Scott Genius 2018 - First Ride

Jun 16, 2017
by Paul Aston  




Scott's Genius has been around since 2004 with various shapes, funny shocks, and personality changing levers. Building on the success of the Olympic winning Spark platform that was launched last year, the new Genius takes on the same four-bar linkage with the TwinLoc system, a progressive kinematic, modern geometry and close attention to detail and specification.

Light weight is always a focus for the Swiss brand and this 150mm travel, carbon framed, 900 Tuned model weighs in at a svelte 12.4kgs. As we know, lighter weight also coincides with wallet weight savings, with this almost top-of-the-line bike is priced to sell at...well, hold your breath, prices to be confirmed later this year.



Scott Genius 2018

Scott Genius Details

• Intended use: trail / all mountain
• Wheel size: 27.5" / 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 150mm
• 65º / 65.6º head angle via a flip chip
• TwinLoc System
• 7 models with carbon and alloy frames
• MSRP: $TBC
• Weight: 27.34lb / 12.4kg (Genius 900 Tuned, claimed)
• Available: September 2017
www.scott-sports.com


Scott produces one of, if not the largest range of bikes on the market. The Genius is available in seven models from the TwinLoc-less RockShox equipped alloy 750, all the way to the Genius Ultimate, which is another step above the super-pimped 900 Tuned featured here. The 900 Tuned is specced with Kashima coated Fox Suspension front and rear along with a 150mm drop Transfer post. SRAM Eagle drivetrain, Guide Ultimate 180mm/180mm brakes, Syncros parts and DT Swiss alloy rims.

Following on from the latest Spark the Genius uses a four-bar linkage.
Following on from the latest Spark, the Genius uses a four-bar linkage.


Frame Design

Out with the old and in with the new. Gone is the single pivot system and linkage driven shock mounted underneath of the top tube. The new four-bar linkage may look like many other designs, but the truth is that this popular system offers engineers a massive range of options to tweak all of the various forces and characteristics of the bike. The new suspension design has almost opposing characteristics to the old version; progressive through the main portion of the travel and tailing off slightly towards the end to avoid harshness as air springs ramp up massively at the end of the stroke.

A trunnion mount Fox shock has allowed Scott to distribute incoming forces into the huge bottom bracket area, shedding weight from the top tube, as well as disguising the TwinLoc remote cable, which is barely visible from the exit port into the damper.

Internal cable routing only to keep things clean.
Internal cable routing only to keep things clean.
The brake mounts fit a 180mm rotor directly.
The brake mounts fit a 180mm rotor directly.


Scott were one of the first brands to push Plus sized tires two years ago, launching a wide range of bikes with the mid-fat offenders. The 'Plus' word has gone, along with a heavy desperation from all Scott staff to not even say it out loud. The new concept is one frame and fork size, and the choice of 29" with 2.5-2.6"-ish tires or 27.5" rims and 2.6-3.0"-ish rubber–it's not 'Plus' anymore, it's just 27.5". Most models will have the option of either size at your local dealer. A simple flip chip on the linkage can be used to maintain a similar ride height in either wheelsize, but doing so also adjusts the head angle by 0.6º degrees, giving a steeper head angle for the smaller wheel.

Scott Genius 2018
Scott Genius 2018



Geometry

The Genius geometry follows suit with the "three L's" trend, and in fact, they have brought to market one of the longest and slackest trail bikes out there - arguably, the first of the big brands to go over the scary 500mm reach threshold. The head angle loses 2.5º to the previous model and now sits at 65º in low setting. The reach numbers grow across all sizes. The XL sees the biggest increase by 30mm, but is now spec'ed with a 50mm stem instead of 70mm, giving a similar feet to hand distance, but with the handling advantage of a shorter stem.

Scott Genius Geometry


At the back of the bike, the chainstay is cropped 7mm (down to 438mm) and the bottom bracket is set around 345mm from the floor, depending upon tire volume and flip-chip setting. The seat angle has been steepened to 75º, and the wheelbase on my XL choice was 1270mm.

The numbers are certainly at the progressive end of things for such a big brand, and they were keen to point out that this is a trail bike, not for enduro. Does that mean there will be a replacement for the Genius LT in the future with even more extreme numbers? I hope so...


What is TwinLoc?

TwinLoc has been a staple of Scott's lineup for years, starting out with funky pull shocks, more recently it has been integrated into conventional shocks. The Fox Nude shocks have been developed between the two brands and offer three modes. Fully open gives 150mm of travel and the compression damping is the most open. The middle 'Traction Control' mode increases compression and closes down part of the air chamber volume, reducing the volume effectively reduces the travel to 110mm at the rear. In this setting, the fork still has full travel, but damping is increased. The third setting is close to a full lockout.

The Hixon integrated handlebar cleans up the most complicated cockpit on the market.
The Hixon integrated handlebar cleans up the most complicated cockpit on the market.


Syncros-onisation

Syncros is part of the Scott Sports group and produces one of the widest range of medal winning components in the industry. Being part of the same group allows them to develop parts in conjunction with bikes. There are some neat touches on the Genius including the one-by chain guide, the Hixon integrated bar/stem/headset combo, and the lock on grips.

The 290g Hixon integrated handlebar stem is designed to save weight, strengthen and simplify. The unorthodox shape takes some getting used to visually, especially when looking down the fork being greeted by a view of the entire headtube. Three 'virtual stem lengths' are available in 40mm, 50, and 60mm. I liked the 5º/9º up and backsweep, but they measured in narrow at 760mm for such a big bike. If you don't like the sweep, my suggestion would be the Production Privee CR35 grip that can adjust these angles.
The headset stem and spacers all interlock with each other. Still that doesn t make aligning the handlebar fork any easier.
The headset, stem, and spacers all interlock with each other. Still, that doesn't make aligning the handlebar with the front wheel any easier.

Syncros is part of the Scott Sports group which allows them to produce components to work with their bike models. The lock-on clamp for these grips also acts as a mount for the Fox Transfer dropper and the TwinLoc suspension levers.
Syncros is part of the Scott Sports group which allows them to produce components to work with their bike models. The lock-on clamp for these grips also acts as a mount for the Fox Transfer dropper and the TwinLoc suspension levers.


The Syncros fender takes care of mud and neatly covers the recesses in the back of the fork arch too. The guard takes advantage of the threaded holes that will work with Fox s Live Valve electronic system. Available aftermarket for 14.
The Syncros fender is a nice detail. It also shields the fork arch from packing with mud.
The devil is in the details. Another Syncros product is this proprietary one-by chainguide.
The devil is in the details. Another Syncros product is this proprietary one-by chain guide.

The Syncros fender takes care of mud, and neatly covers the recesses in the back of the fork arch to prevent mud buildup. Unfortunately, the cutaways around the fork stanchions are needed for bottom out clearance, losing the advantage of Marsh Guard style guards that also keep fork seals much cleaner and cut down on service intervals. Instead of ugly cable ties, the guard takes advantage of the threaded holes designed to work with Fox's Live Valve electronic system. This injection molded guard is spec'ed on the Tuned and Ultimate models and will be available aftermarket for €14





Any bike that weighs under 13kgs should be easy to climb with, and the Genius got on with the job well. Even on the XL size, the seated position was nicely over the bottom bracket, but I went further, slamming the seat forward on the rails to help put the power down even more as the climbs steepened.

Under pedal power, the Genius isn't exceptionally firm but it did pedal through the bumps better than many lightweight trail machines. It feels like Scott have chosen a more active setup, and the TwinLoc should be used to counter pedal bob if that is an issue for you. The middle, Traction Control Twinloc setting does help to speed up the response on mellow trails and increase ride height, which is better for pedaling through chunky stuff. But, as the trail gets steeper going uphill, I don't like the fork riding higher in its travel (in the past, I have disengaged to fork lockout). For trail centers or more mellow trails, the middle setting can be an advantage. I'm not a fan of the full lockout mode, maybe if you need to out-sprint your friends on the last 100m of road to get the first beer, it could help, but riding locked out on the road gives a bouncy, almost reverberating feeling, and again, trying to climb steep stuff with the fork at maximum extension makes it harder to get over the front of the bike.

The newer TwinLoc lever that sits under that bars is a lot cleaner than previous models. Now, it's combined with a single clamp with the Fox Transfer post and a Syncros grip. The downside of this, is that it needs some getting used to if you are a serial bike swapper who is used to a single lever on the left-hand side. I found myself on a few occasions boosting my seat up my ass instead of unlocking the TwinLoc, giving the worst of both worlds heading into steep and gnarly sections.

Scott Genius 2018 Launch


The suspension is on the progressive side of the spectrum for such a lightweight trail bike, in fact, I never managed to bottom out front or rear, always having an equal 10mm in the bank for an unexpected big hit. The suspension is supple off the top, and really gives something to push against in the mid stroke to gain cornering grip and pumping speed. If I had more time on the bike, I would have reduced the volume spacers in both shocks, or put some more aggressive and heavier casing tires on to really start pushing its limits.

Going down the steep runs of Aosta with the majority of time spent trying to slow down, my hands were nicely behind the front axle and finding confidence to weight the front end to find braking grip on the front was easy.

In the loose and dusty corners, I did struggle to keep the front end weighted correctly. This could have been due to a number of factors which had me swapping between understeer and oversteer. Compared to the huge front center, chainstays are on the short side, in their presentation, Scott talked a lot about creating a good balance on this bike, like all brands. At the end of the day, there is no way to have a front center that differs over 10cm between sizes with one chainstay length, somebody is getting a short straw, most likely the smallest and tallest consumers.

The other factor could be the 51mm offsets fork combined with the slack head angle and short stem, something about this still feels strange to me, but it's difficult to put my finger on it. A longer offset should speed up the steering at slow speeds, but once you're rolling past jogging pace on a trail things start to get twitchy and more difficult to predict and counter steer.

I was also on the lower limit of the 150mm dropper post with my 33" inseam. Riders who plan to go up a frame size should check this at their dealer.

Overall, it appears that Scott have done a superb job on the new Genius. A trail bike that has modern numbers and should play well with most riders on a wide variety of terrain with active and capable suspension, and it's very lightweight (if that is your thing) with great attention to detail and integration. Let's just hope that the powerful Swiss Franc doesn't blow the pricing out of range when it is announced.









About the Reviewer
Stats: Age: 31 • Height: 6'1” • Ape Index: +4" • Weight: 75kg • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None • Instagram: astonator
Paul Aston is a racer and dirt-jumper at heart. Previously adding to the list of non-qualifiers at World Cup DH events, he attacked enduro before it was fashionable, then realized he was old and achy. From the UK, but often found residing in mainland Europe.



235 Comments

  • + 47
 The bar/stem combo looks more like a hammerhead shark
  • + 4
 @stefkears: Or a pogo stick
  • + 12
 @sewer-rat: I feel dirty after looking at that Klein cockpit.
  • + 4
 Scary thing is I remember it first time round, when I was in my teens lol @MTBrent:
  • + 4
 @sewer-rat Me too! I can remember drooling over the advert of the guy holding his Attitude aloft with 1 hand while clinging on to a rock face with the other.
  • + 7
 I've got a 2013 Genius LT, and w/ twinlock / reverb remote / 2x, my friends have suggested goto Radio Shack for some color-coded cable labels. And yeah, I've definitely upshifted my front derailleur accidentally after a climb when I intended to soften my suspension for a descent, nearly throwing myself off the bike trying to hammer for speed.
  • + 3
 @sewer-rat: There was a lot of attention to detail on that Klein and some real good quality workmanship.
  • + 2
 Absolutely, just reminded me of the neon days (first time round hey) @chadgmail:
  • + 2
 @sewer-rat: Gary Klein was way ahead of his time....true visonary.
  • + 1
 @dudeism: www.youtube.com/watch?v=lITuHDdhdkw

all thats been going through my head since reading your post ... no clue lol
  • + 71
 I don't get one thing Scott... why do you get journalists from all over the world to one of world's best riding places, knowing some of them are absolute rippers on downs, and you give them 150mm bike with freaking Rekon tyres? Minion DHR2 or DHF paired with Minion SS would leave even better impression of your bikes and you can be sure of it.
  • + 13
 Yes I thought the same thing. Bring people to Aosta for a launch. Give them glorified fatbike tires. Ask them not to call them fatbikes
  • + 48
 I feel dirty giving WAKIdesigns a prop up but homeboy is right.
  • + 5
 Cause lightweight is more important than anything else, including grip, speed and fun...

I guess the other way to keep that 12.4 kgs and decent tyres is to add carbon rims and $2000 more to the bike.
  • + 8
 @leelau: the fact that those tyres are there to cater to demographic that wears Bell Super 2R and full body armor with roach knee/shin guards, as a break in preparing for Trans Alp is one thing. Yes these people put Hans Dampf or Ardent only for the roughest (of) trails (they ride). But if you invite Paul Aston or Steve Jones then prepare appropriate rubber, for the sake of your own business
  • + 8
 @WAKIdesigns: giving it more thought if the Rekons are the OE spec for the bike then it is intellectually honest of Scott to leave those lamentable tires on the bikes and let testers use them. Just as it's intellectually honest for the testers to at least try the OE Spec for a bit.

Hopefully in a more fulsome test the testers can then try to tweak setups for personal preference - within reason of course
  • + 2
 @leelau: but at the same time it is highly probable that readers of Pinkbike, Dirt or Vital will ditch those tyres directly. Even Aggressor is said to be a smarter brother of Ardent. Better but family genes stay the same Big Grin
  • + 3
 @CactusLover: lol there's no denying that Minions are beasts. I had Hans Dampfs and didn't realize they were garbage until throwing Minions on. The difference in cornering grip is night and day.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I can vouch for the aggressor over the ardent, i prefer it to the minion ss, it's just nice to be able to brake occasionally
  • - 2
 This is just anecdotical experience and by no means statistical factual evidence but it feels that every single Scott owner or owner to be used to be a roadie and they just see nino and think hey Scott is cool then go to their lbs and ask for the bike to be weighted then and there and voila they buy an mtb that wil never be used properly so in a way scott is catering very well to their demographic putting those tires.
  • + 1
 @fercho25: they are not that light...
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: they are when compared to other bikes in the same price range of the big brands in my imaginary world this people like getting some cummies from their salesman so boutique (smaller) brands are a no go.
  • + 1
 @fercho25: I meant the tyres Big Grin
  • + 1
 @fercho25: they might be marketed to Roadies, but after 5 rides on the new Spark + I fell in love with it's quick handling and Poppy feel. I am a DH rider who also enjoys a good pedal up, and this bike will be mine as soon as it is available. Love the option of 29by 2.6 or 27.5 by 3" on the same bike.
  • + 44
 What is this new "three L's" trend?

Long, Low, and Le slack?
  • + 90
 Long, Low, & Look...at your dentists new bike.
  • + 2
 Large.
  • + 4
 Long low and Lack (ing in originality)
  • + 2
 Le slack lmaooo
  • + 32
 Being generous and all but 13 years is not "nearly two decades"
  • + 23
 Because maths.
  • + 6
 @MTBrent: the maths can be difficult for some, including me.
  • + 5
 I think they have a pool going - let's see whose stupid review line can get the comment section the most riled up.
  • + 3
 Default rounding up? Maybe too much noxious round up being spayed about.
  • + 35
 Those are metric decades.
  • + 7
 Common Core!
  • + 5
 I blame the parents.
  • + 14
 Trump Math
  • + 0
 Also being generous, decade isn't generally used to specify any 10 year period, mainly the specified 10 years periods '00s and '10s. So they have been around for two decades.
  • + 6
 Easily the best reviewer on Pinkbike. Great comments re rear centre length. We get all this axle width BS while something fundamental like weight distribution is ignored or swept under the carpet due to it costing the manufacturers $.
  • + 5
 @thedeathstar: dec·ade /ˈdekād/ : a period of ten years.
  • + 16
 @MTBrent: there a three kinds of people: the ones who are good at Math and the ones that are not.
  • + 3
 @Rainozeros: And those three out of every two people don't know which ones they are.
  • + 13
 @nouseforaname: I do try to win that competition.
  • + 8
 I always round to the nearest 20...
  • + 19
 Far too many switches and levers. All I want is my right shifter and left dropper. I. Never use the CTD on my rear shock or the dial on the Pike. I run the suspension full soft full time. To me, these semi lockouts are a crutch for poor suspension or poor riding techniques. Steep seat tube angles don't work for me either. I can easily slide forward for steep climbs where you need that position to get up really steep pitches, but what do you do all the other times?
  • + 3
 100% agree.
  • + 9
 Most of the other times you have your seat dropped, unless you ride a lot of flat trails. Bikes like this probably aren't the best choice for Nebraska, but if you have trails that are mostly climbing (seat raised), followed by descending (seat is dropped anyway, so STA doesn't matter), then the steeper STA makes sense. It doesn't make as much sense for flat ground pedaling.

Agree on all the levers. I'd rather have better access to my dropper post lever then the suspension lever. They need to make the suspension lockout a smaller switch so you can have a Southpaw style dropper lever.
  • + 8
 What's wrong with something helping those with poor riding technique?

And "far too much levers" is just one in this case
  • + 5
 Disagree on the switches part, but I guess each to their own. Scott is following this philosophy a long time now and is one of the brands with a very seamless integration, I mean apart from the amount of levers this bike is absolutely clean. But I´m the kind of person that flips the blue lever of my shock about 5-10 times per ride, and tinker with Pikes compression settings all the time.. But I totally get where you are coming from.
Also without this lockout stuff you get access to the "full" adjustability of compression settings, which you lose here with a simplified 3-step setup.
  • + 4
 @daweil: seamless integration unfortunately means proprietary, which sucks. Cane creek has their lockout switch which integrates with their universal dropper post switch, so that doesn't suck. But forcing users to be stuck with a shock which may not be the right choice for their riding is a stupid idea. Same goes for the bars? or stem? Whatever it is, it's a bad idea.
  • + 2
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: that is true I also hate propretary components. But I still think from the levers perspective this thing Scott is going for makes sense for some people, and I guess not many would change the stock shock anyways. Would totally prefer if they would just have gone with a remote compression setting so a standard shock could be used.

As for this bar/stem combo, I have opposing feelings towards it. On one hand it makes so much sense to integrate those components into one, on the other its such a personal preferences thing and all the adjustability is lost here.. as they went for this route it should at least have 800mm width so it can be cut down.
  • + 4
 @Someoldfart I also enjoy having brakes.
  • + 2
 @Someoldfart - while I don't know why would someone other than a racer have a lockout controlled by remote on bars, I do find lock out useful. Why wouldn't you use it? What the F has rider skill or fitness level to do with it? Your bike bobs less, it is a concept that is rather easy to grasp. What I don't get is how can someone say that some suspension platform is so good that they don't need to use lockout. Like some journos say about SC bike. I can't believe we ride same bikes, because all SC bikes I rode bobbed like fk in shock fully open position. That includes 5010.

Also, I find my Lyrik too divey in fully open setting, do I brake too hard too late?
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: My fork, Pike 150 does not bob unless I stand up and sprint or stand climbing. I have a buddy who bobs like mad riding pavement to the trails. It's his poor style that bobs the bike. I reach out and hold his elbows still and his bob stops. So what if the fork bobs a bit. I ride a Bronson with a Corset air sleeve on an float CTD and it moves a bit but so what? I want my suspension working for any little bump to maintain traction climbing. I've experimented with the CTD and the equivalent on the Pike and it really makes no difference to me. Any bump your tires and suspension doesn't absorb causes the bike with you on it into an upward movement. That slows you down.

Squat and dive are unwanted things. No doubt. I don't find my current suspension does that at all. I think the VPP platform does a fine job of controlling squat and bob as do I'm sure other designs. The latest Polygon and Marin React platforms seem like the right direction to me.

Maybe it's the fact that I have been riding bikes of all sorts for fifty three years. My pedal stroke is very smooth and my upper body is very still so I need less platform than some folks. I'm also at the lighter weight end of the scale at 143 ish so I need less air and damping than heavier riders. Maybe it's all relative. I just want seamless suspension without the need for fancy switches manual or electric. I tend to forget things while riding like TALAS switches. Many times I would get part way down a descent thinking my fork was feeling harsh only to find I'd forgotten to extend it. That led to experiments with leaving that fork at full travel and realizing I really didn't need that travel adjust.
  • + 4
 @Someoldfart: So.. you can standing sprint on your FS bike without it bobbing?
  • + 2
 @Someoldfart: yes I assume everyone who does not subscribe to your old fart opinion is a poor rider. I Don't give a flying damn if you ride for 30 years or you are a 20 year old dentist hater. What you say makes no sense. I run my suspension hardish with 15% sag at fork and 25% on the rear and I would never ever run my suspension fully open because I need support. In fact RS Pike and Lyrik are divey comparedto Fox and they require at least some compression or they fold on steeps. So I don't know about your amazing skill if you have no issues with that and if you run 10% or less SAGyou are either Sam Hill or you never heard of front tyre grip.

Now this 25% in the rear still bobs a tiny bit, despite me running LSC in the middle of the range on both fork and shock. I see no logical reason not to lock out both shock and fork for 15min+ climb, while the option is there at the reach of the hand. I just don't. Just because you can climb without lockout doesn't mean you should...
  • + 2
 I also happen to have had a Nomad like in your album and that bike was absolute sht when climbing without lockout. I rode it with Pushed RP23 locked at all times. Even on downs. Otherwise it was blowing into the travel like an idiot. There was no way to pump a corner or natural bump with it in open mode. I also had Fox DHX 5 on it, and with propedal off, it climbed as well as a fricking downhill bike. It was bobbing like an idiot, even with 32t sprocket up front, and with granny ring it was a disaster. I don't know about the Nomad 3 and 4 but Nomads 1 and 2 were amazing with coil shocks and rather worthless with air shocks. So @jonnyboy - it's not only a matter of sprints...
  • + 2
 And apart from personal preferences, there's one thing to point out : the genius doesn't​ have only a lockout, it reduces travel as well.

I don't know about the react etc, but for a given sag %, the more travel you have the more the angles get f*cked up uphill and down hill : the HA slackens in climbs because your weight is on the back, and it steepens on the downs with the weight on the front (+ braking). Do we want a 180mm bike, 65° static HA, having 62° uphill and 68° downhill?

But I guess this point is not so important, considering how Shape shifter etc don't have success
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: try the Guerilla Gravity trail pistol. At 25% sag the thing climbs like a hard tail and rips descents better than any 5" bike I have ridden. Reminds me of the Brooklyn machine works #6 for how stable and confidence inspiring it rides. No need for a shock switch.
Love all of your art and articles! Keep up the great work, bro????
  • + 16
 Every time I read a review on a Scott bike that has the Twinloc the comments always complain about too many levers and too many cables.

I've been riding the Scott Genius 2012 and 2016 model. I've never ever once had an issue with using the remote. I'm running a 1x11 set up so yeah it's much cleaner. Adding the dropper isn't a big deal either. Again, my personal experience is having a remote that adjusts the suspension automatically is simply amazing.

The trails I ride there are just about an equal amount of climbs as there are descents. When pedaling on the flats I lock that B!tch out and pedal hard at top gear.

To those who've never once ridden a Scott Genius or Spark it really is a great bike. Just like most high end bikes the difference is that you don't have to reach down to adjust the suspension...you just keep your hands where they belong on the handlebar grips.

As for the new Genius....I seriously want to sell my car just to buy one Frown
  • + 10
 I agree, the twinlock system is easy to adjust to and have never had an issue using it.
  • + 6
 Agreed, and when it is on the bars you use it often. It is great on my Spark for XC races - lockout on the fireroad climbs, full-boing on the descents, and medium for everything else.
  • + 19
 That bar......looks like a persons face with no nose.
  • - 5
flag lee-vps-savage (Jun 16, 2017 at 6:20) (Below Threshold)
 How do you 'nose' what one of those looks like?
  • + 20
 @lee-vps-savage: He's seen Harry Potter you Genius...
  • + 14
 can't help but think you really didn't get on with this bike. I mean what does it compare to on the decent for instance? is it too light, hence how twitchy it is on the decent? kind left me wondering a bit. as for price no doubt it will be in th 6.5k-7.5k Mark....
  • + 4
 It's gonna be more than that, quick look at syncros prices and it's gonna be more than 10k for this top spec one
  • + 4
 @toad321: Christ bike industry has lost its mind. who the he'll would buy this for 10k when you can get the likes of a yt top spec for 3.8k. granted the quality won't be quite the same but come on that's an outrageous price
  • + 2
 @toop182: getting outraged about the price without knowing the price? Wink haha!

To be fair, it will surely be far more than a YT, but they don't offer anything with this kind of geometry. Also, it's worth remembering when bringing up that old arguement that some people like buying bikes from bike shops.

As for the twitchyness, bikeradar seem to think it may indeed be due to it being too light: www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/category/bikes/mountain-bikes/full-suspension/product/scott-genius-review-51365
  • + 4
 @ilikeallwheelsizes: "Too light" at 27lbs+ lol. That's not why it was twitchy. That's not light enough to notice over more standard 28-29 for similarly spec'd bikes in that category.
  • + 1
 @ilikeallwheelsizes: that bike with an rc2 on the 36, a proper shox and some proper 1000g ish tires would be mint to ride !
then again, my patrol wights 15kg ,witch it is on the weightier side of this segment , wouldn't mind a too light bike like that
  • + 1
 Weight is not a concern of mine. My trail bike has got to be well over 30 lbs and IDGAF. It's indestructible and the suspension design is dope, that's all that matters to me. If I was trying to save 2 lbs I'd put 1 less liter of water in my pack.
  • + 14
 Finally! Horst link, long reach, no nonsense shock, 29er. After all, maybe I'll still end up riding a Swiss bike Big Grin
  • + 10
 I just picked up a BMC trailfox. 150mm travel 29er. I put an angleset on it, so the HTA is around 65 degrees. It shreds.
  • + 6
 I've never heard anyone describe a Genius as no nonsense.
  • + 6
 @inter71: Regressive suspension ratio on 160mm/enduro bike is nonsense.
  • + 1
 @gnralized: Are you referring to a discussion we may have had elsewhere? I ride a 160 regressive bike.
  • + 3
 Yes, Scott going FSR/Horst link for suspension kinematic with a progressive ratio is the biggest info of this new.
  • - 1
 @gnralized: doesn't matter. They continue to reduce travel with their trail modes. VPP's regressive beginning stroke is superior in my opinion. I owned a Four Bar Genius 700 series prior to getting my Tracer. Regression > Reduction.
  • + 3
 @inter71: Regressive first part of ratio had a meaning 10 years ago when first gen air shocks gets force vs. stroke curves strongly non-linear in first 10-15% of shock stroke and needs a great amount of force 1. to break static friction and 2. do trhough first 15% of shock stroke (by opposition to coil). It facilitate this and give more sensibility on small shocks in the first 15% of travel. It stayed like that until now because of patents and diffculty to achieve a progressive curve with conter-rotating links, particularly for VPP (SC/Intense).
It has no sense anymore by now with work done on initial stiction and negative air chambers producing very linear air shocks, like the X2 (I own one). THat's why V10 and new nomad get a different kinematic architecture.
If you check the last iteration of tracer's ratio curve, you will see they goes the full progressive way too.
By now thew sum of mecanic friction (I mean frame and members bearings, including shock journal bearings) on a frame is often greater than the force needed to initiate shock stroke, that why bearing shock mounts make sense.

And no, no idea about the discussion you're talking about.
  • + 5
 Unfortunately, the seat tubes are still quite long. This makes sizing up impossible for many, and droppers are getting longer.
  • + 3
 @gnralized: Air shocks are massively progressive at end stroke. They said they made it more regressive so you could actually bottom it out (not always a bad thing). And reviewer said he'd take a volume spacer out on it. Which would make it more linear (more regressive).
  • + 3
 @inter71: C'mon! After that triple shock behind the seat tube and completely useless DT Swiss shock under tt this bike finally looks like a winner. At least on paper.
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: I wonder what happened to this year model?
  • + 2
 @btjenki: I seems that you mingle suspension (leverage) ratio and shock spring rate.
A shock spring rate can be either progressive or linear, but never regressive, at my humble knowledge.
For spring rate, talking about progressive or linear is talking about the derivative of the stroke vs. force curve.
Linear mean you always need the same amount of force to compress the spring of 1 unit length during all the stroke, regressive mean the force needed to compress the spring of 1 unit length increase along the stroke.
You understand that a "regressive" spring rate will mean that the force needed to compress the spring for 1 unit length DECREASE along the stroke, which is never the case within the realm of MTB...

My words were about regressive-progressive leverage (suspension) ratio : before negative spring (chambers) were implemented on MTB shocks, the initial shock stroke was highly progressive due to initial (static) frictions, etc, see first paragraph...
www.pinkbike.com/news/Tech-Tuesday-negative-spring-air-shocks-2012.html
justifying the existence of a regressive leverage ratio to counterbalance the initial progressivity of spring rate.
Since modern air shock are no more massively progressive (they are still but not massively, except if you want it) at the beginning of the stroke thanks to negative air chambers, and at the end of stroke thanks to high volume aircans, regressive leverage (suspension) ratio are no more useful.
  • + 0
 @pakleni: okay, okay, I'll give them that. It looks really nice, but until they do away with the TwinLoc volume reducing nonsense the Genius will always ride sh!t. Good at everything, great at nothing.
  • + 2
 @gnralized: Haha, I'm going to totally bum you out now: I ride a coil on my VPP.
  • + 1
 Doesn't the Snabb Plus fit that exact description?
  • + 2
 @inter71: good at everything and great at nothing is genuine Swiss way of designing things! Remember the Swiss army knife Big Grin

However, this is not a 'real' enduro racing bike like idk Slash or something similar. It's just long legged trail bike and I know a lot of trails where it could be handy.
  • + 14
 Finally an integrated fender using the Fox threaded holes. The small things...
  • + 1
 Indeed. It's like the latest Shimano cranks having middle ring chainbolts being screwed straight into the spider like it used to be with granny ring only. Or Acros, Trek and Canyon making stops for handlebar rotation so that you don't destroy your frame and brake levers. Those things matter and they don't require changing half of the bike so it fits some tiny resize... Unlike axle resize frenzy...
  • + 5
 Sadly this one won't shield the stanchions or help keep the seals cleanFrown
  • + 1
 That was my take away: can I buy the fender aftermarket?
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: it says there that it will be 14 €
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: couldn't agree more! Crashed the other day with my new remedy, brake levers and top tube still in tact! While riding you'd never know your steering is "limited"
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: yep. Fits boost 34 and 36 forks
  • + 8
 I like it! Not crazy about the bar design but the long and slack category for trail bikes is right up my alley. I'm 6'5 and a 500mm+ reach is what I've been looking for.

Also, I hate to be negative but pinkbike you gotta quit it with these blurry geometry charts. I legit can read zero numbers on this one on my brand new turbo high def smartphone.
  • + 1
 This is a big bike for sure comparable to an XXL SC Hightower. Is 6'1" the intended rider size for this bike?
  • + 2
 @alexsin: I have a YT Jeffsy with a reach of 465mm. With a 50mm stem it works for me but I'd like it longer in a perfect world. Roughly equivalent to a 500mm reach with a slammed stem/bar combo seen here, I imagine.
  • + 10
 OH MY GOOD LORD, this reminds me of the time I discovered the double donut burger, delicious and beautiful and really bad for my wallet!
  • - 12
flag lee-vps-savage (Jun 16, 2017 at 6:18) (Below Threshold)
 F*cks sake, I can't help but love how this bike looks, someone get me a cigarette or something think I'm having a crisis... (Top Gear Joke)
  • + 23
 you're not very good at jokes
  • + 7
 Can someone please explain this lemming-like strategy in the industry- it is the start of the summer and I have tried to get a new bike but can't! I've checked four different bikes and they are all sold out and no date when they might be back in because apparently they are shifting to 2018! So now I have to wait until September? Why not transition to 2018 at the start of winter? I know this is a US-centric comment, but I've tried Specialized, Pivot, Yeti, and Evil . . . . if one of those companies had a different strategy they would have my $$.
  • + 10
 Better yet, start launching 2018 models in January 2018....
  • + 1
 because by 2018, these will be filling the used markets in anticipation for the 2019 models. Clever, no?
  • + 1
 Because most people buying high-end bikes buy in the fall and winter so they have something ready for spring/summer, so brands want their new models ready by Sept. in the Northern Hemisphere. Overall, it seems like bikes are ready when they are ready, there's not as much emphasis on hitting a particular time frame anymore.
  • + 6
 @dthomp325: I'm just complaining cause i didn't think ahead. But it does seem silly to buy in the fall and then look at it in the garage just to 'be ready' for four mos down the road
  • + 10
 why XC-tires on this beast?
  • + 12
 I wouldn't call it a beast, but still way under tired for a 150mm bike with that geo. I guess it's good for show room dentist bike lift test.
  • + 1
 I just saw that the version on Vital MTB has Nobby Nics in one photo and the Maxxis in another photo.
  • + 7
 I agree. If you have a 36 on your bike out of the box, you should have something more beefy on the ground.
  • + 8
 To brag about the weight. Probably saved a lb by going with those over minions
  • + 1
 @dtimms: yeah probably... and then sliding around on the trails when putting down the gas
  • + 5
 Why in the hell is there not a better shock on these? @SCOTT-Sports why not the new DPX2? There needs to be a reservoir shock on these bigger trail bikes. The LT without question needs the X2, its a joke if it doesn't and will be pushed out of the enduro market if you refuse to address the major deficiency which is your shock on bigger bikes.
  • + 2
 I agree. For the Scott Genius LT line up they should have the option to buy the bike with the new DPX2. I never understood this. I can understand the logic for the trail Genius but for the LT enduro Genius even Rémy Absalon uses his Genius LT with the Fox X2
www.pinkbike.com/photo/13391292

@SCOTT-Sports You haven't released the Genius LT models for 2018 yet but we do hope you make them come with better suited shocks. Please Smile
  • + 1
 @LiquidSpin: lt takes a year off. Mine could a better shock, especially in the end stroke.
  • + 5
 I am all about that bar stem combo and the fender for the Fox 36. The bar and stem must save a shit ton of weight over my current setup. I wonder if that's coming to aftermarket.
  • + 2
 760mm, should be 800mm with cutting marks.
  • + 1
 @Legbacon: I use 770 but could be persuaded to use 760 for this setup, as long as the price isn't too high (which it probably will be).

I am willing to pay the same price for this as a Renthal fatbar carbon, bar only.
  • + 1
 @jaame: if you're really into it you could always put on some SC Palmdale grips and gain an extra 10mm per side..
  • + 1
 @Lamename: good idea but i'm not that precious about bar width. Renthal slide on grips are the shiznit!
  • + 6
 Looks Great fellas. She is a beaut. Everything on it including the handlebar/stem combo which is a great idea. Lighter, stronger and no creaking. Right on Scott.
  • + 4
 I do like that bar setup. Not being able to tweak your handlebar roll could maybe bother some. The six cables hanging on that ride would drive me crazy.
  • + 2
 Tweaking the handlebar roll is achieved by installing an angleset on this bike
  • + 4
 @tigerteeuwen: seems ass backwards to have to change the geometry of the front end just to achieve my desired handlebar roll. Am I on the wrong track here?
  • + 2
 @Jordanh604: no, your not off track. I was totally kidding when I wrote that.
  • + 2
 @tigerteeuwen: haha right on. I'm not too seasoned when it comes to mountain biking, especially geometry.
  • + 2
 So so sick. Very innovative, I mean I know flatland BMX companies were making intergrated bar/stems long ago, as were some MTB companies for xc racing, but this ones quite different because it's intergrated into the headset too, to see it here, on a trail bike of this ilk, is a nice touch in my opinion, I think you might see more of these popping up. Lovely looking bike all said and done though, right? I mean picture what Brendog or Needles could do with this exquisite little number. Just saying. Peace!
  • + 6
 Brendog would break it is what he would do.
  • + 2
 @mrgonzo: point taken, but we'll see.
  • + 1
 @mrgonzo: sorry gonzo, I meant to give positive props. My bad.
  • + 1
 @mrgonzo: This would really benefit Brendog, getting use to his Gambler 29er. I think.
  • + 1
 Beautiful bike. One of the nicest aesthetically I've seen in a while. But that lockout stuff Scott does turns me off every time. Make versions without the twin lockout. If the suspension is good then it shouldn't need that crap. I tested the previous Genius with Twin Lockout and I thought the bike rode best when all that crap was turned off. I would assume with the new pivot placement that this thing would pedal even better than the old version so the extra cables and button could be axed to save some weight and complexity.
  • + 3
 It's easy and cheap to remove the twinlock and install thumb levers On the fork and shock.
  • + 6
 Grampa, the Twinlock is excellent. I am on a Scott Spark 2017 and the Twinlock is fantastic. I've also used it on a Genius Plus. You won't take it off, once you get used to it, it's like remote droppers versus gettingoff and playing with the seat quick release.
  • + 1
 Can someone explain to me the pros/cons of the different ways to mount the shock? For bikes like this, the shaft is either topside or bottomside and it seems to me that having it on the bottom would best for keeping it clean, so why do some manufacturers mount it like Scott has here?
  • + 2
 Shock is heavier on the side with air can, so mounting it this way keeps center of gravity lower. Has some drawbacks though, mounting it upside down would keep the shaft better greased. Also design choice - it uses trunnion mount which is pretty wide, it makes more sense to mount this to frame than rocker link, will be stiffer that way. Nothing critical in terms of performance, Transition mounts those upside down and nobody complains, looks better too.
  • + 1
 The Twinlock cable attaches to the shock at the seat/down tube junction. With the shock upside down, it is neater and there's no need to undo the cables to service the shock - just take the top shock bolt out and slide the air can off. So much easier. Nothing to do with unsprung weight (which is negligible for an air can, and even forks, but that's a different debate).
  • + 3
 Genius recipe : Take a Scott spark, flavored it with some bearings on chainstay, 20minutes to the oven. Finally add an Unno handlebar.
  • + 1
 "The other factor could be the 51mm offsets fork combined with the slack head angle and short stem, something about this still feels strange to me, but it's difficult to put my finger on it. A longer offset should speed up the steering at slow speeds, but once you're rolling past jogging pace on a trail things start to get twitchy and more difficult to predict and counter steer." - This is one thing I'm not super happy about in the 29" Fork Marketplace. Currently, only the Rockshox products really allow 46mm offset, and I think that would be ideal for these versatile wheel size bikes. I run a 51mm offset 150mm Fox 34 27.5+ on my bike with 275x2.6 tires, I can definitely notice a bit of twitchiness over my old 43mm offset Pike 275.
  • + 4
 good point about the CS length, but wondering why it took this long to come to this conclusion
  • + 3
 Money and marketing. Companies like Specialized know its tough for designs like Maestro to compete on the "ultra short chainstays bro" front so they use that pitch.
  • + 3
 The chainstays thing has been bothering me for a while, but I've been told Liteville adjust CS lengths across sizes and Norco do it too.

Propain have gone completely the other way and their aggressive trail/enduro bikes all have long, 445mm CS, but it must all come down to the fact that tooling-up for several different rear triangle sizes would be much more expensive, particularly on carbon bikes and most brands have their reasons (good or bad) for not wanting aluminium rears.
  • + 0
 @jclnv: SC VPP gets down to about 430, 425 on my 5010... 438 seems asinine these days.
  • + 1
 @kyle242gt: Why does Minnaar run 460mm?
  • + 1
 Totally agree with the fork lockout comment. Every time I have locked out my fork it felt worse. On the road it feels REALLY bad with every crack somehow feeling worse than a road bike because it sends shockwaves up the handlebar, then when climbing the fork is much more likely to come off the ground and wander over every little rock. I just dont see the point and dont want a lever taking up space on my handlebar controlling it. Perhaps if the fork was TALAS and you could drop the travel on the fly it would actually be useful.
  • + 0
 I'm pretty sure the Twinlock doesn't lock out the fork, it only increases low speed compression. It locks out the shock.
  • + 5
 Looks like.... a Giant.
  • + 1
 Yeah, Big wheeled Swiss Trance
  • + 2
 Dual short link versus 4 bar is pretty different.
  • + 1
 @fatallightning: thanks for correcting, that was my first impression of the profile photo.
  • + 0
 I just picked up a BMC trailfox- 29er- 150mm travel with an angleset to put the HTA at ~65 degrees. It shreds.

After coming off an Enduro 29er, the CCDBair feels x10 better than the fox or monarch trail shocks. This Scott is going to be held back by the rear shock.
  • + 1
 How do one mount a cycling computer (Garmin/Lezyne/Wahoo/etc) on a handlebar like that? I thought 35mm was annoying as most front mounts I had only supported 31.8, but this thing - it's another level.
  • + 2
 Finally Scott get it rigth on the kinematics with 100% anti-squat and 35% progressivity on the 2018 Genius. Major improvement over the previous model.
  • + 2
 hmm...should we go orange/black or turquoise/black. how cool would it be if we did both? said nobody, ever.
  • + 2
 Funny that they lightened up the bar just to make up for the weight of the twin lock lever...
  • + 2
 A handlebar that you cannot adjust roll or stem length on. Only in the MTB industry is that considered innovation.
  • + 3
 Any word on Fox Live Valve?
  • + 0
 Lost me at "integrated bar and stem combo". Once again Scott, proprietary equipment on a bike for the masses falls short. Thought you might have learned lesson from the Equaliser shock mess!
  • + 1
 "Following on from the latest Spark, the Genius uses a four-bar linkage."
The Spark is not exactly a 4-bar... There is one more pivot point on the Genius
  • + 1
 Weird announcing a bike 3 months before its available to buy. Get excited to buy, then forget about it by the time its available. Business 101 fail.
  • + 1
 I thought that orange FOX forks are reserved for sponsored riders. Is it not the case anymore or does the bike come with full factory support?
  • - 4
flag lee-vps-savage (Jun 16, 2017 at 6:14) (Below Threshold)
 Fox 32 Stepcasts come in Orange off the peg, 36's won't these will just be media bikes.
  • + 1
 The 36 has just been made available to the public in orange. £1100 I believe.....
  • + 0
 @kes2903: Which is annoying as Mojo has just sent me the stock list for a pre order for 2018 and had no Orange 36's on!
  • + 3
 @lee-vps-savage: orange looks turd anyway!
  • + 1
 I was thinking the same thing, however, notice the shots of the bike on the trail does not have an orange fork.
  • + 2
 LOVE the look of the orange Foxes, oddly this is the first bike I've seen where it doesn't stick out like a sore thumb.
  • + 1
 Scott has improved the Genius a lot from the old model. You can check it in my blog:

mrblackmorescorner.blogspot.com.es/2017/06/scott-genius-2018.html
  • + 2
 aligning bars is my Achilles. I love the integration to solve this. Here's a new standard I'd fully get behind.
  • + 5
 I wish all fork crowns had gradient marks that lined up with marks on the bars or stem. That way, i won't look like such an idiot squinting at my front tire in the car park.
  • + 2
 I'd be curious to know the specs of the shock. Scott is notorious for using weird sizes.
  • + 2
 185x55 metric trunion. Nothing too crazy.
  • + 1
 Also I'd skip the Hixon bs. Cute and all but modularity is important; throw these in the discount pile with the LadLoc grips.
  • + 3
 50 shades of kashima
  • + 1
 The most interesting question for me: Does this Syncros fender fit on a "normal" fox36 casting?
  • + 2
 Expect a five-digit price tag for this bike....:/
  • + 2
 It's over 9 000 !!!!
  • + 2
 How would you adjust bar roll with those bars?
  • + 1
 I like this "price TBC" approach.... put the bike out there, see how PB reacts then set the price accordingly.. Smile
  • + 1
 WTF does TBC mean though? To be continued?
  • + 2
 @jollyjared: To Be Calculated?
  • + 1
 @jollyjared: It says in the article "To Be Confirmed".... but I kinda prefer what @cgdibble said... I guess it must be taking some serious computing power to figure out what the market will bear Smile
  • + 1
 Could you run a 29 front and 27.5 rear on this? I'm guessing so, but wondering if it would be any good?
  • + 1
 First bike with a fox 36 on which the style police probably would not arrest you
  • + 2
 that bar is crazy! looks intresting
  • + 2
 Bike is great but tell us more about that fender......
  • + 1
 So what happens if/when you want to change grips? Does the seatpost and twinloc levers still work?
  • + 1
 Where i can buy this Syncros fender?
  • + 1
 I like this a lot but am unable to afford this Frown
  • + 1
 Can you fit a Fox float x2? Cane Creek DBAir? Etc...
  • + 1
 Where can I get that fender for a fox 34????
  • + 1
 Gotta make these enduro bikes pro low, bro.
  • - 3
 Horst link? No thank you: that is 1990 technology and it shows!!!! Just read the, for once, honest report about the lack of climbing performance! It is not that Scoot has chosen a more "active" set up. It is that Horst links simply do not climb well unless you ave huge amounts of shock platform. Get used to that middle position and lost of pressure if you buy one of these!
  • + 1
 Depends on what you mean by climbing. Horst links remaining very active provide a lot of traction in technical climbs.
  • + 0
 @preston67: Only problem is that it horribly inefficient unless you REALLY stiffen up that shock.
  • + 1
 Can a guy buy that fender separate ?
  • + 1
 The article claims it is stock on two of the models, and will be available aftermarket for 14€

Awesome that they have no price for the bike but they have the mud guard nailed
  • + 1
 @onemind123: priorities
  • + 1
 Press-fit. Maybe next model.
  • + 1
 So good you can skid into corners!
  • + 1
 #bikeporn beside that handlebar/stem combo
  • + 0
 Nice attention to details and integration. Closer and closer to Apple products target.
  • + 1
 You mean overrated and overpriced
  • + 1
 WTF with that stem and bar? Frown Looks ugly...
  • + 9
 I think it's innovative and good on them for changing things up a bit!
  • + 1
 @lee-vps-savage: maybe... On my opinion it's "Genius" lol
  • + 6
 @Pajamas: That makes no sense in relation to the original point you made Big Grin
  • + 1
 @lee-vps-savage: it was my first impression. No offense Smile
  • + 4
 @Pajamas: No offence taken, it's just nice to see big brands doing something different from the norm, whether it's 'ugly', different or weird, it's good to see.
  • + 4
 @lee-vps-savage: Stem and bar along with with tires are probably the parts that get swapped the most on new bikes. An integrated solution might have some technical advantages on paper but it's a comparably big disadvantage for the consumer.
  • + 1
 @SiSandro: I think Scott bikes, like Cannondale, appeal more to the consumer who is a looking for a complete bike and will not be swapping parts.
  • + 2
 Looks expensive.
  • + 1
 Nice to see adjustable geometry on it!
  • + 1
 6'1" and you're on an XL? I see mountain bike sizing is still ludacris.
  • + 1
 Based on the huge reach on the new Genius he should not have been- likely a limitation of demo sizes.
  • + 1
 The twinloc levers and the proprietary shock are deal-breakers for me.
  • + 1
 Lucky you can change them out for something else.
  • + 1
 The bike the guy is riding is different than the bike they show above.
  • + 1
 No piggyback here??
No thanks...
  • + 1
 looks like another great bike i can not afford
  • - 1
 My last bike was a genius with a pull-shock, I may dislike Scott less if they swapped me for one of these.
  • + 1
 So much kashima!
  • + 1
 I dig it!
  • + 1
 150mm trail bike?
  • + 0
 Looks like a fuel
  • - 2
 I'm looking for this kind of mud fender for a lyrik. Anyone?
  • - 2
 J'avais fait en impression 3D le même concept de garde boue pour ma Boxxer, mais c’était cassant par rapport à un plastique standard. Je parie que RS va suivre et proposer une alternative prochainement. En attendant tu peux surement te bricoler un garde boue similaire avec du carbone et percer / tarauder au niveau des futs à l'intérieure de l'arche de ta fourche.
  • + 0
 @Groscreux: Je cherchais une solution prête et propre directement, le muckynutz tiendra jusque là Wink mais merci !
  • + 4
 @Groscreux: Don't drill the fork arch, you will void the warranty. For a simple mud guard it's not worth it. Just buy a Marsh Guard/ Mucky Nutz.
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