Specialized Diverge EVO: Gravel Shredder, High-End Hybrid, or Just a Rigid Mountain Bike?

May 8, 2020
by Mike Levy  
Specialized Diverge EVO

You're not here to read about drop-bar bikes, I know, but things are getting a bit murky over at Specialized with the debut of their new Diverge gravel range that includes two longer and slacker EVO models, both sold with a flat handlebar. And a dropper post. And room for 27.5" x 2.1" rubber. And basically the same head angle as their 2018 Epic mountain bike. The Diverge EVOs even have front suspension of sorts.

You can get the deep dive on the curly-bar models from Dave Everett on CyclingTips, but we'll stick to the two EVO grountain bikes here. And I promise I'll never use that word again.

Diverge EVO Details

• Intended use: ???
• Wheel size: 700c
• Compatible w/ 27.5" x 2.1" wheels, tires
• Future Shock w/ 20mm travel
• Aluminum frame
• Dropper post w/ 50mm travel
• Head angle: 70-degrees
• Sizes: Sm, med, lrg
• More info: www.specialized.com

Specialized Diverge EVO
The E5 Expert EVO costs $2,600 USD.
$1,600 USD will get you the E5 Comp EVO.


The E5 Expert EVO sells for $2,600 USD, while the Comp EVO version costs $1,600. Both come with an X-Fusion Manic dropper post with 50mm of travel, but you'll find Magura MT4 brakes, a 12-speed Shimano XT drivetrain with carbon cranks from Praxis, DT Swiss G540 rims on the Expert model.

The Comp gets hydraulic disc brakes from Tektro and an 11-speed SRAM NX drivetrain.


Specialized Diverge EVO
Mountain bike? Gravel? Who cares?


Both Diverge EVO bikes are assembled around the same aluminum EVO frame that has a 70-degree head angle (one-degree slacker than the non-EVO version) and a much longer reach combined with a relatively short stem. The size-large flat-bar EVO gets a 440mm reach and 80mm stem combo, whereas the size-58 drop-bar Diverge sees a 401mm reach and 110mm stem. The idea with the EVO geometry is, of course, to keep the roomy cockpit while pushing the front wheel farther out in front of the rider, just like we've seen mountain bikes doing for many years now. That should make them more fun than some of us might expect, and Specialized even uses the phrase, ''... sending technical singletrack...'' on their website. Their words, not mine.

Single-ring drivetrains aren't nearly as ubiquitous in gravel, a world where you might be doing 50mph down an old logging road one minute and then going 1mph up an old singletrack the next, but that's what you'll find on the Expert and Comp EVOs; they're both 1x-only frames. And while there's room for 27.5" x 2.1" rubber, a set of 700x x 42mm tires come stock. They also skip the handy SWAT hole in the downtube that the carbon fiber, non-EVO Diverge bikes get, but you will find front suspension on both. Kinda.

Specialized's Future Shock 1.5 is half-hidden inside the EVO's headtube, with the proprietary stem moving up and down by 20mm to suspend the rider rather than the bike.
Specialized Diverge EVO

No, it's not intended to mimic the action of a proper fork, but rather improve comfort while keeping the look sleek and without adding too much weight. I realize that it sounds like I'm describing a suspension stem, and it sort of is a suspension stem, even if the folks as Specialized probably don't see it that way. That's also selling the Future Shock a bit short, I think.

''The Future Shock is designed for road riding, not off-road trails,'' Specialized says, ''so the system needs to be incredibly active.'' Inside, you'll find a coil spring (enduro ready!) instead of some squishy bumper, but not the external adjustability of the newer Future Shock 2.0 that's used on the pricier drop-bar bikes. If a change is needed, riders can swap out the spring to stiffen or soften the action.

So, what the heck are these Diverge EVO things: Are they just high-end hybrids with better geometry to shred the bike paths? Five-year-old mountain bikes with not enough tire clearance? Or something you'd want to take on a proper mixed-terrain adventure? At least we're not short of options these days.


320 Comments

  • 424 15
 It's a commuter that's too expensive to commute on
  • 615 0
 Down-Townie
  • 25 0
 @scary1: YESSSSS. Marketing term of 2020, fits in with the rest of the year
  • 125 1
 @scary1: price tag would suggest up-townie
  • 4 5
 @scary1: Oh my gosh. Amazing.
  • 42 2
 It's the bike every messenger has been using for the past decade, just way less cool
  • 12 8
 The commuter would be the Sirrus X, which has taller headtubes across the board. This bike fits closer to the Chisel, their aluminum XC bike, so anyone who wants to ride flat-bar gravel with a fairly aggressive fit would reach for the Diverge EVO. You can run your fit like your XC bike but use road chanrings without hitting the stay. I switched my Diverge to flat bars late last year and it's been delightful for everything from riding to get tacos to 80-mile gravel epics.
  • 35 0
 @scary1: Should’ve made a tandem version so I could cycle down-townie with my up-townie girl.
  • 21 2
 @Ben-76: i bet she never had a backstreet guy,i bet her momma never told her why....oh-ohh-oh--oh-ohh-- woh- oh -weh-ohh-ohh-ohh ....
  • 17 2
 @scary1: Up townie girl, she's been living in her Special Ed world
  • 5 0
 Yes, it is a suspension stem.
  • 1 1
 @kiddlivid: you mean like a Down-Turnie?
  • 1 0
 @landscapeben: To real lol
  • 8 3
 @fullfacemike: I am a supporter of flat-bar "road" and "gravel" bikes. I have an older flat-bar carbon framed Roubaix, and the max tire width I can fit in it is a 25 mm. Would love to have a wider tire tire for gravel. The Diverge EVO seems to be an answer.
  • 3 0
 @scary1: #1 comment. And very clever.
  • 8 2
 2020 is a big joke
  • 2 2
 The bars are too wide.
  • 3 0
 @scary1: Actually spit out some coffee.
  • 4 0
 @mervyn1: Kona Dew...
  • 3 0
 @g-42: ive got a dew with wide MTB bars, fat slick tires and a 1x drive train, its a blast around town
  • 5 0
 @heinous: It's how dentists get to work
  • 29 0
 @scary1: Down-townie yessss #commentgold
  • 6 2
 @Yaan: You mean a Cervelo with Enve flat bar?
  • 2 0
 @Ben-76: WOOO OOOOOO WOOO WOOO
  • 1 0
 @scary1: no no, the downie townie is an xmas 2020 debut model
  • 1 0
 @mnorris122: Had a similar setup in the late 90s when I was working as a bike messenger.
  • 1 0
 See what happens when Specialized designers get some bad coke...
  • 4 0
 @softsteel: No, this is what happens when they eat to little shrooms, smoke too much weed and get paranoid whether sober elitists with sticks up their butts will like what they are bringing to the market.
  • 239 7
 1990 specs, 2040 price, 2020 marketing BS. Can't wait to get mine!!
  • 55 1
 Right? Like, if you want an mtb from the 90s, why spend thousands on these gravel bikes. Just buy an mtb from the 90s for nothing on craigslist.
  • 19 0
 denver.craigslist.org/bik/d/denver-1992-trek-8000/7120509379.html

$75 and all the sketchiness of your nostalgic golden years.
  • 9 1
 I was gonna say... looks a lot like my 1991 rigid fork Diamondback. Nice bike at the time, with DX components, and I think $875 on the showroom floor, which is maybe $1600-1700 now? Not so different I guess.
  • 4 1
 @freestyIAM: I bought mine out of someone's front yard for $45
  • 1 0
 @freestyIAM: nicely done!!!
  • 5 0
 @freestyIAM: You’re on the right track. My “gravel” bike doesn’t go back that far: first gen SC Highball, with carbon wheels, 1 x 11 XO1, 100mm Fox 32 with remote lockout, 2.4 Ikons, flat bars. You could probably pick something like it for than a grand or so, but I’ll bet it’s a big upgrade over this Spec.
  • 5 0
 @number44: I bought a '98 Apollo Kosciuszko for $900 new. It was a rigid as well and I loved thrashing fire trails on it one day, bike paths the next. I got rid of it years ago to my eternal regret.

Rigid MTB's are like oversized BMX's, so much fun!
  • 49 40
 @ilovRIDING:
You don't know what the price will be in 2030 and you certainly don't know 90's bike specs. Here are all the components on this bike that would be impossible to spec on any bike in the 90's because they didn't exist:
- future shock technology
- dropper post
- tubeless tires
- alu. frame with manipulated tubing
- 12 x 142 rear through axle
- 12 x 100 front through axle
- 750 mm bars or 31.8 clamp
- XT 12 speed
- carbon cranks
- chain retention help on chain ring
- chain retention help on rear derailleur
- seat that won't make you infertile

And one of the technologies used on this frame is superior to what most of today's manufacturers use: threaded bb.
  • 44 5
 @DoubleCrownAddict: your reason is not welcomed here!
  • 13 3
 @DoubleCrownAddict: These things or the lack of them didnt stop 90s riders shredding on old bikes
  • 11 2
 @petrospit: I never said they didn't, just pointing out the modern specs on this bike. I'm not saying old bikes are bad. Actually, old mtb's were really bad, they all had atrocious geometry for mtb trails. But some of the old parts were cool and some people did go fast on them while others broke collar bones going otb.
  • 12 5
 @DoubleCrownAddict: If anything you proved that 25 years of standards evolution means jack shit on a bike like this.
  • 2 6
flag petrospit (May 9, 2020 at 1:59) (Below Threshold)
 @DoubleCrownAddict: Bikes were bad even at the start of the decade. I have a 2010 hardtail that has old school XC type geometry 100 mm fork and 26 inch wheels. I used that bike when i started mountain biking back at 2013. I took some serious tumbles with that
  • 4 0
 Not really. In 2000 I bought my first "decent" new mountain bike. A GT Outpost, entry level frame, shitty RST bouncy shock, rim brakes, and bottom of the barrel shimano components and it cost $699. Anything with a decent fork and component spec was min $1500... so when you factor in inflation and value of latest geo and tech for performance and comfort, these are, comparatively, a killer deal.
  • 2 0
 @petrospit: in the 90s, we didn't know any better.... we were riding pogo sticks with road bike geometry
  • 8 5
 "Gravel" Confuses me. As I understand it, the point of a gravel bike is to add some spice to road biking by having slightly more competence on non-paved surfaces. This is accomplished by different geometry and wider or knobbier tires.

But if the point is to "add spice" to boring road riding, then what I don't understand is why one wouldn't just use a road bike on that same more challenging terrain. Then, you still have a road bike but you can give yourself some challenge. Maybe pop some bigger tires on there but a whole different bike? Seems illegitimate.

If that's not the goal, and the idea is to have the best bike for the terrain, and people who buy gravel bikes are trying to avoid all paved roads, then I would just have a hardtail mountain bike. That way you truly have a capable bike for everything. You can even ride them on the road if you need to and it doesn't suck. I mean, it sucks more than TRAILS, but it's still okay.

Reiterating my confusion: If the goal of gravel is to do most riding on unpaved roads and some trails, get a hradtail or rigid, flat bar MTB. If the goal is to spice up road by doing some different stuff, get a different wheelset with some slightly wider tires. Or just wider tires.

Who this bike is for: People who want more performance out of their bike that never goes on a "road ride" for the sake of a road ride. Great bike for everything short of ungroomed trails and roads. Not my cup of tea, but I can see lots of people finding this as a great hybrid all-rounder. No, it's not a mountain bike. No, it's not a road bike.
  • 2 0
 @freestyIAM: also double down on antiqued tech with "future shock" which, if we're honest, is just a must less good cannondale headshock (which was pretty not good also) on the wrong side of the headtube. Seems legit...
  • 5 1
 @DoubleCrownAddict: wow dude, bet you're super fun at parties
  • 10 1
 @A-HIGHLY-EDUCATED-PROFESSIONAL: thank real srs gravel racers for the industry pandering to a new segment of very competitive gravel heads who need their bike to perform top notch for this very specific application, thereby unraveling the grassroots of 'underbiking' enthusiasts who originated the scene and organized/supported/participated in lots of the events that ultimately blew up the spot

so we see bike brands doing the only thing they ever do, clamoring to sell you products whose existence is justified by being better at doing the thing than the bike you already have

the results of this process have been fantastic for having a great time on a mountain bike but have produced obviously hilarious results when applied to the gravel segment

it really bares to light the fact that gravel, much like cx before it, is an activity whose allure is more grounded in doing something utterly unjustifiable outside of the context of the often masochistic 'triumphs' of the human spirit, rather than achieving feats of skill and beauty which exalt the possibilities afforded to us by the laws of physics (ie MTB)
  • 4 0
 @A-HIGHLY-EDUCATED-PROFESSIONAL: It's for roadies to transition easier to MTB
  • 6 2
 @curiousincident: Very well said! To me gravel is to road what down country is to MTB. In many ways gravel bikes are just more comfortable road bikes which are not bound exclusively to tarmac - much more suitable for actual needs of enthusiasts, than quasi racing road bikes. And 90+% of folks on bikes with drop bars are enthusiasts, weekend warriors, nothing wrong with that. Just a reality of life. In the very same way, XC racing bikes are an overkill for most folks. By relaxing angles just a bit and adding just a bit more squish and just a bit more aggressive tires, we get a bike which capability is largely enhanced with minimal loss to performance in amateur racing.

I wish gravel bikes would lower the stacks back down a bit and get funkier geometries. Slack head angles, steep seat angles, shorter stems, wider bars. Maybe some new type of bar. For instance I am hunting for a pair of cheap aero pins to mount on my flat bars.
  • 1 1
 @A-HIGHLY-EDUCATED-PROFESSIONAL: Very well said. I like road riding a lot, but there is still, in 2020, an undeniable air of snobbery towards mountain bikes from a portion of road riders. Feels to me like gravel bikes are their acceptable form of off roading, where they can still wear lycra and use spds and feel like they're "proper" cycling.

There was a video by GCN on Youtube (which is a great channel FWIW) where they rode old mtbs and new gravel bikes on the same trails to see which was better. The comments they make are subtle but clearly disparaging towards "overly wide" bars and "energy sapping suspension" of modern mtbs. They add a small "we're just joking" segment at the end, but I think their attitude is one held by many road riders.

Watch as gravel bikes gain short travel suspension forks and their tire widths grow. In 2025 XC mountain bikes will be called gravel bikes, or vice-versa.
  • 5 0
 This inspired me to dust off my 1990 Klein hardtail with Future Shock (40 mm travel) and go for a road ride with a bit of gravel trails today. Sweet!
  • 1 1
 @kingbike2: Until just recently, my Gravel commuter has been a 2001 Author egoist 26” Frame on 2010 Focus CX fork. It took 700x37c tire! All built from scrap I found on the attic. Only chainring/ cassette and chain were new. Fricking awful BB7s with even more awful LX levers.

If someone wants to get at least a bit aero while keeping a reasonable cockpit, get flat bars with more sweep (I have 720 bars with 9degs) and use roadie bar tape near the stem. If it blows like hell you can always grab the bar near the stem and lean over it to get drop bar effect. Actually it’s not that inconvenient.
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Jones H-bar. I seriously want one for my 90's bitsa MTB.... I mean gravel bike.
  • 2 2
 @dirtyburger: this thing is so out there that I fear saying anything about it since the owners took some serious effort to convince themselves it makes sense and their priorities in riding are so far from mine we would never reach any agreement
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: "I wish gravel bikes would lower the stacks back down a bit and get funkier geometries. Slack head angles, steep seat angles, shorter stems, wider bars. Maybe some new type of bar. For instance I am hunting for a pair of cheap aero pins to mount on my flat bars."

Kinda sounds like a description of the Diverge Evo?
  • 2 0
 @Ironmonsoon602: This whole bike reminds me of the Bad Boy in many ways.
  • 1 2
 @Spittingcat: agree, aaaaand the bad boy was/ is a dumpster of dogshit. So I believe we rest our collective case
  • 4 2
 @Yaan: for roadies transitioning to being dirt roadies please follow these three basic steps:

1) Stop shaving your legs

2) Just go ride a mountain bike

3) STOP SHAVING YOUR DAMN LEGS

Submitted with much concern and care.
  • 1 2
 @danielfeary: nh, that Evil gravel bike is full tits
  • 3 0
 @IluvRIDING: I was going to say, it’s a 1994 Rockhopper.
  • 2 2
 @TheR: savage
  • 2 2
 @DoubleCrownAddict:

Here here!
Not to mention the huge price difference Wink . Can't really compare new to 20 years ago... Prices down, quality up, what's not to love Big Grin .
For a good 90% of my riding, this bike ticks all the right boxes. The other 10% (green and blue bike park stuff), I pull out me "hybrid" franken build. Other then a great 100mm sus fork and brakes on mine, this one is way better spec'ed, in every way, except head angle. And if your counting, Thompson stem and bars. Only thing I beat out this un' with, is price Smile . But I don't have all the fancy bits this one has, maybe i'll go and buy a xt drive train, then we'll be even.
  • 1 1
 @Ironmonsoon602: I cant speak to how it will perform off road, but the Futureshock on the Roubaix is amazing for taking the cracks in the pavement sting out of your hands.
  • 1 0
 How is 1x12 with hydraulic brakes "1990 specs"? In 1990 I was running 3x8 with rim brakes.
  • 2 0
 @freestyIAM: if your on reddit check xbiking. Thats exactly it.

Could go to portland and grab a ton of 1980-90 hard rocks and stumpjumpers and sell them as retro gravel bikes.
  • 3 0
 @seraph: Yeah, you are right. It is an exaggeration...should have been more like "1990 looks". But anyway, I bet you I could keep up with this thing on my 90s 3x8 rim brake commuter.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: The stacks are getting too high - some people don't realize that sometimes lowering stack may end up in more comfortable position.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Ya, crazy bike. And i think the rear end looks stupid, heck, i think the whole thing looks like the mashup of my nightmares.
Well, i guess it's to be expected on something so extreme.
The specialized is something more the happy middle, enough burl to do some nice fireroads/green blue tracks, but still stiff enough to handle pumping the miles out on gravel/pavement. I don't know how they stack up against each other, but the hagar doesn't rub me the right-way, I think it's how they shaped the chainstay's, absolutely stupid imho.
It's on the extreme end of the gravel bike world, waaaay to slack for what you want/need. Easy to understand, they basically slapped a rigid fork/drop bars on a modern mtb, so from a styling standpoint, it's a fail, at least to me Smile . But 2 (real) issues standout to me, 1. Plastic Frame, 2. Press fit bottom bracket. And to endurance riders, those are no-no's. If something goes wrong while your on tour, how do you fix em'?...
That's why, to this day, steel, and even aluminum is the preferred material. Any good welder/auto shop can fix steel/aluminum, not carbon. Not bashing carbon at all, it's perfect for mtb/road, but not gravel/endurance. And the price is just stupid IMO, nothing against evil, but there trying to market to a segment of the cycling world that has no interest in this type of bike, and the people that actually want a bike like this aren't interested in this one, for those said reasons. JMO, take it or leave Big Grin .
  • 1 0
 @wcr: I'd argue that from a cost and practicality standpoint, carbon fibre is more easily repairable than either steel or aluminum (which is flat out unviable for repair unless heat treating is performed). Recall the Danny Santa cruz special? The myth of unrepairable carbon fibre reinforced composites needs to die.
  • 1 0
 @dirtyburger: I think his point was that you can get a metal frame repaired quickly in any town in the world. He's right about steel, wrong about aluminum. I'm not sure how important it is anyway- all 3 materials can build a burly bike for that sort of user.
  • 2 0
 @dirtyburger: I never said that carbon fibre can't be fixed/repaired, I said it's isn't practical for endurance/long distance touring. Especially for looooog distance touring, like round the world, by yourself....
Like I said, nothing wrong with carbon, in fact, better/cheaper in the long run, i.e. hoops made correctly. But like I said, steel, maybe aluminum not so much, is the way to go. Have read/heard about enough tour's, to know that you want to go with steel, welders are suppose to know how to heat treat properly, aren't they?...
Here's one for ya, what happens if your riding through India, and you crack a carbon hoop, what are you going to do? Wait around a month, or more, for a new one to get mailed to you, plus all the time to build the wheel correctly. Or the same day, you go to most any bike shop, grab a new wheel, mount her up, on you way the same day, or next.
Like I said, for long distance touring/endurance/gravel, aluminum and steel are the way to go. For "regular" use, carbon is fine. But I still hate to pony up the $$$$ to buy components, when aluminum and steel are just as good, albeit a little heavier, for much less money. Even thou long term cost savings is great, upfront cost is too prohibitive. I guess if you bash and break your stuff all the time, then it pays, but for a guy that looks after, and is careful with his bikes, i'm not worried Smile . 1 set of good wheels should last me at least 5 years, or even longer. Just a few tweaks, trueing sessions, maintenance, new hub bearings, and I should be good for 10 years.
  • 1 0
 @kittenjuice: You said it.
  • 1 0
 @wcr: I think all three, among others can build adequate frames if designed appropriately. Not necessarily disagreeing (except for the aluminum and heat treating part) about the whole mega-touring stuff. But just as any bloke with a welding rig can make a serviceable repair* in extenuating circumstances, so too could any boat builder/ glasser/ dude with glass fibre and over the counter epoxy.
*for certain failure modes.
  • 2 0
 @dirtyburger: Well said, i agree.
I guess if a person was in a pinch, he could make anything work. Bondo makes an all-in-one fibreglass repair kit for boats/fibreglass, so if you really needed too, you could do it yourself. I still stick by my stance on carbon hoops for touring, too much hassle dealing with them.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I am just about to sell my '94 RH. Any takers?
  • 1 0
 @danoiz: I am not shitting you, there's a bloody boom of pre 2005 HTs on Swedish biggest classifieds site since Diverge Evo has been released. The market has spoken
  • 41 1
 If your going to have a dropper, it had might as well be more than 50mm. If you want a dropper and a 'futureshock', you probably also would benefit from a small suspension fork. If your buying this to ride off road, you'd probably be better off with the Chisel XC Bike?

It's the sort of thing I would probably build as a pub bike out of spare parts for shits and giggles.
  • 8 3
 For a gravel bike 50mm is plenty. The use case is for a 20% gravel road rather than a 50% rooty drop.
  • 16 1
 Exactly right. I have every bike I've owned since 1985. My 1996 Kona rigid most closely resembles this. Great pub bike.

Ill sell it to you for $2,600!
  • 6 1
 I got a 1980's Stumpjumper you can have for only $2599!
  • 25 2
 It’s clearly a commuter bike for MTB riders. The problem is, they’re core market is (and will forever be) perfectly happy to slaps whatever old crap is still semi usable from their MTB onto their commuter...
  • 37 0
 exactly. isn' t a mtn biker's commuter their last-last mountain bike?
  • 5 7
 I built my commuter from scrap yes. People still buy fancy commuters...
  • 7 0
 @plyawn: Yeah, my commuter/cycle path/pleasure-ride bike is a Nukeproof Mega290.

Overkill for sure, but i'm not buying another bike to fill that gap (mainly because i'm not allowed. I was supposed to sell the Mega when i bought it's replacement, but i 'forgot'. The wife really doesn't understand needing to have a spare MTB)
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: yes, yes they do... Mine is a venge! Lol
  • 3 2
 @bohns1: Every now and then I see folks in casual clothing riding fancy TT bikes or Levos. Each single person at my architectural office who recently was into buying a new bike, bought a Gravel. They all agreed with my reasoning that flat bar is a more reasonable choice, especially for riding in winter when it is slippery, and in some winters we have lots of sheet ice on paths. But they rode “a Gravel” and Fell in love in it in exactly same way as a father of a family that I know who considered between Audi A6 wagon and Volvo V90 but ended up buying A7 and didn’t buy a 2 door A5 only because bloke at the dealership talked him out of it. “i wanted this half fancy reasonable wagon, but damn that sporty A5 was so much more worth it! Smile
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: our commute competion is basically tt races to and from work 33km each way.. It cracks me up how serious it gets at 5.45am.. We are blessed with bike paths far away from traffic that are basically the autobahn for cyclists.. Rather enjoy it actually.. I have a crux evo for gravel duty but it spends most of its time on the zwift trainer these days as when i get a hankering for offroad it usually ends up being mtb instead of gravel.. Really encouraging to see what a winter of weights and zwift riding has done for the road game and watts/kg..
  • 1 1
 @bohns1: I suck at even tempo mileage, but I can push steeps. Did loads of plyo and sprints on BMX, and went with Emily Battys advice from her channel on sprints with push cart with weights. Recently did Louie Simmons low rep high speed lifts with short recovery and it gets interesting on steeps as well as when rolling into stuff. Acceleration is there. I also had a hard time roll to the DJ site uphill on 32t fron 16t rear With 175 cranks. Now on 32-15 with 165 and I am ordering the 14t rear.

Lifting and sprints 4 life.
  • 2 0
 @plyawn: I guess if you buy only xc bikes maybe? No way in hell I’m doing my 8 mile paved road work commute on any mountain bikes I’ve bought in last 15 years.
  • 1 0
 @driveways: I have a kona unit that I bought years ago, sold to a guy, bought it back, warrantied the frame and now use as my winter commuter. Prior to that I used to buy bikes at the thrift shop by the carload, ride them until they broke & walk home the rest of that trip. repeat.

My commute is pretty short and I wouldn't leave a bike worth stealing at work, so clunkers and garbage work great.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: i sucked too but worked hard on it.. Working harder on everything i suck at in cycling.. Currently its longer manuals..... I want super long manuals dialed in at all costs consistently.. Haha... That one Gowann girls how to manual vid on you tube is pretty stellar.. She kills it!
  • 1 1
 @bohns1: there’s lots of things for me to work on. Boosting, Whips, scrubs, tabletops, one handed wheelies, 360, backflips, pedal kicks... Steady state cardio - I’ll give it a pass.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: i hear ya.. I give many things a pass now a days.. Even lines I use to hit back in the day.. I choose my battles now.. Cool longer manuals have always intrigued me.
  • 1 1
 @bohns1: At leadt 50% of my non-commute riding time is on DJ these days. Guys are building super cool jumps, the airtime is glorious. I was afraid it will lower my stamina and overall MTB skill. With skill it was the opposite. Thanks to practicing whips and tabletops I am more than fine with hitting stuff at angles, boosting rocks in rock gardens, being thrown a bit sideways, landing sideways, much more relaxed. It paid off. Many years ago I devoted whole season to road. I’ll put it like this. My body does not respond to state cardio but my steady state cardio improves with intervals. Yes all anout choosing battles!
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: ya we don't have much for dirt jumps but we do have table tops and high consequence gap jumps.. Some scare the shit out of me as ur speed needs to be perfect.. Only reason my road riding has improved drastically is due to group workouts on zwift with pro riders that drop in to join.. A true test of will in some of those rides.. Lots of interval options to take on sprint records as well.. Ill never make fun of roadies again.. Haha. They can make u feel like u should be in an old folks home strapped to an oxygen tank... Glad I stuck with it..
  • 1 1
 @bohns1: if you ever have time and a site - build them. It's quite depressing to see how much time it takes to build a jump on your own, being 2-3 people still makes it slow. But once you get a group of 5-8 folks, man, you move ungodly amounts of dirt fast. With right spades, water and covers, occasional use of wood, it gets really, really good. And buid them steep. Once you get good at jumping them, the 20-30ft speed jumps on big bike are a laugh.

As to roadies. I still laugh at them a bit. Yeah it is impressive that hubbie of my sister in law sustains 32-35 km/h on a 5h training ride like it's nothing. Yeah I rode with 60yr old amateur but serious triathletes and they wore me out on flat. Yeah wattages on their Strava are impressive. Yeah every roadie on commute drops me after 5 minutes at 30km/h, but give them (aside of my pro roadie) a steep hill and they are like a spider trying to get out of a slippery bath tub. And they get scared when their pulse goes above 170, they have some sort of allergy to high pulse and low cadence. I personally thrive on wheelie inducing steep, on roots, rocks, boulders, in wet. Because it weeds out ballerinas Smile
  • 17 0
 Its a fancy hybrid.

You'd think the gravel market would have matured by now; Niners been selling them for a decade, but the industry and rider demand is still trying to figure it out. Maybe the stupid UCI rules around CX is gumming things up too much.
  • 18 9
 I just built a bike like that. Dropper is great to have because you can manual or do wheelies for miles while riding to work.
  • 10 18
flag WRCDH (May 8, 2020 at 14:31) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: Full saddle height manuals and wheelies are where it’s at — on trail too =). Strangely satisfying to bust them without having to fiddle with the dropper, and then I can immediately get back to full-throttle pedaling (including manual-lander jumps with full saddle height). Full height manual-landers are also quite satisfying on my era-correct pre-dropper MTB’s (despite taking several sketchy years to master, haha). But yeah, lower saddle = more maneuverability. However, I’ve found when doing an 8km+ wheelie twice around Greenlake in Seattle, that full saddle height helps the leg and lower back fatigue. Hoping to do one all the way along the waterfront in Gothenburg — past Escenda engineering to show off to my MTB + engineering buddy Claes there =)
  • 4 3
 @WRCDH: Claes S? Can world be that little?
  • 2 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Yup! Figured you might know him! Do you work with Volvo? I do composites engineering including pedestrian / cyclist impact-protection hoods.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Do you ride with him? If so, say hello for me!
  • 2 4
 @WRCDH: rarely. He moved out of town, Kids and wives in the way Smile I’m not working at Volvo though. Wheeling along the waterfront in Gbg is tough since it’s windy most of the time
  • 2 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Gotcha! Yeah, not sure if/when I’ll make it back there due to possible travel restrictions. I miss Gothenburg...cool town.
  • 1 0
 Hahahaha this comment was epic
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: hahahhaa you're the man. Anybody dumb f*ckin pretentious dipshit from Scandanavia can stroke his own ego on a forum nowadays. f*ck that dude.
  • 20 0
 Finally get a long straight seat tube, and the dropper is only 50mm.
  • 13 1
 I think it's a nice option for people who really want a new production version of an old-school rigid mountain bike. Its like a new production Aston-Martin DB5. That said, I can't personally think of a reason to get this over the Chisel XC bike, but that doesn't mean this bike is stupid. When it comes to pricing, 1600 USD now is like buying a bike for 740 USD in 1988, and this would have been the most capable MTB on earth then.
  • 11 0
 Building my curly-bar version as we speak.

For those of us who live an hour from "proper" mountain bike trails, the shredder gravel bikes are perfect for blasting around town, rallying on diet roads, and playing on the local social trails.
  • 11 0
 I like my gravel bike, but I also worry about when gravel bikers get to the point in late-90s mountain biking when they re-invent the Softride. Actually, let's take bets - do gravel bike manufacturers invent the Softride first (already doing flex stems and posts), or invent URT?
  • 8 1
 Slingshot. That's where it's gonna come to.
  • 1 0
 I think you should check the BMC URS.
  • 1 0
 Isn't the future shock a UFT? since the only part that goes squish is the handlebars
  • 4 0
 Here's my guess
Gravel roads got your forearms tired, we at special-trek-ized have invented a new type of fork. The whole bottom part of the fork moves along a semi-vertical path along telescoping legs with bushings built into the lowers to maximize stiffness. Now feel the difference 80mm of s̶u̶s̶p̶e̶n̶s̶i̶o̶n̶ comfort and control makes on your gravel rides.
In the rear we took compliant seatstays to an entirely new level with our patented Your Butt Bounces (YBB) rear suspension system which features 20mm of e̶l̶a̶s̶t̶o̶m̶e̶r̶ viscoelastic-polymer controlled rear axle travel to take the edge off the rough gravel roads.

In other news special-trek-ized has inititated legal action against moots of colorado for infringing their patent on their "novel, innovative" YBB rear suspension system.
In a not-entirely-unexpected twist Specialized went for two by also filing patent protection on their all-new hardcore gravel suspension called h̶o̶r̶s̶t̶ Mildly Optimized Responsively Efficient Covered Axle Suspension Schema (MORECASSch), which enables their gravel bikes to "improve the contact of the rear wheel with the riding surface."
  • 11 0
 "And I promise I'll never use that word again."

This sounds like downcountry all over again.
  • 6 1
 I like it. I have a 10 mile commute where I can string together about 3-4 miles of gravel roads and the rest is mostly bike path or surface streets. No desire to ride drop bars for that, so this would really fit the bill. And the MTB cassette would make the climb less annoying than the taller gears on a typical hybrid. Ofcourse it's expensive because....Specialized, but someone's gotta buy new for the second hand market to exist.
  • 4 2
 I agree. Looks sick and gravel riding is fun. Drop bars are sketch and this could be a better gravel bike.
  • 2 0
 Why not try drop bars? The whole point of gravel bikes in my opinion is to have the aero advantages / higher speeds to compensate for the less technical terrain. I ride mostly gravel myself nowadays (before more street, skateparks and downhill) but I dont feel like drop bars dont give me enough control at all. I even ride XC trails on my gravel bike with drop bars.
  • 3 1
 @Mattin: I'm not a roadie. I have no desire to do 50 mile rides on open road where aero comes into play. I come from a moto background so drop bars don't feel natural. So for me, I prefer the flat bar. But to each his own. Just saying, people have different preferences and use cases, so I can see where this makes sense for someone like me (not that I am dropping $2k on this bike).
  • 10 2
 Grountain is an awful word
  • 7 2
 all dorks commuting in London with £1k+ road bikes will have one when they realize they never use the drops, can't brake decently from the hoods and the 700x25 wheels are destroying their butts.
  • 2 1
 You have a very weird threshold if you start calling people dorks from 1k up. If you are not a cycling knowledge higher wizard then 1k is the midfield of reasonable and reliable bikes. That’s a bike with Tiagra and Ok brakes. Stuff below 700£ is overpriced Tesco shit. It’s a decorated shitty 400£ bike so that you feel a bit better about yourself, but you’ll drown money in repairs and replacements
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: that is by London standars. Bear in mind that anything sexier than box store level (and even that) left in the street by night (and sometimes day time) might and will be lifted. And 15.45 is night here in the winter. Damn, people steal just handlebars here, a couple bolts and cut the cables and they sell the levers on eBay for £80. I tracked one of them on eBay, the a*shole made £2k in november just on pedals, levers and mechs. 5 stars rated seller hahaa

Decathlon sells beautifully unsexy bikes on 105 for £500, paying 1.5k for a 105 Spesh in a nice color just to be trashed and waiting to be stolen is for dorks.
  • 1 1
 @ismasan: ok I get ya. I wouldn’t leave a fresh 500£ bike outside for night anyways. We have an inner yard where me and most of our colleagues lock their bikes. Although most of attempted bike thefts I’ve seen were done in bright of the day. Thieves are silly and lazy though. They should dress up like students with shoulder bags. Because I can tell a bike thief instantly. Poor looking bloke with a backpack, usually in a jacket regardless of the weather, going around bike stands looking at bike locks more than bikes.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns:leaving it in the street is essential for a daily driver to me, I wanna be able not only to go to work and take it in the building with me, but also be able to leave outside Lidl for 1/2 hour on my way home or outside the metro 5 hours in a saturday night cause I'm going for drinks to the other side of town. Being on the cheap side makes it not only less appealing, but also less of a loss if shit happens.
My bike is just perfect. Shittest Apollo Veho ever, found in the street, but well tuned. Left out for days at the time, always there when I come back. Once you have 35c tyres and a flat bar the city opens up, curbs, parks, stairs... whatever. And £10 v-brakes with fresh pads are like 100 better than Ultegras used from the hoods, and absolutely no one rides the drops in the traffic.

Some people here is very pro, guys around with portable hidraulic cutters. Position it discretly, step back a minute while the thing silently cuts your £80 kryptonite d-lock, and there you go, all without even pedestrians noticing. London sucks.
  • 1 1
 I totally understand what you mean.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I know, I know, I'm just bored XD
  • 4 1
 Im not convinced.

A good commuter needs fenders, a rack or so. Not a dropper.

I love gravel bikes for their versatility (road / light offroad). Steel or alu frame, good tires in 37-45, double transmission and lets roll for 20 km or 200.

When you need to add a flat bar, a dropper post and a suspension youre not in the gravel territory. I dont understand. Buy a xc hardtail. Way better and cheaper.
  • 1 0
 Completely agree. Except my commuter is a flat bar.

This looks to high value/ theftworthy to be a decent commuter around me.
  • 3 0
 I can kind of see it as a ultra distance adventure bike if it were spec’ed with lots of mounting points and maybe a cool multi hand position bar. But this thing is like the original Diverge; half baked.

It’s a hybrid with modern geo.
  • 1 1
 This is "a bike".
  • 3 0
 I did this to my XC hardtail a while ago. Threw on a carbon fork and added gravel tires and a 100mm dropper. I always prefer dirt over road and it's fantastic for just grinding out base miles while enjoying nature instead of wondering if some idiot on a cell phone is going to kill you from behind.
  • 1 0
 That's cool, just don't try to sell it to me for 3 grand.
  • 5 0
 I fail to see how any of these are better than a deore-level xc hardtail with skinny tires.
  • 7 1
 Most gravel riders don't use their drops anyways.
  • 1 0
 So true!, mostly/only if I am on a road and the head wind is giving me trouble or on some short out of the saddle up-hill sprints.
  • 2 0
 Drops are mostly for sprints and head winds, hoods for riding in general. But what makes the biggest difference is the arm position: when riding drop bars, no matter if it's in the hood or in the drops, your arms are in an aero position with your elbows pointing towards the ground. When you ride flat bars, you have your elbows outwards, making your frontal area much bigger and your aerodynamics noticeably worse.
  • 3 0
 Descending single track in the drops is out of this world!!!
  • 1 0
 @Tacocat13: 100% agree. Some of the most fun I've ever had riding. Hitting berms with them is so sick also!
  • 1 0
 @Mattin: I wonder if those SQLab inside mounted “bar ends” would address that problem while still allowing for flat bars? Anyone try them?
  • 3 0
 Most Gravel riders that know whats up descend in the drops.
  • 4 2
 I’m actually a fan of the gravel genre in general, but damn this is really splitting hairs.

Looks like a fun ride for around town, but not the sort of thing I’d buy new from a bike shop.

Specialized really will exploit any niche they think they can fill. (Though they’re quick to give up) This time, they’re selling an expensive, ready-made version of the sort of parts-bin commuter people have been throwing together out of old MTBs and hybrids for years.
  • 3 1
 It's basically a very slightly beefier Sirrus. I have a Sirrus X Carbon Comp with 42mm tires and it's nicer than these. I even took the NX stuff off and put XT 11spd. I ride it on gravel roads and use it as my general use bike. I have no desire to see if it's "trail worthy", but it seems like it would be ok at best. If I'm going trail riding I would just take my Yeti.
  • 4 0
 Had a customer get a Sirrus X 5.0 and then drop AXS on it. I shit you not. Looks the business, but damn...
  • 3 1
 i have said it before and I will say it again, this is mountain biking going full circle right in front of us. road bikes, people start putting something bigger than 23c, then someone makes a knobs for it and it calls cyclocross, then people go bigger and call it gravel, not there is literally dropper posts, suspension forks, slack head angles all for the comfort of riding off road....if only there was a bike that was perfectly designed for off road riding...oh yeah a mtn bike. that is what we have here, a mountain bike.
  • 2 0
 It seems really similar to the already existing Sirrus X. My wife has one and it's a clutched 1x, same futureshock, tubeless tires and wheels, and I bet it could clear 45 mm tires. I keep looking for a lightly used 27.2 dropper to put in so she's more comfortable at stops. Honestly, there are pretty cool. They are really nice jack-of-all-trade bikes.
  • 2 0
 Just grab one of these. No fiddling with cable routing if you want to go lightweight again.

www.worldwidecyclery.com/products/ks-eten-r-dropper-seatpost-27-2-100mm-travel-black?aff=7&source=Guide
  • 1 0
 @Dustfarter: That's the exact one I was looking at. The KS Lev on my 2014 mtb has outlasted two Bontrager posts on a 2018 fuel.
  • 2 0
 This is what I want. I don't love drop bars, especially on gravel. I've been looking for a good frame to build up a flat bar gravel bike with, but it's tough. All of the comments about just getting a 90's MTB are baffling; modern components aren't going to be compatible with a 25 year old frame. I don't want crap wheels, rim brakes, etc. It's surprisingly hard to find a good modern frame to build a flat-bar gravel bike from.
  • 1 0
 > It's surprisingly hard to find a good modern frame to build a flat-bar gravel bike from.

Seriously? You can use almost anything. With most brands, the flat-bar road bikes are just road bike frames with flat bars.
  • 2 1
 @alexdi: that's not true, frames are longer for drop bars
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: What? If a road frame is anything, it's shorter. That's one reason they're used as flat-bar frames; you get a more upright ride when you don't have the extended reach of drop handlebars. The reuse of road frames isn't some big industry secret, it's the status quo for most manufacturers.
  • 1 0
 @alexdi: No, that does not appear to be the case. Frame geometry seems to be different when designing for drop bars vs flat bars, particularly the top tube length/reach. In any event, I'm not looking for drop-bar road bike frames/geo. The old-school hardtail MTBs have closer to the geometry I want, but they often don't have disc brake mounts (or old standards that are a pain for new brakes), don't have through axle rears, etc. I want a sturdy frame with that sort of geo but new, with support for new components. Something like this Diverge Evo seems to fit the bill.
  • 1 0
 @alexdi: what manufacturers are doing this? No real road bike or mountain bike started life as the other. Just look at the numbers.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce:

Scott Addict / Metrix
Fuji Gran Fondo / Absolute
Giant AnyRoad / FastRoad
DB Haanjo / Haanjo
Cannondale Synapse / Synapse

Five off the top of my head. If the flat-bar bike isn't likely to have the sales volume to merit a new frame SKU, they absolutely will use a road frame. (Given that 'road' encompasses cross and gravel bikes, it's not like the cupboard is bare of options.) I don't know what "real" means and we're not talking about mountain bikes.
  • 1 0
 @zedpm: If you're going all the way back before disc brakes (a mid-90s 26er?), I don't know what to tell you. This Diverge is essentially a circa-2010 29er hardtail with a carbon fork. There are thousands to choose from for peanuts that would accept a similar aftermarket fork.
  • 3 0
 I don’t get the hate. Lots of people like flat bars, and this would make an awesome commuter. I don’t get why commuters have to be shitty bikes, if you have the means this seems like a killer option.
  • 1 0
 They have a shock between the head tube and stem. Would that lead to awful bearing bind problems? i mean we talk about bearing bind on slack HA bikes but at least there the force of the rider's weight is nearly in a straight line from handlebar to dropout. Here you have the rider's weight suspended on the end of an 80mm plus stem (more if you take into account the hoods of the drop bar version) which would surely act as a kind of lever to put all sorts of side loading on that headshock
  • 1 0
 I have that shock on a my specialized road bike. you'd have to be getting pretty rad on your road bike to run into trouble.
  • 5 0
 Are we allowed to say it for this one?
  • 3 0
 I squinted my eyes real hard...I think it might
  • 4 1
 I applied companies that come out with random products that seem redundant. To the right customer this is exactly what they want and who is to argue with that?
  • 2 1
 Isn’t a flat bar gravel bike with a ridged fork and long stem just what most mountain bikes were in the 90’s? Which I guess makes this a high end commuter bike? As those are basically old XC bikes with ridged forks.

The addition of brakes that work, and a dropper post actually makes it more capable than the 90’s mountain bikes. So maybe that’s the appeal?

But it’s not a gravel bike. Those need to go fast, and slow. With 1x11... that’s not happening. Plus no drops means no aero benefit, which is half of the point of a gravel bike instead of an XC bike.
  • 5 0
 I don’t understand all the hate. It looks like a great commuter.
  • 4 0
 The only hate I would give out is that the Kona Dew has been doing this for years (albeit at a much lower spec). Speaking of, a Kona Dew with a sick carbon fork and an eyelet at the front of the fork crown for a rando rack would be A+
  • 1 0
 the hate comes from a lot of us who started on rigid EVERYTHING, and the only thing that didn't suck, in hindsight, was the mountains.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: Thanks for pointing out the Dew. That's a really nice bike for $600! Throw a 27.2 dropper on there and have some fun.
  • 2 0
 @benhg: I’ve been riding for 30 years and still have 2 hard tails (one rigid). Sometimes a rigid is all you need and it might actually be more fun. Not everyone is interested in flow trails and gaps.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: agreed. There are some other examples too... I particularly like the 1x drivetrain on the spec, but the Kona is value for sure.
  • 5 0
 I wonder how the bike would be perceived if it said Santa Cruz on it...
  • 1 0
 This bike definitely steps away from the gravel category as we expect it and marketing wise the Diverge name is very confusing.

It should have been called Crossover because it fits perfectly in this platform as an high end / lighter weight option.
  • 1 0
 I’ve been riding a GT Karokoram 29er single speed with an MRP rigid carbon fork, KS Lev dropper, 2.4 Conti, 40mm stem and a 40mm rise 760mm wide bar for the last 5 years, built it specifically for our local trail center filled with green and blue trails. It’s the fastest, most engaging bike for the park. Oh and flat pedals…
So ahead of the curve…
  • 1 0
 I wouldn't go for this bike. However I am considering a gravel bike. Main reason is we are moving to southern Sri Lanka: no trails around here and the roads switch between tarmac and gravel and dirt. I want to explore and that means long distances hence wanting drop bars for comfort and fast rolling tires.
My view of gravel bikes is that they only make sense in certain places. The UK? Singapore? No way. But parts of the US and where I'm moving to? Absolutely.
  • 2 0
 I was really impressed until I saw the brakes. Tektro or Magura? Really? A set of Shimano MT501's doesn't cost much and they're a much better brake than anything Magura or Tektro make.
  • 1 0
 I think I have this bike already, a 1995 Cannondale Delta V500. Oh wait, the Cannondale headshok has way less unsprung weight(and yes they are smooth, axially stiff and quick). I also have a full compliment of gears. 1x12 is great on my newer mountain bike, but not for road/gravel/commuting. The last of which this bike might be ideal, if it had the gearing to go with it.
Close but no cigar
  • 1 0
 My commuter is a 2006 Cannondale Caffeine with a 50 mm headshock. I had to manipulate the CS brace a bit to get 700x45 slicks on it and put 1x11 SLX on it with a 40 tooth chainring. Gearing is fine. Great commuting bike, but about 40 mm less BB drop than this Specialized or my drop bar gravel bike. That BB drop makes a huge difference descending.
  • 1 0
 Holy shit, it's the bike I built myself for commuting but twice as much money! Sign me up!

Norco Indie 3 (sized up one to get longer reach) - $600 Canadian
Amazon 1X crankset - $55 Canadian
Pinkbike special Shimano 11-46T cassette - $20
Deore 11sp shifter - $20
Deore 11sp derailleur - $50
KMC Chain - $20
Amazon 40mm stem - $20

Total cost $785.00 and I don't have an NX drivetrain.
  • 1 0
 So it’s a rad dad hybrid. Or just a really expensive, high end version of what most non-cyclists would consider a bike. Or a really fun commuter bike. Or a gravel bike for people who have neck, back, or wrist issues and can’t handle a drop bar. Or... or... a million other things that make sense, at least for some. I might not want one. Clearly enough people probably do for Specialized to produce it. That’s cool.

Also gravel bikes in general are just a lot of fun when you figure out that they’re just road bikes that don’t suck, that you can ride on more varied surfaces, and that don’t have to follow the UCI’s idiotic rules on frame geometry.
  • 1 0
 it needs its brand name changed to DISAFFECTED, have a skull and crossbones sticker on the headtube, and a troy lee design colorway, then all the kids here will buy it. bonus if comes with a usb stick filled with 21 pilots songs.
  • 1 0
 To me gravel is the stuff that would be too dull on a decent MTB - fire roads, back lanes and farm tracks and anything too much for a road bike which is only good on super smooth tarmac. Gravel has been good for me during lockdown as there is loads from the doorstep . Riding drop bars off road is a buzz on a bike that will take the punishment.
  • 1 0
 I have an enduro bike and a gravel bike. I'm finding that I ride the gravel bike more often these days. I just like being able to cover ground efficiently and explore more. It's nothing to ride 50-75 km on a gravel bike. Pedalling my Hightower with 2.5" tires that distance would be exhausting. I never use the drop on my gravel bike and was actually looking into putting a flat bar on it anyways. Others in the thread have said this, it's hard to find a high-spec hybrid.
  • 1 0
 Really? :0 I think I would never buy a bike like this. Maybe change the handlebar to try to get a gravel, maybe keeping the handlebar but changing the fork to a suspension one and getting a MTB... perhaps changing tyres nad getting a commuting bike. I can´t find the objetive.

Wouldn´t mind to test it anyway
  • 3 0
 Sorry Specialized, I can't properly ride this without adjustable fork offset.
  • 1 0
 Oh god...I knew this would hit the Pinkbike feed as soon as I saw it on roadie sites. You just haaaaaaaad to bait that hook and toss it to the Pinkbike comment section just to see what happens didn't you? smh
  • 2 1
 What is this? This is what it is. Then again I ask the question, what is this? Amazing piece of hard hitting journalism.
  • 1 0
 This should have been the Sirrus X but glad you’re finally getting around to it specialized. If There was a more budget friendly build it’s exactly what I’d like, a commuter that wants to party on the weekends.
  • 1 1
 Commuters need to be cheap enough that they’re covered under your household insurance.

Don’t know too much about the US buy every insurance policy I’ve ever held (in Canada, NZ and the UK) has a maximum unspecified value for a bike of around $2,000.
  • 1 0
 I can’t get insurance with a deductible for as low as $2k anymore in Colorado. Used to be $500 but After the fires and floods here, they won’t give a new policy with a low deductible anymore. It would be pointless to even make the claim on the house policy.
  • 2 0
 I don't know. I subscribe to the idea that life is too short to ride crappy bikes and you like it or not, a lot of time spent on a bike is spent while commuting. For this reason I use my best road bike (when lighter, sans laptop or lunchbox) and gravel ( when using panniers to carry some gear instead of a crappy 50$ POS.
  • 1 0
 @opignonlibre: I've actually caught people while trying to steal my rat bike commuter. My commuter is always expendable.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: I just store my bikes in the office.
  • 1 0
 @opignonlibre: not everyone has that option, and I have more places than just the office to be. I like nice bikes, and my commuter isnt total trash or anything, but it's the bike I ride if there is a chance of it walking off. It's the only bike I let leave my side when I go out.
  • 1 0
 I could see this being a popular cyclocross bike. In the PNW a lot of cx racers use flat bars. The future shock would be perfect on the rougher (relatively speaking...) cx courses.
  • 3 0
 Cannondale had a 1x commuter with disc brakes in their line up 20 years ago. On a long enough timeline we go full circle
  • 1 0
 Surely good for up to 2 h rides on gravel roads and green trails, commuting or just riding along on bike paths - I’d call it a grail bike. I would have switched the carbon cranks for better brakes though.
  • 1 0
 Dang! i was trying to stay current with times and put a drop bar on a old early 90's mnt. bike for my "gravel bike". out witted by the industry once again! looks like i be coughing up 2k for this.
  • 1 0
 With drop bars it would've been a fair shot at the chamois hager, but who is that one for anyway? Too "crazy" for gravel and too lame for the mountains. Marketing BS at it's finest.
  • 1 0
 I have a Niner RLT that I have flat bars and it's built up extremely similarly to this. I don't love it. Except for when I'm riding down very not steep and smooth single track. Would not recommend.
  • 3 4
 Oh man. These super boutique, single purpose bikes are getting to be too much. Even gravel bikes (which are really just road bikes with slightly different tires) are odd. I guess if they get a few more people out on bikes, then what's the real harm, but I can't say I have the attention for any bike that's only purpose is something a regular mountain bike could do.
  • 9 0
 >> which are really just road bikes with slightly different tires

This isn't really true. I'm 6'5" and riding a true road bike would be like packing my frame into an F1 car. My gravel bike is stretched out for days, takes fat rubber and has hydraulic brakes. it's about as close to a road bike as I'll ever want to get.
  • 11 0
 I'm starting to think that maybe we should be stashing bikes around town...like, ride the road bike to the trailhead. Toss in bushes, pull gravel bike out from behind bush. Ride fireroad to technical trail section. Toss gravel bike in bushes, pull lightweight 120mm full suspension mountain bike from bushes. Ride up to top of ridgeline, toss 120mm light bike in bushes, pull slack burly 160mm 29er from bushes, descend. Just need to hire someone to put all the bikes back in the right place afterwards!
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: ???????? winning, I’m with you
  • 2 0
 So.. a gravel bike with a flat bar. I have no idea what this is supposed to be, but still kinda want one.
  • 2 0
 Sounds close to the same as the 1993 carbon Cadex CFM 2 I just picked up lol.
  • 1 0
 I guess when you already have 12 bikes and need to fill the gap between an epic hard tail and an s-works diverge you get this?
  • 3 4
 I just want to vent my hatred for gravel riding right here... hours of torture on boring routes...getting mired if fresh grades if it gets real ‘interesting’. Only better then road in that you don’t get run down by random distracted drivers whist torturing yourself...only rednecks run you down intentionally whilst torturing yourself.
  • 13 3
 Gravel is super tits. You commute on it then do a road ride from time to time and if you want to take a shortcut through the woods? - here you go! I just don’t get why anybody would A - use drop bar (so good move here by Spec) and B. knobby tires?! Knibs do not help on gravel surface, they are useful for CX in mud and grass. Get 38-45c slicks for the love of god and stop pretending you are an offroader!
  • 4 1
 @WAKIdesigns: when you do big distances your biggest enemy is wind, the second biggest comfort. A drop bar fixes both those problems. wide slicks are fine if your gravel tracks are flat and straight, but don't try to go fast downhill on a twisty loose forest road without at least side knobs. trust me.
  • 5 1
 @jzPV:

Yes. Lot of people don’t seem to get this. Drop bars are faster and more comfortable when you’re actually trying to get somewhere.

And you might as well have some tread...most good hard-pack and semi slicks role almost as well anyways.
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns @jzPV @alreadyupsidedown I think you’re all so right. Gravel riding is tits for those reasons, and so are drop bars. I don’t want to ride any real mountain bike on 10 miles of pavement to ride a few miles of mellow trail. I love having a bike that I can take on bike paths or paved roads to get to green singletrack and dirt roads. You can string together some seriously fun rides while taking in some sweet views, and still be on dirt. I think a gravel bike is a perfect training tool for mountain bikers who don’t race road. Obviously this depends on where you live/ride. You probably don’t need an enduro race bike in Florida, and you don’t need a gravel bike for commuting or paved riding.

As far as this bike goes, I usually like what they’ve done with “EVO,” but not really on this bike.
  • 15 0
 Ok, I can understand your hatred if that's your impression of what gravel riding is.

I've got a 25 mile mountain bike trail system right outside my neighborhood, but it's often too wet to ride. Our soil is mostly clay, and we often have to buy rock from a quarry to trail build. Winter and spring are usually a mucky mess for weeks at a time. There's also a network of paved paths, gravel and back roads (chip & tar "pavement"). With a little creativity, I can connect them into 40-50 mile rides with 2-3K of climbing. Some of this is the crumbling cart path of an abandoned golf course that's reverted to open space. Two other parks have gravel carriage roads that cross covered bridges and wind along streams and through hay fields. There's always something pretty to look at, and good shoulders on any roads with significant traffic.

I used to ride this route on my mountain bike, but the road sections were no fun at all. I'd feel my expensive tires grinding off on the uphills, and head winds were like a palm on my chest. Still, given the choice of not riding, or riding a mixed surface route, riding was always better.

Then, I found a good deal on a gravel bike demo, and suddenly those "better than nothing" rides became a lot more fun. I could go a LOT faster, and the drop bars gave me a fighting chance against the wind. That feeling of being able to "go anywhere" and create all kinds of new routes has really freshened up my riding. I ride all kinds of little sections of trail that wouldn't normally be worth driving my mountain bike to. My rides have increased from 20-30 miles to 50-60 and the occasional 100 mile epics. When it's dry, I can cut through sections of singletrack, and trails I've ridden hundreds of times suddenly become challenging with skinny tires and no suspension.

Do I still like bombing down rocky trails on a full-suspension mountain bike? You bet, but this is fun too.
  • 5 0
 @pixelguru: perfectly said. I got my first gravel bike a couple months ago and this has been my experience. I have LOTS of fun riding things that would be boring on my AM bike. The riding is more technical, but you can also hit the road and just crank out miles comfortably (which I love). And railing berms on one?! Insanely fun. I mix my riding between road, gravel and singletrack depending on my mood, and honestly don’t think I’ve ever had more fun on a bike.
  • 7 0
 @man-wolf:
My gt grade with hard-pack/mix terrain gravel tires is the most fun bike I currently own. I sold my full-susp. 9.7kg Oiz because it was little to no usage anymore(5-6 rides in almost 1 year);
Also, gravel bikes put the fun back in the trails near my city, as I live in the flats and there is no hill or mountain in sight.
With the more road oriented set-up(original wheels and tires), I can do 30-50 mile loops and connect different roads by going on gravel/agricultural/tractor roads. Very fast when used it for commuting to work through city traffic(30-35 minutes instead of an hour with the car).
If you don't live in the mountains and can't use your trail/enduro directly from your house, you can't go wrong with a gravel as a primary bike.
  • 1 0
 Yeah that's just an MTB without suspension, A cx bike with a flat bar and bigger tires, A hybrid, This kinda bike has been around since 1997 and it works great.
  • 1 0
 This fills the spot of the ultimate generic "bike". It isnt for anything, it just is.
  • 3 0
 So this is what bike companies do when they're on lock down.
  • 1 2
 Specialized trying to make another category out of a commuter bike, and use this category as an excuse to charge $2600 for it. If you slapped drop bars and a longer dropper (seriously though, it's basically useless at that point) on it and called it an aggressive gravel bike, you'd have better grounds to charge that much. If I made a gratuitously large amount of money, would I buy it? yes, (actually I'd probably buy a Seven Cycles commuter instead) but I don't make that, so for now, I will continue to be offended that there are people out there that own commuters worth as much as my mountain bike.
  • 1 0
 some gravel mfg are blurring the lines between gravel and MTB. Niner magic carpet ride full suspension and dropper ; ninerbikes.com/pages/the-mcr-9-rdo
  • 1 0
 Now we know why ENVE put that adjustable ridget fork out... Every old hardtail out there is gunna get an upgrade and head uptown
  • 1 0
 Ive been calling the resurgence of XC for years now... i'd say we are another couple seasons away till the gravel grinders turn into XC warriors.
  • 1 0
 Looks fun.. I recently sold my old rigid steel Niner MCR, and even though I go faster, further, and am less fatigued after rides, I miss it.
  • 2 0
 Sirrus with “meaty” tires and dropper
  • 1 0
 Or is it a 27.5 Epic?
  • 3 0
 I kinda like it
  • 4 1
 Looks like a session.
  • 1 0
 love this :3 but i rather stick with british steel bikes for me definitly best choice Big Grin
  • 1 0
 "Grountain bike" dammit Levy, what have you done haha. BTW, I have an older model Diverge and actually enjoy it.
  • 1 1
 It is a cyclocross bike with MTB flat bars. All the models of the Diverge on the website are with roadie bars except this one. Better to get an XC bike.
  • 3 0
 Grundle-country
  • 2 0
 Meh. I actually think this thing looks super cool and like a lot of fun.
  • 1 0
 I think the reviewer hit the nail on the head “... who cares?”

No one on PB, that is for sure!
  • 2 0
 I’m a dentist and I’ll be buying one
  • 2 0
 Bro, they're bringing back 80's-90's ridged bikes. This is awesome!!!
  • 2 0
 Wait.. so they put the Headshok on the top?
  • 1 0
 Ironically, this may actually be the cheapest bike on the market that comes with 12-speed XT.
  • 1 0
 I bought my wife last years Diverge. Closest thing to a mountain bike that I could get her on.
  • 2 0
 As heard on a podcast "you just built a really crappy mountain bike"
  • 1 0
 I think someone called them grinduro in Finland. That guy is not allowed to ride either gravel or enduro anymore
  • 1 0
 Orange have had the speedwork out for a few years which is this bike for pretty much £1000...
  • 1 0
 I bought an early 29er hard tail and put narrow tires on it. I guess I was ahead of the curve?
  • 2 0
 Twas a quiet day in the design office.
  • 1 0
 Congrats Specialized. You have invented the hardtail mountain bike from 2009!
  • 1 0
 My wife had a spes hybrid cross trail ten years ago. It was a gravel bike. It cost a lot less
  • 1 0
 I think it's the first sexy hybrid. It doesn't make any sense, but some people will buy it just because it's sexy.
  • 1 0
 Correcting myself here, it's actually the 2nd ever sexy hybrid. First one was the Cannondale Bad Boy.
  • 1 0
 Looks to me like the return of what was considered to be a high end mtb 30 years ago.
  • 1 0
 This bike is dangerously balancing between true innovation and boredom-fueled nostalgia.
  • 1 0
 Don't apologize for mentioning drop bar bikes. It's the skater videos that have me scratching my head.
  • 1 0
 I have a custom build Surly Ogre as my gravel/road/bikepacking rig. Not into drop bars so this work amazing for me.
  • 1 0
 It's actually getting embarrassing to call myself a mountain biker at this point.
  • 2 0
 A new bike category: Cycloscountry
  • 1 0
 If it came with drop bars it would be a budget version of the Evil Chamois Hagar...
  • 1 0
 You know what would make every specialized bike 10x cooler? Instead of EVO, it is DVO!
  • 1 0
 Rigid forks have a place in cheap mtbs. They have for a long time, and it's a damn shame they got away from us.
  • 4 3
 my back hurts just looking at it...
  • 6 1
 You're only 24, stop bitching like you're 60.
  • 2 0
 @seraph: broke my neck when i was 18 so I have some pretty permanent back/neck pain...
  • 9 1
 @mobber7127: So really, your back hurts even when you're not looking at it...
  • 1 1
 read my mind......
  • 4 3
 1987 called, and they want their....(sigh...)
...nevermind
  • 2 1
 What is the point for a dropper on a rigid bike?
And why only 50mm?
  • 2 0
 Same as on a bike with suspension. I put a 110mm dropper on my rigid bike, and it made it so much more fun and capable!
  • 2 0
 Hugely over priced!
  • 1 0
 Hahaha, "you pay the price to go back to 1997 brah, 1997 was prime time out of all the times"
  • 1 0
 Ah, so Levy n Kasmur, I hear you wear spandex too.
  • 1 0
 The proper term is gravcountry, not grountain.
  • 1 0
 The f*** is this?? Go slack or go home!
  • 2 0
 Rad hybrid
  • 1 0
 Put some drop bars on that mofo and make it legit
  • 2 0
 No
  • 1 0
 Hold my flat bars / bars ends...new for 2021/2022
  • 1 0
 2 steps away from the P-FIX...
  • 1 0
 2020 update to the Specialized Rock Combo?
  • 1 0
 Bottom 1% will spend/waste that much for an overpriced commuter...
  • 1 0
 Sinyard's attempt at TRACKLOCROSSING???
  • 1 0
 But better…
  • 2 1
 So, basically a late 90's mountainbike.
  • 1 0
 It’s a hybrid. Not go back to bed
  • 1 0
 Intended use: sits on a bike rack on an overpriced SUV.
  • 1 0
 BSO and nothing I would ever want.
  • 1 0
 Looks like roadies have discovered 90s mountain biking
  • 1 0
 The good old city bike - now with a dropper!
  • 1 0
 It’s just a high end hybrid
  • 1 0
 20mm stem travel isn't Rigid Pinkbike..
  • 1 0
 looks like a cycloduro bike
  • 1 0
 april fools was last month broh
  • 1 0
 This bike is for people who don ´ t like mountainbike trails.
  • 1 0
 have you seen the new prototype ligma?
  • 1 0
 Looks like a......... Gateway drug to mountainbiking
  • 1 0
 Good bike, but looks like 80's MTB.
  • 1 0
 I mean, I like it!
  • 3 2
 Dick Pound
  • 1 0
 this is where n+1=WTF
  • 1 0
 This is fucked
  • 1 0
 Put a Fazua in this One
  • 1 2
 Lol as dumb as a gravel e bike
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