First Look: Spank and DT Swiss Working on Magnetic Drive Hubs

Mar 17, 2014 at 0:10
Mar 17, 2014
by Mike Levy  
 
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There is a good chance that the freehub system within your rear hub features three or six steel pawls, with each of them depending on separate springs that are small enough to never be seen again if you were to drop them on the floor. That basic layout has been around for many years and has proven itself to be quite reliable when the hub is sealed adequately, as well as relatively easy to clean and work on. DT Swiss' Star Ratchet system is even simpler, consisting of only the design's two ramped Star Ratchet wheels and the opposing springs that force them together when you load the hub, making for just four moving components. There are, of course, other ways to create a clutch system, as Chris King, True Precision Components and a few others have shown, but it's fair to say that at least 90% of rear hubs on the market depend on either the classic three or six sprung pawl layout, or use DT Swiss' Star Ratchet system. Spank and DT Swiss think that there might be a better way to get the job done, though, and both have been investigating the use of magnets to do it. Yes, magnets. Have you ever tried to push opposing magnets together only to find that they want to repel each other? Now take that theory and put it inside of a rear hub. Spank and DT Swiss won't be the first to do such a thing, as Soul Kozak, a Polish component brand, has been offering their M-netic hub for a few years now, but it will be interesting to see if the theory takes off with the weight of these two companies behind it.

Spank

Spank says that their Mag-Drive hub has been in the works for two and a half years, with working prototypes being tested in the field at this moment.



Spank's Mag-Drive Hub
Spank gave us an exclusive look at their Mag-Drive hub while at the Taipei tradeshow last week, and although the company didn't want to reveal too many details at the time, we were able to take a close look at a working version that is now built into a complete wheel for testing. It features straight pull spoke flanges and an extremely loud ratcheting freewheel, but you'd likely never guess that it's significantly different internally than anything else on the market. That is, until you pull it apart and see that it uses opposing and repelling magnets to engage the clutch mechanism under pedalling loads. That quick description might be selling the impressively simple execution of the design a bit short, but it's about as much as Spank was willing to share at this point in time, although you can expect photos of the hub's internals to be shown here on Pinkbike in the near future. Interestingly, Spank says that they have been working independently on the system for two and a half years, and that it is in no way related to the DT Swiss' patent-pending design that is pictured below. Having had Spank's Mag-Drive hub apart in our own hands, we can say that their layout looks extremely simple compared to what DT Swiss have cooking, and that it will be interesting to see what the two companies end up with by the time both systems hit the production line.





DT Swiss Prototype
Just made public now, DT Swiss' application for a patent shows that their freehub mechanism ''is biased to the engaging position via a magnetic biasing device,'' meaning that it depends on magnets to engage the clutch and allow the rider to transfer power to the rear wheel. The entire application gives a detailed description of how the system works, albeit in patent-speak that can be a handful to take in, but the exploded illustrations shown below will give you a good idea of the system's layout.

DT Swiss

DT Swiss hasn't dropped the Star Ratchets within their prototype hub, only the springs that push them together.



The two most obvious points to note are that DT's ubiquitous Star Ratchets are still employed, and that the two wound springs usually found on each side of the Star Ratchets aren't present. Instead, a carrier with a number of small cylindrical magnets is contained within the backside of each Star Ratchet, and opposing magnetic rings are located in the hub shell (behind the inner Star Ratchet and its magnetic carrier) and the freehub body (in front of the outer Star Ratchet and its magnetic carrier). It appears that the inner magnetic ring acts on the inner Star Ratchet and its magnetic carrier, with the ring repelling the Star Ratchet out towards the freehub body. The exact same thing is happening to the outer ring and Star Ratchet, but in the opposite direction, meaning that the two Star Ratchet wheels are being pushed together in the same manner as if two springs were pushing them together. As the application reads, ''In a preferred specific embodiment of the invention at least one magnetic device comprises a pair of mutually repelling magnetic components.'' The DT Swiss design is actually more complicated than their current system, and its additional components also make it more complex that Spank's prototype Mag-Drive hub. Having said that, the two magnetic carrier rings hold a number of small magnets, and DT Swiss can likely vary the repelling forces of the system by changing up the number of magnets in each carrier.

DT Swiss

A carrier ring full of magnets can be found in the backside of both of the Star Ratchet wheels.




Why use Magnets Instead of Springs?
''The fact that the two engagement components are biased to the engaging position and urged toward one another by at least one magnetic device,'' the application explains, ''each achieves more optimum mechanical and also acoustic properties.'' Basically, the patent says that, instead of using a single magnetic ring or ring of magnets to pull the moving Star Ratchet towards an opposing fixed ratchet, having a ring of magnets on either side, one positive and one negative, makes for a stronger holding force when the Star Ratchets are engaged. It also reduces the closing force by a factor of four when they are pulled apart slightly each time that the ramped ratchets jump over each other.

The opposite happens when a steel spring is used because the spring's tension is greatest when the pawls are pushed up to the top of the ramped ratchets in freewheeling mode and weakest when the ratchet mechanism is fully engaged. This is the opposite force of what is required. Weak when engaged and stiff when freewheeling adds up to more noise, less positive engagement, and more freewheeling friction. The magnet system, because its attraction is exponentially less when the two magnets are moved a short distance apart, reverses this to a positive end - more engagement force is created, significantly less force and friction occurs when freewheeling, and less noise occurs because when the ratchets ride over each other and separate the magnets, the closing force is dramatically reduced.

Theoretically, it may be possible, using DT's patent illustration, to "time" the positive and negative poles of the magnetic rings on either side of the star ratchet segments to draw the rings together where the spurs engage and to push the rings apart where they ride over each other - effectively removing almost all of the friction and noise associated with the freewheeling mode altogether.

Spank and DT Swiss are still working on their magnetic drive hubs, and it isn't clear when we'll see production versions of either, and therefore a few questions still remain. Will the magnets lose their power over time? How will the designs deal with contamination? Can they be made to be as reliable as current setups? We'll try to answer those questions as more information, and hopefully production versions of both designs, become available in the future.


www.spank-ind.com
www.dtswiss.com
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150 Comments

  • + 207
 But will they sound cool?
  • + 119
 they must purr like a tiger or i wont care
  • + 73
 It is fancy technology and I like it, but if they don't sound cool there is no place for them on both pinkbike and the book of enduro.
  • - 55
flag leeeroooy-jenkins (Mar 16, 2014 at 23:53) (Below Threshold)
 You sir, are incorrect.
  • + 56
 you guy's must have missed the part when he said "It features straight pull spoke flanges and an extremely loud ratcheting freewheel"
  • - 24
flag brutalpedz (Mar 17, 2014 at 0:20) (Below Threshold)
 "extremely loud ratcheting freewheel"
"effectively removing almost all of the friction and noise"

Do they think we are dumb ? It's heavier, it will certainly cost more, we don't need it (actual system work fine for years)... it's just an other engineering delirium to increase sales.
  • + 13
 No need to act like someones putting a gun to your head saying "buy this!". If you don't like it, think the extra grams from the magnet make it "too heavy" or can't afford it don't buy it.

I'm sure the system will cost a bit of premium but it isn't like we're talking about electro-magnets here. It's probably ferromagnetism, not exactly a super expensive material for such a design (iron, nickel, magnetite).
I think it's an awesome concept an if it improves the reliabilitly of a freewheel all while increasing the effectiveness of engagement and decreasing friction.
  • + 21
 @ brutalpedz - My bad, I should have made the differences between the Spank and DT systems more clear. The prototype Spank hub was extremely loud when we spun the freehub, but the DT setup could possibly be made to be much quieter as it is a completely different layout.
  • + 3
 Mike - Will you guys be able to give a breakdown on Spanks design too? Or are they keeping their internals a secret for the time being?
  • + 3
 Aaaaaah ok ! Thank you Mike, now I better understand why these two sentences, so my post could be deleted. In this case I understand that Spank's offer stands out and I would certainly give it a try when it will be available.
  • + 1
 Nice call levy666…you can buy them now.
  • + 2
 Actually they said the spank will be very loud while the dt could be silent if they wanted it to. Sounds interesting but must agree my hope pro2 40t is pretty much perfect.
  • + 3
 Mmmm, Enduro magnets now? My refrigerator would never forgive me...
  • + 3
 Will they sound cool ? Good point. Last thing i want is sounding like a locust invasion soaring down the hill...
  • + 5
 @brycepiwek - Spank is keeping their hub internals under wraps for the time being, but I'm sure we'll have photos to show as soon as we can. It's very different than what DT Swiss is doing.


@levy666 - You're 100% correct, and Soul Kozak is mentioned in the first paragraph as having done it first, although theirs uses a different layout than both the Spank and DT Swiss offerings. Regardless, they have magnets in there that do a similar task.
  • + 3
 Great idea, but magnets attract dirt could result on short lifespan of parts...sale's mans dream!
  • + 2
 HMMMM.. im not sure i can give up my E-thirteen hubs for something so quite.
  • + 2
 everyone just wants a loud hub? so buy hope hubs they sound great and these hubs are probably going to cost way to much
  • + 0
 I swear DT swiss did something like this awhile back???
  • + 1
 its just a thing they are doing so they can charge 50 bucks more for a cheaper costing hub. why change something that works? lol
  • + 1
 @levy666 I think I had a cerebral oedema when I saw the price Razz
  • + 1
 No problem, Just get this youtu.be/tXAKcNFaWT0 Smile
  • + 72
 Magnetic eh? I'm strangely attracted.
  • + 53
 Yes, no doubt these hubs will polarise opinions...
  • + 22
 This is one field of technology that I can't fully explain.
  • + 15
 The idea has real potential...
  • + 11
 very bipolar...and repulsive. Things are definitely going south.
  • + 13
 Stop being so negative. You are only making a Gauss if you haven't seen whats below the surface; integral parts may be hidden.
  • + 12
 Regardless of what's really going on in there, I'd love to demo this hub and take it out in the field Faraday.
  • + 16
 I'll be solenoid if I don't get to try these out. I will be just like: "For Flux Sake!"

Mike's already been lucky enough to capture them through a Lenz. Was nice of him to give us an Induction as to how they work.

I'll be so happy once they're current products.
  • + 1
 well thats it, there are officially too many engineers on pinkbike. (includign myself) haha
  • + 3
 @marstheguy I with I could give you more props
  • + 52
 Insane Clown Posse will not understand how this hub works.
  • + 4
 My thoughts exactly.
  • + 6
 f*cking magnets, how do they work?
  • + 5
 I honestly can't wait for these hubs to come out, and for somebody to put it together backwards, so that I might mock them with ICP references.
  • + 0
 aha icp does have a point
  • + 21
 I have a Schwinn homegrown that is specced with a shimano LX silent clutch. People with loud hubs are missing out on the experience of floating on a fast trail with the only noise coming from the wind in your ears. I used to love the loudest hub I could get before that changed my hub noise preference. I say bring it on! Quiet hubs will be welcome on my next bike.
  • + 15
 Yep another convert to quiet hubs here. Just can't beat the sound of only your tyres on the dirt on a descent.
  • + 2
 Totally agree. I run an old style shimano hub with 16 engagement points just for the reduced noise level! There should be more lightweight silent hub options out there! Heck I got a clutch deraileur last season to reduce noise further!
  • + 3
 Agreed!
Today I was looking into how to get better sound quality with the go pro and came across this....
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWkLhnN2WIQ
  • + 1
 I think there is something to be said for both. On my DH bike I have one of the loudest hubs around, and it's great. But on my trail bike I have and easton rear hub that's neatly silent, along with a 1x10, and a clutch rear derailuer. The bike doesn't make a sound and it's awesome.
  • + 1
 Have a silent hub on one of my winter bikes. Forgot how loud my Hope's are till I jumped on my regular bike. I don't notice them after a ride or 2. Does help when you come up on people hiking though. Like having an evil horn or a rattle snake in your spokes. They turn around, usually from 30 feet out, which I actually like more than running up on someone and having to call out to them "On your left or right" as they usually step in front of you. Still, it's nice to hear nothing but buzzing tires or the ground being grabbed in a fast corner.
  • + 4
 The only reason why my "hubs" are loud is because my disks are a little bent.....Frown
  • + 1
 +1 for the quiet freewheel!
Didn't mind it on the old DH bikes but it would drive me nuts taking loud hubs on a long trail ride
  • + 2
 My new CovertCF last year with Eastons and clutch was damn near silent and the first few rides I took it out I was sketching out because I just couldn't hear the bike, it was weird. Things you've never noticed before freak you out, like brake hoses tapping together started to drive me nuts. Can't say I'd wanna go back to the Pro2 aka "bee in a biscuit tin" on a trail bike.
  • + 12
 Hubs don't make any sound as long as you keep pedalling. #lazycoasters
  • + 5
 Just ask the coast-al crew Razz
  • + 2
 I definitely enjoy the sound of my Hope hub, and was naively hopeful it would keep bears etc. away from me in BC. On the flip side my SS with a chill hub was really quiet, but I rarely took note of the silence. The reality is when I'm riding my ears are only attune to the sound my tires make, and any problems my bike is making audible. Infact, a quite bike actually makes all the little creaks and squeaks way more audible and easier to obsess over. The loud hub puts you in a trance.
  • + 1
 I wouldn't mind mine being quiet but got bloody hope pro2s on both bikes, the Evo SS is the worst -_-
  • + 6
 @cerealkilla just like I've always said. Loud hubs are a reminder to start f*cking pedaling again.
  • + 0
 1997 called, they want their hub back!
  • + 20
 And what happens in 400 years time when the magnets lose their strength an you get a hub failure out on the trails!? Sounds like marketing garbage to me! :-P
  • + 4
 he's a wordsmith...
  • + 8
 What if I insert copper wire or wrap the hub in wire? Will it power my bike computer? My electronic suspension? My as of yet released electric shifting? My lights? My blender and electric stove top for trail side Margarita's and Trail tacos? My 60" flat monitor so I don't miss a minute of the Enduro series whilst I'm actually Enduroing?

Does sound like a good Idea, all joking aside.
  • + 5
 Don't you threaten me with a good time.
  • + 0
 From time to time, I add tailgaiting to a trail ride, Haha, seriously!! It came from racing the Chequamagon 40. Hit the wall hard, like I argued with myself about if me doing that race was a good idea, out loud!! Didn't realize I was doing that till some guy goes "What??? Are you alright?" Anyway, was doing these switchbacks at about the 34 mile mark and swore I could hear polka music. Then I came up on a Lions club, playing polka, drinking beer, eating bratwurst and burgers. Always seemed like a better idea than an energy bar or banana or racing CC. I pack chicken Caesar wraps, which are good and we build the wraps trail side to be freshly made, but hot off the gridle bacon and chicken or steak or fish tacos would be awesome... And beer doesn't like to be shaken, so it's those frozen Margaritas in a bag things.. I have kids, so they can power everything while dad cooks... Thought of everything, just need power.
  • + 6
 Didn't someone already used magnets as pawl springs before? I think they used to stick with the grease or somerhing like that.
As for the DT stuff, honestly I do not see the point. The steel springs they use are a proven, light, and economical solution. I can see more resistance coming from the bearings than the pawls, but as usual, I must be on too much booze.
  • + 2
 Most likely you are indeed. Not all freewheels are equal but all feature friction, that comes from the design. If you have more friction in your beatings please rapidly proceed with an exchange, they are certainly fucked...
  • + 2
 @El-Warpo - You're thinking of Soul Kozak, a Polish brand. Not sure about how well theirs functioned, but it's been in their lineup for years.
  • + 1
 On a second read, why not?
  • + 2
 Stupid phone keyboard... Yeah, why not? Most freewheels work on friction but on your average rear hub you have anywhere from 3 to 5 bearings that need contact seals. So, yes, much friction will come from the ratchet, but there is certain amount coming from the bearings. Also, the ones benefiting the most will be those who coast more (gravity applications?) as when we are pedaling any advantage is negated. Yes, this system is much probably better than steel springs, but just marginally. It will most likely trickle down and be the standard in few years. The way the DT is built, will make easy to replace magnets regularly. Genius really.
  • + 2
 Nicolai's G-boxx 2 uses magnets to engage pawls in their gearbox.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_cpBDmxuqM
  • + 5
 And what about electric currents created due to relative rotation of the magnets to the hub components? these create an opposite magnetic field that acts against the cause of the rotation and therefore creates a kind of "friction". would it be good to have such electromagnetic brake built in the hub? Razz
  • + 4
 No problem, the rest of the hub will be alu.
  • + 2
 In the DT Swiss one, you've got two sets of counter-rotating magnets... I wonder if that might introduce drag. Seems like i remember people finding measurable drag in magneto hubs, so doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility(though of course, the amount of drag might be measurable, but not noticeable.)
  • + 2
 @DrFlow I may be mistaken, but i think magnets can induce eddy currents in aluminium, wasting energy as heat. So @tidli could have a point.
  • + 2
 You are of course right, thealmightybryn and tidli. The mistake is mine, sorry
  • + 5
 The trouble with magnets is that they are remarkably poor at resisting knocks. If you keep on subjecting them to vibration, such as occurs when freewheeling then they simply lose their magnetism over time. That's why they aren't routinely used for this purpose in any field of motor drive or gearing manufacture where long service life is important. Maybe they've figured a way round it?
  • + 5
 Great idea! Does it rule out the use of ferrous based materials in the freewheel? Those who ride 1x drive trains with those new 42 tooth gears, if they're not attached to several of the cogs beside them, may find premature wear on their aluminium freewheel from the torque applied by such large drive gears.
  • + 3
 I wonder if the magnets would act like a magnetic drain plug on axles. It would keep foreign debris away from the bearings and help to determine life/damage of components. But I also guess less wear would be present in a hub versus an axle pumpkin.
  • + 1
 you're probably right about the amount of particulate from the hub itself (very little.) But it would be nice if any outside contaminants that make it past the seals get collected if they happen to be ferrous.
  • + 3
 Magnets...well, until the magnets themselves are being used for engagement (not just replacing springs with magnets,) a crappy hub is a crappy hub. If the hub breaks...it will still break under the use of magnets....i.e the pawl shearing, ramps rounding out, freehub body exploding, etc. None of these problems have been fixed...so this is a pretty big waste of time IMO.

DT Star ratchet systems are crap under a heavy rider. Great that you can replace them on the trail without tools, but it still doesn't fix the fact that it broke.
  • + 1
 This seem pretty cool!

A "silent clutch" system with a close range pedal input freehub would be awesome but......

What about dirt? I RC and often get bits of ferrous rock in and on my motor cans...

don't wash your bike.....
  • + 1
 thats a very interesting concept... now its just how much will it last... by looking at it maybe someone could fit any kind of these freehubs in the old hubs... for me i would say maybe its just like the gyro project from gnarly metal... wow awesome ... and it was... but never heard of it anymore
  • + 5
 Can you use them on a steel frame Smile
  • + 1
 That's a nice looking hub from spank but it's certainly not their own technology. They don't have any patents for hubs. This is most likely a custom hub that they had made with VP Components.
www.faqs.org/patents/app/20130126292

I'd be curious to know when the DT hub will be available and if it will be lighter than their current 240s.
  • + 2
 Won't the vibrations of the engagement stuff the polarity of the magnets or at least their strength by shaking the ions about? Or will it not be a hard enough knock? Pardon my lack of knowledge. I blame CO ED skool.
  • + 4
 Looks like magnets in place of the ratchet plate preload steel springs. Neat.
  • + 1
 That's exactly it. There are four magnetic elements altogether in the DT Swiss hub.
  • + 1
 So basically its a work around of the helical splines that are used on the Chris King hubs. Kind of a cool concept. Not sure how well it will work once the thing gets packed full of crapped up grease like just about every hub does. At least with the King hubs you have a mechanical force acting on the drive rings. I am wondering how easily the magnetic drive will be defeated by dirt and crud.
  • + 5
 i'm not saying it's aliens... but it's aliens.
  • + 1
 New ideas are always welcome, and if either Spank or DT Swiss now develop something new to revolutionise hubs, then that is great - bring it on! Pity the article didn't mention that German hub manufacturer Tune has also has a couple of years of experience with prototypes of magnets in the ratchet mechanism replacing pawls and springs and their rear hub, but it never went into mass production as they didn't get the reliability they were looking for in a ratchet system. We will wait in anticipation ;-)
  • + 2
 Let's set the record straight - these are NOT mag drive hubs. They are normal hubs with magnetically engaging ratchet mechanisms. Mag drive hubs would be super cool though!
  • + 0
 Yes the current system works well and yes this will probably add cost however, hang your bike up and spin both wheels, which one comes to a stop first? I'd be surprised if it is the front. Depending on how much reduction in friction they can manage it may prove to be a pretty nice advantage.
  • + 1
 More engaging force on the ratchet? Who cares? Either the ratchet engages or it doesn't .it is more like a switch.
Engineers trying to make a more complex read: expensive hub. Great.
  • + 2
 So if there is an inner and outer ring with the reverse polarity of the two star ratchets, that means the star rachets should be attracted to one another, no?
  • + 1
 exactly what i thought. the whole article sort of meanders back and forth between stating the magnets will be in a state of repulsion or a state of attraction. If the magnets do repel each other they will lose their strength very quickly. if they are attracting each other they will stay strong for far longer.which is it?
  • + 3
 I could see road and xc racers loving this! Less friction would be awesome during a race
  • - 1
 And people who race in Fontana. Less friction= Better/less pedaling on the wall. Hopefully you can keep your momentum up.
  • + 2
 Really interesting! I think this has the makings to become a great new design in the world of hubs! Maybe even new industry standard?
  • + 2
 Finally some non shitty Enduro product pushed by the market. That's some good stuff and actually clever technology. Good posting.
  • + 1
 "The magnet system, because its attraction is exponentially less when the two magnets are moved a short distance apart..."

Magnetic attraction decays with the cube of the distance, not exponentially.
  • + 2
 Well sounds good idea, if does not make a loud noise you can always but a paying card on your frame that catch's on the spokes?
  • + 3
 First paragraph, last sentence. I think Soul Kozak had theirs in 2006? DT Swiss and Spank giving it a go with different layouts will surely mean that it will become more widely known, though.
  • + 1
 I was just about to post that same hub. They've also got more engagement points than an Industry Nine hub.
  • + 1
 Is there heat resistant magnets exist yet ? high temperature will demagnetize the magnets. Hoping that they won't label it "racing wheel" or "mileage limited" wheel...
  • + 4
 Physics is cool!
  • + 3
 this is genius I can't believe it hasn't been done yet
  • + 2
 Polish brand Soul Kozak has used magnets for their clutch device for awhile now, but this is the first time more popular brands have given it a go.
  • + 2
 So what kind of magnets are used? Neodymium? Different types of magnets should cause different forces too right?
  • + 1
 I'm interested to see if the magnets will have a effect on weight. I know some types can be quite heavy but I would assume they're using Neo or rare earth metal magnets.
  • + 4
 Thats pretty neat!
  • + 2
 This is a refreshing take on hub design. Pawl and spring systems never made much sense to me...
  • + 2
 HA! totally misinterpreted the article title - thought this was magnetic bearings for low-friction hubs!!
  • + 1
 Would ferrous materials such as steel interfere with the working of the hub, or are steel frames not Enduro enough to be considered?
  • + 1
 Sounds like a good way to increase efficiency & maybe reliability. I likes it!
  • + 1
 Inside that hub it that a plain magnet or a p###y magnet?
www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrpPbui37Dk
  • + 1
 good news. im looking forward to see a 3d animation, to understand how the thing works.
  • + 2
 I've always thought they should use magnets to help seat a tubeless tire
  • + 2
 now that ain't a half bad idea
  • + 3
 Or magnet flat pedals and shoes!
  • + 1
 I think in terms of magnets on the shoes the issue would be releasing your foot. If the magnet was powerful enough to have any riding/pedaling benefit it would then be quite hard to get your foot off. Magnets don't really have any type if quick release to get you foot out when you need too.
  • + 1
 Maybe with electromagnets with a flip of a switch. I could see this being useful in the event of a crash. Benefits of clipless without the dangers of snapping your ankle in a crash. Nice idea Pavlovic.
  • + 1
 yeah thats what i always wanted - more switches on my handlebar. MORE!
  • + 1
 No switch. Just change out the magnetic tabs in either the shoe or pedal, until you get the holding force you want!
  • + 1
 Still don't understand the mechanics behind this... instructional video please!
  • + 4
 Insert a magnetic field in where the spring should be. Like when you try to push 2 magnets together, that's the "spring" force. It would still "buzz" like a regular hub but should be more consist and reliable as you would have no spring wear or broken springs.
  • + 1
 Why not magnetic, friction free bearings as well? Electro magnets could be powered by a dynamo built into the hub.
  • + 1
 Dirt are charged particles, magnets attract dirt, experiment: try runnin a magnet on dirt and see what happens? So Enduro!
  • + 1
 yea people who like coloured rims and crappy stuff...
  • + 1
 Looks like the DT system may be able to upgrade existing star ratchet hubs
  • + 1
 Magnetic lockout. It's the future
  • + 1
 Its here! Look into the White Bothers loop fork. Aurora used magnets to lockout.
  • + 1
 It's great to see the bike industry influenced by paintball
  • + 3
 They should paintball on Enduro during the transition stages for extra points and time awards!
  • + 1
 The question is... Will it blend??
  • + 1
 Awaiting magnetic suspension componentry.
  • + 1
 From what I've understood, that's really clever.
  • + 1
 I want friction-less magnetic bearings!!!
  • + 1
 what happens if i fakie across the deck?
  • + 1
 Moar magnets!!
  • + 0
 why didn't I think of this?!
  • + 0
 Seems like the manufacturing costs will make it a boutique item like Enve.
  • + 2
 How so? I don't think magnets are that expensive... I can see DT Swiss' not being inexpensive, but I imagine that Spank's will be priced competitively.
  • + 1
 The tools required to drill out the holes for the magnets would be expensive because the steel used in the ring ratchet system is made from tool steel. It is pretty much the same reason why you don't see these parts being made from titanium. Once brought up to a durable hardness the metal is no longer able to be machined while maintaining the proper temper. Cutting/friction=heat.
  • + 3
 So drill the holes before heat treating.
  • + 0
 Heat treating warps metal hence most heat treating is done after machining.
  • + 2
 Why would the magnet rings need to be tool steel? They could be Al or anything really. Only the contact parts (star pieces) need to be hard steel.
  • + 0
 Look at figure 5. My statements are based on the designs displayed above.
  • + 4
 The exploded view in the figure before that shows that the carrier ring and the star ratchet are separate parts.
  • - 1
 Why take away hub noise?? That's the shit
  • - 2
 spank can spank me. their product sucks...
  • + 1
 Spanking is extra. And that's just like, your opinion, man. I like their stuff and know a lot of people who do as well

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