000$ part of a frame and the existence of a disc brake adaptor or not is not my definition of a clean build, by bike is always dirty anyway. With SC I can choose the BB's that I want and not some cheap plastic adaptors to fit my shimano cranks & the headsets I prefer. IMO SC makes he right choices in their lay outs out there, nice & easy.
  • + 1
 bikegreece - with all the respect, one must be able to mount his brakes without destroying PM threads. It is just like being able to cross th street without being hit by a car. Actualy in most frames PM mounts are made of aluminium which is harder and thus less prone to unintentional thread damage than PM mounts in the magnesium lower legs of forks. There is simply no excuse for thread damage.
  • + 1
 Dear WAKI with all the respect, I'll reveal to you a big secret of life; sh@t happens.
Half (if not all) of the bikers have eventually damaged their threads in someplace on their bikes sometime. All I am saying is that IS is less prone to damage.
I am buying and building used frames like yourself - as you stated- so it seems that the previous owner of my frame .. was hitten by a car, wouldn't be nicer if there was a pedestrian bridge to cross??
  • + 1
 yes as you say: sh@t happens - a wonderful life changing realization, can be very transcendental. However every experience calls to be grounded in reality. Take steps in your personal development that will minimize the chance so sh@t happens to you. Learn to screw bolts in without damagin the thread, do not buy a used frame or fork that has damaged threads. Now tell me how does your psyche cope with forks having only PM mounts these days?

Sorry, no hard feelings, I got inspired by your tone Big Grin
  • + 1
 IndustrIES through the ages took many times the wrong way, thanks God, PM is not a life changing thing!!
  • + 1
 @Waki ok playing devils advocate if we all shift to buying bikes online from YT, Canyon, Radon etc then what happens to local bike shops?
Also a point often missed is that by buying cheap from another country you aren't covered by service centres in your country. Why would a UK BOS suspension importer want anything to do with a faulty pair of forks attached to a bike you bought direct from Germany, same goes for SRAM UK service centre.
Im all for cheaper bikes but LBS already have to deal impossible competition from the likes of CRC/Merlin etc on parts so once you take bikes sales away as well then they aren't left with much.
The other thing that annoys me is that people just see the price difference and assume that SC etc are just ripping them off, what they often fail to realise is where that the extra cost goes. It helps to pay for Demo bikes so people can try before they buy, reps that travel up and down the country dealing with shops for customers, having frames bikes in stores so people can go and have a look before they lay out large sums of money etc etc.
  • + 0
 Why are post mounts the only strippable things? If you're worried about stripping threads, surely a press fit BB would suit you better?

Santa Cruz are ripping us off in that their frames are made in China in large quantities and I am led to believe cost less than $300 American to actually make. The difference between UK and US prices is tax. Well blame yourself or your parents for voting for the commie wannabes that have been in power since whenever if you're in the UK.

I can't see LBSs surviving and frankly it's unavoidable. It would be good to keep them open, but I care more about my bank account than theirs... nuff said. I can fix my own bike and the local shops rarely have what I want at the price I want so there you go.
  • + 0
 LBSs will survive on service, accessories, and beginner bikes.... not terribly different from what they do now. There will always be a few people who buy nice bikes in store at full price, but I don't personally know any. On the other hand, even though I'm telling all my beginner friends to buy bikes online and whatnot, I'm also telling them which shops have the best service and the friendliest staff. Ok, so they can't compete on cost of the bikes, but they're still making money off the people who buy online when they need wheels trued, don't know how to fix something, don't have the right tools, or need accessories. LBSs will be okay. I understand why they're irritated with the online bikes when they come in with problems, but at the end of the day it's money in their pockets. Stripping threads.... come on now. You'd have to be a drunk gorilla to not realize you've cross-threaded a bolt. If you feel that much resistance you either put it in wrong or your threads are REALLY dirty. Either way you should be backing that bolt out.
  • + 1
 Hmm, so where does that leave the Bronson, a former highly praised bike by the likes of pinkbike and so on...

geometrywise theres is not much difference:
WS S WB CS BB HA SA TTL SH REACH STACK
Nomad 27,5 M 1170 433 340 65 74,2 584 725 415 600
Bronson 27,5 M 1139 439 346 67 73 584 731 403 594

just a little slacker, and a little more capable of the rough stuff? ok, 2 degree less headangle is a message, but 67 aint bad (sb66c, enduro, process).
I`m undecided - plus the new bronson colors look good too Smile
  • + 6
 If you had a bro and a dh, you'd ride the dh in the park/resort.
If you had a nomad and a dh, you'd probably sell the dh.
And, many nomad owners will likley have another xc bike for fitness rides.
The bro is enough for most, but isn't gna feel like a mini dh bike on dh tracks.
  • + 1
 I want one of these so bad... can't swing it this year though. Hopefully by the time my pennies are saved SC will start spec'ing these with 170mm cranks instead of 175 (preferably a spiderless crank like the Raceface Turbine), and wider rims. On the non-ENVE builds, WTB i23 rims are spec'd - same as the Bronson - you'd think with today's trend toward wider rims, they'd at least spec the i25 rim on the Nomad. Especially since nobody will be running skinny XC tires on the Nomad.

Also hopefully by that time Shimano will have pulled its head out of its @ss and will have XT and SLX 1x11 drivetrains to compete with SRAM's offerings.
  • + 2
 Enve, Schwalbe, POC and a few others. Your 'it's more expensive therefore it's better' marketing doesn't fool me for one second.
  • + 0
 I understand there are many willing buyers to drop a cool $10,000 on a bike and good on them for it. But to put into perspective that bike cost 1/12 of my house or 1/3 of my 2014 jeep wrangler. I'll have as much fun on my trance, maybe more for the lack of fear of breaking a 10k bike.
  • + 1
 Im sure this bike rips but unless the price drops i'm going with the smartly built Devinci Spartan XP for a fraction of the cost and only 4 lbs more. Let me know when they review that bike.
  • + 0
 I think it's funny that while other brands are looking for ways to sell cheaper products (Commençal, Mondraker, YT, Radon, Evil, etc.), Santacruz is looking for ways to step up their prices. The funnier part is that they are selling more than ever and this bike is guaranteed to be a big success. Don't get me wrong, I really love this bike, but even if I had the money I think I couldn't invest that much money on just one bike when I could buy 2 ou 3 top of the range rigs.

BTW, those Enve rims are the silliest way to burn money. For that price you can get a decent set of tougher wheels and a boat.
  • + 1
 Nice bike, but no where near $10k worth. My Chris King bling'd Driver 8 was a little more than half this bikes cost and mine is built to my spec top to bottom. Buy used and save yourself a huge chunk of cheese.
  • + 0
 My aluminum and steel Xprezo Adhoc has better geo numbers, and can be built lighter than the Nomad. I don't think carbon is the be all/end all that its being hyped up to be. Its really good, but the advantage vs value factor doesn't add up.
  • + 1
 New Nomad is great, love the frame revision, SC now making there own Carbon Riser Bars. Hope they follow through with wheels to boot as ENVE are just for fat cats.. Ibis carbon wheels $1200 USD really puts it in perspective.
  • + 1
 I'm building my new nomad right now spec'd with light bicycle carbon rims. Got the Dh version. $500 shipped, that's $1500 savings by not using ENVE rims.
The Nomad is such a sick bike!
  • + 4
 Picking my frame up today
  • + 2
 Basterd.
  • + 1
 Het zal ook eens niet he hahaha.
  • + 1
 Ik kon het niet laten
  • + 2
 Beetje veel fiets voor de NL.
  • + 1
 Serieus, je mountainbike in NL?!

onze familie verhuisde naar Seattle! grote bergen hier
  • + 2
 Xc in NL, rest in Duitsland, Frankrijk, Belgie, Zwitserland enz
  • + 1
 Ja, als je makkelijk ver kan reizen dan werkt dat wel. Voor mij zou dat niet werken, als ik langer dan een uur moet rijden voor goede DH dan woon ik in de verkeerde plaats. Op het moment ligt Santa Cruz binnen 45 minuten van mij vandaan, al zijn er ook lokale trails (10-20 minuten).
  • + 4
 Nomad vs Tracer vs Capra shootout please.
  • + 2
 Holy Sh1t that would be a test.....
  • + 2
 I've got a Nomad 3 and a YT Capra Pro. They are both really great bikes. Bit more testing to decide which is my favourite.....
  • + 2
 c'mon pb, we all know its a sick bike, but who pays 10k for a bike?? if you want to review the nomad, at least review the lower specced ones
  • - 5
flag Bronco82 (Jun 30, 2014 at 0:41) (Below Threshold)
 Pros and idiots pay that price. Or someone that has a lot of cash to burn. And not just a lot, A LOT of cash.
  • + 9
 I thought pros didn't buy bikes?
  • + 2
 yeah, pros dont buy bikes, they get them for free if (they usually are) sponsored
  • + 4
 Im sure you could probably demo a lower spec version at a reputable lbs, you dont need to complain about santa cruz sending pb the top spec model.
  • + 9
 I paid over 10k for my v10. Yes it's a lot of coin but I work hard and do long hrs. Im not as fit fit as I used to be and probably can't do the bike justice but so what. I love when I do have the time to get out and do some downhill runs and the occasional race. I'd pay 10k for a top of the line nomad if I was in the market .for a new bike.
  • + 5
 I knew some hard working Aussie would pipe up....haha
  • + 1
 Who pays retail anyhow?

My bike is 99% as good as that bike, but I built it up for half the cost by searching for deals and including some used parts (including some bought here on PB). If you can do your own maintenance and builds, it's not that hard.

People always freak out about retail prices, but you could find a deal on the same bike for a fraction of the cost. Unless you need the newest, most hyped bike immediately after its released, why worry about retail? Most people will get the same shit for far less.
  • + 2
 C'mon, 9995usd???!!! Were do we go? 2700usd wheels that can't hold a bit more rude landing???!!! Sorry but I will comfortably stick with my aluminum frame and rims.
  • + 0
 After a week in Liguria pounding rocks, roots and shoots..this bike is the best thing that ever happened to my riding. I bought the black but now I have the self esteem to need the powder blue one! Thanks Santa Cruz and rivierabike.co.uk for the best week of my life! The XT 785 brake out performed every other riders brakes that week...no mechanicals at all!
  • + 1
 I had my Nomad 3 out with Ady and other places in Liguria over the last month. Great bike for that terrain.
  • + 3
 The color scheme is more like for my girl...
  • + 0
 To be fair, there's a sick black option, and this. One for guy and one for girls?
  • + 19
 That's sweet, the 5 year olds are talking about "girl" and "boy" colours.
  • + 3
 Ha! ^ this man... win, I laughed
  • + 1
 www.julianabicycles.com this is the "girl specific" bikes who is manufactured by Santa Cruz. So I'd believe this is made also for real men who don't care about "girl-colours"
  • + 2
 I think it's a pretty smart move by SC because a large number of people will buy the "bold" option, asserting their manliness in the face of ridicule only to get sick of the colour in a year or less and be looking to buy the next big thing from SC Wink
  • + 2
 if you can't pull off riding the "girly" frame, you have bigger issues to address
  • + 1
 "flag svalgis (2 days ago) - That's sweet, the 5 year olds are talking about "girl" and "boy" colours." - Nope, kids don't associate color with gender unless parents teach them to. Wink Hence Hendri's comments.
  • + 2
 Somebody warned us all this day would come on the affordable mongoose review. haha 10k
  • + 1
 Just for fun, the VIDEO: Carbon VS Aluminium – Test Santacruz Bicycles
www.mtb-downhill.net/video-carbon-vs-aluminium-test-santacruz-bicycles
  • + 1
 Here in Brazil the SC dealer will sell that bike for at least 20.000 thausands dollars... and you can buy even a small house with that money
  • + 2
 I'd spec this bike with a DT Xm1501 wheelset. I't would cost a third, weigh less, roll better ....and last much longer.
  • + 2
 10 grand while a crap ton of moola is nothing in the road bike world. S-Works Venge is $18,000!!! Thats a lot of money
  • + 2
 At $3000 I guess its it possible to made titanium (grade 5) wheels stronger and lighter than this ENVE !
  • + 2
 Enve is such a joke!
I half expected their BS "Never had a failure before."
  • + 2
 Gotta say, I miss the "Shitting Dog" look of the old frames. This looks more like a 10 year old VP Free.
  • + 1
 This is the type of bike you ride naked, one because it matches the ridiculous paint job and two because after dropping 10k on a bike you can no longer afford clothes!
  • + 3
 I have no more organs to sell!
  • + 2
 When will the Nomad be released with the lower cost carbon layup option, like the Bronson and Tallboy?
  • + 2
 Funny how this went from a nomad review to an enve review... I'm glad it did anyway coz I was thinking of enve hoops...
  • + 2
 SC is like apple, and the nomad the iPhone of bikes, expensive but top notch.
  • + 1
 Dream bike if you have the money,

that's the small bike when I win the lotto, until then I'l keep dreaming!

(not sure about them wheels tho)
  • + 3
 What a nice looking bike. Can't wait to buy a used one!
  • + 3
 Imagine someone buying this bike and a pair of Kitsbow shorts.
  • + 1
 YT Capra just under £2900 in comp spec with pikes and monch plus or £5700 for Santa Cruz?
Nomad is no where near as exclusive either if thats important to you....
  • + 2
 I don't always wash my bike after rides but this beauty I certainly would, so I could put it in my room and admire it
  • + 1
 it looks like every company is stocking their top of the line bikes with shimano brakes...
  • + 1
 We need the Alloy (cheaper) version of this bike, and we need it right now !!!
  • + 3
 Totally a badass bike!
  • + 2
 I just need to sell my other liver...
  • + 1
 finished building mine yesterday. its awesome i love it. i had a ibis sl before also a great bike. but this is way more fun
  • + 1
 Anyone who has 10g's to put on one bike has got to let me know how they do it!
  • + 5
 Put money away every month, from the date you buy your old bike. When you have enough money to unload, unload it. It's called "saving for a rainy day".
  • + 6
 Its called being single!!! So... ugly people ride 10k bikes
  • + 1
 Considering all of the other options available, spending $10K on a bike is still a horrible investment, no matter how rich you are. Save money, yes...but be smart about your purchases.
  • + 6
 Get an education and professional employment or a decent job you enjoy.

Save your money and spend it wisely, don't waste it on drugs, alcohol or cigarettes. I don't see this as a bad investment, as it ISN'T an investment, it's a part of my life that I very much enjoy, it keeps me fit, healthy and sane, I enjoy riding expensive bikes, so I ride more often and get more health benefits.

My real MTB first bike 20 years ago was a $700 Giant ATX hardtail that I saved for a year for, hopefully the Nomad when it finally turns up crates as many happy memories as that old Giant did.
  • + 4
 Love how it's all the aussies justifying the price haha Get ya shit together rest of the world! So many enve spec sc's here (and in NZ for that matter) so stop whinging bout pb reviewing bikes of this price. Ya can spend that easily on a bike wit a motor and thats just as bad a investment and not as good for ya health. People will spend money how they want and no one has the right to tell them how to. I run a business, work hard and like to the best bikes. Don't tell me I'm a fool coz I can afford as your obviously the fool voz ya can't afford. Enough said!
  • - 1
 @smuggly As I said, "considering all of the other options available...", $10K is absolutely insane. There is no justification, no matter how you spin it.
  • + 2
 Again, who actually buys a bike for retail?
  • + 1
 Lol, I've paid for every bike I've owned. And theres been a lot. I have a job, but i can't tell you that I do not enjoy it...
  • + 1
 @smuggly It is an investment, your second paragraph says it is, it's a good investment in your mental health and well being.
  • + 3
 carbon ≠ rim material
  • + 5
 Carbon is an excellent rim material. It's just that it is so expensive that you may like to choose something less luxurious and designerish. ENVE is cool, great rims, just make sure you are in the class where your girlfriend has Louis Vuitton purse, you drive a Maserati or at least something with Abarth logo on and you both watch DH World Cup from a Danish sofa drinking single Malt from Rosenthal glasses.
  • + 1
 Amazes me that people seem to blindly spec the Enve rims on the latest SC bikes just because it is the "look" for a SC bike when the Light Bicycle rims would save such a massive chunk of money. I'd personally rather have a holiday or two or less debt instead Wink I must be honest, that rightly or wrongly, I do tend to judge anyone that has paid their own money for Enve rims on a MTB.... Waki kind of has the same idea Smile
  • + 1
 I DO NOT judge people for having ENVE rims. At least not anymore. I acknowledge them by having a mere understanding why they bought them. I have no feelings for them. I am even willing to embrace a person who took a loan to buy ENVE rims and drive around with such bike on a roof of a 1998 Audi A4. He is no worse than me buying carbon sht and saying that carbon is not worth buying.
  • + 1
 It is single-cask single malt, i hope? And LV is a bit for the masses or the nouveau-riche, non? Make that a Birkin, dear friend.
  • + 4
 A little anecdote: a rich man once told me he prefers to buy an older used Rolls-Royce than a new one (same with his Yacht) and then people will assume that he has been rich for a long time instead of having all the latest stuff meaning the came to riches recently who knows how - old money is the place to be. Thats why i am keeping my 1993 Merlin with Mag 21 as a city bike ; ) Funny how many older blokes recognise it.
  • + 4
 Sontator - cool anecdote hehe. I assure you that ENVE is not something for big shots Smile I know a few proper big shot, like America Cup sailor, who does MTB occasionaly. He has a stock carbon merida XC racer... he has no time exploring what is cool in that business. And if you told him woooow 8,5kg XC bike!, he would say "yea whatever". As Billy Connolly says: poor people are cool, big shots are cool, it's the middle that sucks, the fkng wannabies Smile
  • + 2
 I do like the Billy Connolly quote Waki Smile When I said I "judge" people with Enve rims for MTB that wasn't the best way to express it as it sounds too negative... the Billy Connollly middle ground thing sums it up better for most people. Love the anecdote too Sontador!

My other favourite Connolly quote that applies really well to MTB is "there is no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong clothes"
  • + 1
 @ mate 1998 how are those carbon rims
  • + 1
 Did pink bike really just tell people they should trail ride on 175 cranks?
You guys are stupid.
  • + 1
 I like the new nomad so much I'd take her home and introduce it to my parents
  • + 1
 I think, never buy a bike if it cost more than 4000€ and i've to use in a enduro/dh trak!!!!!
  • + 3
 oooh wow looks awesome
  • + 1
 No way in hell would I spend $10,000.00 on that bike or any bike for the matter of fact.
  • + 1
 Aghhh I can't find the comment I just posted to edit it. My apologies I quoted the American price for the comparable nomad
  • + 2
 Those enve wheels are roughly 2/3 of the price of my YT Wicked Pro...
  • - 2
 So you're saying you have to build the wheels with weak shitty spokes because the rims aren't strong enough to handle strong spokes?
What if you ride hard and like strong wheels?
Hidden nipples is bullshit. Alloy nipples are bullshit.
Weak flexy bladed spokes are also bullshit.
Total rip off.
Strange they never mentioned the fact that most people are riding around with nearly seized pivots on these bikes since nobody understands how sense rice sc's pivot situation is to pivot axle over torquing.
Which everyone does to their sc pivots.
What happened to the classic no fail
Bearing/sleeve/bearing tag green as hard as you want pivot design?
Oh yeah. In the bike biz. More complicated and more likely to fail is better cuz it saves you a meaningless amount of weight.
Carry on idiots
  • + 8
 I can hardly understand half of what you are saying because your spelling and grammar is atrocious, yet we, the Nomad owners are idiots?
  • + 3
 You can tell what he's saying if you read closely (sense rice = sensitive, tag green = torque?). He's criticizing SC for engineering something that is way too easy for mechanics/users to f*ck up, instead of adding a meaningless amt of weight to have a bombproof/idiot-proof pivot design. Can't confirm or deny what he's saying, but it seems he sees a lot of people ruining their pivot bearings on their SCs.

But yeah. Proofreading is cool.
  • - 1
 I don't know anything about you why would I call you an idiot?
Ya so sorry about the auto correct situation
  • + 1
 ... but the ENVE wheels left us less than impressed !!! that's what i concluded ....
  • + 1
 10 k , why the bloody hell not . It the best ride going . U only live once and were only slaving between rides
  • + 2
 ya, so it's 2014 and my DH rig still weighs 40lbs
  • + 1
 You could have the same specs on a 5000usd o less bike. (Speaking on travel, geometry, weight)
  • + 0
 I know this is off topic, but i dont know what to choose. Orbea oiz m50 or specialized epic comp
  • + 1
 10 G's Damn!!!!! I'm going to have to take up that second job with UBER!
  • + 1
 bellow threshold bikes should be hidden also Smile
  • + 0
 YT Capra, 4200 CAD (no VAT) complete with BOS. No idea if it would ship to Canada, but WTF!?!
  • + 1
 Where did you get that number?
  • + 1
 On their website, subtract VAT, currency convert, presto.
  • + 1
 oops, 4600CAD for the top model. Good thing the company I work for is based in Hanover. Might have to put in for a short term transfer;-)
  • + 1
 Damn thats what my dirt bike msrp's for....
  • + 1
 Leave the enve's, Industry 9 wheels feel the same but cost way less
  • + 0
 for the price of the lowest speced model you could get a yt capra comp 1 and a set of enve wheels
  • + 2
 hottest bike around
  • - 3
 Wow! The Washington state sales tax (10%) on this bike is more than I paid for my first Mountain Bike! I have a good job, nice house, nice car, nice bike (Yeti ASR-5 - not great, but still nice), but there is no way in hell that I would even consider buying one of these at 10K or even 8k for that matter. What demographic are they targeting for this "magic bike"? Is it the Redmond, WA douchebag who wants to roll up to the trailhead in a Porsche 911 Carrera 4S (fire engine red) with his teal and pink magic bike on his Saris racks? This bike will only be found under awesome sponsored riders (where it belongs) or under guys going through a mid-life crisis who are starting to question their manhood and relevance in a society that is starting to regard them as old.
  • + 1
 At Duthie the other week was an older guy and his two sons, all riding new carbon Bronsons. They were a nice enough family but also had some other kids filming them in some project for class. Matching kit and bikes all around. They weren't d-bags but boyyy the envy level was high, as they drove away in their newish Q7.
  • + 3
 Maybe the problem is your nice car, isn't that the classic midlife crisis purchase? I happily spent more on this bike than my car is worth ("budget" build). my thinking: no car can make traffic more fun. This bike makes riding more fun.
  • + 2
 So you are a d-bag if you worked hard and happened to have discretionary income and just like nice things? You sound jealous and bitter my friend. Better you work harder, maybe start a business or study investing.

You might feel a little different then. BTW - when you get there, make sure you give some of your surplus to Evergreen, WTA and all the other great groups out there. If you talk to those folks - I am sure they are very grateful and appreciative of those "d-bags" you are hating on who are major supporters of the groups that help build and maintain the trails you love to ride.

Hey, and just lighten up and have fun - we are all here to ride and have fun..
  • + 0
 What I meant by "nice" car is one that will start every time, doesn't smell like a ski boot and actually locks (unlike my old car).

I am there! My 401K is very happy, I give to local causes (I'm a member of WTA, WWTA, and Evergreen) and I just bought a new house with over 20% down. And guess what? I still wouldn't even consider buying a 10K bike that will be yesterdays news before the sun sets. If you're idea of buying the nicest of something is to just buy the most expensive of something, then that's treading into d-bag territory.

Also, I'm not bitter nor jealous, but it does make me a little sad when someone drives a Porsche that will never see a track and over spends just to compensate.

And I agree - we are all here to ride and have fun.
  • + 3
 I will never be able to afford to own a Ferrari, but I don't automatically think all Ferrari owners are douche bags....
Only a douche bag would think like that?

I like Ferrari's... I'm glad someone can afford those cars or they would cease to exsist!
What a sad world that would be... We only make things that everyone can afford???
  • + 0
 It's not about owning something - it's about owning something simply for the sake of what you want (or need) people to think because you own it. I don't think all Porsche, or Ferrari owners are d-bags, it's just the folks who buy them simply because they feel to inferior to own something else. Like I said before, this bike belongs under a sponsored rider who can make it do what it's meant to do - be an awesome Enduro race bike, but if Joe Redmond plunks down 10K for a bike simply because it's the most expensive (and he needs the most expensive) then that's just freaking sad.


Make no mistake, I'm sure this is an outstanding bike, but I'll wait for it to show up on E-Bay (ridden twice) for 5K
  • + 3
 Your judging people for what they spend their own hard earned money on.
That says more about who you are, than who they are... :- /

Besides that, SC have discontinued the 26" Nomad and have not produced an alloy version of the latest frame.
So if you want to move into the 27.5" domain, which is clearly going to be the norm in the future of MTB frames and you want a SC Nomad, you will be buying this bike regardless...

I'm far from sad about my new frame and you won't find mine on eBay Wink
  • + 1
 You are correct SGTMASON and I do apologize for my brashness. After rereading my posts I see the irony in my calling anyone else a d-bag just for owing an expensive bike. Maybe (just maybe) Smile I'm a little jaded from seeing, all too often, the latest and greatest bikes under guys who haven't a clue how to ride them. With that said, I guess it really doesn't matter what you ride or how you ride it, what really matters is that you're outside, breathing fresh air, and earing workout credits for a post ride beer.
  • + 1
 Well said young man! Wink
  • + 1
 They'd sell more if they picked a more universal color...
  • + 1
 There are two color schemes
  • + 1
 good cuz i don't even know any girls that would be down for that
  • + 1
 My Intense Tracer Carbon weighs 27lb, no carbon wheels. @Bikeactive
  • + 1
 How much travel does it have?
  • + 1
 How would the knolly warden fair with the nomad3?
  • + 1
 This is sick!!!!!!
  • + 0
 HAHAHA...10 GRAND...wait..BUAHAHAHA!
  • + 0
 I thought it was a Yeti.
  • - 2
 Yeah
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