Specialized Announces New Tire Compounds & Casings

Oct 13, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  

Specialized have reworked their mountain bike tire lineup in order to make it easier to tell how much grip and puncture protection a certain model will offer. It's not just a name change though – new rubber compounds have been added that are designed to be extra-grippy for maintaining traction in challenging conditions.

If you looked at coverage of the new Stumpjumper EVO, you might have noticed that Specialized's Butcher and Eliminator tires said T9 or T7 on the sidewall. That 'T' number is an indication of how much damping the rubber compound is supposed to provide. The higher the number, the slower the rubber rebounds, which should help keep the tires sticking instead of slipping.

Cooking up some fresh compounds.

At the moment, T9 is as high as the numbers go, and that compound is available for the Butcher and Hillbilly tires. A faster rolling T5 compound will be used for Specialized's more XC-oriented offerings.

The Eliminator tire, a slightly quicker rolling options that works well in the rear when paired with the Butcher up front, is available with a T7 / T9 dual rubber compound. T7 rubber is used for the center tread, with the grippier T9 compound on the outer knobs for cornering traction.

2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
Specialized Butcher
2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
Specialized Eliminator


There are two choices of tire casings for the Butcher, Eliminator, and Hillbilly – Grid Trail and Grid Gravity. The BLK DMND casing and its missing vowels is no longer in the lineup, and Grid Gravity is now the way to go for DH riders and others who want a thicker casing for more puncture protection.

There are 27.5" and 29" options for all three models, in either 2.3" or 2.6" widths for the Butcher and Eliminator, and 2.3" for the Hillbilly. The 2.3" tires on the Stumpjumper EVO I reviewed measured 2.4", so keep that in mind when deciding which width to pick.


More information: specialized.com


162 Comments

  • 247 11
 The day their pro team stop blacking out Maxxis is the day I would consider buying specialized tyres.
  • 53 8
 You are right about gravity tires, but Spec. trail tires like Purgatory & Ground Control are actually fantastic: better than Maxxis Recon, Ardent, etc. in terms of balance of rolling speed and grip in hard / dusty conditions. Same goes for XC tires: no need to black-out Maxxis - their XC casings just aren't as fast as Schwalbe, Specialized, or even Vittoria.
  • 6 3
 Right?
  • 44 5
 I find the butchers to be a great tyre, leave them on all year round.
  • 9 1
 I used to run butchers all the time as you could get a decent size/thread/compound/weight for about 35e in shops. Not sure they are as competitive on price anymore (don't live near a spesh shop anymore).
  • 5 2
 @bigburd: yea that! Have it as front tire and they are actually fantastic
  • 20 9
 I'd love to say the opposite, but I've tried so many brands and it's always the same. Nothing comes close to maxxis in corner grip and durability...
  • 4 2
 @bigburd:

You ride Rooty muddy loam/leaves on em yeah?

They're amazing on that stuff.
  • 5 1
 This pretty much sums up my feelings on most tyre brands
  • 5 1
 @Mugen:
You can often get them online for a big discount, the Specialized website were selling the old model tyres around the £20 mark. They're a bargain at that price.
  • 8 2
 @DustOnCrust: I'll second that - but, the change that happened some time ago when they introduced the Gripton compound was a game-changer. Especially for the Ground Control. The Fast Trak has always been good IMO.

Locally, we ride natural singletrack, trails, whatever in combo with some transport on gravel and asphalt. Proper riding, not just bombing down, though we have built quite a few enduro-trails as well. All year in the south-east of Norway, so we get everything from bone dry and 30C via mud and bog to snow, ice and -25C.

I've run Maxxis, Vittoria, Schwalbe and a few other oddities, but keep coming back to the Spesh tyres. I like how they feel on roots, rock face & wet stuff in particular. Good grip, predictable, and reasonably priced. Running the new purgatory front, GC rear, normal Grid. 2.3" on the downcountry bike, 2.6 on the enduro rig. And this is the preferred combo among most locals.Guess we all like the more snappy feel faster & lighter tires give, and accept we may get the occasional flat, though this is extremely rare. Destroying rims, however...

Going to parks & big mountains, the Eliminator is my preference, though it borders on Maxxis-feel (stiffer). Also occasionally run the Butcher up front.
  • 19 18
 Spesh tyres are actually fine... as long as they're the only mtb tyre you've ever ridden and you don't try a mate's bike that has any other tyre on it XD
  • 25 1
 @DC1988: I picked up four tyres for £53 from their website - two Purgatorys, a Butcher and a Slaughter. I'm not a pro, I can't tell much difference between a High Roller and a Purgatory, but I can sure tell the difference between £15 and £35.
  • 7 3
 Funny enough I think they have new compounds because they were kicked out by CST (Maxxis' mother company). So basically until now Specialized tires were made by Maxxis.
  • 3 1
 @bigburd: I also have them on my Stumpjumper.

They are less expensive than Maxxis etc and hold up well and have enough grip.
  • 3 1
 @cru-jones: Cheng Shin. I just associate that with my 85 KX 125. Buy lots. Throttle. Buy more.

Stare at the Metzelers and Dunlops...but buy the Cheng Shins.
  • 15 2
 @DustOnCrust: friends don’t let friends ride Ardents.
  • 5 1
 I’ve found Butchers to perform every bit as good as Minion DHF for the terrain around here, and in some ways they’re better. I like the way they roll compared to Minions. I do find, however, that as the Butchers age, the sidewalks get weak and flexy. Then it’s time to replace. I’ve never used the heavier Grid casing, so maybe that would be better.

At any rate, I’m not sure these new ratings make things any clearer or easier to understand. But here we are. It will be fine.
  • 2 1
 The Hillbilly is a great tire for loose, dry, gravely type conditions. Aggressive tread. I'd describe as a cross between a Magic Mary and Vigilante, with more square profile and little smaller volume. Been using that tire for a season and one of my favorite front tires.
  • 6 5
 Ladies and gentlemen, while this obvious debate will go on, and people will continue to state that "these tires are good, and I love these tires", when were speaking in terms of what is simply the best, (at least in the downhill world) i think its safe to say that Maxxis have yet to be beat. Many have come close, but no tire company in mountainbiking has matched the overall consistency and cornering ability like maxxis. There is a reason the majority of top professional racers use them, because they are just that good.
  • 2 0
 @TobiasHandcock: Yep every thing from UK winter slop to the 6 months of dust we have had this year, and they come in cheaper than Maxxis too, which is a bonus as tyres are massively over priced.
  • 11 0
 @jomacba:
I disagree, nothing in the Maxxis range is as good an all rounder as a Magic Mary
  • 1 3
 @DC1988: Well then agree to disagree. While I believe the Magic Mary is a phenomenal tire, (I've spent a great deal of time on the older and newer compounds) Where they just don't seem to match maxxis is grip on wet roots.
  • 3 1
 I feel like I might be a minority in this case, but I can’t stand specialized’s tires with GRID casing.
I had to run ~5psi more (when compared to Maxxis EXO casing) to keep the casing from collapsing on hard landings or square edge hits.
Doing this obviously made the tire skittish and it lacked the damping of a more supportive casing. While saying this, I have not tried the Black Diamond casing so maybe that’s a different story.
  • 1 0
 you should consider the new tires. I have been on dhf, DH, maxx gripp 29's, since they became available. I was asked to try the gravity version at the beginning of this season and they have been amazing. The grip of the T9 is very similar to maxxgrip but the slower rubber dampens the terrain really well. Also they roll at least 15% faster than the maxxis tires. I will continue running the spec tires from now on.
  • 1 0
 @bigburd: they last you a year??!!
  • 3 1
 I've been running a Butcher F/R pretty much all season at a DH park and they still look new. My buddy's Assegai's look like beavers have been chewing on them, they are full of plugs, not to mention the "Maxxis Wobble" that they come standard with now. No thanx.
  • 2 0
 @Zeeroone: this is highly subjective and since getting off Maxxis years ago I’d have to wholeheartedly disagree....subjectively of course...
  • 2 0
 @jomacba: wet roots are a pretty specific parameter. I feel in many other categories the Mary is superior to a Minion. Ex. Hard pack, loamy conditions and center to corner knob transition. You are right about the roots though...
  • 2 0
 @freeinpg: I would say thats heavily dependent on tread pattern. I keep gravitating back to a DHR II front and rear. The side to side knob profile is super consistent, they shed mud well, the tread blocks aren't overly high, and the 2.4 casing is narrow enough it digs into loam quite well. In all fairness, I believe the DHRII is superior to every other tire in maxxis's lineup. Now that being said, I'm speaking objectively, and to get a better idea of my setup, I'm running carbon 29" hoops with cushcore in the rear and cushcore XC up front with Maxxgrip DH casing. I'm also 215lbs, and run 24-25psi front and 27-28psi rear.
My one real complaint is a set of tires will last maybe a month to a month and a half.
  • 21 1
 @jomacba: There is not a single thing about maxxis tires that is head and shoulders above what everyone else makes, they used to be better than most 10 years ago and most people are scared to try new things so they stick with what they have been using for years. Not that it´ s too hard to understand with prices of MTB tires, but still, so many people would be surprised how other tires can outperform their personal benchmark...If you go over all features that make great tire, there is nothing that maxxis does that some other brand doesn´t do better. Casings? Like super fragile EXO? Kenda´s atc casing is the same weight category and more robust. Overweight DD that is just like exo with more rubber all around the casing so it´s still not very supportive at sidewalls yet too thick under the tread so be supple? Schwalbe´s Supergravity wipes the floor with it. Or DH that only comes in maxxgrip or ST version so cannot really be used for rear wheel unless you fancy changing tires every other week? Michelin DH tires anyone? Compounds? Yes, maxx grip is sticky, but it wears if front of your eyes, it´s not that hard to make sticky rubber that doesn´t last. Meet the conti´s black chili DH version. Tread patterns? Well, they have been doing variations of the same stuff for years and years and no, they didn´t come with all the knob shapes like some people think they did when they say every new tire is DHF or DHR clone, there were brands using those shapes before them and it´s not like MX bikes weren´t using square shaped knobs before either. It´s only recently that they came up with something new with disector/asegai. So they are decent at most, but they have huge presence on OEM and some very loyal following around the world based mostly on good memories. Now hurry up downvote the shit out of me like usually so no one can see the blasphemy.
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: No down vote necisarry. This is an open forum designed for the exchange of ideas and perspectives. You sir are fully entitled to that, and I appreciate the rebuttal.
That being said, I never stated that their tires are heard and shoulders better, nor did I state that all maxxis tires are better. While I did generalize, ultimately I was referring to whatever tire would suit best as an overall. I don't believe any company does everything well, but I do believe they all do one thing well. I am also speaking in terms of overall traction, so in terms of casing, I would say Schwalbe probably hits the nail on the head more consistently than any other company with the exception of their DH casing, which I feel is mostly on par. I haven't ridden kenda in several years, and historically they haven't been amazing. The new Michelin tires are very good, yet the casing is very heavy.
I have ridden contis, and they have been garbage right across the board. I speak to the newest casing.
Maxxis has the largest OEM market for a reason. Their tires work well. They don't have a gun to companies heads.
Is there room for improvement? 100% maxxis quality control sucks. The lifespan is shit, and the exo casing is pretty much unridable without blowing up a wheel or riding them (hard) at ridiculously high pressures.
I have no love for any tire manufacturer in particular, and if there truly is a tire that performs more consistently, and isn't lined with lead or made with paper mache, id love to give them a go.
  • 2 0
 @stinkball:
I tried an Ardent once...ONCE! The first and only time my rear came all the way around in a situation where that should've been impossible
That tire died a slow painful death thanks to caustic chemicals and fire
  • 1 0
 @DustOnCrust: The Eliminator is a fantastic tire. I'm bummed to see that BLCK DMND is out of the running now. Per the specs, it's a couple hundred grams lighter than the Grid Gravity for a 29x2.6. BLCK DMND is a fantastic casing if your casing is folding around fast corners. Grid Gravity should do as well, being 200 grams heavier.
  • 1 0
 +10 tried this numerous times. Stick with Maxxis now
  • 1 0
 Och I've always had me a soft spot for them Specialized tyres. How 'boot ye knock out some 26" versions for me ol' Demo?
  • 3 0
 @Mondbiker: Everything you say is true, there is no single uber-feature on Maxxis tyres. But the overall package of the Minions and Assegai is very well rounded with no glaring weaknesses. And they are available in a myriad of different versions, so that everyone can find a tyre that suits their style and terrain.

The ultimate tyre would obviously be a mixture of all the best features found on different brands. Minion thread pattern, Schwalbe casing, Conti rubber, Vittoria tubeless setup and Specialized prices.
  • 2 0
 Designer of Butcher is who? And the compunds are from...?
Yes, Maxxis was ahead. Yes, they have a lot really good tires.
But - I know quite a lot people testing Shorty and Hillbilly... we all said that HB is better. Why? Cuz it is! And guess what? Is also cheaper (it was, dont know about new priceing). Could say the same for Hutchinson Toro (newest one).
And HB is not the only tire from them...

Most people have "problems" with Spec... they dont want to admit that something from them could also be good (bikes, saddles, etc.) so they are saying that tires are also no good.
  • 1 1
 @cebe: Designer of the tires for both companies was the same guy initially. Who is in charge of current iterations none can say. But the guy who worked on the Minion, Wetscream, Swampthing, Shorty...same guy who worked up the Butcher, Hillybilly & others for Specialized for what it's worth.

He's long been gone from both companies though.
  • 121 3
 Screw these in-house, T-whatever ratings, just put a Shore Durometer number on it! That is the standard used by the rubber industry, and riders who actually think in terms of compound hardness know 40a-50a is ballpark for Maxxis 3C, and 60a is Maxxis Dual. Marketing people, keep your mitts off of our tire metrics: actual widths and Shore Hardness will do.
  • 6 0
 Agree 100% the dimension variations brand vs brand has always seemed so absurd to me. And, I don't understand why companies got away from publishing the compounds. I guess some marketing guru or economist convinced them that what we have today is better....who knows.
  • 33 1
 @Veloscente: I agree with you in principle, but rebound rate is a separate parameter from durometer. If one compound has some durometer and some rebound rate, similar traction could be obtained with a slightly lower durometer and slighter higher rebound rate or higher durometer and lower rebound rate. We could also look at the extent of the cross-linking, carbon vs. silica content, carbon particle size, etc.

As much as I agree with the "just give me the numbers" sentiment, I grudgingly acknowledge there's an argument for this arbitrary "traction index".
  • 8 2
 Agreed all we need to know is the dimensions, casing construction and Durometer. Pretty much every manufacturer hides those details behind bullshit names except Maxxis who still have stupid bullshit names but at least explain what they actually mean.
  • 5 1
 I actually came here to say the exact same thing. Tip of the hat to you my good man.
  • 4 4
 Where does Maxxis publish their durometers? Also, there are three types of 3C, pretty sure MaxxSpeed doesn't use "40a-50a". And what about the other 2 Cs in the 3C? Where is the other durometer for the "Maxxis Dual"?

I think they used to publish that the SuperTacky was all something like 42A? And Spesh used to quote a pre-Gripton Butcher Grid as having 42A shoulders, too. But no one lists that anymore, so I don't know how you made that "ballpark" or what exactly you're yelling about.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Almost everyone "explains" it, and all with a bunch of marketing, Maxxis is not the only one. Conti, for example, has all their "tech" listed out (www.continental-tires.com/bicycle/technology/mtb), just like Maxxis (www.maxxis.com/technology/bike-technology), to use as a key.
  • 1 2
 @just6979: well I meant Maxxis are the only ones who make to information easily available out of the brands you’d actually buy. I still don’t know how soft a purple magic Mary is but it feels on par with a maxx terra which is 42a on the side nobs and 50a on the centres.
  • 5 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Got a link to where Maxxis publishes that?
  • 8 3
 @thenotoriousmic: And f*ck off with that "actually buy" shit. Plenty of people have had shit experiences with Maxxis, and great experiences with others.
  • 4 1
 @just6979: It's knowledge of the elders, and it's out there for the finding if you want to do some research. I've made note of Maxxis durometers over the years. Some were published by Maxxis, others came as beta from reps at trade shows, tire designers in interviews, etc.
Maxxis has typically used 70a rubber as their base for both Dual and 3C tires. The other number(s) are for surface rubber.
MaxTerra is 70a / 50a (center) / 42a (side knobs)
Dual is 70a/60a
Gravity compounds get softer from there.
  • 4 1
 @R-M-R: Great, so publish the durometer alongside a separate rebound rate number, just do it in industry-standard units. In house, proprietary scales are nothing but pure marketing horsesh*t. Publish numbers that can be quantified and compared to the competition: if your product is any good you have nothing to fear by that comparison.
  • 1 4
 @Veloscente: "Publish numbers that can be quantified and compared to the competition: if your product is any good you have nothing to fear by that comparison."

Tell that to Maxxis, which you seem to be infatuated with. Because word of mouth "from reps at trade shows" is just as useless as the "proprietary scales" which you hate so much, when compared to published numbers.

And what's to say Maxxis hasn't changed compounds over the years? Perhaps those durometers you've gathered over the years are completely wrong. Because if they haven't been tweaking those compounds, instead just riding on momentum of loads of OEM deals, they're gonna get passed by everyone else.

You do know there are 3 types of 3C? MaxxTerra is in the middle, do you have gleaned "data" on MaxxSpeed & MaxxGrip? You said gravity compounds get softer, but the only thing beyond MaxxGrip is SuperTacky. So does MaxxGrip use something softer than 70a for a base? Does MaxxSpeed use a harder base? Harder center and/or knobs?

So many questions that could be answered if your lover Maxxis did what you're bitching about others not doing, which is publish the numbers!
  • 4 0
 @just6979: super tacky is 42a everywhere where max grip is a 42 down the centre and 40 on the side nobs and a 70a base.
  • 4 0
 IMO Maxxis dual compound is best for desert riding. More companies should make dual-ply casing with harder compounds for tires to survive in the desert. Your 42a dh tire might be great for PNW or UK, but it will last a week before the knobs are shredded in Moab/Sedona/SoCal.
  • 1 4
 @thenotoriousmic: You must not realize that those are all rhetorical questions. I don't care if you have them memorized. Where does Maxxis publish them? That's the only thing that matters.
  • 5 0
 @just6979: it’s not my responsibility to educate you. I’ve already done enough, try google.
  • 4 1
 @just6979: Take a deep breath, and realize you have screamed so loud trying to win a rhetorical battle, that you've lost sight of the war. No one here is holding up another manufacturer as a perfect paragon of disclosure, and no one has to. The one, sole point of *my* thread was to point out that brand S had the chance to rate their tires on a systematic, transparent, & quantifiable scale, but instead, they opted for an arbitrary, reference-free measuring-schtick created by their marketing department. That will be all, move along w/ the ad-hominem rant, these are not the droids you are looking for.
  • 1 4
 @Veloscente: And my point was "brand S" is far from the only one, and as yet not a single example has been given of a company that actually does what you want. Your example of Maxxis is a terrible one, because they do the same thing with arbitrary scales/names.

Ad-hominem? You sure you know what that means?
  • 3 2
 @just6979: You're hilarious. Ad hominem is the taste of your foot in your rhetorical mouth as you double down on insults instead of reflecting on why no one is interested in your threadjack attempt that borders on hallucinatory non-sequitur.
  • 3 0
 @just6979: pre 3c Maxxis used to have its Durometers on the side of the tyre 42a super tacky. 40a slow reezey etc so it’s pretty much common knowledge amongst people with an interest in tyres and the benchmark others are tested against.
  • 1 2
 @thenotoriousmic: used to. That's the thing. So did Specialized, they listed them on the site and I think the packaging. but no one lists them anymore.
  • 2 1
 @just6979: Few companies list durometers because riders with a poor understanding of rubber properties will equate durometer with traction. Sure, there's a relationship, but it's only part of the picture. It's like listing the suspension travel of a bike without listing the length or head-tube angle: it gives an incomplete picture and could cause people to make poor purchase decisions.
  • 2 0
 @R-M-R: so giving them ridiculous names that nobody understands and is different with every company helps? Come off it. Wink
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: No one made that claim.
  • 1 3
 @R-M-R: Yes, I agree. You don't have to tell me that, I'm not the one ragging on companies for not doing it and fellating companies that maybe used to do it.
  • 1 2
 @Veloscente: No one is interested? This is a pretty f*cking long thread...
  • 51 11
 Surprised they don't have a butcher s-works selection priced at £800....
  • 3 2
 with electronic inflation that allows you to take air out with a flip of a trigger while riding.. I think I just gave them their next idea
  • 4 0
 With a belt of woven unicorn hair for flat protection and vibranium beads.
  • 8 1
 Oh come on!
"The higher the number, the slower the rubber rebounds". If you want silly proprietary ratings at least be consistent with how durometer ratings work and not the opposite.

I hate it when companies do dumb shite like that.
  • 7 0
 Durometer (Shore hardness scale) is hardness, not rebound speed. This isn't just a proprietary scale for durometer, it's indicating something different. Might also inversely indicate hardness, but this article didn't mention it.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: Yes. You're correct but as the article says: "The higher the number, the slower the rubber rebounds, which should help keep the tires sticking instead of slipping".
It's essentially the same thing and a matter of semantics since a low durometer typically equates to "soft and grippy" on mtb tires.
  • 1 0
 @Dustfarter: you're confusing causation and correlation. Slow rebound and soft shore rating both help grip (correlation), but low shore alone does not cause slow rebound. So telling just the hardness (shore) doesn't tell everything, and that's what they're trying to add here. It's just more info, which is never really a bad thing.
  • 7 1
 Wish they would offer the Ground Control in a tougher casing. That’s the best tire they make. I like the Eliminator as well but it’s pretty slow. I’m not a Maxxis fan as out of the 5 Maxxis tires I’ve had 3 have had defects that caused them to wobble. Bontrager is where I’ve kind of landed in the meantime. Partly because they are the only ones I’ve never had issues with and partly be used we have a Trek store the next town over and I can always get them with out ordering.
  • 4 0
 I'm with you, the Ground Control is a highly underrated, all-around use tire. Better price and equal performance than a Maxxis equivalent (I'd put it up against Rekon anyday) and great quality control from the factory. I wish they would update it with Grid Trail casing though.
  • 2 0
 I’m really liking the GridTrail sidewall. Great balance of rolling, weight and puncture resistance. I’m a fan of the Spech thread patterns. I’m not a fan of their compounds. They just don’t have the traction of something like the Addix Speedgrip or Addix Soft.
But for a tire like the Ground Control where I want a fast rolling tire I think the Gription compound is pretty darn good.
  • 2 0
 @MonsterTruck: the new Ground Control Grid blows the doors off of Nobby Nic Speedgrip for cornering grip, especially if it is even remotely wet. The "grip" part of Speedgrip disappears in the wet. The Ground Control Grid just doesn't roll as fast. I run two Nics in the summer on my fast-rolling trailbike setup, and then swap in a GC up front as rain returns. The Nic is a lot better in the wet w/ soft Addix rubber, but most of the rolling speed advantage goes out the window (I've rolldown tested the whole lot. Numbers don't lie.)
  • 1 0
 @Veloscente: good to hear. I like Specialized tires, just not the compounds so far. Looking forward to trying them out.
  • 1 0
 I really like their Slaughter tread pattern, but it is also only available in the thin grid casing that doesn't have much sidewall support and puncture protection.
  • 4 0
 Funny I don’t think anyone has mentioned the old 2.3 butcher grid. 2014-2016 and maybe a bit before. They were 1,000g and aside from being a bit narrow for 30mm+ rims they were an amazing tire. That compound hooked up extremely well. I believe in 2017 they released an updated butcher with a new tread and compound. They still called it a grid but it couldn’t come close to the previous grid, I ended up returning them and getting my money back! Hope these newest versions are back on track!
  • 5 0
 You mean back when CST (Maxxis) made Specialized tires?
  • 1 0
 I didn’t know maxxis was making them at that point but it makes sense. That original grid compound was legit. @jefe:
  • 3 0
 I'm very happy with GRID version of Purgatory and Slaughter. These tires suit my Trance 29 like a glove, fast rolling but still grippy and tough for dry and pointy rocky trails that destroy any Maxxis in a few rides. I don't need some 1.5kg 2.6 balloon tires, but fast rolling, great cornering and long lasting ones and these are perfect.
  • 6 0
 I think their tires are great, especially for the price.
  • 4 0
 Can't wait to try these out, old Butchers n Eliminator where great in the moist and loamy track but not so in dry & dusty canberra trails.
  • 3 1
 Side nobs pull off the carcass even on the double diamond butchers, I like the hillbilly as a front tyre though, wouldn't say Maxxis has nailed a durable tyre except their DH offerings, Double downs are just a pass for me - I'm 12 stone, and ride with tyre inserts BTW...
  • 6 0
 The Butcher is an amaizing tire . It’s like the DHF but cheaper
  • 2 0
 The previous new compound (Gripton) also lasted a bit longer than 3C MaxxTerra in my experience. So I'm sure these new compounds will remain quite long lasting while being just as sticky as ever.
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer would be interesting to know how the T7 compound relates to what was previously used for the Grid Trail tires.
  • 1 0
 ^This. Would need to know if they are grippier than their previous editions before I would buy a pair.
  • 1 0
 I will ride these new tires when I buy a Stumpy Evo and see how they are. Even with the updated compound I doubt I will like the new Butcher. My current bike came with Butcher front and rear. I feel the tire knobs are too weak and they would fold when riding over roots and rocks. It didn't matter if it was wet or bone dry. They lost traction when it was needed most. Continental Der Barons and E13 in MoPo compound are the current kings of wet root and rock traction.
  • 4 0
 I feel like non-Maxxis tire companies should be working overtime to get their tires spec'd OEM on bikes. My Optic came with a Magic Mary up front and Ive liked it so far and would consider buying it again, but the only reason I know that is because it came OEMk. I've always gone with DHF up front because I know what Im getting with that tire. I dont want to spend a bunch of money and then have a tire that I dont like. Not only would I be pissed about the wasted dollars, but I only get so many chances to ride and if a ride is ruined by a tire I wouldn't be pleased at all.
  • 2 0
 @mtmc99: Yeah I agree. There are a lot of good tires out there beyond Maxxis. I understand why people don't want to risk spending the money on a new tire. A few years ago I wanted to try some new tires and started by buying some lightly used ones. I was pleasantly surprised especially with e13 and Continental.
  • 2 1
 Does this mean they are getting rid of the Butcher in 27.5x2.8? I need to stock up if it does because that has been a great combo with a 2.8 slaughter in the rear for a great plus set up that has plenty of cornering grip but also doesn't have too much rolling resistance.
  • 1 0
 Have two butchers 2.8 laying around for quite long time... used couple of rides, no tarmac, almost no gravel, only nice soil. Smile
  • 1 0
 I had nothing but issues with the previous version of the Grid Casing Butchers, BUT the BLK DMND casing version is one of the best tires I’ve ridden for the money and his great tire wear. I hope the new Grid Gravity casing is comparable.
  • 1 0
 Does this mean they have solved the ever leaking sidewalls and propensity to blow off various rims (including thier own on a 6fattie...)?
I think the tread is ok, they seem to work ok, but they just dribble sealant everywhere. And have done for three months, across three different tread patterns and two carcass types.
I had to return the 29er tyres as they blew off the rim at 15-20psi - my rims were blamed, yet the replacement Michelin and the prior Schwalbe or Maxxis didn't have a problem.

I'm presuming poor QC, and for that reason, I'm not buying again.
  • 3 0
 I've had about 8 of these tires of the past few years, in combination of Butcher, Slaughter, and Purgatory, mostly GRID casing, but a couple Control as well, and have had zero blow offs (even running 19 psi in a 2.3 on 25mm internal width rims (Stan's), or 18 psi in a 2.6 on 30mm rims (Roval)) and zero leaking sealant. They all lasted until the center knobs were worn down to the sipe and the side knobs were worn across to the sipe, except for one Control casing sidewall I managed to slash, but rider error there.

Are you sure you got tubeless ready versions?
  • 2 0
 Never had a problem with Spec tires in last 10y... they are standing good without sealant for almost 14 days and with almost no air leaking... cant tell this for M - first 3 weeks need to pump them every day or two.

In house is 5 or 6 different Spec tires, 3 or 4 Maxxis, 2 Hutchinson, MagicMarry, etc. almost everytime/every year.
  • 1 0
 @kazimer : The Eliminator tire, a slightly quicker rolling options that works well in the rear when paired with the Butcher up front, is available with a T7 / T9 dual rubber compound. T7 rubber is used for the center tread, with the grippier T9 compound on the outer knobs for cornering traction.
  • 2 1
 I've ran Specialized tires with my Stumpjumper from day one. Had the stock Purgatory up front and Captain on the rear. The Captain tire was great but it wore out fast. Both of these older tires from 2011-2014 were either spot on or slightly wider than the specified width. When I switched to the Ground Control over the Captain, I thought it'd have the same width and traction as the Captain, but sadly, the width was really narrow (like a 2.0" when the tire says 2.3") and the traction on roots and rocks even on dry conditions were pathetic (even with lowered pressure). I also noticed that the ground control knobs were getting ground up quite a bit on rocks and the tires were used only for like a half season. I decided to get the new Purgatory tire and it seems that Specialized tire width rating is similar to Maxxis tire width ratings where if you don't have a wide enough rim, the width of the tire will be under their stated width. Kind of disappointing to say the least but that's not the worse. The newer Purgatory also doesn't grip and spins out on a lot of the dry and wet stuff. I'm just so surprised the tire spun out so easily on dry roots. The wear on the knobs on rocks is terrible with each knob getting an engraved outline around everyone one of them after coming off trails like Seven Summits and Full Monte in Rossland. I have Magic Mary and it's been great. No wear like the Purgatory or the Ground Control. As well, all of the Schwalbe tires I've gotten over the years, every single tire I put on has the widths as specified by Schwalbe. I won't be getting any more Spech tires from now on.
  • 1 0
 Hopefully they've figured out how to make this rubber work on wet rocks. Had a set of Butcher Black Diamonds last summer, they rolled fast, cornered amazing, but the first sign off rain here in NZ and it was more like ice skating than bike riding. There rubber just doesn't seem to work on wet roots and rocks like Maxxis or Schwalbe.
  • 1 0
 Haha, totally opposite here... However, wet rocks are not just wet rocks. There are so many factors. Type of dust, moss, pollen, how much it has been ridden etc. The local trails can be super slick after rain, but a couple km away there's a park where most trails are on rock face, roots etc, and the grip level there is always amazing in the rain.
  • 1 0
 Durability, longevity, and price point of spec tires allows me to have condition specific sets (mud, sand,etc.)and intended use specific sets (trail, park, etc.). Outright grip not up there with maxxgrip, but predictable break loose, consistent over life of tire and 85-90% Maxxis grip levels... might have a set of max grip for race day.
  • 3 0
 I would love to hear how T9 compare to Schwalbe Addix Soft and Ultra Soft rubber.
  • 1 0
 "That 'T' number is an indication of how much damping the rubber compound is supposed to provide."

Just damping? Are the higher numbers not also softer? As in a lower Shore A number?
  • 1 0
 Eliminator looks like a good competitor to the Dissector, will be waiting to see how durable it is. The Dissector performs well but the durability is a joke, 3 months of riding and the side knobs are barely holding on.
  • 1 0
 The Eliminator has been out for a couple of years. It has only been revamped with a different casing now. The previous version was a nice competitor to the Dissector for trail-use. There was no real DH version, though.
  • 1 1
 I prototype tested these tires in July/August and these are a major upgrade from the previous Butcher. I got 4 punctures in the old butcher in 1 weekend of racing and the I got these and I haven’t had a flat since. The knobs are soft but they wear pretty good as well. It is much stiffer then the last butcher, don’t have to worry as much rolling bead. These tires are killer, I’m going to swear by these!
  • 5 6
 I really like heavily damped tyres. The older Maxxis DH casings were amazing for this. But now everything has to be tubeless and moved to high TPI they’re all flimsy like road tyres - even the DH casings! I’m pleased to see tyre ‘feel’ on the agenda here but I’m not getting my hopes up.
  • 2 1
 I feel yeah.
  • 3 0
 If you miss those feel try Michelin Rock'R2 enduro tires. Excatly what you mentioned in feel. Yeah they just 2.35 on paper but a generous 2.4 is real life, weight around 1200g. You're lucky if find somewhere a pair.
  • 3 0
 @milan89ers: I’ve actually been looking at some of the Michelin’s. Some of the compounds/ thread counts look as though they would be exactly what I’m looking for. I’ll have a look at those ones too tup
  • 3 0
 Ahh man, you'd love DH22 from Michelins. I've put a set on my Reign SX 29 and the damping is next level. I have been running two Mary's in supergravity casing and DH22 is just next level. The amount of grip, stability and damping it offers it's pretty crazy. Makes the supergravity casing feel like xc casing that's how much better it is. 19/23 psi. Obviously they pedal slower but I recon it's same difference when you change from say Hans Dampf to Mary at the back. Might try 34 for summer next year but by that time I'd be used to pedaling these so probably be buying DH22 till end of my days haha.
  • 2 0
 @jankesdh: I just looked these up...over 6.5lbs for the pair? Sweet Jeebus! I want to try these tup
  • 1 2
 @kazimer : in this paragraph maybe the word option should be at its singular form ? No no I’m not playing smart ass , I know you re an English grammar Nazzi and under no circumstances do I seek to argue with you on this I’m just wondering . And you re my favourite editor
  • 1 0
 I really liked the hillbilly 2.6. Idk why they would get rid of it. Spec’s 2.3’s are too small for 200lb rider in soft terrain
  • 3 0
 The old "2.6" was a 2.45, the new "2.3" is a 2.4.
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: Does anyone know what the 2.3" and 2.6" tires are listed as in millimeters on the sidewall? According to ERTRO standards, every tire has to list its bead seat diameter and tire carcass width in millimeters on the sidewall, like 584 x 63 (a 27.5" Maxxis DHF 2.5) or 622 x 57 (a 29" Maxxis Ikon 2.2).
  • 1 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: the old (or current renegade, gc, etc.) ertro is 58. Spec doesn't list the ertro on their website which is annoying.
  • 1 0
 I bought two Butcher Grid 2.6s one time. They were 2.4 and the knobs folded under hard cornering. Still use Bontrager and Vittoria.
  • 3 5
 Two things that immediately jumped out at me. . . .they're still making the (puny) 2.3 tires??? And, the trail casing is 800g and the dh casing is 1200-1300, seems like a big gap in there where a lot of other brands offer a 1000g tire that (for me) fills most of my needs.
  • 11 1
 2.3-2.4 is about as wide a tyre most bikes will fit from about 2015 back...
  • 2 0
 Epic Evo 2021 fits 2,4 tires max. (I'm sad)
  • 2 0
 Most Specialized 2.3 tyres are actually quite large. Much bigger than Maxxis 2.3, for instance.
  • 2 0
 Seems silly to base your tire just off weight. The Trail casing is the "equivalent" of an EXO which is about 1000g and the Gravity is on par with DH & DD. Not really sure where the problem is. Also like Ttimer said, Specialized's 2.3 tires are misleading as they tend to measure 2.4 which is a great size.
  • 4 0
 Specialized 2.3 is the equivalent of a maxxis 2.5
  • 2 0
 thank god theyre still making them and in 26" otherwise i wouldnt have a new one on my bike.
  • 1 0
 @gkeele: 26 aint dead..... lol.
  • 1 0
 @fruitsd79: I'm on a brand new 650b DT Swiss wheelset, so here's hoping 2.3" isn't going anywhere soon!
  • 1 0
 @gkeele: maxxis 2.6 dhf, dhr, rekon and dissector 27.5 on both of my wheelsets are 3-4mm wider at the lugs than schwalbe 2.35 and michelin enduro 2.4, all measured at 30 psi.
  • 3 1
 Do they still ooze Stans?
  • 2 2
 Is it too much to ask for a sub 1000 gram, 2.5, DH casing tire with a folding bead, skin wall in 26" or am I being unreasonable?
  • 8 0
 A sub-1000 gram 2.5 "DH" casing is not a DH casing that you want.
  • 1 0
 yes you are being unreasonable, instead you can get this and enjoy it
  • 4 0
 Yes, you are. Skinwall on a DH tyre, really?
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: I can dream right?
  • 1 0
 @just6979: again....I can dream.
  • 1 0
 I really like the Butcher 2.6 as a front tire. It's my go to over any Maxxis including the Assegui
  • 1 0
 Michelin wild enduro front is awesome better grip and durability than Maxxis
  • 1 0
 The butchers are diabolical ...
  • 2 1
 Great! Maybe their tires will actually work this time. That'd be a treat.
  • 1 0
 Anyone know the width of grid trail 2.3 on a narrower rim?
  • 3 6
 i kinda wish newsites would call out their sponsors on marketing tricks and inform their public. doesnt mean the tires bad or good of course, but i think itd help everyone.
  • 15 3
 Pink bike is more marketing than news and if you don’t realize that you might be a sucker
  • 3 0
 News flash: marketing companies do marketing.
  • 4 0
 It's a press release, it's pretty blatantly obvious. It's not like it's masquerading as a review or something.
  • 1 3
 @MTbucket:
I made a similar comment on the article about the making of the Specialized Stumpjumper video and got downvoted into oblivion.
  • 4 0
 @SeanC1: Its a press release...Pinkbike is reporting it. This is obvious stuff guys not some bigger conspiracy.
  • 1 2
 @MTbucket: It doesn't mean that I can't challenge it and want pinkbike to be better - but thanks for the insult
  • 19 21
 no 26, no sale.
  • 9 6
 "Whooooooo f*ckin cares" -Nick Swardson
  • 3 1
 @Boondocker390: the thousands of us who only have the money to buy second hand
  • 2 0
 they still make the current butcher in 26", wouldnt be surprised if this is as well
  • 1 0
 @dicky1080: My 5' tall GF just bought a 26" bike. Of course, it is her very first bike and it is over 10 years old. At this point you are not buying a 26" bike second hand, more like 5th hand+
  • 2 0
 @dicky1080: I've never bought a new bike, but I have 29" wheels.
  • 2 1
 @dicky1080: if you aren't buying new then why do you care if they aren't making these in 26"? You wouldn't buy them anyway.
  • 1 0
 @warmerdamj: I mean new bikes. All bikes need new tyres
  • 1 4
 Eliminator looking a lot like an assegai
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