2011 Scott Genius LT - EuroBike

Sep 17, 2010
by Mike Levy  
If you had told me about the Scott Genius only a few short years ago I would never have believed you, but it looks like the future is here and it has a carbon frame and 185 mm of travel. Scott has designed the Genius LT to be the ultimate do-everything package, whether that entails burly descents down terrain that is going to require every last millimeter of the bike's travel, or all day climbs that start in the valley bottom and finish atop wide open alpine peaks. There is a lot of technology packed into this 6.2 lb frame, but the Genius' Equalizer 3 shock is the crowning jewel and what allows the bike's character to change from a 185 mm travel trail tamer, to an efficient 110 mm travel climber, and even into a fully locked out bike if the terrain demands it. The low mounted shock has been co-developed with DT and is actually a compact pull shock that is comprised of three separate oil filled chambers. The travel selection depends on oil flow from each of the chambers, by using the remote lever and closing off the oil's passage from one to another you effectively limit the amount of stroke that is available, thereby completely altering the bike's personality. Listen to the audio to get a better picture of the Genius LT.
If you had told me about the Scott Genius only a few short years ago I would never have believed you, but it looks like the future is here and it has a carbon frame and 185 mm of travel. Scott has designed the Genius LT to be the ultimate do-everything package, whether that entails burly descents down terrain that is going to require every last millimeter of the bike's travel, or all day climbs that start in the valley bottom and finish atop wide open alpine peaks. There is a lot of technology packed into this 6.2 lb frame, but the Genius' Equalizer 3 shock is the crowning jewel and what allows the bike's character to change from a 185 mm travel trail tamer, to an efficient 110 mm travel climber, and even into a fully locked out bike if the terrain demands it. The low mounted shock has been co-developed with DT and is actually a compact pull shock that is comprised of three separate oil filled chambers. The travel selection depends on oil flow from each of the chambers, by using the remote lever and closing off the oil's passage from one to another you effectively limit the amount of stroke that is available, thereby completely altering the bike's personality. Listen to the audio to get a better picture of the Genius LT.

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If you are wondering why you are not seeing the typical carbon weave that most people associate with the material, it's because that finish is usually only used for cosmetic reasons. In the quest to shave grams from the finished product, Scott forgoes this step. The front triangle is built in such a way that it is molded in a single step, as opposed to being separate tubes that need to be joined individually after they are produced. Scott calls this process IMP - Integrated Molding Process - and it has allowed them to drop an impressive amount of weight from the previous Ransom model. While it may sound like the emphasis was on reducing weight while designing the Genius LT frame, the smart people behind the design have not forgot what a 185 mm travel bike is capable of. To that end, tube thickness has been optimized for each location depending on whether it may need a bit of extra material for impact strength or if it can be light and thin in a non-critical area.
If you are wondering why you are not seeing the typical carbon weave that most people associate with the material, it's because that finish is usually only used for cosmetic reasons. In the quest to shave grams from the finished product, Scott forgoes this step. The front triangle is built in such a way that it is molded in a single step, as opposed to being separate tubes that need to be joined individually after they are produced. Scott calls this process IMP - Integrated Molding Process - and it has allowed them to drop an impressive amount of weight from the previous Ransom model. While it may sound like the emphasis was on reducing weight while designing the Genius LT frame, the smart people behind the design have not forgot what a 185 mm travel bike is capable of. To that end, tube thickness has been optimized for each location depending on whether it may need a bit of extra material for impact strength or if it can be light and thin in a non-critical area.

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One part thumb shifter, one part suspension control center! This is the Twinloc lever as found on the Scott Genius LT. This little guy not only controls the bike's Equalizer 3 damper, but also the fork's lockout as well. When in the full open position both the fork and shock are allowed to move through their full stroke. If you are going to get your climb on, one click activates the bike's 110 mm traction mode while the fork remains active. If the climb is going to be long and smooth, say a forest service road, one more click of the lever locks out the suspension on both the front and rear of the bike. All the Twinloc remote is missing is the ability to control your telescoping seatpost and pack your lunch for that all day epic.
One part thumb shifter, one part suspension control center! This is the Twinloc lever as found on the Scott Genius LT. This little guy not only controls the bike's Equalizer 3 damper, but also the fork's lockout as well. When in the full open position both the fork and shock are allowed to move through their full stroke. If you are going to get your climb on, one click activates the bike's 110 mm traction mode while the fork remains active. If the climb is going to be long and smooth, say a forest service road, one more click of the lever locks out the suspension on both the front and rear of the bike. All the Twinloc remote is missing is the ability to control your telescoping seatpost and pack your lunch for that all day epic.

Continuing with the
Continuing with the "have it your way" theme, the geometry of the Genius LT can be fine tuned depending on what your ride plans may be for the day ahead. The upper eyelet of the Equalizer 3 damper is mounted to an offset insert within the linkage, simply flip it around to change the bike's attitude. Bike park day or you're looking to cross some gnarly terrain? Put it in the 66.3 degree head angle setting and get your shred on. If the day's ride will be tamer and you'd like the handling to match, swap it to the 67 degree position to get a bit sportier feel.

Don't think for a minute that the Scott designers haven't gone to town when laying out the rear of the Genius LT frame as well. You are no longer required to use a bolt on adapter to mount your brake due to the frame's built in 180 mm post mounts, which both sheds a bit of weight and simplifies brake mounting. The bike will ship with a burly 12 x 142 mm axle and dropout system, but also be convertible to both 12 x 135 mm and standard 135 QR options. Don't get rid of those spare wheels because they still have a home on the LT.
Don't think for a minute that the Scott designers haven't gone to town when laying out the rear of the Genius LT frame as well. You are no longer required to use a bolt on adapter to mount your brake due to the frame's built in 180 mm post mounts, which both sheds a bit of weight and simplifies brake mounting. The bike will ship with a burly 12 x 142 mm axle and dropout system, but also be convertible to both 12 x 135 mm and standard 135 QR options. Don't get rid of those spare wheels because they still have a home on the LT.


Is the Genius LT the F1 car of all-mountain bikes? It certainly boasts an impressive amount of technology and adjustability that should let it excel on nearly anyone's local mountain, but are you looking for that kind of flexibility in your ride? Let the discussion commence below!

Visit the Scott website to see their entire lineup.

Stay tuned for more Eurobike coverage!



60 Comments

  • + 4
 Looks pretty good even the base model the lt 40 comes in at 31.94 pounds and has a list price of $2950. It still has a decent spec as well with an aluminium frame, Rock Shox Lyrik RLR, Avid Elixir 3 brakes and shimano xt/deore drive train. It even has a head angle that should not hold you back on the down hills with a 66.3 degree angle in low and 67 degree angle in high setting. Sounds like a good package for some one that wants one bike that they can take any where on the trails and not be held back on the ups or downs.
  • - 12
flag RaleighVoid (Sep 17, 2010 at 2:22) (Below Threshold)
 i dont like post mount. especially on a frame. thread it wrong and youre fucked
  • + 8
 thread it right then! if I remember correctly its a £7k bike so youre gonna want to look after it.. plus there are loads of other places on your frame where bolts thread directly into the frame, think pivots and occasionally axle
  • + 5
 plus there are ways to fix it if you somehow destroy a thread. it would be a lot easier than for a post mount fork. for example you can make a bit larger hole (e.g. M7 instead of typical M6) and use larger bolt ooor make the hole go through the material, use longer bolt and a nut. sorry, my tech English dictionary is sometimes poor, but you get my point, right?
  • + 10
 your tech English dictionary is pretty spot on mate
  • + 2
 I honestly have never cross threaded a caliper bolt. This is a non-issue as far as im concearned. Only time Ive ever come across fussed thread for a caliper bolt was on forks that had no right still being in service.
  • + 5
 As long as you thread the first few turns of the bolt by hand, it is literally impossible to cross thread, if it doesn't want to turn after about half a turn, take it out, and reset it. As our meerkat friend would say, Simples!
  • + 1
 if you can manage to cross-thread a post mount then im sure your capable of cross-threading an IS mount. its not hard to put a bolt in straight...
  • + 1
 Some day when I'm rich I'll own a scott genius LT. This thing is amazing.
  • + 3
 This thing's ridiculous, of course it's not a reign X that most of us can afford. In Cali I've probably seen two Scott FR bikes on the trails ever, and one was considerably past it's prime. Just like the ransom carbon this thing is built for Scott racers like Wildhaber to slay megavalanche on. By the time you're bringing down enough dough to blow $5k on one you might need a 30 lb. FR bike 'cause your busy schedule doesn't let you get out enough to sac up and pedal. I agree with Cebelar and PHdotd, you can't repair rare bikes very easily (and imagine if that shock ever broke). Cheers to those of you who can afford one-lemme borrow it; i'll be the guy humping a 40lb. Demo up the hill. Heavy, yes..gravity likes heavy; and so far I've yet to be stopped on my way up by some bridge troll who demands my bike weigh under 30lbs.
  • + 4
 no one told you? 30 is the new 40
  • + 2
 well said chris. i'll props to the bridge troll!
  • + 1
 The shocks are actually made by DT Swiss. They are serviced out of Cycles Lambert in QC and BC. They are a ton simpler than the Ransom shock, that always broke. This new shock is amazingly reliable and works great too. I work for Scott and there has been a ton of hype behind this bike, I will be getting mine quite soon.
  • + 2
 two comments ... the equalizer is EXPENSIVE to replace if its not warranty, trust me, my buddy can make his comments about it. AND.. hmm, what else did I want to say. Um, what do I have to do to mount a 203mm rear disk?

For sure, bikes are evolving pretty fast.
  • + 2
 if i had the money, id have one on order in a heartbeat. im just worried about the equalizer shock and how much abuse it really can take, like if i took it into say the whistler bike park, would it take the hits, the drops, or is it specifically for a "close to ground" am style.
  • + 2
 All current shocks can take any abuse. If you just think about it structuraly: comparing lets say Fox Float shock to DHX rc4. Everything in Float is larger: valves, piston everything. Take the spring off any coil shock and realize how crispy it looks comparing to any air shock. In fact coil shock body without a spring is usualy lighter than air shock body.
  • + 1
 Another concern is replacement parts. If you blow the Equalizer shock can you mount another rear shock in there if there is a delay in getting replacements? Or is the bike designed for the pull shock?
  • + 3
 ugh, if something is designed for pull it can't work for compression - it's pretty logical Smile and I don't think there are that many pull shocks on the market
  • + 1
 I've been rocking a Scott genius for a while now..its a great all around bike and i could'nt imagine how good it would feel with another 35mm of travel. No problems with the rear shock, but several companies are servicing them including dirt labs in the US. If it breaks in the next year i'll be let down, but so far the technology has made my day, and allowed me to bike more efficiently. I'll be saving for a carbon genius LT...but may wait a year or two so they can work out any bugs
  • + 2
 The bike can do what ever you want. I work for Scott Canada and just recently got back from Switzerland, HQ, and they were very excited about the bike. In our testing, it actually passed the Gambler test, meaning it is STRONG! If you have ever seen a cut away of the new Santa Cruz V10 and how thick the carbon is at the HT, it is very similar on the Genius LT. Very stiff and super light at the same time. As for the shock, we have two DT Swiss service centers in Canada and the shock actually doesnt have much to go wrong, the Ransom had a very complex rear shock and also held up to 550psi, which caused it to fail. The DT Swiss Equalizer shocks are super simple and even easier to set up (instructions are on the side of the shock w/ built in sag meter. It is super plush and smooth, similar to my old DHX 5.0 coil I had, TRUST ME...DT does it right!
  • + 1
 I have a Ransom built up for my son and the bike is amazing. We have not had any trouble with the shock. There is a bit of brake jack, but that was expected. We went with a trail/ AM build kit and the bike weighs 27 lbs with petals.

smithy86 - How do you explain the numerous pictures of steel and aluminum bikes with snapped headtubes while using carbon forks? I have never seen a snapped carbon frame that was used for its intended purpose. Did you see Sam Hill's bike after his crash this spring? OMG!! He's lucky he wasn't on a carbon bike or he might not have been able to keep riding after the crash! Razz
  • - 1
 and carbon fibre has a high strength to weight ratio so it does not make it stronger than alloy its just composite plastic EPOXY and graphite
  • - 2
 it depends really on what's more important to you, strength vs.weight...
carbon fibre is definately not the strongest out of all three, (but that's just when you are talking about carbon-fibre used for biking). Carbon fibre is the lightest, and has the best ratio of strength compared to weight, but it cant withstand as much pressure as aluminum or alloy which are pretty much the same thing. Alloy is the cheapest out of all three but it's just as good as aluminum, just a bit heavier...
  • + 1
 You are digging a hole for yourself. Clearly you don't understand what strength to weight ratio means. It means if you put an aluminum frame next to a carbon frame with the SAME STRENGTH, the carbon one will be lighter. But they key is they are equally strong! Likewise if you put an aluminum frame next to a carbon one with the SAME WEIGHT, the carbon one will be STRONGER. That is how ratios work. Also, the word "alloy" means any mix of metals. This usually refers to aluminum frames. They are not different.
  • + 0
 yes im not saying that but for its weight it is stronger so why not make the carbon frames a little more heavier not as heavy as aluminium. so that way they are near enough bomb proof instead of ridiculously light. that way they wont feel so fragile to ride
  • + 1
 Just curious (and I'm not being patronizing) but which carbon frames have you ridden that feel fragile? The goal in making frames (no matter what material) is to find the right balance between weight and strength, depending on the application. No point making a bike bomb proof if weight is the priority. And no point in making it super light if strength is the priority.
  • + 0
 whyte gt and scott
  • + 1
 With these stupid cannondale/scott pull shocks, the magic link (which actually works realy well), and all these vpp/dw links, have we forgotten the little propedal switch? Will make any bike climb uphill like a pro for cheap without any complicated stuff to break.
  • + 1
 This is nice but the Cannondale Claymore is a way better design imho and just as light. better shock position, better looking, and the pull shock is by fox so i'm guessing it will be much more reliable and serviceable. the idea of 2 shocks is gonna be such a handy thing to have on the trail especially for riders who want to enjoy the climb just as much as the decent.
  • + 1
 the chief designer from Scott moved over to Cannondale end of last year, noticed how the linkages and the shocks are essentially the same principle?
  • + 1
 i ride a 2008 genius (and Intense 6.6) which was one of the first scott's to use a dual chamber shock(air) and it rides beutifully, they suffer a bit from brake jack, but the main reason i wouldn't purchase a scott again is the ditributor rights holder in this country is useless, requested a new pivot bolt and bushing set and got nothing, 6 months later i sourced my own from a machine shop, downtime on that shock here would be nightmare unless i got a service/ overhaul manual with the frame, awesome looking ride though, those new lyriks look the business
  • + 2
 just on that note between my 2 rides, i would choose a VPP over a Horst linkage any day of the week
  • + 1
 To be fair though, this is not a Horst Link. It's a faux bar.
  • + 1
 This is the perfect bike for the old school dh rider that still wants to play. 185mm f&r and two settings for the suspension. 32lbs for an AM bike that will do it all. Sounds like the right choice for me.
  • + 1
 I rode one for awhile. Great climbing bike, really stiffens on descents though. Proprietary shocks are a concern... I believe its technically a single pivot design.
  • + 1
 I dig my Scott Genius and most likely will be switching up to this LT version. The Twinlock is amazing- so simple and yet so cool.
  • + 3
 Position of the shock is very stupid. Not for muddy conditions.
  • + 2
 although still a very nice bike but high price
  • - 2
 Expensive and unnecessary, to many thing to go wrong in the suspension.
If I want a bike that will do it all I choose top line Giant Reign/Reign X for half the money.
Sorry Scott, this is too much for me, but I'm sure it will find its place on the market.
  • + 2
 Of course it will. The Reign is not a carbon frame.......not a fair comparo.
  • - 1
 I agree with kovaldesign that Scott are still charging quite a lot for the Genius. I'd most likely get a Reign just to save money.

If you want a good carbon frame, invest in an Ibis Mojo / Mojo SL / Mojo HD.

The Genius is still a nice bike Big Grin

RIP Scott Ransom, you will be missed.
  • + 1
 I still think about CARBON as a luxury accessory for the reasons: a full Carbon bike will be around 5% lighter than an equivalent Aluminium one and the frame cost will be around 50% more for Carbon.
What's the big deal about Carbon then? Perhaps it has different feel and some people may like it but I seriously do not think it will make me a better rider.
  • + 2
 Carbon has a completely different feel, just like a steel bike rides differently than an aluminium
  • + 3
 Thats what starts happening when you get into the high end. You reach a point when cost is not proportionate to weight. Its like this with cars, motercycles, airplanes, you name it. But some desire the best of the best, are you suggesting that nobody provide it? Just because and frame that costs 50% more isnt 50% lighter. These are not real world expectations.
  • + 2
 I don't know about the highest end model but 7+ inches of travel, nice spec, and 31lb weight for $2900 is amazingly good!
  • + 1
 Sorry, I'm trying to say that the highest end model isn't great value for money but the cheapest model, the lt 40, is very good value for money.
  • + 2
 Koval, it ain't all about weight, my friend. Carbon is STIFF like a mofo and much stronger than aluminum (until it get's a deep scratch, which does weaken it substantially).
  • + 1
 Definately not a fair comparo as some said. The Reign doesnt compare with weight to travel ratio. Plus how many Reigns do you see when you ride? Everyone has a Giant, you will stand out with a Scott. Plus if you cant afford a LT 10...dont buy it...look at our more affordable options like the LT 30 and 40. Great spec and great weight for the price.
  • + 1
 and why do we need 7+ inches of travel for an AM bike?
  • + 1
 Pretty interesting bike, looks like Big mountain specialist
  • + 1
 looks like a rats nest at bars
  • + 0
 For a second I thought this was a hardtail and got really excited
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