Shimano Announces New 6-Bolt Ice Tech Rotors

Aug 30, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  

Shimano has added a new rotor option to their lineup, the RT-MT905, which allows riders with 6-bolt hubs to take advantage of the heat dissipation technology that was previously only available in a Centerlock version.

The Ice Technologies Freeza design consists of a layer of aluminum sandwiched between two outer steel layers, with a portion of that aluminum extending below the steel layers to act like a cooling radiator. Compared to stainless steel rotors, Shimano claims the IceTech rotors allow brake pads to last 10% longer, and create a 150°C (270°F) overall temperature reduction.

When the rotors become available in early 2022 there will be 180mm and 203mm versions. Shimano did release a 220mm stainless steel rotor a few months ago, so I wouldn't be surprised if a 220mm version of the RT-MT905 gets added in further down the road. For now, Shimano says that the heat dissipation benefits of IceTech make it possible to avoid going with larger or thicker diameter rotors.

The 180mm version is priced at $85.99 USD, and the 203mm version will retail for $94.99 USD.




Greg Minnaar had the new rotors on for his World Champs winning run, although it didn't really look like he used his brakes that much...



365 Comments

  • 230 2
 Cool
  • 10 2
 Uh oh
  • 8 2
 Uh oh
  • 20 7
 Brake jokes are lame. Slow your roll.
  • 6 4
 Ice Cold
  • 3 4
 C-c-cool-cool-cool... =] #lol
  • 3 2
 Available in 2022
  • 7 3
 @TrailFeatures: you're such a drag...
  • 8 3
 cooler then a polar bears toe nail.
  • 20 3
 At some point these punts are gonna bite. Just not sure when that is.
  • 2 2
 @49thbiker: *Earnest* "EwWwWwWwWe..." o.O
  • 10 26
flag scott-townes (Aug 30, 2021 at 18:40) (Below Threshold)
 cooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooool
  • 13 3
 This is Shimano taking Ice Tech puns too seriously. The moment you leave home on a crisp early summer morning (say 15degC), the claimed 150degC temperature reduction will dump the rotor temperature straight down to -135degC. It will be covered in ice instantly.

Not sure how this is going to help braking performance. But if you just spent 95USD on one you should still be dick about it.
  • 1 4
 @vinay: Where do YOU live? Summer temp is 32-35C where I be(& your rotor will be between ambient temp[15C]& braking temp['X' less 150C], not over 100C below ambient Vinaaay)... =P
  • 7 1
 @TrailFeatures: We can stop it any time
  • 3 4
 @PDXooo: Part of my response was to point out how silly the claimed temperature drop of 150degC is if made without context. If ambient temperature is 20degC, would the rotor temperature be 30degC if a peasant rotor would have been 180degC? Of course not. This temperature drop probably applies to a difference between the ambient temperature and what it would have been otherwise (with a "standard reference" stainless steel rotor). That would have given an idea of what it does. As it is here, it says next to nothing.

I live in The Netherlands. On an "early crisp summer morning" as I mentioned 15degC would be average I think. It may be warmer in places (though 32 to 35C for an early summer morning seems quite warm) and in the mountains these summer mornings are typically a good bit colder. Either way, it doesn't quite matter of course if it was merely meant to illustrate what happens when the temperature drops another 150degC.
  • 25 1
 @vinay: First please tell us what you need brakes for in Netherlands?
  • 4 1
 @bok-CZ: I don't Smile .
  • 5 2
 @vinay: the claim will have nothing to do with ambient temperature but a comparison between operational temperature during high braking situation ie. standard rotor @ 500degC vs. IceTech @ 350degC. Ambient temp will have minimal impact apart from the transition time between ambient to operational temps
  • 2 0
 You bros need to just clamp on the binders and stop this @#$&.
  • 1 0
 ..
  • 2 0
 @YeahGnar: Yes, agreed. The second sentence in my post mentions that relation (though with different numbers, 180degC for standard vs 30degC for Ice Tech but I'll get back to that later). The third sentence seems to be what's being misinterpreted or at least didn't come across as intended. I meant to say there is a temperature difference (dT) between ambient (T0) and the temperature (Ts) of what the standard/reference rotor would reach under the test conditions. If the Ice Tech rotor dissipates the heat quicker (than standard/reference) then the temperature drop (Ice Tech vs standard/reference so Ts-Ti) would be bigger the larger the aforementioned temperature difference dT is. The press release states a fairly large temperature drop of Ts-Ti= 150degC so we should expect quite a big temperature difference dT for that to happen. How much? My example of T0=20degC and Ts=180degC (so dT=160degC) obviously got us an absurd number of Ti=30degC. But would it be the numbers you're suggesting then? The stickers I've seen for logging max rotor temperatures on car brake rotors only go up to 280degC or so. Would people manage to get their standard rotors up to 500degC as you suggest? Mind you aluminium melts below 700degC and (depending on the alloy) becomes affected well below that point. Not sure how the heat transfer is to the brake oil but Shimano oil boils at 280degC (according to epicbleedsolutions.com) so having the rotor up to 350degC sounds scary. But yeah, I haven't actually found anything on how hot mountainbike brake discs become during use (without failure of the system). Has anyone ever tested this with an IR thermometer? Either way, my point was that it just does matter what the temperatures are they used for the test that resulted in the 150degC figure. That of the reference/standard rotor during the test as well as the ambient (lab) temperature.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I was thinking that brake rotors get up to say, 400C & that the Ice Tech gets them down to 250C... How hot do they really get? Say a regular steel rotor... O.O
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Never mind - I just saw Gnar's comment... o.O
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Thick car rotors have a significant improvement in Heat Soak when compared to thin bike rotors - so them having lower operating temps is understandable...
  • 1 0
 @PDXooo: I stand corrected, the stickers I've seen are for the car brake calipers, not the rotors. Has anyone measured the temperature of a brake rotor (using an IR sensor for instance)?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: you can't measure temperature with IR on anything reflective, because it's reflective to IR radiation as well and causes significant misreadings.
But you can guesstimate the temperatures by the colors the disc shows right next to the braking surface after intense use. de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anlauffarbe
Looks like 300, maybe up to 400 degree centigrade are possible on steel discs, depends of course on ambient temperature and the amount of energy the brake needs to dissipate. That said, my freeza discs show no discoloration, so I guess it works. I always struggled with fading brake power, it's almost completely gone now. Really like them
  • 1 0
 @PDXooo: car rotors can reach 800 degrees c fairly quick in a race or on longer downhills. You can see them glowing red inside the wheel. Car brakes are (usually) not designed for persistent high loads.
  • 1 0
 @whoopsy: Thanks. The discoloration is permanent I suppose. I once got that when I tried a Marta 2007 brake. The front 160mm rotor was black and blue in few laps (on a trail with maybe 10m descends, me being about 67kg at the time) so apparently it didn't have enough capacity for even short descends (no dragging, just short hard dabs). And the color was permanent indeed and I recall it did affect brake performance. So I suppose the discoloration is to be avoided as we could consider a discolored rotor no longer effective. Your link suggests the rotor already turns yellow at 200degC so is that to be avoided already? It is probably a different steel as I understand the link considers tool steel whereas the brake rotors are stainless.

As for the car, I suppose these rarely are being used heavily at a low speed (as might happen on a bike when riding a steep tech descend) so they get to cool quicker. If you expect to descend for a longer bit in a car (like on a descending road) obviously one should use engine braking and usually the road signs suggest that too.

Either way, this is all nice for research and all. The only question I had (and maybe it got lost in the discussion) is, what exact temperature did the reference/standard stainless steel rotor reach in the lab test which the Ice Tech rotor stood 150degC below?
  • 1 0
 @PDXooo: I’ve always wondered if ice tech rotors do anything your aluminium usually black hub doesn’t already do. The aluminium core is supposed to draw heat away from the braking surface but surely your aluminium hub will do exactly the same thing as in absorbing heat form the rotor?
  • 1 0
 @49thbiker: cooler than the other side of the pillow
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: The spider should both draw heat away & release heat to the surrounding air - the hub doing that is just coincidental(& minimal, depending on the grade of the alloy)... =]
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I cooked my rear Avid HS1 rotor in Chatel cos my front pads were gone. I remember the boiling like noise the rotor and caliper made the hole lift up for the next run. The next ride the brake was gone,but a long stop for lunch fix it. The rotor came to normal color the next day of ridding. I still have that rotor and it is fine,you could use it again no problem.
  • 1 0
 @bok-CZ: not hitting your car at the end of the ride (or when on holiday of course).
  • 181 54
 Screw centerlock
  • 53 140
flag p-m-z (Aug 30, 2021 at 14:37) (Below Threshold)
 no, I hate 6 bolts coming loose(even with lock tight on it). centerlock is da best
  • 58 32
 @p-m-z: Ever had a centerlock come loose mid-ride? Super fun trying to get it tight again.
  • 103 4
 I want to say the same but I do love everything about them. More secure, less parts to drop when putting on/taking off, no damaged torx bolts, no loctite needed, no uneven overtightening, and most important, lighter for weight weenies. I would never change my hub to accommodate them but if you gave me the option with no cost difference it would go centerlock.
  • 116 10
 @toast2266: No i tighten my components CORRECTLY the first time.
  • 23 56
flag locaroka (Aug 30, 2021 at 15:18) (Below Threshold)
 @rideonjon: I can't remember all the CORRECTLY ways to do bolt rotors as I am just a dad that doesn't work in a bike shop or spend his hours tuning bikes. Not everyone wants to spend the big $ on a nm wrench, look up the torque settings for Sram at 6.2nm and Shimano at 2-4nm and who knows what other brands specific torque setting. Also, dig out the old loctite and find out that it's gone solid. Don't forget to do the damn tightening pattern when you do tighten them all up. The basic biker just gets a rusty torx and cranks it in. Centerlock makes it easy for everyone not just the bike gurus.
  • 94 5
 @locaroka:

So confused that you believe a “bike guru” is needed to mount a rotor.......
  • 9 24
flag locaroka (Aug 30, 2021 at 15:32) (Below Threshold)
 @AckshunW: Just a bit of tongue and cheek with regards to doing it CORRECTLY.
  • 18 15
 @locaroka: using a star pattern or whatever when install a rotor or anything else on a bike is a complete waste of time. It's not a head gasket lol
  • 56 14
 Not trying to be mean, but if someone can’t if install 6 bolt rotors, they probably shouldn’t leave their house, much less go mountain biking. It’s pretty hard to screw up. You don’t need a torque wrench unless you are ridiculously ham-fisted. I’d never ride a hub (or a frame with suspension hardware) that required me carry a BB tool on my rides.
  • 6 7
 My bad. Cassette tool. I think. Same either way.
  • 17 0
 @locaroka: torque and cheek *
  • 30 39
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 30, 2021 at 16:07) (Below Threshold)
 @locaroka: Centre lock sucks mainly because they rock on the spines when braking on rough ground and sound horrible and secondly because they’re completely utterly pointless. Yes it does the job but not as well as 6 little bolts and they require a massive bottom bracket tool which you won’t have on a ride incase it comes lose which they do unlike 6 bolt and in the unlikely event that a 6 bolt comes lose every multi tool has the right tool to fix it. I’m currently running centre locks and I have absolutely no idea why they exist.
  • 4 0
 @muscogeemasher: u were right the first time
  • 3 1
 @lognar: thx for the correction. You can see how quick I bailed before even considering them. Not willing to carry either.
  • 9 1
 @locaroka: SRAM has the torque settings on the rotors, and Centerlock also needs a torque wrench..?
  • 3 5
 @rideonjon: you've never had any part come loose on your bike ever? I hope someone is paying you lots of money for your infinitely superior mechanicing skills.
  • 10 2
 The worst part was Shimano throwing Centerlock to supposedly enhance component integration (use the same cassette tool etc) and pushing the 15mm standard to make it work. Then they had to come up with a different standard for the 20mm hubs, or Centerlock rotors wouldn't have e in DH/FR
And now we have boost axles to improve the strength of a sub par axle diameter and wagon wheels... What a joke...
  • 36 1
 @toast2266: if you had a center lock come loose you’re doing it wrong
  • 7 0
 @rideonjon: so , why does your 6 bolts come loose?
  • 7 2
 @locaroka: paha dude, don't do anything if you can't figure out how to install a rotor. Did you know that everything including your center lock need a torque wrench? No? Well then you don't know a thing.
  • 35 0
 @toast2266: Never had a brake rotor come loose.EVER.
  • 4 0
 @Serpentras: Reading is hard......you have to tighten the bolts the first time you install the part.Duh.
  • 33 30
 Anybody who thinks that a system that relies on six things being properly tightened is better than a system that only relies on one is not someone I would trust with my brakes.

I've used both systems extensively and both are fine. I never had either one come loose in all my years of riding, nor have I had any "rocking" on my centerlock bikes. I have however had countless ISO bolt heads snap off and need drilling...that's something I don't have to worry about with centerlock. Centerlock is so much simpler and quite frankly, the future. People just haven't accepted it yet.
  • 17 0
 @p-m-z: In 12 years of riding I've never had a rotor bolt come loose.
  • 1 2
 @rideonjon: understanding is hard , duh?
It doesn't matter if you neve get something loose, you could even use a stick.
  • 16 3
 Quick everyone pick a disc type and be a d!ck about it… but seriously screw center lock. I can replace my lost cleat bolt with a center lock disc.
  • 4 0
 Can’t?
  • 11 0
 @blackthorne: No kidding! I've been on CL for years and have never had one "suddenly loosen itself up" the way some posters insinuate happens. I put it on the hub, spin the ring on and torque it to 30ftlbs (yes, I'm an American) and that's the last time I think about it. "I don't wanna buy a torque wrench" LMAO.
  • 2 4
 @rideonjon: wait, so you tighten your rotors correctly but you've had other components come loose that were therefore tightened incorrectly? That seems kinda dumb. You should just tighten all of your components correctly.
  • 4 17
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 30, 2021 at 18:03) (Below Threshold)
 @Compositepro: the sooner centre lock no longer exists the better.
  • 3 2
 @muscogeemasher: True
  • 2 2
 @Serpentras: Whooosh!
  • 13 5
 @TheRaven: Ever heard of redundancy? One of the great things about the six bolt system is that it does NOT rely on all six bolts to be properly tightened. One or two loose bolts doesn’t change the performance of the system a bit.
  • 4 0
 Are there people here that are really saying they can't figure out how to tighten 6 bolts? yeesh
  • 9 2
 @Blackhat: I have. That's why Centerlock has so many splines. It's even possible for Centerlock to work without a lockring at all.
  • 9 6
 @TheRaven: if its been around this long and people haven't accepted it yet, its not the future
  • 3 6
 @TheRaven: yeah any my rotors will even work with 2 bolts
  • 5 3
 @TheRaven: I see. So redundancy matters when talking about center lock. But all six bolts have to be tightened perfectly. Got it.
  • 29 0
 Wow, there are a lot of strong feelings about this up in here.

I’m totally agnostic. I’ve got both and they both work great. I don’t really know what y’all are on about. With either standard, if you’re having rotors come loose mid-ride, there’s some pretty serious user error happening.
  • 1 0
 @rideonjon: then there are many shimano rider that don't know how to tighten correctly then!
  • 3 0
 Honestly I’ve had more loose rotors on six bolt than centrelock. My current bikes are six bolt but I don’t mind centrelock. I quite like shimano hubs and still have some on spare wheels. I would prefer my next bike came with shimano hubs than some of the oem specials that appear on some models. If that means centrelock, I’m ok with that.
  • 5 6
 @locaroka: Forget the loctite on rotors.......use copper never sieze---deeper, longer and tighter and never loosen or sieze!!!! I put that shit on everything!!!
  • 5 0
 holy shit, who knew center lock vs 6 bolt was such a decisive topic
  • 28 0
 Pick a rotor standard and be a disc about it!
  • 3 0
 @p-m-z: I've been riding six bolt rotors for almost 2 decades and never once had a bolt come loose.
  • 3 2
 @mhoshal: congrats, I've had 3, 6 bolt rotors and they have came lose every other ride. even if i slather them with lock tite. i really don't care if others like 6 bolt I just prefer centerlock
  • 2 0
 I am indifferent between the two. but for those complaining about CL coming loose on trail, check out the portable CL disc tool from Terske. Zero reason not to catty one if you use CL. Issue solved.
  • 12 6
 Center lock is much better design in so many ways the normal 6 bolt flange
1. It’s easier to maintain
2. All though big tool required it make it easier to get the bike ready for flights and back to ride.
3. I never ever had a lose rotor , all you have to do is use the correct torque.
4. Hubs have a cleaner look
5. It is defiantly a better engineering solution which is unfortunately not excepted by closed minded riders. Every mechanic see the advantages. Same as racing cars single nut wheel changing set up. @thenotoriousmic:
  • 22 0
 @dllawson819: why not use CL with 6bolt adaptors and have the drawbacks of both?
  • 2 0
 I’m mostly in the ‘don’t really care’ camp, but would say CL has a clear advantage. I’m naturally lazy, so the thought of having to remove 12 little bolts when I pack my bike for a trip (and then have to re-install them when I arrive), does not fill me with excitement. CL is much quicker when you often remove your discs. I can imagine that you don’t care if you only remove them when they are worn out (or if you’re not lazy like me).
  • 1 2
 @TheRaven: you could argue however that if one thing comes loose however its done with 6 bolts if one comes loose the ithe 5 have a chance, these are the choices you make

I know folks who cack handedly could balls both up
  • 1 2
 @TheRaven: ive had the rocking thing myself some people overtorque the ring to get rid of it,
  • 3 11
flag OneTrustMan (Aug 30, 2021 at 23:58) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven:
Centerlock isn't simpler.
You need a cassette, or bb tool and a wrench.
While 6 bolt rotors can be installed with even the cheapest china multi tools.
6 bolt is much simpler than centerlock, in fact it can't get any more simpler.

And yes I have both.
  • 3 0
 Once had an Easton hub with those 6 holes not aligned... Only CL for me from that time and no regrets. You only need a cassette and BB tool which many people already own.
  • 5 1
 Few comments here,
1. Centrlock adoption has nothing to do with what the people want it's purely political as to weather brands want to align with Shimano standards or not, can you ever see Sram making a centrelock rotor and admitting it's better?
2. Those worrying about one bolt coming loose vs 6 havn't factored in the locking washer and toothed faces that make centrelock much more secure, and while some lockrings need a big BB tool, most use a Cassette tool which is much smaller (my little one up multi tool actually has a tool to tighten a cassette lockring) plus is anyone running around complainging about how thier cranks, cassettes, seatposts, rear mechs, pedals and even wheels are fixed with just one bolt.
3. I will admit that even though it has no impact on performance the slight wiggle back and forth that centrelock somtimes has is quite offputting.
  • 5 0
 @maglor: I suspect it's not just political, but also cost - stamping a flat bit of stainless into a disc, and slinging 6 pretty standard bolts into the bag is cheap. Casting an aluminium disc hub, machining splines, pinning it together, machining a nut with pretty odd thread (for the non MTB world) and adding splines to that is not cheap. Plus the same splines and thread onto the hub. For those reasons, 6 bolt will remain on low to mid price bikes, even if there were no politics. So CL is just an unnecessary standard.
I've got the one-up tool, and it's great. But it won't go over the axle to do up a CL rotor, I think.
  • 5 2
 @maglor: centrrlock does not have a wiggle, at least not on shimano or dt hubs i have owned. They have always been dead stiff for me. If you have a wiggle in cl mount, you should claim your warranty...
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: You're right cost is a factor but there's always a lower price cutoff for certain technology or standards due to cost, cheap bikes will always miss out on standards that we would just expect to have on proper bikes, like through axles (cranks and wheels), threadless headsets, trigger shifters, air suspension, tubeless and much more, doesnt mean that good bikes should also use them same bits becuase it works for the cheap bikes. also worth noting shimano sells centrlock rotors as cheap as £14.99 and thier hubs are among the cheapest too so can't be that expensive to make, only bikes that cost less than a few hundred quid will miss out and who wants one of those bike shaped objects anyway.
Oh and for the one up tool most hubs have end caps that just pop off out the way for bearing access.
  • 4 0
 I'm loving this. Gonna have to nuke myself another bag of popcorn.
  • 5 0
 @mhoshal: I once had all six bolts come loose on a ride, I've had to create my own nine bolt rotors just to be sure
  • 4 3
 @nullzwo: haha I’m currently running 6 bolt ice tech rotors with centre lock adapters with Ice tech finned pads for the noisiest possible set up. Would not recommend.
  • 2 12
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 3:55) (Below Threshold)
 @luriaguy: everything you said was wrong. You can put a 6 bolt rotor on with any multi tool or the tools you can find in any random garage and it will never come loose. Centre locks require a massive BB tool that nobody owns and doesn’t fit in your bag and doesn’t securely fix your rotor demonstrated by the noise your rotor makes as you rock forwards and backwards with the brakes on.
  • 1 0
 @p-m-z: something is wrong if that's happening
  • 1 0
 @locaroka: have you ever changed a wheel on a car? Bolting up 6 bolts in a star pattern is literally one of the more basic mechanical aptitudes.
  • 5 0
 @thenotoriousmic: If someone owns a non-pressfit Shimano crank, he must also own a BB tool...
  • 1 9
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 5:04) (Below Threshold)
 @lkubica: It’s a very specific tool that you won’t have unless you specifically brought it with you and why would you? It’s massive unlike a multi tool. Sorry the debate is over. 6 bolt wins again. Next question.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: You do realise centrelock rotors can be used with a lockring that requires a cassette tool and not a BB tool, which is much smaller and while not as simple as a multitool is still easy to carry should you wish, not that the rotors have a habit of coming loose anyway.
  • 1 0
 @maglor: annoyingly, there's no way of getting the axle out of the way on the Bitex rear hub on my road bike without first removing the CL disc... Which meant I had to buy a new cassette tool, as the axle didn't fit inside either of my existing cassette tools, which work fine with cassettes and one up head sets
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: That's quite a specific ploblem to be fair and sounds more down to poor hub design than anything else.
  • 3 9
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 6:17) (Below Threshold)
 @maglor: Yeah I’ll just take a spanner and a cassette tool instead of bb tool in my bag, problem solved abs let’s not forget how chewed up those cassette tool bolts get when your torque them to recommended. The amount of tile I’ve spent trying to get my cassette tool that’s gouged itself into the bolt is unreal.

Nope debate is over 6 bolt has won again. There’s no straws to clutch that will change the fact 6 bolt is vastly superior. The simplest solution is always the best.
  • 19 4
 Ok lets straighten some things out here:

1 - Centerlock is absolutely simpler than 6-bolt. It's got two parts, including the rotor. You can put the rotor on the hub without the lockring and it would still work - which means that if the lockring comes loose or straight up falls off somehow during your ride, you still have that brake to get you back to your truck. Sure you might have to stop periodically to re-seat the rotor but there's no chance of this working with 6-bolt setups. Regardless, in my 22 years of riding, i've never seen or heard of a rider having either system so much as come loose.

2 - You don't need to carry a new tool with you because of centerlock. It uses the same tool your cassette does. Oh you don't take a cassette tool with you now because cassettes don't come loose? Yeah, neither does centerlock...for the same reasons. Oh you have the DT wheels that require the BB tool? Same situation.

3 - Centerlock is not a new or weird system. It's taken from automotive splined wheel hubs that have been used since the beginning of suspensions. 70 years ago, cars had splined hubs, and they still do today. Why? Because it's the best design for the job. F1 and SRO WCC racecars have used splined wheel and brake interfaces for decades. These are the absolute top of the food chain in racing, no expense spared exercises in automotive engineering...the best of the best, and they haven't found a better system.

4 - Centerlock hasn't been accepted as the future yet because people are scared of change. It took nearly 70 years for seatbelts to be accepted. Nuff said.
  • 9 13
flag toast2266 (Aug 31, 2021 at 6:54) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: as long as we're straightening things out:

Centerlock costs more, it's not repairable on trail, it's not redundant, it's not backwards compatible, and it's much less common than 6 bolt.

It's a solution to a problem that doesn't exist. It was shimano's way of trying to maintain relevance in the hub market by creating a proprietary system, but all they did was take a standard that was nearly universal (6 bolt rotor mounts) and f*ck the whole system up by introducing another standard with limited adoption.

The pinkbike comment section likes to go on rants about new standards that are introduced for no apparent benefit to the end user. Centerlock is a case study in exactly that.
  • 8 1
 @toast2266: Centerlock does cost more, and is less common. Neither system is "repairable on trail" or "backwards compatible".

The vast majority of "innovations" in MTB are solutions to problems that didn't exist. Hub standards are the premier example of this. That said, Centerlock does improve on the rotor-to-hub interface, albeit in a relatively expensive way.

We agree on the unnecessary standards...but I rather like centerlock...it actually has a few benefits for a modest price - unlike constantly changing hub sizes that force you to buy a new frame for nothing at all.
  • 5 7
 @TheRaven: I have a t25 wrench on my multi tool, but not a cassette lockring tool. That makes 6 bolts substantially more repairable on trail. Aside from things coming loose, if I nuke a rotor on a rock and need to remove it so the wheel will spin freely so I can ride out, I can do that with a 6 bolt, but not with a centerlock.

6 bolts were the original disc standard, so there is nothing to be backwards compatible with. Centerlock is the new "standard," which is not backwards compatible.
  • 1 8
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 7:57) (Below Threshold)
  • 13 0
 @toast2266: You don't need to tighten centerlock on the trail, ever. I find it hard to believe you would ever need to tighten 6-bolt ever. This is a non-issue, and even if it were, you can ride centerlock just fine with a loose lockring.

If you nuke a rotor, you bend it back. If you nuke a rotor so bad that you can't bend it back sufficiently, you are going to have other problems that are going to keep you from riding out. These complaints referencing theoretical problems that never actually happen are pretty silly.

And yes, centerlock is backwards compatible in the context you are speaking:

content.competitivecyclist.com/images/items/900/SHI/SHI009S/BK.jpg
  • 2 13
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 8:05) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: which part of this debate is over didn’t you understand? About as much as you understand about brake rotors by the sounds of it Wink . You can only use a cassette tool on your rear wheel assuming your using some kind of through axel with your fork so that’s a cassette tool, bb tool and some kind of spanner instead of the multi tool you was going to take anyway and let’s not forget if you want to use decent rotors you’re probably going to need 6 bolt adapters. I’m using centre locks now and yes they do work but not as well as 6 bolt so what’s the point and why are shimano still pushing them 20 years later? If they haven’t taken off in 20 years they’re never going to take off.
  • 14 0
 @thenotoriousmic: What part of YOU DON'T NEED TO TAKE A TOOL FOR CENTERLOCK WITH YOU ON RIDES do you not understand? About as much as you understand about interfaces by the sounds of it.

None of what you posted is correct. You were never in the debate to begin with. No surprise you think it's over.
  • 3 10
flag toast2266 (Aug 31, 2021 at 8:16) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: I don't need to tighten a centerlock on trail, ever. Except for all those times I've seen a centerlock come loose on trail.

Sure I can lecture my buddy about not properly torquing stuff. But that doesn't do me much good when we're 15 miles from the car and his stupid centerlock rotor is loose.
  • 6 2
 @toast2266: Your buddy has nothing to worry about, he can still ride his bike. But it doesn't matter because it doesn't happen anyway. I'm not even going to get into "proper torqueing" because I don't even do it. You don't need to. Neither centerlock nor 6-bolt comes loose as long as you do the standard regular bike-look-over like any frequent rider does.
  • 6 1
 I have SRAM Centerline CL rotors on 3 different DT 350 hubs and there is absolutely no rocking back and forth even without the lock ring installed. It must happen on some hubs or people wouldn't say it, but it doesn't happen on DT 350s.
  • 8 0
 @toast2266: Sounds like your buddy needs some tough love. A nice brisk 15 mile walk back to the car will give him all the time he needs to learn how to properly maintain a machine.
  • 4 10
flag toast2266 (Aug 31, 2021 at 8:39) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: this is not a hypothetical situation. I've seen plenty of rotors (both 6 bolt and centerlock) come loose on rides. 6 bolts are a quick and easy fix with a tool that almost everyone carries. Centerlocks involve jamming a flathead screwdriver into the splines and hitting it with a rock until it's sorta tight, and then hoping that holds for the remainder of the ride.

If centerlocks solved some problem or had any clearly defined benefit, maybe that bullshit would be worth it. But they don't. They solve zero problems, they create problems that didn't previously exist, they're less likely to be in stock at shops, and they cost more. I have no idea why someone would willingly put them on their bike.
  • 2 10
flag toast2266 (Aug 31, 2021 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 @DBone95: the tough love isn't learning how to maintain a machine, it's learning to not buy stupid proprietary braking systems that have no tangible benefit.
  • 11 1
 @toast2266: I can't explain this to you any more clearly. YOU DON'T NEED TO RE-TIGHTEN CENTERLOCK LIKE YOU DO WITH 6-BOLT. KEEP RIDING. Fix it when you get home.

^^^^^^^^ CLEARLY DEFINED BENEFIT ALERT!!! ^^^^^^^^^
  • 9 1
 @toast2266: lol!! Keep on waiving that fist and gnashing those teeth..... "Damn you centerlock, damn you straight to hell". LMAO.
  • 2 11
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 8:52) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: Calm down please try and control your emotions. Unfortunately the debate ended 20 years ago when we as a community rejected centre lock and stuck vastly superior 6 bolt design.
  • 1 11
flag toast2266 (Aug 31, 2021 at 8:53) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: Sweet, so I can tell my buddy he can ride out with his centerlock rotor clanging around and rubbing constantly instead of just taking 15 seconds to snug up a 6 bolt? These clear benefits are pretty dubious.
  • 1 11
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 8:56) (Below Threshold)
 @toast2266: don’t waste your time. You’ve absolutely destroyed him with facts and he hasn’t changed his opinion. He’s not interested in listening he’s just trying to win the argument. Just let him think what he wants to think as he’s dribbling nonsense all over his phone.
  • 4 0
 @toast2266: that's almost exactly how I tightened the CL disc when I first fitted it on my fancy new road wheel, except I used a mini pry bar and plastic hammer... I'll admit that it didn't come loose, so I never had to figure out how to tighten it at the side of the road!
I think roadies like CL as they're clean looking and slightly more aero
  • 2 8
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 8:59) (Below Threshold)
 @toast2266: speaking from experience. The rotor doesn’t fall off but you do have to stop all the time to wind the lock ring up by hand to stop you trashing your rotor and calliper. I’ve never had 6 bolt fail not even a single lose bolt.
  • 1 1
 @DBone95: so let me get this straight: you went and removed all 6 lock rings on your 3 bikes and reinstalled the wheels and rotors to test this? If you went through all this hassle can you do it again and upload it to youtube? you seem like youve got the time. Let me know.
  • 1 6
flag lognar (Aug 31, 2021 at 9:03) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: lol the riding with loose shit is ok mindset is also a good way to ruin a bunch of expensive stuff
  • 5 0
 @lognar: What? Can you not imagine that I have multiple bikes? I didn't think it was that hard to decipher, but I was wrong. No CL rotors rock back and forth on any of my 4 wheelsets. All with DT 350s and all with SRAM Centerline rotors. If you don't believe me, ask me if I care...
  • 7 2
 @thenotoriousmic: There never was a debate. Centerlock is only growing in popularity.

@toast2266: And what do you do when your six bolts are sheared clean off? No riding out then. Yeah, I know, that would never happen. JUST LIKE CENTERLOCK COMING LOOSE WOULD NEVER HAPPEN.

@lognar: It doesn't ruin anything. That's exactly the point of the design. You can ride out with a loose or missing lockring, just like you can on a cassette.
  • 9 0
 The funny thing about all of this to me is, I have had both 6-bolt and CL rotors over 10s of 1000s of miles and have never had a single issue with either. Not one loose screw. Not a single loose lockring. Nothing. I prefer CL now as I think it is a much better system. F1 seems to have no problem with a central lockingring on their wheels...... dumbasses.
  • 1 7
flag toast2266 (Aug 31, 2021 at 9:19) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: you're equating something rattling loose with shearing 6 bolts clean off? With that kind of logic, it's no wonder you're a centerlock fan.
  • 1 4
 @maglor: no ine is worrying about one bolt coming loose are worrying about the one lockring coming loose in design terms you forget to do one thing up it can come and bite you in the ass if you manage to f*ck six things up you are the ass also centrelock was iirc designed or one of its considerations was for rapid assembly by OEMs odd thread as in 24 tpi like all the others ?
  • 7 0
 @DBone95: Same. Both systems are trouble-free. Centerlock is better because it's the simpler system. That's all there is to the discussion.

@toast2266: I am, because it's the same logic. Both scenarios fall under "sh!t that doesn't happen"
  • 2 0
 @atrokz: you must have a big car for 6 bolts my pickupbonly has 5
  • 1 6
flag Serpentras (Aug 31, 2021 at 9:37) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: I don't believe you. I have seen sheared off bolts, I have see open CLs
I also have seen a broken AXS deraileur without an impact broken on the parallelogram.

Never assume it doesn't exist because I didn't saw it yet.
  • 7 0
 @Serpentras: Don't misunderstand, i'm not saying that it has never happened in the history of mountain biking. Of course it has...and trees have fallen on and killed mountain bikers too, but we don't all ride in iron suits just in case. You can't possibly be equipped to handle every possible situation that may come up on your ride...with or without brake rotors. The point here is that the chances of you needing to re-tighten your properly-tightened lock ring or bolts on a ride are so slim that you can file those situations right along side the falling tree situation.
  • 2 1
 @Serpentras: i got two punctures the other day on my road bike in 20 years i havent had a puncture i swear it
  • 1 13
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 10:02) (Below Threshold)
 @DBone95: it’s a completely different sport with different set of requirements and an entirely different budget. It simply comes down to the fact that 6 bolts don’t rock on the spine, your not forced to use Shimano’s overpriced monkey metal rotors or adapter and if you did have an issues with your rotor out on a ride you’ll be able to work on it with a multi tool and a replacement will be much easier to source than a centre lock rotor.

@TheRaven: I can’t tell if your trolling or just have learning difficulties, nobody can be this stupid. Why don’t you have a big think about the pro’s and cons of 6 bolt vs centre lock before commenting again or just go back through the comments and actually listen this time or maybe just wait another 20 years to see if centre lock finally takes off.
  • 6 0
 @thenotoriousmic: "Different budget"? Ummm, OK?. The cool thing about this sport is you can use, or not use, what you want. You can continue to be scared of centerlock for any of a million different hypothetical reasons, and that's fine with me. I can continue to use CL or 6-bolt and never give either a second thought once I install them and that's fine with me too.... You must really hate lock on grips!! lol
  • 9 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Cool story bro. It's fun watching your comments get downvoted into oblivion like always. Same fanboi different day.
  • 2 8
flag Blackhat (Aug 31, 2021 at 10:28) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: Reminds me of my old SRAM GXP cranks. Through some combination of user error, design flaw, and manufacturing issues the clinch bolt (that calls for ALL the Nm) would loosen from time to time. A pain in the ass since my multi tool didn’t have an 8mm allen, and if it did could not put a tenth of the required torque on it, but at least that splined interface got me home. Overtime the problem happened more and more frequently no matter how I torqued it, until finally the crank arm wobbled even while the cheater bar was actively torquing the bolt. Turns out those splines were eating themselves just a little with each loose pedal stroke.

Splines are great when they’re machined to tolerance and tightened down to prevent all movement. And without movement a properly tightened lock ring won’t back out. But a slightly loose spline interface messes all that up and leads to problems like movement in the parking lot and repeatedly loosening lock rings no matter how carefully it’s tightened.

And the bike industry is simply awful at achieving tight tolerances. Even on top of the line equipment as Hambini demonstrates.

So I’m sure plenty of people - yourself included - have had fine experiences with center lock. It may even be the technically superior design when made to tolerance. But that doesn’t make it a better design for the real world bike industry, it doesn’t mean it improves the user experience, it doesn’t change the fact the existing design worked perfectly fine, and it doesn’t invalidate the bad experiences of all the people who have had them back out despite having no issue with 6 bolt.

Anyway, good luck with your hub after riding out with that loose rotor. Hopefully you won’t need a new one. Thanks for helping me clarify why I dislike centerlock.
  • 10 1
 @Blackhat: Again you're talking about problems that just don't happen. I can rattle off a list of things that can happen with 6-bolt too, like bolt heads shearing off and leaving bolt studs in the hubs that can't be drilled out. Or threads stripping...all of these things are problems that can require hub replacement, and all are also things that can't happen with Centerlock. But just like the stuff that CAN happen with Centerlock, these are all things that essentially DON'T happen. So trying to use them as justification for hating on the interface itself is very petty.

But you do bring up a great example of another tool we don't have on the trail that we sometimes need - a big enough wrench to re-tighten crank bolts. I've had the same thing happen to me and it also eventually destroyed the cranks. But the splined interface on that type of crank is very different than the one on centerlock. That difference is why the splines on Shimano's pinch-bolt cranks are also very different, and unsurprisingly very much like axle and hub splines on race cars. It's a better system.
  • 6 0
 @TheRaven:

All this Passionate discussion is great and all, but none of it matters—- I’m introducing a new standard to rule them all: Spoke Mount!!!! No new fasteners at all, all you have to do to change rotors is remove your tire, detention your wheel, thread 11 of your spokes through these little loops on the back of the rotor, and put it all back together. KISS principal of course.
  • 3 6
 @AckshunW: will spoke mount cost more without offering any benefit? If so, I think you'll do pretty well with that.
  • 8 0
 @TheRaven: a noble effort spending so many words on these ancient luddites.
  • 1 0
 @rideonjon: I was laughing last night and thought of you when I dropped my daughter and 5 friends off for a shuttle on Mt. Seymour. I did a pre-check as usual on the bikes. One kid had 4 loose bolts, one of which was causing damage to the frame. Two others had loose bolts on their bikes. 15 year old kids, all downhill racers, all poor bike mechanics. I know it's a very small sample size and the the kids ride pretty hard and the terrain is as rugged as it gets so the bikes get trashed. My daughters bike was fine as I must have tighten the bolts correctly, phew.
  • 4 4
 @TheRaven: Rotor movement in the parking lot was reported in this very comment thread by someone supporting centerlock. Loose lock rings are regularly reported as an issue with the system both in this thread and on the internet generally. It's hard to take you seriously when you say they don't happen.

You're flatly dismissing the lockring issue as user error, but you weren't there when they tightened the lockring, and you haven't measured the spline interface of the rotor/hub. And the cycling population seems perfectly competent to tighten lockrings on cassettes, yet they become ham fisted monkeys when a brake is involved?

What's interesting is that people seem to report no problems, or constant problems. This would be very strange if human error was to blame since we are inherently variable and generally pay close attention when working on something that failed recently. It seems far more likely that in some cases the hub/rotor is made correctly and the users ride along with no issues for years, while others receive a defective product that allows the ring to loosen. OR... the spline interface eats itself the first time you make a mistake.

I do agree that the SRAM interface is a particularly poor design, which combined with their sloppy manufacturing is why I'll always avoid their cranks. And yes, shimano cranks employ a far better spline, with a redundant pinch bolt system. It's funny though - centerlock does not use redundant pinch bolts. It uses the same high torque end cap approach as SRAM cranks. And I'm going to bet that if you loosened the pinch bolts on a Shimano crank and go for a ride it will eat itself as effectively as any SRAM crank. If you don't agree feel free to try it and report back.
  • 1 7
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 11:57) (Below Threshold)
 @DBone95: Yeah man I really hate lock on grips. Push ons are so much better. ODI longnecks and a can of spray paint and they’ll never slip and the grip performs so much better without the plastic core. Definitely worth trying considering how cheap they are compared to lock ons . And like I said I’m currently using centre lock hubs and I have done loads in the past nothing wrong with them just not as good as 6 bolt for previously mentioned reasons so what’s the point in a more complicated design which isn’t quite as good?

@TheRaven: I doubt it was as much fun as watching you shout and strop on the internet because somebody poked fun at something silly you’d said. I look forward to more of the same next week when your banging on about how great cup and cone bearings are or something equally as stupid.
  • 9 1
 @Blackhat: As I already explained, when I say "it doesn't happen" I don't mean it in the literal sense. I mean it happens as often as all six bolts coming loose on a six bolt setup - pretty much never. That doesn't mean NEVER. Pick a large enough sample size and you'll find examples of both. That doesn't change the fact that it doesn't happen enough to warrant carrying a tool for it.

The bottom line is this - both systems are in the same category when it comes to problems - if someone is having chronic loosening issues on either one, they are doing something wrong. I'm not going to get into "proper torque" because I don't even do it. I just make it tight, and go ride. Centerlock lockrings have ridges that interface with ridges on the hub so that they can't back out. That means, by physical law, if the ring backs out, it wasn't tight. I'm not going to speculate on the user's mechanical ability cause it doesn't matter. I've NEVER had a single issue of any kind out on the trail with either system. I have had plenty of bolts shear off though when trying to swap discs. Fortunately that happens on the bench and not on the trail.
  • 1 10
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 12:05) (Below Threshold)
 @Blackhat: I’ve had rotor knock from the back wheel of every centre lock hub I’ve ever had. Scrapped a shimano wheel and and slx rotor because the noise was too bad last summer.
  • 6 1
 @thenotoriousmic: LOL Bye!!

Took about 8 minutes this time.
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: pickup trucks use them here. My cayenne does only have 5 though. Haha
  • 1 8
flag Blackhat (Aug 31, 2021 at 12:48) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: Even by your own standards your claim is not true. The simple fact is there are a lot of reports of centerlock coming loose, and very few for 6 rotor bolts. I'm willing to consider a reporting bias, but the ratio is not even close. Multiple people have reported chronic issues in this thread, and none have reported similar with 6 bolt here.

You keep circling back to faith in the design and tolerances, plus your N=1 experience. Maybe you've never had an issue because you've been lucky enough to get products that happened to be within the required tolerances? You're just one datapoint. There are enough others reporting issues that it's reasonable to ask if there's a fundamental issue with the implementation.

Why are you so defensive about this? Like, if people were attacking your personal experience I would get it. But it's the opposite - No one is saying your rotor is loose, but you're speaking with complete certainty about others experiences without ever seeing the parts in question. Saying things like "if someone is having chronic loosening issues on either one, they are doing something wrong." You simply don't know that. You don't know that their parts are in spec. It's weird that this is so important to you.
  • 1 1
 @DBone95: lol the wheels are driven with stud not the nut
  • 1 0
 @toast2266: do you know how much it would take to shear six bolts off all at once lol honestly someone will say its happened …. Not to them but they will have seen it
  • 1 9
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 13:02) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: yet everyone agrees centre lock sucks but you so by your logic you’re wrong again. Keep stamping those feat.
  • 2 2
 @TheRaven: there is nothing simpler than a bolt its that simple they have been around longer than seatbelts what centrelock is is a fancy big odd thread driven by a special splined interface to tighten it from the get go it isnt simple its a special fastener it then sits on a spline which is not as simple as a hole with a thread in it to produce , you are saying its easy to do up one very complex bolt others are saying its easier to screw in 6 simple ones
  • 3 3
 @Blackhat: its almost a shame we cant post videos my road bike has rotors that rock on the spline anyone that says it doesnt happen is f*cking clueless
  • 1 4
 @Compositepro: ThEn U r DoInG iT wRoNg!!!!
  • 2 0
 @Blackhat: I can confirm that if you forget to do up the bolts on a Shimano crank, it'll slip. And it feels very odd to pedal with crank arms at 12 o'clock and 5 o'clock! However, it was easy to put back with the multi tool, and somehow the cranks still work
  • 2 11
flag thenotoriousmic (Aug 31, 2021 at 13:24) (Below Threshold)
 @Compositepro: all we are doing is pointing out some of the issues we’ve had with centre locks and he’s trying to gas light us into believing it never happened by telling us the things we’ve seen and heard with our own eays and ears are impossible meanwhile a 6 bolt may not have failed ever.
  • 1 1
 @mountainsofsussex: oh you mean the splined shaft with the two simple bolts in there imagine that
  • 1 1
 @Blackhat: im pretty sure im not im pretty sure i know how to turn a spanner to whatever the torque says on the tjn im pretty sure the local mechanic does too im pretty sure about lots of things
  • 3 0
 @thenotoriousmic: im going back to watching netflix
  • 5 0
 Can we please chill a little and discuss a less divisive topic.. say, vaccines?
  • 3 1
 @Compositepro: could it be just the pads in the caliper? I have 6bolts on all bikes and there is rocking when i hold the brakes and wiggle the bike back and forth..
  • 1 0
 @GZMS: it could be but i know the splines are a bit gash on bontrager hubs too , these arent the DT ones if i wedge something in there in there to stop em moving you can see it moving at the hub spline , im just being a fesicious nob to be fair like anything theres going to be good and bad of everything and splines are for transferring torue so really when the brakes on its going to ride on one of the faces of the apline so its a non event either way
  • 1 0
 @DBone95: i was asking if you’re actually tested the rocking rotors with braking forces when installed on the bikes, rather than just by hand. Im genuinely curious, the YouTube bit was a joke. Where did you get that i didnt believe you have 3 bikes. Who doesn’t have 3 bikes? Lighten up dbone. Bikes and bike nerding is supposed to be fun.
  • 9 1
 @Blackhat: So first, no there are not "a lot of reports of centerlock coming loose". There are a few, and many of those same people have also had 6-bolt bolts come loose. There are actually a lot more reports of 6-bolt bolts coming loose or braking. That's to be expected, of course, cause 6-bolt is ancient so there's a lot more of it out there.

My experience is not "N=1". I've been riding for over 20 years, and cannot even begin to count the riders i've met and ridden with in that time, not to mention the hundreds of bikes i've wrenched on. But I guess you're right...you know what they say "you can trust everything you read on the internet!".

I'm not the one who's defensive. I posted up a few facts to clarify things, and the anti-change trolls swarmed. Don't even think about pinning this on me son.
  • 1 7
flag iggzilla (Aug 31, 2021 at 16:08) (Below Threshold)
 @Blackhat: you can say that again.
  • 7 0
 @lognar: I'm as light as it gets. I'm the guy who lines up his tire logos perfectly and measures his sealant, so you can probably imagine that I have checked all of my bikes for rocking rotors at the hubs.... The fact that I have all CL DT Swiss 350s with SRAM Centerline rotors probably says how happy I am with the interface and performance of the pair. Someone above did mention the pads rocking back and forth in the caliper, and that I have seen. When I drop a Centerline rotor onto a 350 hub the connection is absolutely perfect, but I have never used any other CL hub before and I'm sure there are some out there that do rock.... unless people are mistaking brake pads for rotor rock? lol Too soon?
  • 1 6
flag Blackhat (Aug 31, 2021 at 17:50) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: You can be 100% correct, swarmed by anti-change trolls on all sides and still be defensive as hell. I don't know whether centerlock is the best rotor mounting or not, but it is a 100% certainty you are defensive about this.

You've convinced yourself that the people reporting problems are some sort of conspiracy, and obviously there's no rigorous data source to prove otherwise. Just to confirm to myself though, I googled "6 bolt rotor loosening" and compared to "centerlock rotor loosening". The results are dramatically different, with a raft of frustrated forum posts over centerlock. The issue has also been reported by Andrew Major - a prominent and mechanically competent member of the cycling media:

meatengines.com/f/now-nigh-onto-no-six-bolt-hubs-i-hope-you-like-center-lock.

So it's more than a few trolls on pinkbike.

I hope centerlock keeps treating you well. But regardless of how many years you've ridden you're still just one guy, and you weren't on centerlock for most of those years. No matter how many years you've ridden you're not qualified to substitute your intuition for others experience and observations without even seeing the problem.
  • 6 2
 @Blackhat: Again, i'm not mad, nor defensive. I've been among the most rational ones here, just pointing out ridiculous claims. For instance - those who claim an interface with 6 fasteners is simpler than one with a single fastener. It's not my opinion that that's a ridiculous claim, it's a fact.

I have made no claim of conspiracy anywhere, and i'd appreciate if you'd stop putting words in my mouth. You continue to inflate my claims to try to make me seem more concerned than I really am. Again, my points are very simple and have not changed.

Also, I call BS on your google search. I searched "rotor bolt loose" vs. "centerlock rotor loose" and all I found on centerlock were questions about what some call "rocking". Granted I didn't go through all 532000 results so I have no doubt there are authentic instances of the issue you are talking about. I also did not go through all 12.5M loose bolt results either but I think I can let the total results speak for themselves there.

I don't know why you are so defensive about 6-bolt rotors man, no one is saying your rotor is loose.
  • 8 0
 @toast2266: Don't recall saying i have had other parts come loose,just said i've never had brake rotor bolts come loose.
Probably because i use centerlock.
  • 1 7
flag toast2266 (Aug 31, 2021 at 20:40) (Below Threshold)
 @rideonjon: you said "i tighten my components CORRECTLY the first time." If you don't believe me, you can scroll up a little bit and double check.

Can't believe you've had other components come loose. I would've figured a superior mechanic such as yourself would've figured out how to torque everything (not just rotors) CORRECTLY.
  • 1 7
flag Compositepro (Aug 31, 2021 at 23:56) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: hahaha you cant even understand simplicity its a global term not one that meets your very narrow definitiion of trying to win an argument on the internet which frankly nonone is f*cking interested in , we could also define simple as the manufacturing process too and one of them aint so unfortunately mate whilst you may think a lockring is simpler to make than an m6 bolt there isnt an actual manufacturing engineer worth his salt going to tell you it is , the only simple thing is that you do up one fastener with centrelock and it doesnt matter how YOU want to alignnit to YOUR belief system , it is a fastener outside the scope of that every singl aspect is more complex than a six bolt
  • 1 1
 @p-m-z: Honestly, I think you mistook some toothpaste for Loctite.
  • 1 0
 @Tim2: ok
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: ya but you can post a link to a youtube video…
  • 1 4
 @cvoc: bet it takes me as little time to pull those 12 torque screws out with my drill then it does for you to remove both centerlocks lol
  • 3 4
 @mhoshal: you love screwing with your little drill don't you.

They are 'torx' screws by the way, not 'torque' screws.
  • 1 5
flag mhoshal (Sep 6, 2021 at 11:46) (Below Threshold)
 @git: I wouldn't call a Dewalt hammer drill a "little" drill lol and "torx" stands for "torque screw" dumbass
  • 3 0
 @mhoshal: "Torx is a trademark for a type of screw drive characterized by a 6-point star-shaped pattern, developed in 1967 by Camcar Textron. A popular generic name for the drive is star, as in star screwdriver or star bits."
  • 1 0
 @DBone95: dont have a brain and try and educate anyone on here about engineering its full of simple f*ckers that wont even get why a torx can actually be torqued accurately
  • 1 3
 @DBone95: Quoting the first line from wikipedia isn't a credible referance even if in this case it is correct, although the Torx name is derived from thier ability to be torqued correctly so while calling it a torque screw isn't correct it's not completally wrong either and we all knew what he meant so can we not be a little nicer.
  • 1 0
 Centerlock 6 screws
  • 1 0
 @dancingwithmyself: this. I have a torque wrench but never use it for rotors. Have both 6-bolt and centerlock and prefer the latter though...
  • 55 2
 Braking news
  • 2 1
 Hot off the press
  • 2 1
 These rotors can get bent
  • 53 1
 $95 for a rotor. Sweet.
  • 5 2
 At least ice tech bend if you look at them too hard. . .
  • 4 4
 Phhf amateurs, my rotor's cost 130€ would be 150Usd
  • 5 0
 Drilled and slotted Tundra rotors for my 4Runner aren't that much. I'd pay that for Galfers, though.
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: did you need adapters for the bigger rotor size?
  • 4 3
 they dont even look good. im done with shimano anyway
  • 2 0
 XTR ones are $95. There will be an XT./SLX/Deore version that will cost less
  • 1 0
 @makripper

No adapters needed, but calipers need to be upgraded, too..They are direct bolt-ons for 3rd gens. You can run 199mm or 231mm rotors and calipers from a (for example) 2005 Tundra V8 4X4 on any 1996-2002 4runner. 199mm are truly mod-free but the 231mm do require a minor trim of the dust shield to fit the caliper and they don't fit inside all stock wheels. The benefit is the much thicker rotor's heat dissipation and brake power. The weight of an armored-up 3rd gen can cause the stock rotors to warp over time leading to feedback at the wheel and some fade.
  • 2 0
 @vanillarice19: there are no slx/deore icetechs i think
  • 30 0
 So it's the "Freezr" version that is now available in 6 bolt. You can already get 6-bolt Ice-Tech rotors.
  • 3 1
 That's what I'm lost on. I got net propped but it's a smaller deal and hardly worth a full article lol. No new tech. No big changes.
  • 9 3
 Yep, I've got a set of ice-tech xt 6 bolt rotors on my bike that I bought last year. Kazimer is too busy complaining about wandering bite point to notice anything else with Shimano equipped bikes.
  • 3 4
 @JamesR2026: you realize this is a different version with aluminum between steel plates.

Like ya I have a bike equipped with 6 bolt ice techs too but it’s not these
  • 5 0
 @coadymacmillan: You realized that the original version is also aluminum between two steel plates.

This version just extends the aluminum down to act act as a radiator. Not sure how much difference that tweak makes, but the originals work well enough for me already.
  • 2 0
 Yeah the original were fine
  • 3 0
 @makripper: when you have nothing to write about.......and you get paid per word
  • 3 0
 @coadymacmillan: Someone else already said it and @ you, but yeah, the ones I have are the Ice-tech sandwich construction. These new ones just have an extra aluminium heat sink section to dump heat into the air. That is the "Freeza" bit.
  • 31 2
 Awesome! Can't wait to buy some of a these in 2024!
  • 33 14
 Wow, how is this new. This is Shimano accepting people don't want centrelock. What nonsense.
  • 20 3
 Yes but also it’s interesting that Chris King who sponsor The Syndicate have discontinued 6-bolt hubs (and even discontinued DH hubs too), they only manufacture centrelock - strange decision
  • 4 4
 All they have to do now is release them in 180 & 200mm
  • 6 2
 @tavaenga: Are you sure? Their website seems fully stocked with 6-bolt hubs with no mention anywhere of going center lock exclusively?

6 bolt must be near 100% of what they sell, no?
  • 5 2
 @mobiller: chrisking.com/products/iso-rear-hub

Pretty sure it says "no longer in production"
  • 5 3
 @tavaenga: I'm almost certain that non of what you just said is true. Maybe there is none available due to covid, but I personally own a set of 2021 6 bolt DH hubs in Boost 20×110 and 12x157.
  • 8 0
 @Asqet: I think being non boost has a lot more to do with that hubs production status than it's rotor mounting.
  • 1 1
 @jomacba: I just looked at my go to dealer for bling part's. Not one Chris King hub got 6 bolts.
Well I won't buy them now , haha.
  • 5 0
 @jomacba: nah, tavaenga is correct. King discontinued the ISO series hubs, and is now offering only their new CenterLock Boost series. There are currently no Superboost/DH hubs in their lineup, which I’d assume is temporary, and which I assume they’ll reintroduce as CL only when they get production up and rolling.
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: I own a pair of late 2020 ISOs, and a pair of summer 2021 CL king hubs. I think you probably got the last batch before they switched over.

I’m not sure exactly when the switch was, but it’s real recent. When they put out the new limited colors—the gold and the two-tone—that’s when it was. A couple few months ago.
  • 1 0
 @Glenngineer: Whoops wrong link. But 6 bolt Boost has also magically disappeared.
  • 1 0
 @BrambleLee: absolutely correct. Maybe it's because they couldn't handle the demand and switch to a less popular design? I made sure to get some of the last 6 bolt hubs...
  • 3 0
 @BrambleLee: Weird decision. But then who is buying aftermarket king hubs nowadays?
Those who want reliable hubs get them cheaper and lighter from DT swiss and the high engagement fetishists get their fix from I9.
  • 1 0
 I think Chris King offering only CL hubs makes some sense of you consider the demographics of the end user. In my experience, their stuff is on high end race bikes and other light, expensive builds. CL has theoretical advantages and potentially lighter weight, which makes it attractive to gram counters, engineer types, and boutique users. On the other end are utilitarian users that find the practical disadvantages of making the more disposable part more complex, both increasing initial and recurring costs, a little bit repulsive. We buy DT hubs, and run 6 bolt rotors, because they work fine, we don't value the miniscule advantages of the other standard, and we've bent some rotors in our time. We can go find rotors from a host of manufacturers, sometimes for peanuts, that slow our bikes down just fine.
  • 1 0
 @tavaenga: strange decision ? mtn bikers poor people (15k mtbss aside) road bikes DENTIST CENTRAL cash cow they spend 20k on road bikes anyone who can muster the extra 5k is a winner
  • 18 1
 It's funny, I find Center Lock exceedingly more convenient to use than 6 bolt and but yet I never, ever, buy Center Lock anything when buying a bike or wheels. I just don't care.
  • 4 2
 I like CenterLock more as well. But since many wheel/hub manufacturers still stick to 6 bolt standards, it's a good financial decision from Shimano. They now can sell their products to a wider group of cyclists.
  • 6 0
 I'm with you. For me the inconvenience of the 6 bolt is well worth the peace of mind that you can both tighten and remove the rotors with a multi tool when you're way out in the woods
  • 6 0
 How many times do y'all honestly remove your brake rotors? I do it maybe a few times a year and the 6 bolt system takes only a few minutes more. For me that is well worth the ability to use them trailside in an emergency situation. If you put a torx bit in your drill or driver, it is not that much work at all, certainly not enough to merit a whole new standard in my opinion.
  • 3 0
 This. Rotor bolts are the only thing on my bike I use a power tool on. Takes 15-30 seconds per wheel
  • 5 0
 I've only used six bolt. My partner's bike has centrelock and we fly away to ride 3-4 times per year and I've got to the point of just leaving the centrelock tool in her bike bag. A recent ride we had to remove a bent front rotor from a bike near the start of a ride. Think three hours of climbing with a 30 minute descent, not one of us had the centrelock tool but we all had a T25. Again, a pretty rare occurrence but it was lucky he had six bolt.
  • 2 0
 This is the main benefit of the old designs - and why none of the enduro pros use centrelock
  • 10 1
 Stopped by to see what all the squealing was about.
  • 6 0
 I asked myself “How can there possibly be 200 comments about a disc rotor?”

Then I remembered that I was on the Internet, where everyone’s opinion is the only correct option.
  • 5 0
 you are so wrong
  • 6 1
 Shouldn’t this article state that they are reintroducing the six bolt Ice Tech rotors? I had those several years ago. I remember when they wore through to to aluminum center. Like the tootsie roll center of a tootsie pop!
  • 6 2
 Cant believe they aren't offering a 204mm version... so bummed. Many tests have shown that 204mm rotors offer superior modulation (+32.4%) over 203's. They tested this in Italy over the course of two years. 204mm rotor can be lighter than 203's as well and some studies have shown -3.68% overall. My biggest take aways is that we should all just get into trial running because then all you have to worry about is one pair of shoes and not the way your rotors attach to your hubs.
  • 3 0
 I wonder if they'll have the same issue with staying true as the centerlock version? I found that mine went out of whack all the time after big bike park days full of top to bottoms. The rt-76/86 stayed true far better despite not being quite as good at heat disipation.
  • 3 3
 Pretty laughable claiming to not need bigger thicker rotors when the current rotors warp at the slightest hint of heat.
  • 6 2
 I'm confused. I have shimano ice-tech rotors on one of my bikes, from roughly 2016ish. They are 6-bolt, not centerlock. Is it only the latest ice-tech rotors that weren't available in 6-bolt?
  • 2 0
 Yes
  • 7 0
 U confuse ice tech with freeza rotors
  • 3 0
 Your rotors don’t have those extended cooling fins.
  • 1 0
 Thanks folks, I'm less confused now.
  • 5 0
 150 degree temperature reduction? Does anyone know how hot brake rotors actually get? That's insane.
  • 32 0
 The best way to know is to grab them at the bottom of a big steep descent. Then you'll know.
  • 8 0
 @nozes: can confirm that with FREEZAS it still burns your leg when you press it against.
  • 2 0
 hot enough to brand my calf the first time i went downhilling.
  • 16 0
 @jasbushey:

freeza burns
  • 3 0
 I believe around 300 degrees last I heard is the average on decents with standard rotors
  • 1 0
 At least 212F. Easy to test. Drip some water on them after a big descent.
  • 6 0
 @nozes: just sneak up behind the guy in front and dab him on the calf with your rotor at the bottom of each descent. Louder the scream the hotter the brake. Post results.
  • 3 0
 I still have a burn on my hand from when I touched my rotor about 5 years ago. Thankfully I was at least smart enough to use the back of my hand like I was taught to do to test door knobs in a house fire, even though I was not smart enough to know better than to touch my rotors after a long descent
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: Just a tiny bit. Extreme warping could occur with such uneven cooling.
  • 7 5
 I had always fancied 6 bolt hubs, until very recently.
Centerlock is not bad - let's face it. It may rock back and forth in the parking lot.
But it provides a much faster and easier mounting and removal.
So much so that I now only have a single pair of freeza rotors for both of my DT Swiss wheelsets.
I have never had a rotor come loose, but I still carry this little gem.
uniortools.com/eng/product/1669-4-2-in-1-pocket-spoke-and-cassette-lockring-tool
It will fix a loose cassette too, and doubles as an extremely nice spoke wrench.
Now this 6-bolt rotor is of course a wise move by Shimano. Too bad they didn't do that years ago.
  • 14 0
 How many times a day do you unmount/remount your rotors?
  • 15 2
 "It may rock back and forth in the parking lot."

...?!
  • 4 0
 I believe that tool will only work on 180mm or smaller rotors. the 203s use a larger tool.
  • 5 0
 @BCpov: you’re on the right track, but that’s not exactly what the scenario is. It’s not that you need different diameter rotors used different lockrings. The issue is that the lockring that used to come with CL rotors was from back in the days of QR axles, and those lockrings aren’t compatible with 15mm or 20mm thru axles.

Current MTB CL rotors come with an updated lockring, regardless of their diameter, with which that dude’s tool would not work. Those rings have a 16 notch bb tool pattern.

The old style that used a cassette tool are compatible with 12mm thru axles though, so I think the road series rotors still use those. And, CL has taken much more of a foothold in road/gravel than it has in MTB.

Bike standards are weird shit…
  • 2 0
 Terske Disc Rotor - look it up. It's a pocketable CL rotor tool. Fit's 15/20mm mounts.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: slight movement where the splines on the disc don't completely mesh with the splines on the hub, even when torqued correctly. Design tolerance. Doesn't effect performance when braking but a bit disconcerting when pulling your front brake and rocking the bike back and forth (as if checking for loose headset).
  • 1 0
 @BCpov: It’s dependent on axle size, not rotor size. 12mm TA is the max size the cassette tool lock rings will handle.
  • 10 5
 Sweet. Now 6 bolt riders can experience rotor warp every 3 rides...
  • 6 3
 yes, those who clings to the brake levers even at 1% descend
  • 2 1
 @atiboa: lol yep, that's me. Shit, I can barely even ride.
  • 4 1
 @DBone95: never understood why some became irritated when a Shimano product is being launched (unless they have SRAM stocks), a product they didn't like. Believe me, there are millions of riders who are completely satisfied with Shimano rotors. I've used many Shimano rotors (from Acera to XTR -> everything from XC to Freeride) and never had any problems with them. Maybe yours were faulty? Who knows.
  • 4 0
 @atiboa: I have Shimano brakes (520s) grabbing on SRAM centerline center lock rotors and am very happy with how they stay true and how smooth the braking is. I'm 6'1" 200lbs and can not keep an Ice-Tech rotor true for the life of me. I do have lighter friends who have no issues with them though.
  • 2 1
 @atiboa: my current set warped on the first ride if they were even straight in the first place and my metallic ice tech pads outlived my previous set of ice tech rotors. I’m still using 200mm Center lines from 2014 that’s are still perfectly straight and unlike ice techs centrelines are easy to bend back.
  • 2 1
 @atiboa: so since these rotors work for your use case everyone else should just shut up and not point out the issues? Nothing DBone said implied he’s “upset” about this launch, just a little snarky criticism of the product.
  • 2 0
 Mine work like a charm, came with the new bike and I love them. first time ever I don't have to deal with excessive brake fading. What makes this even more impressive is the fact that I now ride an ebike (+10 kilograms in mass) and I'm faster than ever on the way down thanks to the rad geo of that bike.
I'm sold on those freeza rotors.
  • 2 0
 @DBone95: that was supposed to be directed to dbone95
And I'm also heavier than him
  • 3 2
 Cant believe they aren't offering a 204mm version... so bummed. Many tests have shown that 204mm rotors offer superior modulation (+32.4%) over 203's. They tested this in Italy over the course of two years. 204mm rotor can be lighter than 203's as well and some studies have shown -3.68% overall. My biggest take aways is that we should all just get into trial running because then all you have to worry about is one pair of shoes and not the way your brakes attach to your hubs.
  • 1 0
 I had some centrelock ice tech rotors, and found they were quite easily bent with light pressure. My bike is regularly loaded in the car or clumsily stored, and the rotors were a problem. I now have Magura 2mm rotors which seems rock solid.
  • 3 0
 Centerlock, 6-bolt, microspline, xd, 4 technologies, 4 times as much hubs for the same function. Annoying.
  • 1 0
 You forgot the good ol' HG driver body.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: That one doesn't really overlap. It's for cheaper cassettes, and/or with smaller range.
  • 1 0
 My 6 bolt SRAM rotors came loose on my hardtail causing it to rock. This was before stage 1 of an enduro. Luckily I had a multi took to snug them up. I think they have a higher chance of coming loose on hardtails
  • 2 0
 I too noticed that in the past. I thought that was just me.
  • 1 1
 I’ve been trying out the ~200mm ice tech rotors from my Mrs bike for the last week. I’ve been pretty impressed with them as someone who usually runs a 220 front. I would definitely consider a six bolt 220mm version. Hers haven’t warped after a year of riding about 3000km. That said she does weigh about a third less than I do.
  • 1 0
 Just run the cheaper 1pc & when u cook them nicely to a deep purple/black rainbow hue and they scream like tortured demons just take the flapper wheel to them & sand off the hardened layer.
  • 1 1
 They dont even last as long as the tires. Alu core is amazing bs. the big companies are very good at making things complicated, expensive and yet not long lasting. but maybe they offer a monthly subscription. to keep the shareholders happy.
  • 5 2
 Looks like they’ll brake the bank too…
  • 4 1
 I-cy there finally listening to riders and making a 6 bolt version.
  • 2 2
 which riders? those who didn't repair their bikes on their own? Smile
  • 1 0
 I've been using their ice tech pads and current tech six bolt rotors for a few years now. It's a solid setup. No need for upgrading.
  • 2 0
 Damn I was looking for these after switching to a 6B hub. Ended up with Galfer rotors which are super quiet
  • 1 0
 Don't know anything about Centerlock. But alum is more conductive than SS and will transfer heat more efficiently ... an interesting concept.
  • 1 1
 Am I the only one who hadn't got to watching the men's World Championship race, since my wife and I work different shifts and try to watch together, only to have it spoiled by a damn product announcement? GAAAAAAAH.
  • 1 0
 Nope, me too.
  • 1 0
 Stay of Pinkbike altogether?
  • 1 0
 Yeah pinkbike need that subscriber funded test lab up & running to do some controlled testing and see what's marketing BS and what's a real benefit
  • 5 4
 Lookin forward to wandering my bite point all over these sweet rotors! ...thanks Shimano! Wink
  • 3 1
 In tests in a German magazine, they melt.
  • 2 0
 Yeah,but do they blend?
  • 2 0
 Post link.
  • 3 0
 @Fat4242: So, um... don't drag your brake all the way down Mt. Ventoux?
  • 1 0
 @Fat4242: thanks dude. I was expecting worse. I’ve done something similar but not as bad where the steel veneer started blistering around the rotor holes after getting it really hot.
  • 2 0
 @Fat4242: LOL "The german "Bike" Magazine (MTB) undertook a test of a number of Disk-Breaks in its May- or June-Edition. They found, too, that the Shimano ICE Tech Rotors when tested for heat tolerance do fail quite early because of the aluminium core melting..." Shimano is not what is used to be.
  • 1 0
 Why did it take this long to make this version instead of keeping these just for centerlock?
  • 1 3
 They wanted to FORCE riders to purchase their centrelock product - that's why(my comment shows how I responded) ... -.-
  • 5 4
 Centrelock gang here - look at ye olde six bolts trying to imitate our ways
  • 3 0
 fucking FINALLY
  • 2 1
 No 160mm and 140mm rotors? You think XC / gravel / road cyclists enjoy brake fade caused by overheated brakes?
  • 4 0
 road bikes (and many gravel) use centerlock and have had 140 and 160mm ice tech freeza discs for years
  • 1 0
 I know, I have that on the rear on my gravel bike. But for those who own bikes that come stock with 6 bolt hubs they could upgrade their discs to Freezas without having to buy new hubs. For example my Lefty fork can only work with 6 bolt discs, so I can't get a Freeza disc for it. And I'm not putting a 180mm disc on my gravel bike.
  • 2 0
 @Mattin: ahh I see. Though I've always wanted 180mm on my gravel bike as stopping performance is pretty tame…
  • 1 0
 It depends indeed on your riding style and mostly on where you ride. Here 160mm front and 140mm rear are more than enough, but if I'd live in proper (and steep) mountains I would go bigger too.
  • 1 0
 @Mattin: If cooling is what you're after then 180mm size will be a great option. Larger surface area = greater heat dissipation.
  • 1 1
 SRAM: we released 5 new derailleurs, 3 new cassettes, a new seatpost, and a new suspension fork.
Shimano: we have a new rotor! Gold star!
  • 2 0
 Aaaaand a new Dura-Ace group
  • 1 0
 @Kiowa008: A semi-wireless Dura Ace and Ultegra group, while doing away with the mechanical versions of both. lol
  • 2 0
 @seraph: All the better honestly. 105 is fantastic if you must have cables
  • 2 0
 **not expected on the shelf until 2023
  • 1 0
 Am I the only one who picks centrelock because it looks sleeker? Obviously that's why it's dominated in roadie world.
  • 2 1
 I prefer centrelock mostly for the alignment, with 6 bolts discs get disaligned quite easily. I think that's the main reason, as you really don't want your discs to be rubbing on a road bike. Also if I'm correct the complete set up for a centrelock hub and disc is lighter, but I'm not 100% sure.
  • 1 3
 6 bolt / Centerlock : Meh

I deal with both.

That Centerlock ever had a reason to exist? No it didn't, 6 bolts is fine, and, Thankfully, became a near universal fitment.

Just Shimano doing Shimano, as ever . Ho flamin' Hum.
  • 2 1
 I don't even consider six bolt. If a wheel or hub is six bolt I don't buy it. Ever.
  • 1 0
 I'm surprised PB editors even allow stories about Shimano brakes...must be a slow news day.
  • 1 0
 Shimano must be really desperate. They have to give their precious freeza rotors to 6bolters Smile )
  • 2 0
 That’s cool
  • 4 2
 203mm still.....
  • 4 1
 That's 3mm more braking power than a typical rotor!
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: 17 less
  • 3 0
 @VtVolk: actually 1.5mm more
  • 2 5
 IT IS OFFICIAL!!! Shimano Is No Longer On MY Personal SH*T List - won't buy any of their products, etc - because they didn't provide a 6 bolt version of their Ice Tech rotors(forcing people to buy their centre lock tech - & forcing me personally to use 2 piece rotors instead)... >.> #YESiAmThatSortOfPerson Now have a 220 & 203 Magura of MDR-P rotors - New\Unused - for sale... =P
  • 10 0
 You okay bro?
  • 1 0
 @extratalldirtrider: I'm a tad less pissed now... >.>
  • 1 0
 Correction: "will soon be marketed"
  • 1 0
 Next up, xd compatible cassettes.
  • 2 0
 Ice Ice Baby
  • 2 0
 World Champ approved !
  • 1 0
 It's about time after all those year !!
  • 1 0
 An xt with more fin. New breaking
  • 1 0
 nice. but where's the rest of the new saint group?
  • 1 0
 wer später bremst ist länger schnell
  • 1 0
 and the new Shimano Saint groupset? derailleur, brakes, cranks...
  • 1 0
 It’s about time. Only been like 10 years since they were first released
  • 1 0
 Black is the worst color for cooling parts..
  • 1 0
 nice upgrade lmao
  • 1 0
 It's about time.
  • 1 0
 STOP there! Whaaaaa!?
  • 1 2
 gimmick
  • 1 4
 Why 203mm rotors and not 200mm?!
  • 11 0
 It's 3 more.
  • 1 0
 why 200mm not 203mm?
  • 1 1
 The whole point of Freeza's is that you accept the weight penalty for less overheating and less brake fade. So why would you then choose the opposite (more heat and more brake fade) with 200mm discs over 203mm discs?

Yes I know the difference is indeed neglectible.
  • 2 0
 203 is a closer approximation of 8”. Not sure why that matters though.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.030324
Mobile Version of Website