Sender Ramps Announces New Ramps, A Cycling Balance Board, & More

Dec 2, 2020
by Sender Ramps USA  

PRESS RELEASE: Sender Ramps USA

ISOLATE - PRACTICE - PERFORM
We design and manufacture bike features and coaching equipment for all abilities. We are leaders in design and production of equipment that transforms flatland training and coaching sessions. Never before has it been so easy to run engaging, challenging, fun and progressive sessions for all abilities.


We have taken our WORLDWIDE Classic Trainer to the next level. Following on from the success of our AWARD WINNING 2020 model we have made some fantastic upgrades but retained our key features.
Sender Ramps premiere product Train your balance core strength upper body and pumping skills with this great product. Featuring a huge step pad for safe dismount this unit is so much more than what you can make at home. Foldable packable transportable and durable this product will teach you how to manual in weeks not years and give you a great tool to train with in the offseason

Foldable sidewalls for easy packing and transport Fits almost every trunk
We have taken our WORLDWIDE Classic Trainer to the next level. Following on from the success of our AWARD WINNING 2020 model we have made some fantastic upgrades but retained our key features.

Pro Core Skills Trainer
The art of the Manual is always going to be on every rider's must do list. Train your balance, core strength, upper body, and pumping skills with this Sender Pro Core Skills Trainer. Featuring a huge step pad for safe dismount this unit is so much more than what you could make at home. Thousands of riders, coaches, and clubs worldwide having been progressing their personal skills and techniques, training and recovering from injury using our products. Front wheel lift and good weight transfer is fundamental to climbing over obstacles, dropping and jumping. Our trainer is adjustable to all wheel sizes! We have yet to receive a single report of a damaged wheel, because it has been designed to support your wheel, yet flex as you practice reducing peak loading.



Curved and Straight Ramps
The Sender Ramps 200 and 350 Curved and Straight ramps are our beginner to intermediate folding ramps. A super strong design with birch plywood legs and phenolic plywood surface are all CNC cut in our workshop in Inverness, Scotland. We recommend keeping equipment inside when not in use. All ramps fold down for easy transport. Generally curved ramps are best for takeoff and straight ramps can work great as either lips or landings.

Attach the Sender Orbit on to your 650 straight or curved ramp and take flight This is for expert level riders as it can produce some serious air time.
Attach the Sender Orbit on to your 650 straight or curved ramp and take flight This is for expert level riders as it can produce some serious air time.

Orbit Ramps and Extensions
All of our products are designed to work together making progression simple and affordable. The Orbit Extension bolts onto the 350 / 500 and 650 to create a super fast increase in height on all ramp sizes! Attach it to the 650 Extension and it creates our sendiest take off at 800mm (over 31 inches) off the ground.

350 Curved Ramp to Case Pad with 350 straight landing.
Straight ramps to table tops are a great way to introduce beginners into balance and spacial awareness.

The double table top is a great choice to take your manual and drop skills to the next level. Go bigger with taller legs or smaller for newer riders.


Tabletop and Tabletop Legs
The tabletop is a great place to take your manual skills to the next level. Go bigger with taller legs or smaller with shorter legs for newer riders. Table Top Legs can be matched to the size ramp you are working with. This range is absolutely spot on for clubs, coaches, instructors, and ride groups. Designed to offer opportunities for isolating and working on skills and technique development for all abilities across many MTB and BMX scenarios.

The Sender Balance board is a great tool for building cycling specific balance using left or right foot forward. Replicating the balance you find from slow moving trail sections or technical features this unit is a great product to up your balance and confidence on the bike.
Right or Left Foot Forward

Use your balance board in numerous ways


Cycling Specific Balance Board
The Sender Balance Board is a great tool for building cycling specific balance using left or right foot forward. Replicating the balance you find from slow moving trail sections, or technical features, this unit is a great product to increase your balance and confidence on the bike. With multiple training uses, the Balance Board is a great tool for any athlete.

Can take 40 Inch Screen Large Fan Hole with Optional Fan Shelf Two Swing Arms with features Water Bottle Mobile Fan Remote holder Towel holder Height Adjustable Laptop Shelf Tablet Slot with Cable Holes in Shelf Easy Wire Feed Holes in Column and Shelf Screw Points in Base to secure to floor Large Monitor mounting block - Easily Adjust screen height Folds for Easy Storage and Transportation
Can take 40 Inch Screen Large Fan Hole with Optional Fan Shelf Two Swing Arms with features Water Bottle Mobile Fan Remote holder Towel holder Height Adjustable Laptop Shelf Tablet Slot with Cable Holes in Shelf Easy Wire Feed Holes in Column and Shelf Screw Points in Base to secure to floor Large Monitor mounting block - Easily Adjust screen height Folds for Easy Storage and Transportation

Can take 40 Inch Screen Large Fan Hole with Optional Fan Shelf Two Swing Arms with features Water Bottle Mobile Fan Remote holder Towel holder Height Adjustable Laptop Shelf Tablet Slot with Cable Holes in Shelf Easy Wire Feed Holes in Column and Shelf Screw Points in Base to secure to floor Large Monitor mounting block - Easily Adjust screen height Folds for Easy Storage and Transportation


Pain Station
The Sender Pain Station is the ultimate home training companion. It folds easy for transport or storage. Simple adjusting work shelf and screen mount can hold up to a 40 inch screen! With two swing arms to hold your favorite water bottle, towel, cell phone, TV or fan remote, all of your training comforts are at your fingertips. Featuring a tablet slot with cable holes, the Sender Pain Station turns your at-home pain cave into a modern media center with the highest standards in cycle training. Add in our turbo fan and you have no excuses in your climb to peak fitness this off-season.

The Sender Roller fits between and onto our 350 - 500 and 650 Ramps. You need 2 ramps the same size. It works with a curved and straight or a straight to straight but WORKS BEST with a curved to curved
The Sender Roller fits between and onto our 350 - 500 and 650 Ramps. You need 2 ramps the same size. It works with a curved and straight or a straight to straight but WORKS BEST with a curved to curved

The Sender Roller fits between and onto our 350 - 500 and 650 Ramps. You need 2 ramps the same size. It works with a curved and straight or a straight to straight but WORKS BEST with a curved to curved


The Sender Roller fits between and onto our 350 - 500 and 650 Ramps. You need 2 ramps the same size. It works with a curved and straight or a straight to straight but works best with a curved to curved entry and exit.

MODULAR - COMPACT - PORTABLE
All components are hand finished. We don't compromise on materials and fixings. We use pull and impact tested FSC Certified 18mm (13 layer) BIRCH Plywood. All supports are planed Redwood. All structures are secured with stainless steel screws and hinges. We stand behind our products with 100% confidence in their quality and longevity. With the right care and treatment, they will last a lifetime in your pursuit of THE SEND!

Sender Ramps North America
Sender Ramps USA Instagram


75 Comments

  • 147 3
 "Back in my day", we used to raid construction sites, find scrap wood, nails, and build our own sketchy ramps. It was a rite of passage. It is the way.
  • 58 4
 It is the way.
  • 92 1
 This is the way.
  • 20 0
 Yup - a couple of cinder blocks and a few boards. Don't kids have any ingenuity today?
  • 10 1
 @strassen: Yes! I don't want to anger the Mandalore. I have spoken.
  • 6 0
 @neimbc: hahaha, I think these ramps by Sender Ramps are badass. But the simplicity/sketchyness(?) of dinky ramps were always fun to me.
  • 19 1
 Just because ready-to-ride options are being sold does not mean all the kids just stopped building kicker ramps with scrap wood and nails IMO Wink
  • 12 0
 This is the way
  • 7 0
 As is tradition
  • 5 0
 Not sure if kids now have to much access to money, are lazy, or if companies will just make anything ridiculous to sell. As a person that can manual long distances down trails I don't see merit to these products at all. It all about slowly building your skill sets from a wheelie to a manual.
  • 3 0
 skateboard + kitchen stool + 1" by 8" = a dang good time and a broken rib
  • 22 0
 I made up this ramp for about $150, if you want the model let me know.

photos.app.goo.gl/t4HvjyFLhrsNxneZ7
  • 9 1
 We were there as kids too! Our roots are in Dirt Jumping but we wanted to teach new riders how to feel confident in controlled settings before sending it for real. Growing up riding BMX, MTB was a smooth transition for us and we thought if we could just help people learn those basic skills, we would prevent a lot of injuries and sketchy moments when you are actually out there doing your thing. Sender USA is aimed at coaching, so all of our products are built to last a lifetime if you treat them well. If you are a coach, shoot us an email and we can work together on some options and coaching strategies.
  • 4 0
 It is the way.
  • 1 0
 @quinnltd: That is pretty awesome, huge, but awesome. I'd like the model.
  • 1 0
 @quinnltd: that’s super nice!
  • 4 0
 It isn't kids buying these things. Look at every manual trainer video on Youtube. It's 30-50 year olds with too much money and not enough tools in the garage.
  • 3 0
 @quinnltd: That ramp is amazing, period. A picture or video of someone jumping over that Honda will elevate it into the realm of epic. Would anyone like me to hold their beer?
  • 4 0
 This is the way.
  • 2 0
 It’s a Creed.
  • 2 0
 I do it till today
  • 1 0
 @neimbc: this kid will have bike and biz skills!
  • 4 0
 Going way back, we used to turn toboggans upside down and launch off them with our CCM mustang with banana seat and sissy bar.
  • 2 0
 @vjunior21: I believe you guys who can do that have a gyroscope in your head that was implanted.
  • 2 0
 This is the way
  • 2 0
 @neimbc:
Former competition trials rider. I mess around when I ride and sometimes people are wowed. I am like "What did I do." LOL.

If you want to learn to manual start with a wheelie, feather the rear brake (Most important control feature of any wheelie or manual), and progress to not pedaling during the wheelie while sitting on your seat. At some point you can do that then raise of the seat and there you have it. I think using the manual boxes like these skill some control skills that are helpful in a lot of riding scenarios. Besides who covers the warranty when you move your body weight to far to the side and taco your wheel in these manual stands?
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh:
I love C.A. One of the most talented riders there is. I wouldn't rider one of his bikes after he is done with it if you paid me. LOL

Beware of C.A. selling bikes on PB listed as "Gently Used" or "Got this for my wife and she didn't use it." It's a trap. LOL
  • 1 0
 @neimbc: and your bro's lying on the ground in front of it...!
  • 2 0
 @quinnltd: Daym! What's up Hot Rod?!!
  • 2 0
 Hey Grogu!
  • 14 0
 Manual trainers don’t replicate a rolling manual with the chain still in place. You are constantly engaged with the hub and you can use the resistance to stay in place. It’s weird how all of the manual trainer manufacturers show it being used with the chain still on.
  • 4 0
 You mean to say that a turbo trainer (that clamps or replaces the axle) would be a better option? At least it decouples the drivetrain (provided you set resistance low or off) though as I mentioned elsewhere, the best way is probably still to just learn it without any of these tools.
  • 10 5
 We have been manualing bikes for over 20 years and the moment we jumped on the Pro Core Skills Trainer we could really see the advantages of doing a bit of groundwork as a new manual'er. The cool part about the trainer is you can learn in phases. We recommend learning first with our strap to prevent looping out (simply being comfy picking up your front wheel, then practicing without using your brakes (death grip style - no fingers on the lever) then after you master those skills, you could take your chain off and really lock down your balance. The thing about MTB is the bikes all have different manual (balance points) so finding it is going to be different for everyone. Our machine is safe for all ages and skillsets, and is so much more than just a manual machine! Core Strength, Balance, Rear Wheel, Front Wheel, Rehabbing injury, fighting off winter boredom, teaching your friends or kids. Everyone can benefit from a bit of extra confidence on the trial. Check out the Pink Bike Pod Cast Episode 10 around the 6:15 mark as they dive into our unit and its uses.
  • 2 0
 @SenderRampsUSA: I haven’t tried the manual trainer yet but it makes sense to me. I learned to bow stall a kayak in moving water by starting in a pool with both hands holding the pool wall. Progressed to only using one finger per hand on the wall and could eventually bow stalk with a paddle in flat water and finally moving water. Took me a few years but it was worth it. The manual machine seems to offer a similar approach.
  • 2 2
 some dudes that don't have those skills needed for infinite manual invented these at first ! i have a good friend that manuals on a session 88 26" without brakes just balance ! imo , exactly what you said , you will never develop any of those pure balance skills if you don't learn it oldschool
  • 6 0
 Would someone who owns a manual trainer tell me why it’s worth having? I’m seriously considering buying one (making one is not an option for me, so don’t suggest that please).
  • 39 2
 @rburroughs4: my 2 cents is dont buy into the manual trainer.

People get those cause they're scared to loop out.

When you get your bike off the trainer think you'll be less scared, especially when you realize the bike is free to move?

Instead, get some platforms - if your a clip rider (crappy $10 nylon are plenty good) and get em in your cranks.

Next purposefully loop out going slow and catch yourself. When you feel good doing that, go manual on platforms still, and when you can use back brake to keep from looping you'll be good to safely go back to clips.

Or you can crack your tailbone and bounce your head off the ground like we did growing up. Both methods work.
  • 2 0
 I have one that I built. I do not find it very useful but for the first steps it was helpful. I am sure you can learn manual without it as well.
  • 4 0
 If you need to ask if you need it means you dont.
  • 2 0
 I had a sender ramp but sold it. I honestly admit that I didn't really progress well with it. I think you would be better off buying a dirt bike while practicing manuals on slightly declined terrain. In case you don’t want to buy another bike, just do it on the bike you already call your own. Learning the manual in action is much more effective.
  • 3 0
 From the perspective of someone learning manuals and bunnyhops for the last six months:

It's possibly worth having for building the muscle strength and control needed for the back/forth motion needed once in the manual position. If you video yourself, you'll also see if your position looks right once in the manual. That's useful as it's lower and further back than you'll think, and it may highlight a need to work on flexibility to get that low.

It's no use for learning how to actually get the front wheel up in the first place, which for me was the hardest part, or how to steer side to side while in the manual.

As others have said, it also only replicates anything if your remove the chain.
  • 9 0
 For the money, buy the Manual Masterclass from Ryan Leech (ryanleech.com). Get excellent and friendly coaching from a good number of instructors including of course Ryan Leech himself. You can take baby steps and enough attention is given to the bailing (stepping off the rear and slamming the rear brake). I honestly don't see how such a trainer would fit in there as you balance the bike by pushing the rear wheel more or less forwards, I can't see that being the same as having the rear axle being stuck in place and just moving your body around. As you can already ride a bike, I think you'll agree that riding with training wheels won't teach anyone anything about side to side balance. Seems to me it is quite the same with such a manual trainer.
  • 3 0
 I've got a Tilt Industries Balance Trainer and I love it. I don't see how people can say they don't help with manuals, it has definitely helped me get the muscle memory figured out for the balance point. You need to make sure you take your chain off though. Also, you can use it in your basement when there is a foot of snow outside. Spend 30 minutes on one and your core, legs and arms will be sore the next day. The Tilt Industries product is cool because it triples as a bike wall storage mount and they have a service stand attachment coming soon that looks pretty sweet. And it folds up for quick storage.
  • 6 0
 I bought one. Was struggling with the confidence of throwing my weight around enough and letting the front wheel come up whilst rolling downhill. Having this helped me position myself and focus on just the technique and body movements without worrying about getting enough speed, that i might go off sideways into a ditch on fire or looping out too far and accidentally swallowing my bike. Haven't used it as much as i'd like to as i bought it whilst i had a lot of downtime waiting for work to set me up to work from home, but i was back working not long after i got it. But i was starting to get the hang of getting the front wheel up with good technique. A bit more practice and i think i'll get there. Lots of people will say you don't need it and you just learn on your bike when you're out riding. This may hold true for a lot of people but i really struggled with that. Try practicing manuals while out on your bike. If you start getting it a little, maybe just persevere. If you really feel you're not getting anywhere, this could be a worthwhile investment as it was for me. As an added bonus it also provides a great solid base for adjusting suspension settings.
  • 2 0
 @Grosey: Good tips.
Invest in a good rear brake and find a long smooth path (preferably with a slight downslope) and practise. The loop out and catch technique is the only thing you need to learn really, the rest is practice which can be done anywhere, any time you ride. Just make sure your brake pads aren't contaminated as it hurts sliding on your tailbone, especially on the road (speaking from experience).
  • 1 1
 It helps with “forcing you” to get your butt down, and teaching to bend your knees to maintain balance... I threw one together with scrap lumber in 10 minutes (if that)...but it isn’t a magical device, I find it just as hard as trying to do it on the road.

If you get one then you’ll still need to use it for at least weeks, if not months. I can currently manual the space between rollers (could do that before the trainer) but even after weeks of practice I still can’t ride a manual for more than 10-15 feet.
  • 2 0
 Re: manuals - if its tough to hold work on core strength.
  • 1 0
 @Grosey: ugh!!!!
  • 1 3
 show me someone who learn on the trainer and then popping manual on the parking lot. .Never seen no one being able to manual even after winning the fix manual world cup. it's not even the same motion, try pushing with your legs on that stupid thing.
  • 1 3
 @tmittanck: and now? can you manual? sure not
  • 9 1
 There's a sucker born every minute...
  • 2 0
 Of those things the pain station actually looks pretty good - would go nicely in my home gym and look better than the standing desk and wall mounted telly I have. But on the other hand - what I have works and didnt cost me much.
  • 3 1
 I am sad that this is what new people to the sport think of first when we talk about hitting jump and doing manuals. Its a perfect example of how capable bikes have become for new riders and how bikes have exceeded those foundational skills. It blows my mind to see so many riders out on the trail, but completely lack the foundational skills which were essential to have on 56lbs dh rigs from 20 years ago. Thus why I see no new talent on my local trails.
  • 2 0
 Do you get outside your local trails? I live in Kamloops and the young talent is crazy! Head out to the bike ranch any day after school and there’s a handful of kids with serious skills. Maybe your problem is riding in Ottawa, and not the next generation of riders.
  • 1 0
 @drumhellraiser: Kamloops... speak no further! yes the issue is places that used to thrive on building DJ's and ridding downtown features. But now days red tape everywhere so new generations just scooter the parks.....
  • 1 0
 It's a bummer that you purchase one of these as a gift for a kid in the beginning of December and I had to contact them to get status on the 14th. They cant get the orders out until the end of December and didn't bother to reach out to anyone.
  • 3 0
 Sender ramps or MTB Hopper?
  • 3 0
 Can`t give you an opinion on the Sender Ramps, but 5/5 for my MTB Hopper !
  • 3 0
 Hoppers look lighter and look like they have more leg adjustability for use on uneven ground. I was gutted the hoppers weren't heavily discounted this black friday, I was planning an 'impulse' buy!
  • 3 0
 Hopper
  • 1 0
 Sender Ramps
  • 3 0
 This is tickling my Lego fancy.
  • 3 0
 Bricks and whatever piece of wood you can find laying around FTW! ha
  • 2 0
 But if everyone learns to keep the nose up there wont be anymore FRIDAY FAILS!
  • 1 0
 Balance board looks quite cool, will it be available through UK distributor?
  • 1 0
 I think it's actually a UK company. sender-ramps.com
  • 1 0
 @dndhm: Ah yeah, I just saw the US links above and assumed, thanks!
  • 2 0
 I'd use the manual trainer to work on nose manuals instead.
  • 1 0
 we found great skills learning your endo-pivot skills for those tight corners like the French have mastered so well!
  • 2 0
 Looked on the site. So expensive to build a meaningful set of features.
  • 1 0
 Can we have clip-in balance boards? It might render the pain station useless.. but would sure look fun from the outside Wink
  • 2 0
 A good shovel costs around $20... but might cause you to sweat...
  • 1 0
 A shovel and eyes work well too.

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