Sombrio Releases its First Mountain Bike - A $999 Hardtail

Sep 7, 2021
by Sombrio Cartel  




PRESS RELEASE: Sombrio Cartel


Sombrio is proud to launch our first line of mountain bikes available in Canada, the Shovel series.

The Shovel; commonly known as a hand tool - many of us would have first picked up a shovel as our first foray into trail building. Now the Shovel represents a tool for progression, a cornerstone for the everyday Joe, a foundational element of many great things. The Shovel is purpose built to be square one. A starting point for entry into the world of mountain biking. Designed to be easy to use, attainable and most of all - fun.

Taking heavy influence from The North Shore and the rigours of modern mountain biking - the Shovel is the cumulative result of what you need to get rolling from your first ride.

Sombrio was founded in 1998 on The North Shore of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Founded by mountain bikers to represent to core values of what riders need in order to progress. Maintaining the free-spirited attitude with a focus on gear that people want to ride. Honing equipment in the harsh mountain environment of the North Shore - we create innovative products that perform on any trail or path you may take.

Shovel 3 shown above. $999.99



Key Highlights
Rolling on 27.5 X 2.6 inch rubber with room to spare, this hardtail can tackle almost any terrain you can throw at it. The 66 degree HT paired with a 140mm fork up front, it sits solidly in the trail category of things. The Shovel has internal dropper routing so as you grow and get more capable with your Shovel, you can add a dropper to make it your own jack of all trades.

Gobs of tire clearance.

Geo Highlights / Pricing / Availability:

• 66 degree HTA and 74 degree STA
• $799.99 - $1,299.99 CAD depending on model
• Available through Canadian dealer network
• Top model - Shovel 2, boost through axles front and rear
• Internal dropper post routing
• Big bling-y head tube badge
• Ample tire clearance
• T6-6061 Aluminum frame


Internal dropper routing.

North Shore and Shovels? Contact your local trail association.


The Shovel comes decorated in Sombrio componentry; cockpit, saddle, seat post. The entry level Shovel 5 starts with mechanical disc brakes, Caribou Co. wheels, L-TWOO taking care of shifting and a RST fork. The top end Shovel 2 comes with upgraded MicroSHIFT 10 speed Advent X 11-48t drivetrain, UD34 front suspension, KS dropper and Riderever Attack hydro disc brakes. These components help keep the price more attainable for those seeking performance of a good frame with solid geometry whilst on a budget.

Equally at home on the pump track as it is in the alpine single track.


Pricing Structure
Shovel 2: $1,299.99
Shovel 3: $999.99 (shown in photos)
Shovel 4: $849.99
Shovel 5: $729.99

Did someone say bike packing?

To find your nearest Shovel - swing by your Sombrio dealer check in order to check it out. If you are unsure where Sombrio goods are sold, use our dealer locator here.


Photography: @the_real_liam_wallace
Website: Sombrio Cartel





151 Comments

  • 173 2
 Key Features:
- Able to be purchased with money
- Headtube badge
  • 14 0
 All u need
  • 108 0
 We try
  • 4 2
 @SombrioCartel: thank you. pls come out with a 29'' version!
  • 9 1
 @SombrioCartel: and make it worldwide and frame only option
  • 10 0
 Nah, I'd say if the goal is to make an affordable but good bike for new riders, pick the specs that are good for the job and just go with that. More options only increases logistics, stock etc and increases pricing. If you're new, you just need a complete bike that is up to the job. Getting "dick about it" comes later and long as the bike allows you to make upgrades then you should be good. By the time I replaced my first frame, the only things that were still original were the headset and the rear V-brake (as it didn't accept a disc brake). Everything else broke (rider error) or a few things I wasn't happy with and I replaced over the years. So yeah, just spec a complete bike with the most affordable stuff that's up to the job and just go!
  • 84 0
 As a shop that's a dealer and has already sold through all the ones we got for 2021 I will say these are perfect bikes for people looking to get into trail riding. I won't be suggesting them as an N+1 bike, but as a kids first trail bike, or a bike for someone just scratching the surface they've been wicked!
  • 9 0
 Really reminds me of the RM Soul I got for my son. There are parts on it that would bug me (some for performance, others just in my head), but the geometry is excellent and will be a great bike to him to continue to develop on. Also, that Microshift drivetrain on some of these Sombrios runs great and the clutch mechanism is good enough that he's had no dropped chains yet.
  • 6 0
 Agreed. My first mountain bike was a Marin hardtail that was along these same lines. It was perfect for me to just get out on the local trails, explore a little, and see what it was like. After a couple years I had a much better understanding of my local trails and how I wanted to ride them which made purchasing and upgrade much easier.
  • 16 0
 i'm glad i got started on a hardtail. it made me a better rider and by the time i got my full suspension i knew it was something i was passionate about before i forked out the cash to upgrade
  • 6 0
 Agree, 1k bike is good starting point, also hardtail it a simpler to start working up your skill's and learning basis;
  • 4 0
 @big-red: The Soul is a great bike. My kid's 2019 Soul 10 has been upgraded a few times. I put on a Rockshox Recon, and 11 speed Deore drive train.
  • 11 0
 Thanks for the support SmithCreekCycle !
  • 7 4
 This isn't just for "scratching the surface". Those years when you've got all the time and guts in the world, you just don't have the money. 1000$ is just a lot of money especially as you also need a helmet and basic tools. Allen keys, a chain whip, chainbreaker, circlip pliers for fork maintenance... lots of stuff you never thought existed but which does add up. And then you've got the wear parts. This may be a bike you can afford and actually ride the hell out of it, but it isn't like you'll be replacing it soon after you've scatched that surface. And luckily, it seems to me like this is a good bike for riding in general. Maybe not for full on DH but XC, 4X, DS, DJ, pumptrack... why not?
  • 5 0
 @vinay: … not sure most beginning, or even advanced, riders own circlips or are doing their own fork maintenance. I grew up working in shops from 14 on (for the pro-deals - the only way I could afford a Kona fire mountain with a rs mag-10 in ‘94) and only worked on my own forks a handful of times even with access to a full shop. I fully agree with allens, chainwhip etc tho… I think every new rider absolutely should learn how to wrench on their own bike.
  • 2 0
 @Tarka: Ah well, my point was mainly that the cost of getting into the sport isn't just the money you spend on the bike purchase, there is so much more. Whether or not you'd be getting circlip pliers or not, it is only part of the cost. If people are only doing lower leg service they'll only need allen keys indeed. Either way, my first mtb fork was a RS Judy TT. Coil in one leg, nothing in the other, grease lubed lowers. So yeah, fork service was easier than actually riding that fork as it started to resonate when riding down a longer staircase (as there was no damping at all). And of course, unlike a chainwhip, lockring remover, portable allen+T25 toolset and portable pump, circlip pliers aren't really bike specific. You may already have or need them for something else (garden tools, power tools etc). Maybe I should have limited myself to bike specific gear as those are the ones you really need and likely don't have when you get into mountainbiking.
  • 1 0
 I'm on the other side of the coin here- not a beginner, but rather a 35 year with a kid on the way. This is the kind of bike that would be nice to pick up as a loner (as long time riding buddies move away, I've had to find other people to ride with, and some of them have really lame bikes), a change up bike for easier trails, or as something to cruise around on with a wee one.

I'd be fun also to get the lowest end build and start building it up over time with the parts I really want. I love it.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: lol nice… I went from the mag 10 to a manitou 4; the whole elastomer, un-damped phase was a disaster. Marzocchi coil was next. Open bath is better than nothing. I guess I aged out of doing my own fork service a while ago, especially living in a place that has multiple specialty shops that only do suspension tuning. I 100% agree that “entry” into this sport is much more than the cost of a bike. I’d argue that a high-pressure shock pump is also 100% necessary these days, and also that learning about sag/ leverage/ damping rates is under-valued for most beginners - but is also hard to understand without an engineering degree or many crashes. No need to look any further than Friday Fails for evidence of under-damped rear shocks!
  • 40 0
 Great looking bike really but wow the spec list reads like a foreign language
  • 6 0
 @AckshunW that’s probably all a new brand can get right now (I know they’re not “new” but new in ordering components to speed on a bike)
  • 17 1
 Alibaba spec list for sure.
  • 10 8
 Probably every bit as good as the household products of the same cost.
  • 2 5
 perfect for the "I found a tube bent it and hammered on bike works great. the 300 $ raceface I once had crank broke on first ride" crowd.
  • 17 0
 The UnDing fork for sure had my head turning. Advent from Microshift is awesome though.
  • 12 0
 if can't have a dropper at this price point, at least put a quick release on the seat post binder!
  • 2 1
 @Phaethon85: Yeah WTF at the very least spec an TK silver or Judy. Not sure I'd be willing to by a complete fork spec'd with an Amazon fork.
  • 3 0
 @gtill9000: huge oversight. Luckily an inexpensive fix
  • 2 0
 My son's bike has Advent and it shifts every bit as well as the my SLX/XT components.

I think L-TWOO are a bunch of ex-SRAM engineers (I may be wrong there) that set up on their own when SRAM closed down a site in China. They are guys that built NX, GX, SX etc - everything not top of the range basically.
  • 1 0
 I think Microshift is great. Wide gearing range but cheaper wear parts (cassette, chain) so cheaper riding basically. Only minor thing to keep in mind is that you really need to bring your allen keys on the ride (if you already thought you could do without). Unless I'm the only one who remembers to engage the clutch a few minutes into a ride, it is good to be aware that you need an allen key handy to engage it. Works perfectly fine but you just need to keep one handy. I've not got much riding experience with Microshift (I installed it on my old shorter frame, for my daughter) so I can't really tell how these compare to the big name brands. But if I'd really want a wider gear range (currently running 11-36 with a Shimano Zee rear mech) I think I'd rather go with one of these than invest in an expensive (in terms of wear parts) 12sp drivetrain.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I've managed to fold my Microshift 42t steel cog over the next 3 cogs. Bent it back with pliers and rode a couple weeks before I replaced with the 12-46 cassette. I have heard of people doing the same with Shimano 11 speed so I guess I am not alone, however I am being very ginger with my shifts now.
  • 27 1
 Frame only option? I know it kinda goes against the simplicity of entry into mountain biking they're aiming for, but there are those of us that would like to build a budget hardtail to our own spec.
  • 6 1
 A thousand times yes.
  • 1 15
flag 7hhuman (Sep 7, 2021 at 8:08) (Below Threshold)
 Does it have a 12x148 thru axle? I doubt it. This bike was spec'd by a clothing company by what I can tell.
  • 10 0
 @7hhuman:

Yes, actually it does.


The top model has boost thru axles. It’s in the spec listing, in the article.

This bike is absolutely rad for a beginner or someone looking for a true budget bike.
  • 6 1
 @7hhuman: * A clothing company that actually has a pulse on real-deal trail riding tho.
  • 2 0
 @7hhuman: a clothing company that is also part of the Cannondale, GT, Mongoose, Charge, etc group. I’m sure they were able to get advice from Nick Larsen if they needed it. He’s been making hardtails for years before joining CSG (Blender, Cleaver, Duster, etc)
  • 2 0
 If you want to build up a budget hardtail there are better brands to start with who specifically sell frame only. I've done one with an octane-one prone frame (as have lots of people) and been pretty happy. The welds will never be as nice as higher end offerings, and the paint is pretty weak but the frames are solid and pretty modern in geo and spec.
  • 1 0
 NS makes a very affordable frame only option for the Canadian market.
  • 3 0
 @CustardCountry: Sombrio isn't owned by Cycling sports group. Louis Garneau bought them a few years back and LG makes bikes.
  • 1 0
 @hndicapaces: oh, my bad, I knew someone bought them, just assumed it was CSG for some reason. Ta
  • 1 0
 Seconded.
  • 19 0
 Dont forget that price is in Canadian Dollars. Wow. Well Done.
  • 6 0
 Cheers!
  • 15 0
 Gotta be jumped over roadies now.
  • 9 0
 This is amazing Its cheap yet it is fully modern. Most cheap hardtails don’t have rear boost axles so often those get stripped out when your rear tire start fall out beacuse have a stupid qr skewer.
  • 8 0
 Our entry level models have a QR rear end with a boost front thru axle. The top end Shovel 2 does come equipped with boost thru axles front a rear. For sending of course.
  • 2 0
 @SombrioCartel: Is that full sending, or just the tip?
  • 20 1
 @m1dg3t: We respect sending of all types and sizes.
  • 3 0
 @SombrioCartel: Equal opportunity sending! Big Grin
  • 8 0
 These look like they rock for beginners. This is the bike that every beginner asks for but is never available for a $1000 (On the PNW Facebook forum for instance). Pinkbike tends to have some gatekeeping comments which are largely focused around spec this time. However, this bike can be actually upgraded since it has a proper boost rear end, proper head tube, and comes with a dropper.
  • 9 0
 Producing a bike that is step 1 was a huge goal for us. Creating something that is able to reduce the barrier for mountain biking and encourage progression by offering a platform to build on.
  • 11 1
 That spec list spells trouble
  • 7 13
flag pbfan08 (Sep 7, 2021 at 7:20) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah... mech disk brakes don't belong anywhere on a MTB in 2021(unless MAYBE we're talking kids bikes).
  • 19 0
 @pbfan08: They are on the $799 bike, which is the price of some disc brakes (i.e. without the rest of the bike)
  • 35 5
 @pbfan08: I’ll take a $50 mechanical disc over a $50 hydro disc EVERYDAY.
  • 12 0
 For $800 dollars I’d rather have a good frame and shit parts than ok parts and a shit frame. It’s entry level, so people don’t want to spend over $1k just to try the sport.

Don’t all Pinkbikers whinge almost every bike release/review that there’s no decent cheap bikes for newbies to the sport?

It has room for a water bottle and doesn’t look like a Session, what more do you want Pinkbikers?
  • 1 0
 There is a common belief that any mech disc is worse than any hydro. Sorry, but my Paul Klampers with Trickstuff pads, Yokozuna housing and Servowave levers beat cheapie (but still acceptable) Tektros, and trounce Promaxes, which feel like the hoses and pistons are gummed up with somebody's morning deuce. I know, I had to spend a ton of money to get a good result, but it's my money and I am happy with the result.
  • 4 0
 @Insectoid: Avid bb7 s with 8 inch rotors have massive stopping power. Not the best modulation. Oem Deore hydraulic brakes are probably 100 $ pair. It's the resin only Shimano rotors that have absolutely terrible stopping power.
  • 5 0
 @b1k35c13nt15t: Shimano makes a killer pair of hydro brakes for super cheap. About $60 I recall. We always recommended them to people looking to replace their f*cked up old oem stuff. Honestly I would run them in a heartbeat on a lighter duty hardtail, and I'm used to saints.
  • 2 0
 @Sshredder: I didn't have any problem with stopping poser on the resin-only discs I had on my commuter, but the resin pads don't last long. I changed mine over to metallic pads and found out why they say the discs are resin only, they squeal horribly.
  • 1 0
 @Insectoid: I’ve got Klampers with Onza Box levers and rt99 rotors. The key is that Yokozuna set. I recommend it, but no one thinks it’s worth it.
  • 9 0
 Good geo, upgradable components. That's what most beginners need
  • 5 1
 I used to ref in a rec hockey league where the top division was "4". Now we have a top spec bike that is "2". I'm not #1 at anything but if I was, or wanted to think I was, I wouldn't be scared to use "1". Like, the best. Or is this a weird humblebrag thing? Or did they stop at "2" because Microshift (you know, almost there but not quite)? Or are they just saving room for when they can get their hands on some Shimano and have a pretty kick ass bike considering the price points?
  • 9 0
 I ended up using the Micro shift Advent 9 on my Rootdown built this year because there was literally nothing else, some stuff I ordered in October last year is still MIA. For the $150 I spend on the entire group it's near flawless. Sure the 9 speed 11-46 had some big jumps but you get used to it. Only thing I'd wish I'd done is get the pro 9 shifter I didn't know existed at the time so it would push/pull release. I'm in no hurry to swap out the group since the whole thing's costs as much as the XT derailleur on my other bike.
  • 5 0
 Hi ! You said it right, we saved room for the Shovel 1 that is coming for 2022 ;-)
  • 1 0
 @TheBrosCloset: I'm with you if you're 1x. 2x anything leaves a lot to be desired, but the last bike I worked on with a Microshift front was bullshift.
  • 6 0
 What kind of fork is that? AliExpress or is it a known thing? Not knocking it just curious cause I haven't heard of them before.
  • 7 0
 It's a Uding fork made by ZTTO. They have their own little suspension factory. ZTTO is mostly known for their affordable drivetrain parts. I ride their cheapo 11 speed 9-42 cassette on my moped. So far Iike it.
  • 1 0
 UD D5 Coil-Boost, 140 mm travel, rebound adjust and a lockout.
  • 8 0
 Next time: a shovel called "bike".
  • 5 0
 Look out 2023!
  • 4 0
 I like this concept. I completely ignore if this is the objective, but this is an incentive for someone to buy a quality bike and continue into the sport. On the other hand, it is good to give the opportunity to other brands or new ones to have more offers into components. In the long term, we can have more quality offers on less $$$$$.
  • 8 3
 "A tool for the Proletariat" Uuugh. Someone has been switching between their copies of the "Communist Manifesto" and "Commodify Your Dissent" while having a go on the crapper, eh?

Keen bike. That tagline though. Oof.
  • 5 0
 Could be worse, they could have called it 'Steal this bike'. But I agree, it's a head-scratcher. I don't think many proles want to be marketed to explicitly as such by their capitalist overlords.
  • 3 0
 They're not the only ones, but it's so stupid to run only the dropper cable internally in the downtube, since it has to come out to avoid the BB area and then back into the seat tube. Just run it external on the downtube, right next to _the other external cables/hoses_, and then jump into the seat tube. Could even save on the BOM since they could ditch 2 of the port covers and the work to drill 2 holes, and just need to swap the two-cable bosses for three-cable bosses.

(Probably not enough savings to get a dropper actually included at the $1K price point, but you never know which models have the most room left in their margins.)
  • 3 0
 The Shovel 2 has a dropper post and is $1300 CAD, which is less than $1000 USD.
  • 3 0
 I'm super happy to see these Chinese drivetrains on bikes. The thing that shifts gears is so unimportant relative to suspension and brakes. Unfortunately, this bike doesn't necessarily seem to be using the money saved on the drivetrain on that, but I'm sure COVID plays a role in that.
  • 4 0
 I wish they would re release their Mtb midtop shoes, cant remember the name of them but literally the best riding shoes to-date. My friends are still going strong, I would steal them but he has poor personal hygiene.
  • 2 0
 the x shazam? they were great winter riding shoes loved them
  • 1 0
 @sideshowb: Think my mates are "Shazam" mine were the "loam" (did some searching last night) , yes prob Shazam better for us in the UK.
  • 4 0
 When do we get a review of chinese groupsets (Ltwoo, Sensah, Sride) on Pinkbike? There is a world outside of Shimano and Sram. Not to forget the taiwanese alternatives, like Sunrace, or Microshift.
  • 4 1
 Soooo many parts sourced from Alibaba... that folks won't have a clue as to who they are most likely... especially not the Sombrio dealer network. L-TWOO drivetrains are fragile on gravel bikes... I cannot see them being better on an aggressive trail hardtail. UDING suspension forks are likely not a brand name that is going to inspire confidence in buyers. The RiderEver Attack brakes are acceptable performers. I imagine the KS dropper is one of their coil spring non-adjustable consumer models. The article says the top model has boost thru-axle hubs but neglects to mention the other three model are different. On the 3 its only the FRONT wheel that's a thru-axle (the other 2 are non-boost 9x100 QR open dropouts), the frame of the Shovel 3 & 4 are the same and uses the open dropout 10x141mm QR skewer hub setup. The shovel 5 isn't boost spaced frame at all, being the older 10x135mm open dropout standard. The 2, 3 and 4 all run clutched Microshift drivetrains (Advent X, Advent 9, and Acolyte 8 speed versions). All use narrow-wide single ring Prowheel cranksets but its square taper on all but the top model. .
  • 6 0
 Gotta take your hat off to them....
  • 8 6
 1300 bucks. No dropper and no-name components that will fail and be more expensive to replace with quality components than the cost of the bike. This is no better than a 500 dollar throwaway specialized hardtail, and there's wayyyy better specd 1.5k bikes out there I'm not seeing the draw besides fleecing money from wanna-be's who will ride it around town and never see dirt.
  • 4 2
 Buy the $850 one and replace the parts as they die.
  • 5 0
 @CustardCountry: buy the $850 one, trash the wheel in one ride and spend $400 on a wheel built to an outdated standard where quality components are near impossible to find.
  • 1 0
 @Bro-LanDog: outdated, but not necessarily worse. And just get them built on hubs that allow you to change them to other standards, Hope, etc.
Also they might not die first time out, especially if you’re new to the sport.
  • 3 0
 1300 dollar one has a dropper, check the spec sheet.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: Good looking out. The pictures I found online didn't show one. I stand corrected on that regard.
  • 2 0
 It has the main thing a Hardtail needs - a low top tube and standover. The rest of the Geo doesn’t look too bad for a Hardtail and it retails for less than a lot of ‘frame-only’ hardtails. And hopefully you can always bung in a -2 slackset if you want to slacken it out (64* is great fun on an aggressive trail Hardtail)
  • 6 0
 Next up their fat bike called the snow shovel.
  • 3 0
 Who told you next years line up?!?
  • 3 0
 @SombrioCartel: you mean the 2022 spade trail bike and the 2023 backhoe ebike?
  • 5 0
 @alicialeggett Time for a thought experiment. Put on your product manager hat and assemble a bike for $1K.
  • 2 0
 Looks good especially for a cheap bike, but I'd say make it a bit slacker. 66 ain't terrible, but after riding a 64.5 HA hardtail for years, it felt every bit as maneuverable as my older steeper bikes, but when it got fast the bike was more stable and when it got steep it was nice not to feel like I was gonna go OTB, which was priority for me and I imagine noobs too. Was a bit slack for doing pumptracks & that kinda riding, though. Hardtails compress into their fork, so get steep once ridden, so really, 66 is like 68, which is XC level slackness when there's pressure on the bars.

My Sombrio shorts are the best I've owned FYI. Really good quality.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the feedback.
  • 4 0
 Pretty wild to launch in the midst of a global supply chain slow down. And for that price, wow.
  • 1 0
 Looks like the model shown for 1000$ Canadian has a clutch derailleur? The fork has hydraulic damping, magnesium lowers and a forged 6061 crown. It would be fun to beat the crap out of the fork untill it fails then put on a low end RS gold . Much bang for your buck for a grand. If the hydraulic brakes suck put a 8 inch rotor up front.
Or put a over forked front end like a Pike or step cast 34, Suntour Durolux, Manitou Minute. A quick release and Deore hydraulic brakes .
Tad more affordable even with serious modifications than your typical dual sus that starts at about 3000$
  • 2 0
 Geometry looks amazing for an entry level allround bike. Will save newbie rider from at least a few OTB's. Surprisingly this is where most brands fail with their "first bike" models.
  • 2 0
 We take note from riders, Pinkbike comments and industry trends whilst designing the Shovel. The homologation of modern ride trends in the trail category fall inline with the geo we have chosen for the Shovel.
  • 1 0
 Do you guys think this a decent combo for my wife who is just getting into mtbing. She currently rides all kinds of blue trails (no jumps) on her "walmart bike". I'm myself pretty new to it (riding blue and black trails on a stock RM Fusion 10 with same drivetrain as Shovel 3) and never heard about those brands for the fork, breaks, rims, hubs... I'm concerned about the maintenance in the long run especially when/if she gets more confident and goes on black trails as well. There is Shovel 3 available in my area but I'm wondering if I should wait for something more established to become available (RM Soul, Giant Talon etc...).
  • 1 0
 Talk to your local shop! See what they recommend - they have a great understanding of local trails, conditions and the gear that works best on that type of terrain. The Shovel 2 could be a great option with through axles front and rear, clutch 1x drive train and contemporary geo. But we're bias Wink
  • 1 0
 Update: went to the LBS over the weekend and was able to check out the Shovel 3 and 5. They look legit for what they are meant for, unfortunately the Small was a tad too big for my wife, otherwise she would have gone with it.
  • 2 0
 While I don't need a bike like this right now, I am happy it is around and will probably end up buying my next riding shorts through Sombrio to support the effort in making more affordable bikes.
  • 1 0
 Thank you for the support!
  • 4 0
 Awesome Boys.someone needed to go that way.good to see it from the Cartel
  • 3 0
 Do Sombrio employ many people on the North Shore? I thought they were sold to Cannondale 10+ years ago?
  • 4 0
 It has room for a water bottle, what more do you want
Pinkbikers?
  • 3 0
 Something, something, looks like a session.
  • 1 0
 room for 2 or 3.
  • 3 0
 You gotta respect them for filling a void in the market with a...SHOVEL In all seriousness though, I think this is great.
  • 1 0
 Sweet- the more entry options for new riders and kids the better...especially with new geo. However, not sure I'd call it the shovel. The last think I want is my bike digging into the dirt.
  • 2 0
 Good onya Sombrio, would be good to see a few of these mixed in with the Trek and Norco hardtails that the groms favour around these parts.
  • 1 0
 There is a missing link to the Bikes section, only available on the CA store:

ca-store.sombriocartel.com/collections/bikes

If you go to www.sombriocartel.com, there is no "Bikes" section.
  • 3 0
 Wish they'd just sell the frame!
  • 9 0
 Man, the whole bike is cheaper than your typical frame-only option.
  • 3 2
 Canfield brothers Nimble9 is a good choice for frame only
  • 2 0
 @mi-bike: But then I gotta get all those off-brand parts out of my garage!
  • 4 0
 Noted.
  • 3 0
 There's alr-UD oil on those stanchions.
  • 1 0
 Bit worrying for long term durability, eh?...
  • 2 0
 Is it just me or does the frame tubing and design looks identical to my 2019 salsa timberjack
  • 2 0
 Nice rig and great value. Most importantly the wheels are the same size like they should be on all Mountain bikes
  • 2 0
 I want one as my winter thrasher! Rebuilding my suspension cost almost as much as this complete bike...
  • 1 0
 @SombrioCartel your fit guide within the shovel2 page links to clothing fitting, not bike fitting. Would a 5' child be able to ride one?
  • 2 0
 Hi ! If you scroll down on the product page you have all the geometries : ca-store.sombriocartel.com/collections/bikes/products/shovel-2-bike

Yes your 5' child can fit on a small Shovel !
  • 2 1
 Looks cool. Would be wicked with a Deore groupset and a better fork - even one of the better Suntour models.
  • 2 0
 La géométrie looks good
  • 1 1
 Yeah, 27.5 vs 29, but if they have yer size, an On-One Scandal is a way better deal.... SX model is right around the same price.... you have heard of the fork before.....
  • 2 0
 This is what theworld needs
  • 3 0
 I can dig it.
  • 1 0
 Do Sombrio still have a UK distributor? Sure hope so - the Shovel looks awesome!
  • 1 0
 Thank you, all. We pay attention to the comments, we do read every single one.
  • 1 0
 somewhere this is a country singing, singing "SomBrio, Somewhere"
  • 1 0
 So is the Shovel 1 just called the Shove?
  • 1 0
 Would anyone designing an hard tail put the cables underneath?
  • 2 0
 27.5" aint dead!
  • 1 0
 is that a through axle?.....if not its a downgrade from my Octane prone
  • 1 0
 The top end Shovel 2 comes equipped through boost thru axles front and rear. Shovel 3 with boost QR rear and thru axle front. 4 & 5 come with non-boost QR rear ends.
  • 1 0
 @SombrioCartel: interesting that it made more sense to make 3 different frames due presumably to wheel pricing instead of just boost thru axles on all.
  • 1 0
 That grease on those forks just scream quality...
  • 1 0
 Will there be a frame only option?
  • 1 0
 Do Uping up in the air when you ride these forks?
  • 1 1
 I got 99 problems but a stitch ain't one
  • 1 0
 best hardtail name ever?
  • 2 2
 Bout time
  • 1 4
 heres your pos, you prol.
even comes w/ a schwag joint
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