Schwalbe, Canyon, KS - Eurobike 2014

Aug 26, 2014
by Mike Levy  
Schwalbe

The new Jumbo Jim is available in both 4'' and 4.8'' widths.


Schwalbe Jumbo Jim

Will fat bikes be the only place we'll see 26" wheels? It's certainly the only genre where the smallest wheel size is continuing to grow, with nearly every major tire brand adding mega-wide rubber to their lineup, including Schwalbe. Their new Jumbo Jim is available in two different widths depending on your needs - 4.0" or 4.8" - and both sizes can be had with either the German brand's SnakeSkin or LiteSkin sidewalls. Fat bike tubes aren't light, so the Jumbo Jim can also be made tubeless quite easily if you're looking to save some grams and improve reliability. Weights range between 990 and 1,290 grams depending on the width and casing.

Schwalbe

The Procore system consists of a low pressure outer tube and a high pressure inner tube, and the system works with any rim that's 23mm wide.


Schwalbe Procore

The general rule of thumb is that as you go down in air pressure, you also go down in regards to reliability. Schwalbe's Procore system, developed with Syntace, aims to allow riders to run lower air pressure for added traction via a dual chamber layout that employs both a high pressure inner compartment with a low pressure, tube'd outer. The high pressure inner section (in blue in the photo above) is a separate tube that is to be run between 55 and 85 PSI, and its job is to both provide protection against rim dents and eliminate the chance of burping due to how it helps hold the tire onto the rim. The racers out there will also like how the system should allow them to finish their run in the event of a puncture thanks to the inner chamber still being inflated, although the average guy out on a ride will still need to perform a trailside fix. Schwalbe says that the outer tube can be run as low as 14 PSI to maximize traction, something that simply isn't possible with a more conventional setup, and the entire system is said to weigh 200 grams. The good news is that you don't need to run a Syntace rim or even Schwalbe tires to use Procore, with it being compatible with any rim that sports an internal width of 23mm.

Schwalbe Procore valve

The production version of the Procore system uses a clever valve that allows you to choose which chamber you fill by rotating it, meaning that consumers don't have to drill a secondary valve hole in their rims.





KS

Cross-country dropper - the Ci weighs around 400 grams and sports 65mm of drop.


KS LEV Ci

Most mountain bikes should come with dropper seat posts regardless of their intention, at least in my mind, and we might start seeing exactly that as weights come down and reliability goes up. Coming in just under 400 grams for the 30.9mm model, KS' new LEV Ci is aimed at cross-country riders and racers who want to get their seat out of the way but still run stuff like foam grips and aluminum nipples to make themselves feel better when it comes to grams. The relatively low weight comes courtesy of a carbon outer tube and a carbon fiber head with titanium hardware, although its 65mm of total travel likely means that it won't be the first choice for trail riders out there. KS has also started including Power Cordz cables with their posts for more reliable action in the long run - they're made from rust-proof synthetic material - as well as lightweight Recourse housing that KS says knocks off a 1/3 the weight of standard steel-lined shift housing. KS has had a standard LEV C in the lineup for 2014, but the Ci model shown here utilizes internal cable routing and a redesigned actuation mechanism at the bottom of the post.




Canyon

The Strive CF goes from 160mm to 130mm of travel at the push of a button via its Shapeshifter system, and you're not locked into using a proprietary shock.


Canyon Strive CF

Enduro racing may be the butt of a lot of jokes lately, but it's also going to be the reason that trail and all-mountain bikes that we'll all be riding in a few years will be so awesome. An EWS racer's needs to be aboard a machine that crushes the downhills but can then also be ridden back up with minimal effort should make for some pretty interesting bikes as things develop further, and Canyon's Shapeshifter technology is one of the more interesting developments in this regard. It uses a supplementary air actuator, hidden mostly out of view behind the rocker arm, that actually changes the location of the upper shock mount in order to alter the leverage. The upper mount moves by just 15mm, which doesn't sound like much, but it takes the Strive CF from 160mm to 130mm of travel, as well as raising the bottom bracket by 19mm and steepening the angles by 1.5 degrees.

Canyon

The supplementary air actuator is hidden behind the rocker arm, and it controls the bike's travel and angles by changing the location of the upper shock mount.



The Shapeshifter system is controlled via a handlebar mounted remote, with a standard shift cable and housing being run internally through the frame and up to the small air actuator, and a small indicator on the rocker link reminds you what mode you're in. Canyon says that Shapeshifter adds a total of 200 grams to the bike, and that their team has been using the system throughout the 2014 EWS season. The design allows nearly any shock to be used due to the Shapeshifter system being entirely separate from it, meaning that you're not locked into using a proprietary damper.

Canyon

The Shapeshifter system appears to be pretty normal until you take a closer look at what's going on, and it's controlled by a small thumb operated remote.


View entire Eurobike 2014 Product Gallery Here


172 Comments

  • 93 5
 With all the hate Protour lays on the new Specialized suspension design, the biggest thing that held Gwin back this year was that dang flat, and hes not the only one. If this new twin chambered tube really works, this is a bigger revolution in DH racing than any new suspension gimmick.
  • 37 1
 Tires are one of the less reliable part on a mountain bike, so every innovation ther is welcome. I vonlunteer to test it.
  • 22 2
 This bike defiantly goes in the babe section of bike porn
  • 7 0
 I've been running my bike this year with a narrower higher pressure tube inside and larger volume tubeless tire. 0 flats since I made the conversion. All you have to do is drill an extra valve stem hole in your rim, and set it up tubeless. I highly reccomend it. It cost me a $10 container of Stans.
  • 1 0
 a lot of rieders allredeay use the twind tube system... Fischbach killed both chambers quite often....
  • 6 1
 @cougar797 how do you inflate a smaller tube without it just stretching to fill the whole space? I've run 2.0 tubes in my 2.5 inch tires for over a season before. They just keep expanding until they meet the tire.
  • 1 6
flag mp11 (Aug 26, 2014 at 9:56) (Below Threshold)
 you have 2 holes in the rim so 2 completely different air chambers
  • 3 5
 ...of the same pressure
  • 7 0
 @hamncheez the blue tube is probably very stiff, if its anything like the Nuetec TuBliss system.
  • 4 2
 Also tubes inflate to fill space against a lower pressure outside than inside, if you have 30psi pushing against the outside of the tube then its not going to stretch as far as say it was 14.7psi (as is the case with a regular tire at sea level). Essentially you inflate the tubeless setup first and THEN you inflate the tube.
  • 5 4
 And by inflating the tube you increase the pressure in the tubeless setup as the tube expands, obviously. Unless the tube is really stiff, the difference in pressure between the tube and tire will be minimal. It might do a few PSI, but the rim protection factor Schwalbe offers will just not be there, and it'll not provide much benefit over standard tubeless system I believe.
  • 2 6
flag deeeight Plus (Aug 26, 2014 at 11:04) (Below Threshold)
 Depends on the tube you use... there have been some ridiculously thick walled tubes (on the outside) meant to be thorn proof that would do a similar function to the Schwalbe system. They're more commonly found in 700C sizes (so perfect for doing this on a 29er wheelset) but they do exist in 26er models.
  • 3 2
 My question is: why don't they put the valves at entire opposite ends to maybe help out with balancing? I'd imagine you have to do some trickery to get the wheel trued.
  • 7 1
 The wheel being trued and balanced weight-wise have nothing to do together. Plus the stem won't be much heavier than the removed aluminium from the rim hole AND tires are already so much heavier and so unbalanced you won't notice it.
Even on a car you won't notice below 80 km/h, a speed we are quite unlikely to reach. At least not me.
  • 2 3
 Actually in the photos of riders actually using this system the valves are opposite to each other , two valves side by side will cause a noticeable imbalance . Think about when you get your car wheel balanced and the tiny weights they use to correct the imbalance , think of that relative the weight of a car wheel , and yeah car wheels do spin at higher speeds but the affect will still be there on a MTB rim.
  • 3 2
 Actually I would not be surprised if some mechanics actually do balance wheels , at least in the road world and probably the MTB world too.
  • 2 1
 @ hamncheez above. Yes. Also I drilled my extra valve hole opposite the orginal just because I thought it looked good. Plus it helps me keep myself straight on which valve is which.

Also I can add that I am running light tires, a small volume tube, and a little stans so the method is waayyy lighter then any other heavier tubeless tire or heavy DH tube setup I've tried and has proved far more reliable then both.
  • 1 1
 Wat happened with Protour, I think I missed something...
  • 3 1
 Where is the man? I call his name, Protour, Protour, @Protour !
  • 7 0
 how can you balance mtb wheels when they will soon be covered with random bits of mud, i also wouldnt drill a hole opposite the original valve hole as this is normally where the rim is pined welded joined etc.
  • 1 0
 "Compatible with any rim that sports an internal width of 23mm"
That's pretty exact and will rule out a lot of rims, ie my Flows :-(
  • 1 1
 Happy to see that the new CrossMax XLs are 23mm wide. Now will the Procore system be available for 29" wheels?
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez you definetelly shouldn´t be doing that with your tubes, stretching that far a tube only make the walls thiner and easier to flat, y use 2.4-2.6 tubes even on my 2.35 tires
  • 2 0
 As an established weight weenie, i did previously use the "regular" butyl tubes in undersizes and stretched to fit bigger casing tires, but now I just use equal rated size thinner-wall tubes. If you are going to undersize, it makes more sense to undersize by diameter and not width, as the tube wall will stretch less to fit a larger diameter tire than a wider one (of equal diameter). I use 26 x 1.9/2.1 rated tubes for example in 29 x 2.1 tires.
  • 3 2
 It makes even more sense to ditch tubes anyways Smile
  • 2 0
 I would get a flat on the trail and replace with whatever tube I had handy- often too small a size. My lazy person would then just leave them in there for a season or two.
  • 2 0
 The "tube" part looks more like a road tubular tire with no tread, so it should not expand at all. It would be interesting to try this, but between removing the tread from the tubular tire and the fitting of a second valve piercing it as well, seems overly time consuming and rather frustrating.
  • 3 0
 Vital MTB just released way more details, they only run on one valve now, and the tube itself fits into a membrane to stop it stretching, the outer chamber isn't actually a tube, just regular tubeless, the entire kit including tire levers, sealant, rim strips, tubes, membranes, valves Etc will be around $200 for both wheels.
  • 1 0
 Oh yeah, and 23mm is just a minimum ID width. You can go wider rims if you want
  • 1 0
 @bigburd: no the valves were not opposite. They were one next to the other. What you've seen was a ghetto version of it with a tube as it's been explained once by Steve Smith mechanic..
Anyway back to the balance: no you won't feel it. Plus having the valve stems opposite would make it a pain in the ass to install as this inner chamber is certainly very rigid, almost as much as a tire to avoid extension to the outer chamber... And moreover Schwalbe changed the system and there will only be one valve with trick to fill both chambers. More details:
www.bikerumor.com/2014/08/26/eb14-schwalbe-pumps-up-procore-dual-chamber-system-on-all-rims-jumbo-jim-4-8-fatbike-tire-actual-weights-more
  • 1 0
 Well I seen pics on Dirt of brendogs bike and it had two valves and they were opposite each other , the only time I see them side by side is in these pics they use in every promotional article
  • 1 0
 Well they may have tried that option but I'm still very confident the concern was not balancing the wheel. You also have only one stem on your tube (or tubeless) system and I don't have the feeling you feel the difference.
  • 1 0
 I am not a World Cup racer. I run tubeless and if I have a flat I will inflate my spare tube. Nice and easy.
And would I have more traction if I run my car wheels at 1/3 of the recommended pressure?
  • 3 0
 If you ride your car off road yes. If not, I'm not sure it would make a difference in grip, but the tire would twist and that could get weird to control. I guess Smile
  • 2 0
 If you deflate your car's tires, the tires will bend in the middle and you'll lose traction. T'hat's because bike tires are round and car tires are squared, so it's not the same. But in mountain bike, if you run not enough pressure in the tires, you'll lose traction, because spikes need a minimum pressure to be well in contact with the ground.
  • 1 0
 Most likely not true off road otherwise rallye car would not sport high tires when on dirt (and most likely less pressure) and very low tires on asphalt. The bend of the tire on dirt won't happen so much as the tire will first loose grip. Higher tires will (like for mtb) allow lower pressure making the tire comply with the terrain and bounce less.
The pressure on your tire knob to get grip won't come from those 1.5 bars but rather from you pushing on your handlebar. And that's a lot more.
  • 1 0
 They change the tire so they also change the "recommended pressure". So yes the pressure change, but they put enough air in them...

And if you push on your bar, you don't increase the contact pressure, you increase the number of knobs in contact with the ground.
  • 2 0
 And almost as soon as the procore system was invented its ghetto equivalent was introduced to the public.
  • 1 0
 There was still a few Schwalbe riders on Procore flattign this season Ragot, Brendog. Some had race enders as well
  • 33 1
 Ooh, shapeshifter technology! Pretty fancy stuff if you ask me. Damn sexy bike too!
  • 9 1
 No proprietary shock and adjustable travel and geo. Seams Canyon can do what Scott, Kona and Cannondale can't.
  • 3 0
 Don't forget Bionicon, they started the whole (modern) thing, & still use proprietary stuff I believe.
  • 1 3
 Choppertank, the little shock and remote that do the geo changing are proprietary, but still better than those monstrous triple chamber setups beloved of Scott and Cannondales. I'd quite like to try a Strive with the geo altering shock replaced with a solid piece set to descend/slack mode. I bet the bike rides just lovely set to that setting and left.
  • 3 0
 Bionicon's system offers greater adjustability, and has been on the market for years.
  • 4 0
 groghunter I was giving them props for NOT being proprietary. I have a Kona magic link bike and it took me over a month to source a replacement magic link shock for $220 that looks like the taiwan shocks you see on ebay for $50. They said it was one of the last so when it goes I'm f*cked. Didn't know about Bionicon but I was dissing proprietary stuff.
  • 1 0
 My 2010 Kona Coilair has been rockin solid no problems. THe main shock isn't proprietary. I have used mine as a DH bike and haven't taken the best care of it and it still works great.
  • 1 0
 Yeah I stripped the thread on mine. User error should have loctited it. Upgraded to the air shock but not the linkage. Way better. More damped feel and the ability to change the rebound. You can't put any old shock in to replace it though. Gotta be Kona. Want to get the bearing linkage when fund allow.
  • 1 0
 It seems like it's the smaller companies like Canyon that are truly advancing this sport... Designs like a shapeshifting system is just pure genius, and is really what the future of MTB might look like in the coming years.
  • 1 0
 KDstones, Canyon are one of the biggest cycling companies in europe! They don't have much US presence (yet) but then neither do Orbea, Merida and Rose who are similarly gigantic.
  • 1 0
 While I don't doubt the effectiveness of the system, I don't know how necessary it is. Go demo a Bronson, Nomad, Enduro, Slash (I did all in one day) and see how well the pedal. On all of the aforementioned bikes I never once felt the need to get better pedal performance out of them. I never had the urge to reach down and flip the propedal switch.
  • 1 0
 @choppertank3e I phrased my statement unclearly, I was also condemning them, more adding to the pile of companies that have thought about how to do this, then decided they had to do a custom shock. Though in Bionicon's defense, their concept is that you need to shorten the fork & pivot the bike forward at the same time. Kinda surprised that Canyon hasn't partnered with Fox or RS to do the same.
  • 1 0
 @fix-the-spade... oops my bad. Here in the US, we rarely see a Canyon... Thanks for clearing that up!
  • 3 0
 It's so innovative. Now you not only have to send your swishing fox damper in for service, u have to send your frame in too. Smile
  • 1 0
 While the armchair hater can whine about the "proprietary" dyad Fox shock on a cannondale it is apparent, they have never ridden the shock. I like the canyon idea but one of the most amazing things about the Dyad is the fact that it truly is two shocks in one. Therefore you are not always dealing with an altered spring rate/pressure/pro-pedal/inertia valving and of course the Dyad is a pull shock that has far too many advantages that have already been discussed. Plus the canyon uses FSR which I have never much cared for (but I am sure the suspension adjust and ramp up on the canyon here would be a major plus).
  • 1 0
 I've only met one person who rode a pull shock. It was on an old K2. He said it was great when it worked but it no longer did and now he was stuck with no way to rebuild it or replace it. I swore never to buy a proprietary shock bike. I however fell in love with the Scott Ransom except for the fact that it had an interrupted seat tube. I remember Timo Pritzel back flipping one at the Adidas slopestyle but it could also be locked out. Having owned only Kona's when a reveiw of the Abra Cadabra vs the Ransom said the Magic Link worked better than the Dyad I was almost sold. When Kona announced a 3rd generation of Magic Link that could be retrofitted to the 1st gen bikes I bought an old new stock 1st gen frame. Then Kona discontinued all magic Link bikes because they didn't sell and they wanted shorter chain stays on their 650b bikes. Even though Kona Canada says they stock parts for 10 years the distributor over here in Aus had trouble finding me a replacement Magic Link shock. Proprietary stuff works great other wise they wouldn't do it. It reduces the potential service life of your bike though and limits future upgrades. Maybe replacing the Dyad shock on an old now discontinued Ransom is easier but I doubt the Cannondale one fits.
  • 12 1
 KS, worst company I have ever dealt with, warranty is a joke, 7 week run around of bs on their end. I honestly cannot understand how they are still in business, integra post failed after 6 weeks of use. Spent the whole racing season on a backup fox doss while the KS sits in purgatory waiting to be repaired. It was sent in, then sent back without a note or explanation, and not repaired. After exhausting attempts to contact, they finally say, it wasn't broken, it has been sent in again, they still are trying to say it isnt broken. Its leaking oil and has 1.25 inches of sag. SMH.
This is a public service announcement/warning to anyone considering a KS LEV Integra.
  • 4 0
 X Fusion Hilo Strate. 5 months so far and it works perfectly still.
  • 2 5
 They sell a LOT of seatposts and shocks... remember KS is short for Kind Shock...they're core business is as an OEM shock maker.
  • 17 0
 You know you run a dropper post when you are excited its worked for only 5 months
  • 3 0
 hahahahaha
  • 3 9
flag deeeight Plus (Aug 26, 2014 at 11:13) (Below Threshold)
 A lot to be said for a good seatpost QR and a hite-rite.
  • 1 2
 @ nmpearson. .... mavic wheels are STINKY proprietary. .. I just laced ck hubs to deemax rims... it was a labor of love
  • 3 0
 I'd mention how reliable the DOSS is, but you already know...
  • 2 0
 My dropper post Ks Lev 2012...works perfectly since 2012 whithout any maintenance. Maybe you were unlucky :/ .
  • 1 0
 I think it's an integra only issue, as most I know with the non internal version are not having any problems.
  • 1 0
 KS either works great for years, or it's broken within 6 weeks. Reverbs are pretty much all great at first, but will need $$$ service after a year; two at most. Pick your poison. I choose KS because of the remote. That said I have a Reverb Stealth on my bike right now... Like ^^^^ said.... Just be happy it works 1/2 of the time.
  • 1 0
 My 27.2 KS Lev has been faultless for 2 years with zero maintenance so far. Second only to my original Gravity Dropper 27.2 which is retired after 9 years with almost no maintenance.
  • 1 0
 Nothing makes a hobby mechanic's heart happier than the new amazing 2 week old 400 buck part that stops working. I like my CrankBros Kronolog so much that I take it apart once a month and service it. Cheaper than sending it in for repair
  • 15 2
 Procore and Shape Shifter... These are the most important innovations on the field since dropper posts came around.
  • 2 0
 My Wildcard does this with 1 Bolt. 125mm to 160mm. I am not sure if i would pay premium AND add complexity for a 1 button solution.
  • 1 0
 The Shape Shifter is the same thing as the old Kona Magic link, just button-actuated instead of automatic.
  • 1 0
 Magic link looked like a flimsy contraption... This like a solid mechanism. And to change the hole of a bolt would be too much of a nuisance for me Big Grin Though I think I'll have to try to make some sort of equal system in my Nomad, and the bolt-changing thingie is probably the only kind of solution possible with basic hand tools.
  • 1 0
 The last gen magic link was solid, not flimsy at all. It just sold poorly and they never put it on a bike with good geometry.
  • 9 1
 Id just save my money and get a tire that weighs 200 grams more that comes with a super supportive sidewall. Then run that complicated schwalbe system so I can run a wimpy tire that folds over in corners and then be bouncing off that inner tube. For trail riding at least. For pure DH I can see the benefits for racing.
  • 4 0
 ^this guy gets it. MTB tires are structurally supportive, so the tire will still be folding over and handling like sh*t.
  • 7 0
 Im liking ProCore,

One point everyone misses regarding the amount of flat tires WC DH racers get that cost them runs!

Its more often not the tires, its the rider pushing for the lightest fastest tire setup he she can or think they can get away with, not actual tire option.

What I mean is they are not using the right tool for the course or job at hand, maybe running a faster tread in rear especially and or lighter casing or inner tube.

Hill used to run cut down mud spikes on narly tracks for example in the dry, you're not fast if you dont have control grip or reliability or choose the right tire. I remember Hill saying he couldnt believe still other racers hadnt figured this out yet, FabianB in 09 /10 ran WS spikes cut down at Pietmaritzberg pancake track came 4th.

Blamming all tire issues simplistically on current technology is a racer copout. And PB immaturity as to what racers try to get away with to win, thats why it racing and so cool, no risk no reward!

But shit happens! that's racing dawgs!

Racing is also being smart though, choosing right parts to win but also finish, no finish no win!

ProCore is great but not a silver bullet.

Plus all u weanies arent going to add 200grams per wheel and the cost will no doubt send you all into a wheelsize frenzy debate and conspire that the system is made out of atomantiom carbon fibre!
  • 8 0
 If the Porcore works as adverstised, biggest thing in MTB since Disc brakes
  • 5 2
 I can't help but wonder if they could make the Procore system have an 'innie' valve like a basketball to adapt old rims without a second valve hole. I know you wouldn't be able to inflate with the tire on, but maybe you could give it a little bit of stans and only have to check it once a month.
  • 5 0
 Can't we just do a second hole in the rims to put the second valve ? I think that was said on an other news, just need a drill
  • 5 2
 it is easy to make second hole, why complicate simple think
  • 15 0
 If I could afford carbon rims I wouldn't drill them.
  • 1 0
 I never thought of the whole only being able to use it with an internal width. Looks like WTB makes a few 23mm internal...and that's about it
  • 1 0
 SRAM Rail 50s are 23mm internal as well.
  • 1 0
 QBP says the rail 50's are 21mm...i just noticed Havocs, Iodine 2, industry nine trail possibly also if 23.4 is close enough
  • 5 2
 I've been itching to get my hands on this new Schwalbe dual chamber procore stuff, but 23mm??? Havn't you fellas noticed? Wider is better. Please make one for 26"x 29mm rims so I can use my 729s! Some will want this for even wider rims im sure.
Actually im tired of waiting, think I'll find my canvas, a tube and the sewing machine, and make my own system up.
  • 8 0
 As mentioned in previous articles about the schwalbe procore system an internal width of AT LEAST 23mm is needed. Thus ANY rim with an internal diameter of 23mm or more is compatible. Now I just wish they made a schrader valve version...
  • 1 0
 nmpearson- QBP are wrong in that case. SRAM themselves confirm that they're 23mm internal.
  • 3 0
 I drilled a second hole in my rims to run a tube inside a tubless set up. Super easy.
  • 4 0
 I read somewhere that 23mm is the minimum width for Procore. So I hope it works with every rim that's wider, or at least up to 30mm or so.
  • 2 0
 I don't know what you all think, but mavic makes some pretty good 23mm rims. .....
  • 2 0
 I also wonder if you might be able to make a bumper out of a material like POC's D30 stuff, and not have to worry about air at all. Maybe it would be a substantial weight increase?
  • 2 0
 @getonyourbike that's good to know. @wolf-amongst-lambs Rims yes, wheels...I just don't love how proprietary everything is. i.e., if i bought a crossmax wheelset i'd want to grab an extra rim, a few spokes, nipples, and a tool right away. it can take a while for spares to get to you if your LBS isn't well stocked @paulwatt if that's the case, that's pretty freakin amazing bc most of the rims i run are nearer to 25-27
  • 3 0
 There is a dual chamber system with only one valve. It should be released more info on eurobike.

www.deaneasy.it/en

Video here:
vimeo.com/74188832
  • 3 0
 I guess that people will start to make ghetto procores using cheap road tubular 26" tires.
  • 7 1
 The article says:

"The production version of the Procore system uses a clever valve that allows you to choose which chamber you fill by rotating it, meaning that consumers don't have to drill a secondary valve hole in their rims"
  • 2 0
 @mrpark - I was wondering how long it was going to take for someone to actually notice that.
  • 1 0
 Thats a super cool solution to the multiple valve issue too. I want to try one of these.
  • 1 0
 So the thing weighs 200 grams. I'm no weight wienie, so I have no idea if that is heavy enough to matter or not. Thoughts?
  • 1 0
 Well if you aren't a weight wienie 200 grams probably won't matter. If the system works, letting you run lower pressure and eliminating most flats, then most people would probably make that trade off. Especially downhill and enduro riders. To put it in perspective 200 grams is about the same weight savings/gain you would get by changing between a steel and Ti shock spring.
  • 1 0
 1 lb is roughly 454 grams, so it's just shy of half of a pound. It's also added to the worst place you can add weight on a bicycle.
  • 6 1
 Dat bike looks absolutely wonderfull, perfect setup.
  • 2 1
 Love it that it's so clean - well done CanyonBikes
  • 3 1
 If they could integrate the Shapeshifter actuation in with the Reverb remote, it would make for one clean system. Seat up would give you the 130mm travel and seat down would give you the plushness
  • 3 0
 Supposedly, we should be seeing support for controlling droppers & rear shock with Di2 remotes, at the same time. Shouldn't be impossible to integrate this as well. change geo, shock compression, fork compression,(cause why wouldn't they) & dropper height with one button push? crazypants.
  • 5 1
 That shapeshifter is such an awesome idea!
  • 6 3
 We already know about the Strive CF, could you bring us some info on Canyons that we don't already know about?
  • 6 3
 SASS
  • 3 5
 Care to elaborate?
  • 1 0
 Have a look at there Eurobike site:

www.canyon.com/_en/eurobike2014
  • 1 0
 Been keeping an eye on it since it launched the other day, I'm currently awaiting delivery of a Strive CF Race but also interested in the Torque DHX, loving the all black one on the Eurobike page
  • 2 0
 I love 26 inch fat bikes because its like a 28.5 inch bike and it rolls over everything thank to schwalbe for a good fat bike tire
  • 1 0
 Rode something similar to those wheels 8-9 years ago. They were heavy as all sh#t, but props to Toby Henderson for thinking outside of the box back then.

m.pinkbike.com/news/THE-Eliminator-rim.html
  • 1 0
 It seems to me that the Procore system should allow any wheel to be run tubeless. I thought I remember reading that in another post about it. Thoughts?
  • 2 0
 Yep and you can run lighter tires without the risk of pinchflatting! I'm looking forward to testing it out!
  • 6 0
 Run tubeless on any wheel by adding a tube!
  • 1 0
 @slovenian6474 I'm not a huge fan of "ghetto tubless" plus you don't get the second benefit of the Procore system being you can run ultra low pressure without burping.
  • 2 1
 @skierdud89 The Procore system is a tube. It's literally adding a tube. We've gone full circle here.
  • 2 0
 it's adding a tube and a smaller tire within your existing tire. But it's better than regular tubeless because it won't burp the tire and it makes tire compression more progressive thus making your suspension work better. And super traction!
  • 1 0
 Yeah, it sounds great. I just think it's funny. Nuetech has been doing this for awhile now for dirtbikes. I've heard decent things about it. nuetech.com/tubliss
  • 1 0
 Yeah it is kinda like Nuetech but for bikes. Can't wait to try it.
  • 5 2
 Just get to the Transition and Knolly both.
  • 2 0
 Is there anything saying when the Procore system is hitting the market? I'm dying to give them my money...
  • 4 1
 Did Bionicon licence the shapeshifter thingy to Canyon?
  • 1 1
 Why would they? It's a totally different design
  • 2 0
 I down looked at a grassy ski slope then up at a huge field of scree and My first thought was: I want a fat bike!
  • 3 2
 That Canyon looks great...more moving parts equal more maintenance though so that is something to consider.
  • 2 0
 I LOVE THE FALL!! Bring on the EuroBike and the InterBike!!
  • 3 1
 I wish we could be canyon in Canada.....
  • 4 1
 I know I emailed them directly , and no go, no way to get a new bike over here. Although they did say they were working on it but who knows how long that will take
  • 2 1
 Fly to Europe, buy, fly back with it? Make a friend in europe to buy & ship for you? I know, pain in the ass, but I want one too.
  • 3 1
 Someone over there should start a business shipping these things to North America !
  • 1 0
 I think it all boils down to insurance and liability.
  • 2 0
 Yea, as soon as you make a business out of it, you become liable, & have to obey things like patent law in the destination country(which is why a bunch of brands had to stay out of the NA market until the FSR patents expired here.)

Individuals can import pretty much anything that isn't outright illegal in their home country, though of course duties & tarifs may apply.
  • 3 2
 Apparently I'm not in your tax bracket bro. I thought in 2012 there was buzz of Canyon being available in this great country of ours. Their bikes are heckakewl, well spec'd and well priced imho. Maybe because I can't have it is why I want it. O-o
  • 3 1
 Don't mistake my desire to have one with the financial capability to actually get one. That said, it would be unlikely that the price with added Tarifs would exceed a similarly equipped bike sold here: you're going to pay normal bike prices instead of awesome Canyon prices, not way more than buying a bike here.
  • 3 0
 I inquired about buying one and shipping it to my cousin in the UK if they won't ship to Canada, and he'd ship it to me....no go...CANYON basically told me politely to go F myself
  • 1 0
 Shouldn't have said that to them and did it anyways, then proceed to tell us all about how to do it!
  • 1 0
 The only way to do it is have someone in Europe buy the bike with their cc and ship to address. then have it shipped here. Too much hassle, there are lots of other bike brands willing to take my money I am sure
  • 1 0
 Sounds like the best method would be to figure out a way to plan a riding holiday in Europe, get it bought, & pick it up when you get there. Extra points for bringing a bike with & selling it there, then putting the Canyon in the same bike box & playing it cool through customs.
  • 1 0
 Good Lord, its 2014 ! We put a man on the moon , were going to start a colony on Mars, but we cant ship a pedal bike across the pond !?!!? What is going on ?!
  • 1 0
 @Siliker269: As people mentioned above warranty and all that stuff. If something brakes or isn't correct you put it in the box which comes with the bike and send it back to Canyon and you don't pay a cent for it. Imagine they would do that all over the world. And what if a Canyon specific part brakes. Do you want to wait 4-6 weeks for the spare part to arrive? Don't think so...
  • 2 0
 Well I have a Nicolai right now so I don't think that would bother me a whole lot actually
  • 3 1
 Pro Core: A tubular road tire for 29ers would do the same...?!
  • 2 0
 If you manage to inflate the "big" tire, maybe.
  • 1 2
 Same problem for the Schwalbe system?
  • 3 1
 Canyon bike rebound knob looks very user friendly.
  • 2 0
 At least it's got the little slots to stick an allen in to turn it: I've seen similar ones with no help at all.
  • 2 2
 all this press around the Canyon team bike and its already sold out. seems like they should start whoring another bike now.
  • 1 1
 Will be available for order again middle of October. MY2014 inventory is sold out in some sizes, MY2015 inventory will be updated at that moment.
  • 1 0
 Emailed Canyon and they said they have no plan to make any more team bikes.

"Strive was extremely popular and had sold out quicker than we had intended, as it was introduced mid 2014 we did not have any plans to release a 2015 model. sorry for the inconvenience"
  • 1 0
 available again!! excited!
  • 1 0
 Yeah! No upgrades to the models but enough stock (for now Wink ).
  • 1 0
 dont really know what i would upgrade on that spec anyway! its the 2015 fox model so happy with the lot i reckon. website says i should have a small, but reckon i will order medium :s
  • 1 1
 I'm really digging these new rear suspension technologies that's been coming out this last year
  • 2 1
 Erm... That Canyon is a proper nice lookin bike. Just sayin.
  • 2 1
 Wish I didn't get a capra after seeing the canyon. Stunning machine!
  • 2 0
 Wanna sell it? :-)
  • 1 1
 Clearly hamncheez is making a profession of laying down smack on Protour.

Paid for by Specialized?
  • 2 1
 The canyon looks rad.
  • 1 0
 Uuummm no thanks
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