Field Test: 2021 Specialized Epic EVO S-Works - The Most Versatile

Aug 18, 2020
by Mike Levy  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Specialized Epic EVO S-Works



Words by Mike Levy, photography by Margus Riga



Specialized’s race-focused Epic platform has been around for something like two decades now, and they’re saying that the latest version is the lightest, fastest Epic they’ve ever made. Sarah Moore tested that race bike, but we’re here to talk about the equally all-new EVO version.

Specialized applies those three letters to models that are a bit more capable than their standard fare. In this case, the Epic EVO gets more travel - a 120mm fork and 110mm out back - whereas the race-ready Epic has just 100mm on both ends. On top of that, Specialized also uses traditional suspension on the EVO as opposed to the pedal-assisting Brain system on the normal Epic.


Epic EVO S-Works Details

• Travel: 110mm rear / 120mm fork
• Carbon frame
• Wheel size: 29"
• Head Angle: 66.5°
• Seat Tube Angle: 74.5° (effective)
• Reach: 460mm (size L)
• Chainstay length: 438mm
• Sizes: XS, S, M, L (tested), XL
• Weight: 21.88 lb / 9.92 kg
• Price: $11,525 USD
www.specialized.com
You probably won’t be surprised to hear that the EVO is slacker than the standard Epic, with a 66.5-degree head angle that’s a full degree more relaxed than the race bike. The reach on my large-sized tester is 460mm, and all sizes get a 438mm rear-end and a 74.5-degree seat angle.

While the race-focused Epic has the latest version of their Brain shock, the 110mm-travel EVO gets a SIDluxe from RockShox instead. The Brain-equipped shock makes sense if efficiency is the name of your game, but it’s also not as forgiving or predictable as a traditional system. Given that the EVO isn’t solely about watts and winning, Specialized made a good call. Like many cross-country bikes, it employs a flex-pivot near the axle that allows them to skip the bearings and hardware that'd normally be required. That means less weight, of course, and the design can easily handle the few degrees of movement required. The shock is compressed by a carbon fiber clevis, and there's a split flip-chip that lets you alter the head angle by half a degree.

Another thing to note: The standard Epic and Epic EVO do share the same front triangle, but the EVO gets an entirely different rear-end. Why? Well, the Brain shock integrates with the chain and seat stays, but the EVO doesn’t use it. That means that the EVO frame is actually 100-grams lighter than the Brain-equipped race frame, with a hardly believable claimed weight of just 1,659-grams. For some perspective, the Scalpel SE frame is said to weigh 1,900-grams and the Ranger frame 2,900-grams.



2021 Specialized Epic EVO S-Works for XC DC Field Test review. Margus Riga photo.

2021 Specialized Epic EVO S-Works for XC DC Field Test review. Margus Riga photo.
2021 Specialized Epic EVO S-Works for XC DC Field Test review. Margus Riga photo.

Climbing

The Epic EVO's character seems a bit more climbing-biased compared to the Revel and Transition that roll with wider bars, shorter stems, and seat posts with more drop. That, along with its 21.88lb weight - no, that's not a typo - and especially the 1,240-gram wheelset, add up to a machine that says "I'm ready to climb for as long and as hard as you want,'' much more so than the two bikes previously mentioned. It just has that attitude about it, and that's exactly what it delivers.

Much of that climbing was done in wet, slippery conditions, and while the Scalpel SE 1 consistently dominated those traction-limited moments, the green Epic was a close second in my post-ride notes. Sure, it's obvious that the EVO isn't a pure race bike when you're struggling up some boulder field at what feels like 0mph - more attention is required to keep it on-line, of course - but any dabs were my fault, not the bike's. Speaking of dabs, while the Spur had me putting a foot down here and there, the EVO would keep on chugging. If you're the kind of rider who's always counting dabs, you'll probably be more at home on the EVO or Scalpel. On the other hand, if you climb with your kneepads around your ankles and aren't in a huge rush, the other bikes might be more your flavor.

On rolling terrain that requires you to put in work - the stuff where you want to carry good speed up and over that short rise to get the most out of what follows - is where the EVO can be mind-blowingly quick. None of the other bikes were slow on that sort of stuff, but I was always highly motivated when aboard the Epic EVO. I think that's pretty telling.

No Brain, no cares. The EVO might not be as race-y as normal Epic, but it sure as hell never feels slow. Light, fast, and capable, and with thick cross-country DNA, this would be my pick of down-country bikes if I wanted to race some cross-country as well. In other words, the EVO is the quintessential down-country bike.


2021 Specialized Epic EVO S-Works for XC DC Field Test review. Margus Riga photo.

2021 Specialized Epic EVO S-Works for XC DC Field Test review. Margus Riga photo.
2021 Specialized Epic EVO S-Works for XC DC Field Test review. Margus Riga photo.

Descending

All five of my test bikes look at the challenge from different angles, with Transition taking the most extreme approach and Cannondale doing the opposite by assembling their's around the standard Scalpel frame that gets a bump in travel. Not a bad way to do it, especially if you aren't aiming to make a bike that's on the bleeding edge of the category; don't assume being the first is always a good thing. Specialized split the difference with this bike by using the standard Epic's front triangle and then attaching an EVO-specific rear-end for better suspension performance.

And on the trail, that's exactly how it feels. While the Spur does a good job of pretending to be a short-travel trail bike, and the Scalpel SE does a good job of being a long-travel cross-country bike, the Epic EVO sits somewhere between them. Let's get the grumbles out of the way first, with one being the combo of a 470mm seat tube (remember, same front triangle as the race-y Epic) with a 150mm dropper post.
Timed Testing


Our timed lap for the trail bikes was just shy of 20 minutes long and split into three sections. First, we powered up a smooth section of switchbacks before starting up a more technical, twisty section of trail that tested the bike's slow-speed handling and traction with tired legs. After that, we evaluated how the bikes maintained speed on a short bumpy traverse before the main descent, comprising of a small rock roll before a series of rough, suspension-testing corners and straightaways. Nothing too rowdy, but representative of the terrain the trails these modern cross-country bikes were intended to see.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Mike Levy: "The Epic EVO had the quickest loop time, 1.40-percent up on the Scalpel SE1 and 5.58-percent ahead of the SB115. It placed third on the descent, 1.41% behind the Spur."

It wasn't that long ago that this wouldn't give me anything to moan about, but not so in 2020 when many bikes have shorter seat tubes and longer stroke posts. When the trail got rough and fast, the EVO's seat would use a little love tap to remind me that it was awfully close. That doesn't do it any favors on challenging terrain, and I never felt as comfy as I could have been when the bike was getting knocked around under me on a chunky trail. In those moments, there was no surpassing the Spur's longer footprint that provides a sense of calmness, even if the EVO leaves most of the others wondering which direction it went.

All of the bikes being on matching tires provided the ideal situation to compare performance, especially in the corners. It's here where something about the EVO clicked with me and I consistently pulled brakeless two-wheel drifts through berm after berm, as well as any and every flat corner. You know how a go-kart tells your ass precisely what's happening under you as the kart slides around the track? It's the same thing with the EVO, and there's almost no better feeling in mountain biking than absolutely nailing a corner.

If you're riding a three or four-year-old short-travel bike, you'll be astonished by the EVO's suspension performance. Actually, to be fair, that's true of all of my test bikes; the SID Ultimate offers slipperiness, support, and bottom-out resistance that just wasn't possible with 120mm only a few years ago, and the same goes for the rear-end. That said, the EVO's SID did develop a bit of premature bushing play - RockShox says that they'll look after any issues that arise with customer bikes ASAP.


Cross-country Field Test 2020


Listen, I know that Transition Spur has got you all hot and bothered - it should; it's a wildly capable short-travel bike - but it's hard to look past the EVO's well-rounded versatility. Let me put it this way: Yes, the Spur is a more confident bike at the outer limits of what you should be doing with small amounts of travel, but if you're the type of rider that is - or pretends to be - sporty and capable, or you just want to cover all sorts of terrain exceedingly fast, the Epic EVO would be my choice


Pros

+ Amazing in the corners
+ Very versatile
+ Light, fast, efficient

Cons

- Long-ish seat tube, 150mm dropper
- Did you see how much it costs?





The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible with clothing, protection, and support from Giro. Control tires provided by Schwalbe, and power meters provided by SRM. Filming took place at The Backyard pub in Squamish.




Photos: Margus Riga
Video: Jason Lucas, Cole Nelson, Max Barron



315 Comments

  • 116 3
 Did you see how much it costs..?
  • 63 4
 Explain to me how their s-works turbo levo Ebike is only $1000 more...
  • 21 0
 I saw that. I chose not to look.
  • 15 1
 @stumphumper92: it's wild. It would be very interesting to see a $/g calculation for each of these bikes, broken down by how much each component weighs. That would highlight where most of the bang for your buck is, as well as make it much easier to compare the sub-Sworks build specs.
  • 8 0
 @stumphumper92: Those 3k Carbon wheels, that are a crime to sell, but I want them someday...
  • 17 15
 @thechunderdownunder: I refuse to believe manufacturing + R&D costs that much. BUT as is often repeated here, supply and demand. They can sell it for that price bc people will pay it. But if you are paying it, then you are either rich or lack common sense.
  • 9 1
 Which is funny b/c in order to get the 22# weight, you have to buy the S-Works at >$11K. Reports have the regular Epic EVO coming in around 24#...just like the other bikes in the test. Certainly, you could buy a lot of weight savings for $5k!
  • 25 6
 @stumphumper92: "I refuse to believe manufacturing + R&D costs that much"

As well you should. Specialized - like every other bike company in the world - is trying to make money selling bicycles. If you don't want wheels that are hand built from the rims up buy something cheaper.
  • 6 0
 @smartyiak: Biggest chunk of weight there is the wheels. Only the S-Works comes with the Control SLs - all the other models have the Control Carbons, which are about 400g heavier (nearly a pound). If you could a find a shop willing to swap the wheels out of the box for just the cost difference, you could get an Evo Expert to a similar weight for around $2500 extra ($1550 for the wheels, plus an X01 cassette and carbon cranks).
  • 3 3
 Well above 5 digits. Ridiculous.
  • 3 0
 @ChristophColombo: Sure...but $2500 would buy one hell of a wheel set for any of the other bikes!
  • 3 2
 I feel like specialized kinda charges a "dentist tax" for the s-works level. I wish they would trickle down the profits to other levels and save us others some money.
  • 11 4
 I stopped reading and went strait to comments once I saw the price. Turns out a top of the line Ford Raptor handles off road terrain better than a mid-spec Tacoma as well. $$$
  • 2 0
 @smartyiak: Is that true? Expert or Pro model? I may be looking at a Expert model in the not-too-distant future, but haven't seen a weight anywhere. I can live with sub 25 (before I put an X01 cassette on Smile )
  • 3 0
 @smartyiak: the frame weight on this though was a pretty substantial difference over everything else. If all the components were matched to every other bike in this test, you'd still be between .75 and 2.5 lbs lighter than everything else in this test. So unless the frame is quite a bit more expensive or the spec is bad, it's going to be lighter at each price point.
  • 3 0
 @smartyiak: not true. Look at the frame weight numbers. Spec it just like the spur, it will be 2 pounds lighter, and similar price to Transition.
  • 2 0
 @Bikerburt: I understand...what I am saying is: the Spur is similar (in weight and price) to regular non-Sworks Epic Evo. I believe that its light weight helps it be an amazing climber...but it's also fair to mention: you only get the light weight by paying $11,000 (or $3525 for a frameset and the parts). I don't know what the non-Sworks frame weighs, but the full builds are coming in at ~24-25#.
  • 1 0
 @smartyiak: 100grams heavier according to another poster but not verified
  • 2 0
 @bigwheels87: Thank you sir.
  • 2 2
 @stumphumper92:
Simple, motor + battery only costs $ 300.
  • 2 0
 @stumphumper92: way higher end carbon used on this one plus wheels that are a lot more expensive
  • 2 0
 @stumphumper92: That already includes the AARP discount.
  • 16 1
 @stumphumper92: you also have to trade in your dignity when you get an ebike.
  • 1 0
 @ColinFerguson: The Expert model already has an X01 cassette.
  • 1 0
 @smartyiak: Yes, 24# (Pro) and 25# (Expert); still competitive weight numbers.
  • 4 0
 PB tested the wrong Evo model. Try the Evo Expert at $5925 or the Pro at $8200 instead.
  • 2 0
 @stumphumper92:
First off I agree, the price of some push-bikes is really absurd. I think the main difference is that a cutting edge XC bike can't be over built at all, or it ceases to be a cutting edge XC bike. If the bike is on the ragged edge of performance where a 200lb+ person will break the bike if they get too aggressive, then they have to factor in warranty replacements into the cost that everyone pays.

The E-bike can be over built a lot more, so their engineers probably know it's a bike that way fewer people are likely to break.
  • 3 0
 @stumphumper92: they will sell a shit load more Levos.
  • 6 0
 @rlsedition: Took delivery of my large Comp yesterday, 25lbs, ~7oz without pedals (but with the bottle cage and tool), setup tubeless. I'd say its very competitive. Makes me feel better about the cost savings compared to the Pro that I had as a demo for a few days.
  • 2 0
 @rlsedition: Actually it has the GX cassette, XG-1275.
  • 2 0
 @bsavery: i used to cycle to work and saw loads of S-Works road bikes ridden by people who i just couldn't understand how they were benefitting from them.

I understand that, as you get to the sharper end of competition, small advantages become of bigger importance. And this is where the S-Works tier validates itself.

For ordinary folks, it seems completely unnecessary. But people buy them. And they're free to do so i suppose. But i was passing these people on my cheap 2nd hand road bike and i am far from a strong rider.

Eh, if people got the money to spend on it, up to them. No different from people buying performance sports cars to drive at the same travel at the same traffic speeds as someone in their bog-standard motor really.

Maybe all the money from sales of top-tier bikes can subsidise better value lower-spec models that are all most folks need. We can dream...
  • 1 0
 @tempest3070: no shit? thank you for clarifying that I can spend my money on something else!

The only reason I said that is bc everytime someone argues prices they get all uptight about "supply and demand" and R&D, etc. Obviously I understand how the industry works. It was more towards the people that get all defensive about pricing (*cough cough.*) Which is weird af to defend in the first place unless you just love spending money or you sell the products.
  • 1 0
 @tempest3070: At these prices they should be able to recover their R&D costs with the sale of just a few bikes.
With the global demand for bikes so high at the moment they can pretty much define their own prices supply and demand and all that....
  • 6 0
 @DidNotSendIt: A friend of mine has 50,000 miles on his S-Works. Not sure if he bought it new (probably did), but I think he found good value in it.

At the same time, you can find used S-Works bikes WAY cheaper than new. So just because you see people riding them to work doesn't mean they paid full price. Likewise, I see people driving $50,000 Jeeps to work, or $100,000 Porsches. The Jeep will never get used off road, and the Porsche will never see a track. Do you judge them equally to the person who commutes on an S-Works?
  • 3 0
 @JSTootell: i suppose if they can be picked up cheaper 2nd hand that makes a big difference.

I don't suggest people shouldn't buy them and i did equate it in my comment to people who buy performance cars that never get used for their intended purpose.

For the sake of clarity, the people i started seeing riding them were in their 50's-60's, quite out of shape and were slow cruising along the promenade. Shouldn't judge a book by it's cover i suppose, but they certainly did not look like the athletic rider that would benefit from the race-orientated advantages that S-Works provides. To me it's like someone who doesn't exceed the capabilities of their lower-spec fork wanting Factory Kashima. If you're not exceeding what the low-spec fork can do, the benefits of factory-level tech will be lost on you.

Again, if they want an S-Works, they can crack on, i really have no issue with it (beyond any flipant "more money than sense" comment). My comment was just that i can't see what benefit they can be getting out of it over much lower priced bikes.

Each to their own as they say though.
  • 1 0
 @ColinFerguson: I built up my XL Expert Evo, came in at 25.1 lbs with the stock tires tubeless, all else stock except upgraded cranks and bars to carbon, Ergon GS1 grips, with Eggbeater 11 pedals. Could save some weight from the stock build with different tires, and definitely with an X01 cassette. I added some weight with the grips but they're worth it for me.
  • 1 0
 And we all know how it will maintain it's value throught the weeks after you buy it!... It's like ice cream on the sun! I PASS...
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: Previous generation (2018-2020) S-Works FS Epic's can be had for about $6-6.5K on average right now. Depending mostly on condition and components. The AXS equipped variants are a grand or so higher.
I expect it to go lower as time passes and supply of the new model increases.
  • 1 0
 I wonder how durable this and other super light frames coming out actually are. I think a bike like this would be a disaster for a heavier aggressive rider who makes poor line choices. I know I'd break it eventually.
  • 2 0
 @DevoMTB: You are correct, but mine will be replaced with an XG-1295 version once the original cassette wears out.
  • 1 0
 @dejock: hi how are you finding your EVO, any complaints? I'm trying to decide between the Epic and Epic EVO
  • 1 0
 @Pundi: I’m a big fan of my Epic Evo Comp. Two rides in. Massive step up from my 2013 Tallboy.
  • 72 7
 Specialized has been killing it over the last two years:
The current generation Stumpy is worthy and capable
The Enduro is basically top of the class
The Levo SL is a breaking new grounds in what an ebike can feel like on the trails
And now the new Epic looks like a winner too (especially the Evo)

I know their corporate practices can be pretty shitty, but they're making some killer bikes right now (and the working man spec is inline with everyone else pricewise).
  • 16 9
 A few buddies are former 2020 Enduro owners and didn’t get along with their dream rides. Seems to be love or hate with nothing in between.
  • 4 0
 @Hill-Seeker: Interesting, mostly going off all the breathless reviews. What didnt they like about them?
  • 18 46
flag dthomp325 (Aug 18, 2020 at 7:59) (Below Threshold)
 > I know their corporate practices can be pretty shitty

I guess if by "shitty" you mean spending buckets of $$ on mtb R+D and sponsoring some of the best athletes in the world.
  • 23 2
 @dthomp325: I think the reference is toward their their zeal for litigating their patent and trademark portfolios, not their R&D and sponsorships. I don’t think anyone takes issue with those things. And I get it, trademark/patent defense is part of the deal especially when you’ve put a lot into your brand and products, but some companies are just way too eager to litigate.
  • 17 11
 @dthomp325: Also the crime of defending their trademarks which they're legally obliged to do otherwise they lose them.
  • 26 6
 @dthomp325: no, by "shitty" he we mean suing the shit out of small companies and putting them out of business, with lawsuits that specialized would have no chance of winning if the small companies could afford to actually go to court.
  • 11 0
 @tempest3070: You mean like Roubaix?
  • 8 14
flag tempest3070 (Aug 18, 2020 at 8:29) (Below Threshold)
 @Hayek: What should they do instead of litigate when they've got evidence of infringement?
  • 30 4
 @tempest3070: this has been covered so many times you're just choosing to be ignorant.
  • 12 1
 @roma258: A few of them felt that the Enduro felt dead, muted, and "turned like a tanker ship." According to them it was really good at holding straight-line speed but was slow when you got out on the gas coming out of the corners. Probably a great race bike for Cody Kelley who pops off of everything but it just wasn't a good fit for the guys who are quite quick (top 20 in regional Masters Enduro events).

My taller friend got pretty fired up about the effective seat tube angle and found himself further back than he wanted to be. He's been going on about how other bikes with the same effective seat tube angle get a lot of criticism while the Enduro seems to have received a pass some how.
  • 28 3
 @tempest3070: I’m not sure if you’re just being facetious or genuinely interested, but if you wanted to be bored, then keep reading. In my dissertation I argue that on average, firms should do nothing in the case of infringement. That’s not always the case, but litigation should be considered very seriously before engaging. It’s extremely costly and in consumer-facing products, there is strong evidence that There are negative externalities including reducing consumer WTP. Patents ultimately expire or can be worked around fairly easily, meaning they’re unlikely to produce the sort of long-term barrier to competition that firms are looking for. In terms of total factor productivity, intangible assets are more valuable to a firm in the long run. Meaning a dollar spent investing in the values your firm shares with its consumers (in the case of Specialized: trailbuilding, advocacy, etc.) will have greater return than a dollar spent litigating your patent portfolio.
  • 8 0
 @Hill-Seeker: Thanks for the summary, that's really interesting! The wheelbases on these bikes are getting, really, really long and the angles really slack. And while the reviewers continue to claim that these bikes still handle surprisingly well, I think at some point geometry and physics take hold. And yeah, not everyone rides or even races their bikes in Squamish.
  • 4 9
flag TheR (Aug 18, 2020 at 10:58) (Below Threshold)
 @beetardfoozer: So tell me, what small company did they sue the shit out of and out out of business?
  • 1 3
 @smartyiak: thats one, yes
  • 3 1
 @TheR: Google is your friend
  • 5 7
 @beetardfoozer: No, I’m afraid you have no idea what you’re talking about. If you are referring to Cafe Roubaix, I suggest you make Google your friend.
  • 6 3
 @TheR: That's one example bud, and you seem to be pretty f*ckin flamed about it. So you really think that if Cafe Roubaix were able to afford litigation, and Sinyard didnt personally apologize and end the lawsuit, Specialized would be awarded the rights to a name of a city in France?
This example you chose to use as an argument only reinforces my point.
  • 8 10
 @beetardfoozer: No, I asked you to name a single small company Specialized sued the shit out of an put out of business. If it’s their M.O., should be pretty easy to do, right?

But I suspect you are just talking out of your rear in order to justify some irrational hatred you have toward a bike company.
  • 3 0
 @Hayek: That's some super cool info. Thanks for sharing! Is there a place one could go to read your dissertation?
  • 1 2
 @GeorgeHayduke: Covered where? I don't know the backstory here
  • 1 0
 @Hayek: Awesome, thank you for the information
  • 3 2
 @smartyiak: Google says they came to terms and Specialized apologized? I'm not sure what you mean by Roubiax here if you're not referring to the cafe Roubiax thing.

www.caferoubaix.ca

If you're this worried about them even after they came to a good solution seven years ago maybe you should order some parts from them?
  • 3 0
 @Hill-Seeker: As a trailbike, I hear nothing but complaints about the new E29, in spite of the reviews indicating that it's a great all around bike.
Short of an out and out Enduro race most riders would be substantially faster overall on the Epic tested here, imo.
  • 2 0
 @tempest3070: I wonder if Fuji bikes had anything to do with it....hmmmm???? shrug>
  • 2 0
 you ever seen the doc Klunkerz? Basically launched their mtb division by stealing from Ritchey. Seems a lil shitty
  • 6 1
 @speed10: Ritchey, Guy, Cunningham (and others) were the innovators. Fisher, Sinyard were the businessmen. Sinyard is, by all personal accounts, a hyper-competitive tool. Employee turnover at the big S is unreal, and being a S dealer carries an exclusivity penalty. They make some cool stuff, but I will never own any of it.

Also, don't forget the Volagi bikes lawsuit. But here's a rundown on some of the rest:

drunkcyclist.com/2014/03/12/now-know
  • 24 2
 @TheR: Jesus christ bud, cant a guy make a snarky comment on the internet without needing an entire dissertation supporting my opinion?
Here, I'll amend my initial statement:
-no, by "shitty" we mean threatening or initiating trademark litigation with small companies,** with brands like Volagi, Mountain Cycle, Cafe Roubaix, Epic Wheelworks, Epic Bags, etc., with lawsuits that specialized would have no chance of winning if the small companies could afford to actually go to court. These lawsuits threaten the very existence of the smaller brands, while they are used by the Specialized legal department to justify their budgets.**
There I fixed it.
Many consumers, myself included, would not like to support this type of shitty corporate behavior in the bike industry. This is not a new conversation. You are being disingenuous by pretending not to understand my point.
  • 3 0
 @SunsPSD: Huh, what are you talking about? It's a 160/170mm trial bike vs. a 100mm bike? Yes the Epic is faster on a side walk, no it's slower going down 'ride don't slide'.
  • 6 19
flag TheR (Aug 18, 2020 at 14:27) (Below Threshold)
 @beetardfoozer: You made a baseless claim, and I called you on it. Personally, I don't care. I just think it's funny that you and so many others that frequent this site have based your opinion on this company on complete fables, half-truths and partial understandings. I just like calling attention to it and watching the cognitive dissonance at work, as you then scramble for evidence to support your already ill-informed opinion.

Just try not to go apoplectic tomorrow when they name this bike best in class. That will be two for the Big S this year, counting the Enduro in that field test.
  • 1 0
 Current Stunpy is capable if you by the Cascade Designs Link! Damn way better bike with that.
  • 10 2
 @TheR: Ok fanboy, its not a baseless claim. its internet short-hand because i would rather write a sentence than a paragraph.
Im sure the bike rides great. I, along with most people I ride with, will never buy one because we have experienced Specialized's shitty practices, either byreading about it in publications like this, or in bike shops that sell specialized, or in the specialized offices. I am close friends with a few people who worked there, many different departments and roles. None of them will ever spend money on specialized products. But i guess they are ill-informed.
  • 8 13
flag TheR (Aug 18, 2020 at 19:39) (Below Threshold)
 @beetardfoozer: if I’m a fan boy, I’m the worst ever, as I don’t currently ride a Specialized, nor am I interested in any of their current bikes. I have owned Specialized in the past and would again if they make a bike that piques my interest. I just don’t have an irrational hatred of a corporation, and I just think it’s hilarious when Specialized or Yeti makes a good product, and all the sheep chime in with predictable bleets of “Lawsuit!” And “Dentists!”

As for you, you are so informed that you couldn’t even back up your simple statement without going to Google first. Seems pretty convenient that you know so many people who worked there, and I’m even more skeptical that they’ve all sworn off Specialized for life, but I can’t prove it and suppose anything is possible. So I guess there’s no point arguing that.

But on the off chance you are one of the informed ones, I guarantee you’re one in a thousand of these parrots in the peanut gallery who always chime in with “lawsuit” any time Specialized is mentioned.
  • 6 11
flag TheR (Aug 18, 2020 at 19:46) (Below Threshold)
 And finally no one has yet chimed in — neither you nor the few people who have downvoted me — and told me what poor, small company Specialized has sued out of business. I know you keep saying that wasn’t what you meant when you wrote it, but then I don’t understand why anyone would write what that didn’t mean.
  • 1 0
 Double post
  • 2 0
 @Hayek: username checks out
  • 2 0
 @tempest3070: That has been debunked over and over by lawyers, but keep posting it to defend them.

Here is one of many articles on it.

www.dbllawyers.com/can-lose-trademark-rights-dont-sue-infringers
  • 4 1
 @Hayek: I just think it's funny that people care so much about Specialized suing some people 10 years ago. "I'll never buy a Specialized because they got aggressive about their parents and trademarks a decade ago", to each his own I guess, but it doesn't seem like a big deal to me.
  • 2 1
 @dthomp325: Then buy a specialized.
  • 8 2
 @TheR: OK. keep pretending to not understand.
Ive already clarified my language from the initial post, but im sure you will keep pointing out that i havent named a company that theyve put out of business. you got me. keep pretending as if that invalidates my point.

"I just dont have an irrational hatred of a corporation"
yes, an irrational hatred of business models that are stifling innovation, consolidating capitol, bullying small businesses, treating their employees like shit, and *literally destroying our planet*. sure, your right, its silly of people to have an opinion about things and to vote with their dollar.

Stop being willfully stupid. you are dishonest. Defending a corporation you have no relationship with from some a*shole in a comment section on a mountain bike website is a strange hill to die on.
  • 1 0
 @downcountry: We'll agree to disagree. Levy was not riding a sidewalk in these videos and he was hauling ass. He was catching air in places that he would not have on a big Enduro sled, just because he was maintaining more speed.
  • 2 7
flag TheR (Aug 19, 2020 at 7:32) (Below Threshold)
 @beetardfoozer: No, it’s you are being dishonest and disingenuous. I don’t care about the bike company. I just find your baseless assertions amusing.
  • 4 2
 @TheR: "No, you are"
great argument bro.
  • 3 5
 @beetardfoozer: The fact that you can’t name a single company that hasn’t gone out of business because of Specialized completely invalidates your point, because that was your point. As far as I can tell, not a single company has been harmed by an alleged lawsuit. Cafe Roubaix — an misunderstanding that was straightened out. Lawsuit dropped. That’s not a sign of a ruthless, overly litigious company. That’s the sign of a reasonable one.
  • 3 8
flag TheR (Aug 19, 2020 at 7:47) (Below Threshold)
 @beetardfoozer: It’s every bit as valid as any argument you threw out there. In the end what I’m saying is you have no clue about any of the details of any lawsuits, or cease and desist orders or any of the legal measures this (or any) company has taken against anyone. You just parrot what the rest of the bro’s have to say here in comments.
  • 6 2
 @TheR: Are you high, obtuse, or just being willfully stupid??? Speshy has engaged in some questionable litigation practices (just read one of the several links posted...or do a google search on your own).

And I'm pretty certain that everyone, aside from you, gets Beeftard's point. Going out of business isn't the only measure. How much time, effort, worry, headaches, and $$$$ did these companies expend b/c what was an obvious bullying tactic?

In the case of Cafe Roubaix, Speshy's "misunderstanding" was "straightened out" in part b/c Fuji bikes (owner of "Roubaix" TM until 2019) told them to knock it off. Being forced to back off from suing a small coffee shop is hardly the hallmark of a "reasonable" company.
  • 5 2
 @TheR: a quick stroll up the comment section, or again, a quick google search and a few minutes of reading, will help you see that Specialized ended the lawsuit you are dead set on making this conversation about because it looked really really bad on them, not because they are reasonable.

hers something for your research
twitter.com/i/status/1275956194717208576
  • 3 6
 @smartyiak: I don’t know — how much worry, time, effort, etc., have these companies expended because of Specialized? That’s what I’ve been asking. I’ve gotten lots of snark and ad hominem, but not a single, objective fact from anyone that supports this claim. Nor have I gotten any evidence that anyone knows anything about trademark law or the true details of these orders.

Look, I know you’re all determined to dislike Specialized, and that’s fine. Just don’t pretend it’s rational, or that you know any facts about it to support your claim.

@beetardfoozer: Again, lots of snark, but it’s pretty clear you’re reaching. You’re assuming a motive when you can have no way of knowing what the motive was. And you’re assigning a motive based on your own bias.
  • 5 1
 @beetardfoozer: Does your mentality extend to drivetrain components, because this is an area where real innovation (not me too accesories etc) is being stifled by heavy handed lawyers. i hope you dont ride sram, because that would fly wildly in the face of your stance on specialized.
  • 1 3
 @Bustacrimes: i dont buy sram or rockshox, partially for those reasons.
  • 3 2
 @TheR: You havent been asking anything dude. Youve used my initial poorly written comment on an inconsequential internet comment section to obfuscate a debate about a real issue that many consumers find important enough to sway their purchasing decisions.

Stop pretending you don't know how the world works.
  • 3 2
 @beetardfoozer: That question is precisely the question I’ve asked over and over again 3-4 times. And still no objective answer that indicates you have any grasp of actual facts that influenced your decisions — at least not until yesterday when this argument prompted you to do a couple Google searches to get your story straight.
  • 3 2
 @TheR: At this point, you're just arguing...for the sake of argument.

I'm not determined to dislike them...I even (gasp) own some Speshy stuff. I only commented b/c being willfully ignorant or stupid is just annoying.
  • 2 5
 @smartyiak: Again, ad hominem and snark. No arguments, no facts. I find that equally tiresome. Just throwin’ that out there.

Look, at this point, I’m tapping out. I enjoy a good debate, but this one wasn’t good, and whatever it was, it has run its course. I apologize to whomever has taken offense. If we had met on the trails, chances are we’d have had a good time.
  • 1 0
 @Hill-Seeker: Have they tested on the Vaalserberg????
  • 4 2
 @beetardfoozer: I hope you don't ride Fox either, they recently sued 3rd party graphics companies selling stickers, and I hope you don't ride Shimano who requires companies to pay for a license to use their patented microspline freehub.
  • 4 3
 @dthomp325: Those are different issues.
The fox logo issue is not my favorite, but its not as gross as specialize suing a wheel builder called epic wheel works. They are actually protecting a brand logo, as well as a specific product they sell(replacement logos). Epic wheelworks wasnt slapping specialized logos on their wheels.

The shimano issue also feels a little gross, but they have a pretty good argument in terms of managing their new technology in a way that allows some oversight of production of compatible parts from other companies to preserve intended function, or make sure the other companies shit operates properly with their new groupset. the licensing has already been opened up, and will at some point go away all together.

False equivalence arguement.
  • 5 0
 @dthomp325: I get where you’re coming from. I worked at a Specialized dealer during the summers in college and soured a little bit toward them given the way they threw their weight around with dealers. Since then, I’ve seen issues within almost every organization I’ve interacted with. I guess it comes down to no organization being perfect, and each of us determining what amount of crap we’re willing to put up with in each. If I had more money, I’d seriously consider buying the new Epic Evo in spite of their history. If I wait around for an infallible company to sell perfect bikes, I’m going to end up spending a lot of time waiting around and not riding.
  • 3 1
 @beetardfoozer: Ok, this is a new topic, different argument, and my intent is to come at you respectfully as possible.

In terms of trademark and copyright, the laws apply the same for a brand name as with logos, with the added caveat that the brand names must have a connection to the industry in which the brand name is applied. Something like "Epic Helicopter Tours" of the Grand Canyon or something like that would probably not get the attention of Specialized, nor would they have ground to stand on. Epic Wheelworks has a direct connection to cycling, and therefore Specialized is obligated to protect its trademark within the industry or it will lose it within the industry. It's the exact same thing as Fox protecting the Fox Head or Fox Tail or whatever. Every single company ever protects its trademarks and copyrights in the exact same way -- they have to, or they will lose them. What you have done is applied a subjective double standard -- it's OK for this, not for that. Fine, but the law doesn't work that way, and companies are out for their own interests. All of them.
  • 3 1
 @TheR: Why do you keep posting that BS?
You can do I search you aren't obligated to sue everyone and no you don't automatically lose your trade mark if you don't.
Just one article by lawyers:
www.dbllawyers.com/can-lose-trademark-rights-dont-sue-infringers

From another:
"A trademark owner is not required to uncover all possible uses that might conflict, or immediately commence a lawsuit against every possible infringer. At the same time, a complete failure to enforce will lead to a weakening of an owner’s marks, loss of distinctiveness over time and, as we saw in this case, potential forfeiture of certain available remedies. So, at a minimum, owners should establish an appropriate level of proactive monitoring of USPTO registration applications, the Internet and other uses in commence. "
  • 4 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Did you miss this phrase? "At the same time, a complete failure to enforce will lead to a weakening of an owner’s marks, loss of distinctiveness over time and, as we saw in this case, potential forfeiture of certain available remedies."

You are responsible for defending your trademarks. I am not a lawyer, so perhaps I misunderstood or mis-used "lose your trademark," but that second sentence was essentially my point.
  • 2 2
 And I’ve had experience with cases defending trademark and copyright. I am not a lawyer, but worked with lawyers in doing so. In my experience things ended smoothly.
  • 4 2
 @TheR: Nope didn't miss it at all. So basically it's not all or nothing and that same article is long and goes into detail, but bottom line Specialized didn't and doesn't have to go after small fish but choose to go after the easy targets, that's why they are a shit company.
Notice how they didn't go after Fuji bikes? Wonder why, they make a bike with the name, but they went after a small shop with the name of a bike model- not even close to the same thing.
www.bikesdirect.com/products/02fuji/fuji_roubaix.htm

Why didn't Fuji sue the shop? Why did they step in instead of suing the shop?
Proves the point everyone has been making and you're wrong on.
  • 3 2
 @TheR: You're absolutely correct....this wasn't a good debate. I thought you were tapping out...but, instead, you just double-down on dumb.

I'm glad you made copies for some TM guys...maybe you know them well enough that you can ask them about this issue personally...so they can tell you you're wrong. shrug>
  • 2 2
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: No it's not all or nothing, and they don't have to go after everyone, but they do risk losing the effectiveness of their trademarks, so they hire a team of lawyers to look out for these things for them. It's what every corporation ever does.

You bring up Fuji, so I assume you're back to Roubaix? Maybe you have a point. I couldn't tell you why they don't go after Fuji -- maybe the two companies have an agreement that you and I are not aware of? Also, and I've brought this up several times now, Specialized dropped the whole Roubaix thing with the shop. Worth noting, yes?

My main point in my more recent post was the fact that this guy said he was cool with Fox going after a small sticker company in defense of their logo, but not with Specialized for defending their brand name in other cases. It's an arbitrary double standard used to support his already-formed biases. It's essentially the same thing, yes?
  • 3 1
 @TheR: There you go again. All you had to do was read.

1. Every corporation doesn't do that (i.e. Fuji didn't do that);

2. You could tell him why they didn't go after Fuji...if you just read the multiple links in this thread and what I wrote. The answer is: b/c they couldn't.

3. Specialized dropped the whole thing b/c Fuji TOLD THEM TO...b/c Fuji OWNED THE TRADEMARK (in the U.S....which Fuji made clear to Spesh that they risk using "Roubaix" in the U.S. if they kept messing with the Canadian cafe (b/c you can't really own a worldwide TM)).

4. Fox owns the logo and makes aftermarket stickers...Speshy didn't own anything...they licensed it in the U.S. from Fuji.

5. No...it's not a double standard...they're different. And, Fox got plenty of flack...and the issue was resolved within a week...without a 3rd party getting involved.

If it hasn't been made clear enough yet or you can't understand it, maybe you're just out of your depth and should stay silent.
  • 62 3
 Mike's halfway-out-of-control riding on these bikes is just so loose and fun to watch, you should do a compilation video of just those clips. Obviously a good rider, but also seems like he's always just inches away of going totally off the rails. Way more interesting than 75% of the super-pinned shredits posted on the site.
  • 22 0
 All perfectly captured by the “whaaaahahahahahahahaaaa-oh” in the intro.
  • 11 0
 that's because I don't think he is in control like the rest of the super-pinned shredits where they are in control...
  • 24 0
 Unable to decide between Epic EVO and Grim Donut until I see the huck-to-flat video.
  • 1 0
 Is that Grim Donut review gone to another paralel Universe?
  • 2 0
 @PauRexs: No, it's just in indefinite lockdown - to many symptons and no way of curing them
  • 14 1
 "the SID Ultimate offers slipperiness"
"That said, the EVO's SID did develop a bit of premature bushing play"
Maybe a connection there? I'm sure Rockshox has to balance out-of-the-box feel with bushing play. It took my skinny butt 6 months to break in my Pike, but I bet the bushings never get loose.
  • 1 1
 Does breaking in a fork damage anything? Part of the bushing does wear away and might be scrubbing away at other parts?
  • 3 0
 @Jacquers: Just ends up with the lowers oil. Simple fluid swap and bye bye
  • 14 1
 Curious, would you say this bike handles better than a 6 inch trail bike from a few years ago? (I'm talking 2014-2016)

It seems like suspension tune and geo has come along way.
  • 13 0
 That would be an interesting comparison. A modern short travel rig with the same geo as a trail bike from 5 years ago, descend down the same trail and see what happens.
  • 1 0
 Good thought. I'd like to see a back to back comparison. I bet modern GEO/Big wheels probably rips as hard as a longer travel mtb from a few years ago. I'm thinking about going to a 120mm/130mm bike. I'm on 140R/160F right now and it's unnecessary for what I ride. Rarely do I use all my travel unless I am at the bike park...
  • 4 0
 I have a Trance 29/Fox34 that is a little longer and slacker than the gen 1 Enduro 29/Fox36 I rode for 5 years. In New York and Colorado (where I live now) I can ride descents faster on the Enduro with the same wheels and Magic Mary/HD SG tires. The Trance runs out travel on big hits at enduro stage speed, and with lots of grip, “folds up” under hard braking corners. Also, pedaling grippy tires negates any potential efficiency of less travel.
I’ve now got light rims, and Dissector Exo+ fr/Slaughter Grid Trail w/cushcore xc on the Trance. I brake early and try to ride light and quick rather than fast. For the 5+ minute descents in the alpine, I ride a Stumpjumper Evo/36/Cascade link. It’s so much faster and so many fewer sketchy moments.
  • 4 0
 @stumphumper92: what trails are you riding??? I regularly go through all my travel (140r/150f) with sag at 30% and 25% respectively. And if I took my bike to the park it would get destroyed. And I'm not even an aggressive rider.
  • 3 0
 I like this idea as well given a lot of riders still have one of those in the shed (2014 Lapierre Zesty for me!!), as well as adding a comparison to a modern "trail bike" (i.e. Norco Optic or equivalent). Same course stats if possible for the modern trail bike. Seems like a lot of folks on the fence for the next bike may straddle this short travel trail or DC bike. There was a review by "Bikers Edge" a while back that compare the Megatower, Hightower, and Tallboy on the same trails with timing, etc. It was pretty darn interesting.
  • 2 0
 @rrolly: You could easily adjust that by adding volume spacers to your fork/shock.
  • 1 0
 As long as the bumps don't get too big, should feel just as good or better. The amount of travel correlates to how big the rocks in the trail can get before you're in over your head and getting bounced around, whereas the geometry will more closely predict the handling feel.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: Hello there BC rider! He’s from Kansas. Your trails are slightly different.
  • 1 0
 @CasteelGilmore: Have done a lot with spacers. I've found that spacers in my fork work well, but I will likely remove them from shock and up the pressure since I've been running my bb too low and bashing rocks.
  • 13 1
 As someone who works in the laboratory I respect the consistency in the number of significant digits in your report (e.g. 1.40% instead of 1.4%) but at the same time I firmly believe that such precision is absolutely meaningless given the amount of other uncertainties which affect the results. If you would like to be completely accurate, report the error too, e.g. if do several loops and compute the average time and std.
  • 1 0
 They should run the same watts in every test
  • 13 0
 Excite. After waiting 2 months for my Epic Evo to arrive and almost as long for this review to come out, it sounds like I made the right choice.
  • 5 0
 Same here, so hard to pin one of these bikes down. they flew off the shelves
  • 2 0
 @bongpill: Ordered mine 20 minutes after the press releases came out and it just delivered yesterday!
  • 1 0
 @DevoMTB: Ordered my Expert on July 2 and haven't heard anything yet about delivery.
  • 1 0
 I have to wait for November or December. But, so glad I've got my order in.
  • 14 0
 This is the one. Now I just need to find the 4200 slx version in stock...
  • 5 0
 Specialized's website allows you to see what shops nearby have the model/color you want! That's how I found mine (still have to drive 4.5 hours each way).
  • 3 0
 I have it, it’s amazing. The base Sid feels remarkable like the dialed in pike ultimate I had on my stumpy. The bike as a whole is perfect.
  • 10 0
 In addition to bicycles, I'm a motorcycle and car nut as well. Read any of the enthusiast magazines and you'd see that the editors usually select test vehicles with similar equipment and pricing, when possible, which replicates what real consumers do when they're shopping. Why PB tested $11-12k bikes against $5-7k bikes caused me to shake my head in disbelief.
  • 8 0
 It would have been nice to see more testers provide their feelings about these bikes. Mike’s always been into short travel bikes, but it would be great to see someone with some previous all-around or XC racing experience (like Evan Guthrie or Ricky Federeau), as well as a local expert rider or other PB staffer. It would provide more perspectives to zero in on traits that a variety of people might see differently.
Of course the same goes with the true XC bikes with Sarah as well.
  • 8 0
 I just bought the Epic Evo Expert. I'm more of a gravity oriented rider, but this is one of the funnest bikes I've ridden. Light, efficient, pops over trail features, and loves to rip turns. If you want to have fun while covering ground (not just on the downhill), this bike is a riot.
  • 1 0
 When did you order your bike? I have one on order.
  • 2 0
 @rlsedition: Luckily, I didn't have to order it. My LBS had one in stock.
  • 2 0
 @moabRover: Blue or orange? Please tell me orange and please tell me it is a head-turner.
  • 1 0
 @rlsedition: I ordered one on 2020-07-23 and it just arrived at the shop today.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: I've got the orange, and was surprised. Up close in natural light, it has a nice & understated metallic look. Depending on lighting, it can be everything from rust-ish orange to very red. Looks great without being as glam as the chamelon.
I liked the blue, but I've had it with matte paints, such a pain to keep clean.
  • 2 0
 @knutspeed: Ta. I can't wait.
  • 1 0
 Sweet! Can’t wait to ride mine. But do you agree with Levy that dropper is not long enough? I am getting size M. What is the longest dropper it could fit?

I got the Comp in black version. Looks killer.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: Yep, I bought the orange and it’s a beautiful bike - great metallic color in sunlight.
  • 1 0
 @bongpill: I’m mixed about the travel on the dropper. I’m on a size L - 150mm.

I’ve ridden it on some long, fast downhill trails, including today, which was about 9 miles up and about 11 miles down some classic Rocky Mountain single track. .

When it was down. I noticed the saddle more than I do on my Enduro, but it also never really felt like it was in the way. It didn’t keep me from finding jumps, popping off trail features or getting in some little manuals here and there.

I might try a longer travel post, but it’s definitely not necessary to ride fast and hit all sorts of features along the way. It’s such a great bike!
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: I ride the orange and it is a head turner.
  • 11 0
 If only I was 60lbs lighter. Mongo too big, Mongo needs beefier bike.
  • 1 0
 Hey, 'Mongo', in my mind's eye, your forehead & jaw, both jut out quite a bit! (If I'm wrong, sorry...)
  • 9 2
 Excessive bushing play, but SRAM says they'll take care of it?! This isn't an isolated incident. And when your forks go sloppy in a handful of rides, try submitting a warranty claim on sloppy bushings on a new RS fork....

Looks like SRAM is using consumers as guinea pigs again....and without their once solid warranty coverage.
  • 7 0
 I just hucked/overjumped an Epic Evo w SID35 from about 2m to flat. Didnt even bottom harshly front or rear with 22,5% sag. Im 75kg. Inpressed by the new SIDs control, stiffness and ramp. This new generation of downcountry bikes are very capable and I agree the Evo is versatile and fast both Up and down. A bit short reach and compromised by the not so steep seat angle vs modern trail bikes, but the light weight and just-enough travel compensate. It is fast while its dry below.
  • 4 0
 RockShox have made a huge leap with the new SIDs IMO. Small bump and ramp up is something else, and they ride nice & high too. On previous RS forks I've faffed about for ages with tokens, pressure and settings - this one was good to go more or less on what S recommended in their suspension calculator.
  • 1 0
 They want to keep the wheelbase short...thats why it has conservative geo
  • 1 0
 @housem8d: but keeping down the overall wheelbase could have been achieved in other ways, e.g. with shorter chainstays like the normal Epic and adding those mm's to the front center extending the reach. Which in my opinion would have resulted in a more roomy but still more playful bike. But they were limited I guess when they chose to use the same front triangle for both Epics. Shorter chainstays would have required the steeper seat tube angle to climb well. All a bit of a compromise because of the front triangle and the upforking on the Evo. None the less a very good bike as it is.
  • 1 0
 @housem8d: I can also add that upsizing is kind of prevented by the seat tube growing too much, I'm 6'2 and the Large is too small but the XL seat tube is too tall for my legs with a 150 dropper. And I also gain stack from the higher steerer tube which wouldn't disturb me too much as a trail rider but if I raced XCO I wouldn't want it. So I'm kind of between sizes. If you are not or don't want a longer bike, then reach is no issue, just that the seat tube could have been steeper like the normal Epic.
  • 1 0
 @FredrikWestman: couldn't of said it better myself! it's a very nice bike, that's for sure. it's crazy how some people know exactly what numbers they want....and how such small differences on paper actually make a difference. But I would prefer a longer chain stay with this kind of bike, just to help keep things calm when you're doing things you shouldn't be doing with this bike....don't mind having a short reach, its not like the bike was meant to race enduro. although i only ride 40mm stems so the large would have a 440 reach which is too short....1st world problems!
  • 1 0
 @FredrikWestman: I'm close to 6'3 (190cm) on an XL. My wife insists I have a long upper body Smile Sit at about 81-82cm, and I could run a 185 dropper.... Running the seat center on the post, stock 50mm stem. Coming from too many S bikes the last 10 or so years, this bike fits me perfectly, and has a very good weight distribution front/rear - something I didn't expect with the slacker HTA.
Old gen Stumpy/Camber is a bit too short, prev gen Epic too stretched, current gen Stumpy felt...weird. Had to weight the front a lot. It would be so much easier if we could just size our bodies to bike frames.
  • 1 0
 @knutspeed: I have to measure, maybe I could run the XL, depending on dropper stack.
  • 8 0
 Anyone else think it's not totally legit to compare the mid-level builds of all the other bikes to the top-level build of the Epic? I bet the other bikes would have climbed better with an extra $4k of carbon on them...
  • 9 0
 Long-ish seat tube, yes, but I look at that front triangle and start dreaming of the water bottles I can put in there!
  • 10 0
 No Brain and loves to Party - Perfect!
  • 6 0
 I know it's asking a lot, but I would love to see weights listed for 2-3 spec levels on all these bikes.

Many (most?) buyers are going to be looking at the $4-7k builds.

How significant is the weight penalty w/ those (still very capable and high-end) build kits?
Are there any major compromises to those kits that make them a poor value?

(Things like heavier and cheaper suspension, wheels, cassettes, etc) I'd especially love to see a breakdown of which components on these cheaper builds really add extra weight... with the Evo I'm guessing the wheels are the #1 place where major weight savings is achieved over the cheaper models.
  • 2 0
 I bought the Epic Evo Comp when it came out... about 27.5 lbs on my (admittedly crappy) scale. Having weighed the wheels separately, I can shave off 3 lbs just with a new set of wheels, lighter cassette than the SLX behemoth, and tubeless conversion.
  • 6 0
 Better yet, PB should try to obtain and test bikes in the same price range, just like we consumers do. Trust me, we don't compare $6,000 bikes to $12,000 bikes when we purchase.I have a Epic Evo Expert ordered currently, but wonder just how much of the "goodness" of the S-Works model will rub off on my new bike, given mine will be roughly 3 pounds heavier?
  • 1 0
 @tommy2bliss: how much did the stock wheels weigh? I've got a Comp coming and looking to replace the wheels ASAP
  • 2 0
 @Cooken83:

I weighed the wheels (with tires, tubes, rotors and cassette):

2735 gr rear, 2050 front. I subtracted the claimed weight of components and got 2120 grams for the wheelset.
  • 1 0
 @tommy2bliss: thanks! I was guessing around 2kg
  • 1 0
 Took delivery of my epic evo comp yesterday. With a tubeless conversion and the bottle cage and swat tool mounted, my size large was 25 lbs, 7oz before I added my pedals. Id agree that theres significant weight savings to be had with lighter wheels, and I'm also considering an xt cassette swap once my new wheels come in. I don't think a 25lb build with pedals is out of the question for the slx build, which rustles my jimmies just thinking about it.
  • 1 0
 @dejock: that's actually lighter than I expected. I've got a size large coming next week. I've got some 1450 gram wheels to go on it and will also swap out the handlebar (it's too narrow so might as well get a wider carbon bar). SLX vs XT cassette is only 60 grams so I'll just stick with the SLX for now.
  • 7 0
 There is a Fox Factory build with XTR for around $8,200. Thats pretty fair to me. Obviously this one is priced in a different league.
  • 9 1
 Mike, who can bench more...you or Sarah?
  • 8 0
 $5 says sarah.
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy would you say the Spur is more a trail bike that happens to be light because of the spec, rather than a heavier Down Country bike? How does it compare to the Ripley/Tallboy for example.

I know it got asked in the Spur review, but do you think if you rode a medium Spur it would be closer to the Epic, as the numbers looks similar on paper, the reach, stack and wheelbase are within a few mm of each other, whereas the large Spur is more like the XL in the Epic. That Evo is hella pricey too!
  • 4 0
 Agreed. Mike's reasoning for choosing the large Spur didn't make a whole lot of sense to me -- especially given the geo numbers for most of the direct competition.

At 5' 9.5", my medium Spur climbs like a billy goat, hops around on every small jump like a rabbit, and still descends like a rocket with only slightly more concern for line choice than my trail bike.

It would certainly be very interesting to put Mike on a medium Spur for a few hours.
  • 12 8
 It’s amazing to me that a company that makes such awesome bikes (this and the Enduro are best in class) is so dedicated to eradicating regular mountain biking and replacing it with ebikes. I’m glad they didn’t skimp out on these when they are not part of their long term plans.

As far as price... If you pay MSRP for a specialized you are a moron or your shop is ripping you off. They have the most margin and the best bro deals. You have to get in a knife fight with the shop or be friends with a rep but you can get four figures off this bike no problem.
  • 11 0
 I'm not the biggest fan of e-bikes, but it's readily apparent the two markets can co-exist. I don't think any major bike brand is trying to eradicate their non-assist models.

Also, margins completely depend on the model and ( unless things have changed massively since 2018 ) Specialized dictates how much of a discount you can give when selling their bikes. I used get around this by tossing in free service, kits, helmets, etc when people purchased higher-end models.
  • 3 0
 ?What? These bikes are sold out. Shops cant keep them more than a week. Why would they come off the price at all? The only one you can get is the Lavender color.
  • 5 0
 @mikelevy I’d be interested to see your opinion of the Spur if you downsized to a medium.

Seems Transitions sizes are one larger than the competition a large Spur is closer to a medium Epic Evo
  • 4 0
 I've ridden all the new Epic Evo's now from S-works down to the expert. My favorite without question is the Epic Evo Pro (fox suspension) it simply oozes capability and outclasses the other builds with the fox 34 step cast fork, three position shock and Fox transfer dropper. S-works may have the cachet, and it is super lite, but if shredding trails and steeps above what you think a downcountry bike can handle is your cup of tea.... The pro model is in a league of its own.
  • 4 1
 Maybe the Pro is great, but it's also quite expensive at $8200 MSRP.
  • 6 0
 No mention of the flip-chip. What position was the flip-chip in? I hear it can play a factor in the ride of this bike.
  • 3 0
 According to Specialized, all models are assembled with the flip-chip in the low position. It definitely would have been nice to hear about the ride differences between low and high.
  • 6 0
 and the axs droppers are heavy, if they put a carbon dropper it would be another 200 grams lighter
  • 4 0
 This is actually a really good review I've seen from him in a while. Gets away from the numbers and just talks about the bike. good job!
  • 7 1
 Con 150mm dropper....because that's not enough? genuinely asking
  • 12 1
 Totally. 150 isn’t enough on an XC Bike? Seems like 125 should suffice.
  • 2 0
 Honestly, look at the post. I ne, he’s got enough post out of the frame to run a 170. Two, the AXS post limits the drop because of the battery (so I’ve heard). Three, it may not for the spec level, but you could fit a OneUp 180mm post on there for sure.
  • 2 0
 " there's almost no better feeling in mountain biking than absolutely nailing a corner."


Here, here! Especially when you dive in right at the limit. So good.

One compelling reason for me with the Spur is both the pricing which I think for the X01 is very good and also as a rider a bit taller than Levy the large is about perfect whereas the large EVO with a reach of 460 might start to feel short and I'm not sure I want to ride a stem longer than 50mm. Revel's pricing was actually pretty good too considering the build yesterday had their wheels which are quite interesting.
  • 3 0
 I ordered one in the Expert build a few weeks ago, hoping it arrives this month! I know it's not totally in your control, but it would've been nice if all the test bikes had similar price-point builds.
  • 2 0
 Can we get a review on the Giro gear the reviewers used in these videos?

I recently switched from a 5 year old set of Sidis that were deathly stiff to the Giro Sectors which are noticeably flexier and have been pleasantly surprised. No change in timed loop laps, and I'm starting to think super stiff shoe efficiency might be marketing hype.
  • 3 0
 Because it is more efficient doesn't mean it will directly translate to more speed.
  • 4 2
 Why doesn’t Pinkbike do a ride review on a bike most of us would actually consider buying - Specialized Status????

No one needs to spend more than 5k on a new bike. Performance per dollar starts dropping once you get over 3.5k and by 5k you not getting much more for every dollar you dish out.
  • 3 0
 I would argue that the "momma bear" of mountain bikes today is at roughly $5000; that's where the value is best.
  • 6 1
 I´ll buy two Spurs for that price!
  • 3 0
 Or one Spur and one Patrol.

/done.
  • 3 1
 This bike survived the elimination rounds only to be crossed off due to cost... (and Specialized horrible warranty department...)
My winnder of the 2020 XC DC filed test is the Giant Trance
  • 2 0
 Nice! I installed a 120 SC 34 Fox on my Trance Adv 29 and it is a 24.8 lb XC/Down Country rocket. With a 67 HT angle and 75.5 ST angle.

It was ahead of it's time other than the 1 degree too slack seat tube.
  • 2 0
 @OzarkBike: that's exactly my plan but wondering how’s the BB height is impacted by the 120mm fork?
  • 2 0
 @OzarkBike: How is the BB height? Running my Trance 29 with a 130 but am tempted to put a 120 Sid on there.
  • 1 0
 @jrk37: I use 170mm cranks with no issues.
  • 1 0
 Genuine question who actually buys these bikes. this and other bikes are podium bikes to be ridden by top athletes looking for gains measured in seconds. If riding at that level aren't you likely to be sponsored and not need to buy a bike. Also if riding at that level I could understand buying a top end frame, but buying an off the shelf bike, would the owner not change half the components to suit their riding. We see on pink bike all the pro riders or privateer bikes are non stock machines. Buy this bike then still change the stem, bars, saddle, grips, tyres etc
  • 1 0
 PB should have used the same wheels, not just tires on all the bikes. Those epic wheels at 1240g are weigh too unfair an advantage. It would be interesting to see if the Spur could get around the tighter climbs as well or not with them.
  • 4 0
 @MikeLevy did you ride the Epic and, if so, how does the Evo compare?
  • 2 0
 Also very interested to hear this answer.
  • 4 0
 Specialized also sent a medium Evo so Sarah Moore rode both and talked about it in the PB podcast. Summary is Evo sounded like both of their favorites
  • 2 0
 I wonder why they haven't done the SWAT compartment in the down tube. It's one of the very useful features that set Specialized apart from other brands.
  • 3 0
 just having a WAG, but I think they need more carbon around the SWAT to reinforce it...possibly adding weight. could be weigh off though.
  • 2 0
 It's a rad feature but adds cost and more importantly weight.
  • 5 0
 It was mentioned in the First Look article (www.pinkbike.com/news/first-look-2021-specialized-epic-and-epic-evo.html): "Riders won't find a SWAT hole in the downtube of the Epic bikes as the tubes are simply too small. Adding the feature would have also increased weight, not what most XC racers or riders are looking for."
  • 2 0
 @DevoMTB: They have a SWAT box which mounts to the bottom of the bottle cage on the down tube.
Thus the third mounting point. It'll fit a full sized tube, CO2 + Head, Tire Lever, Dynaplug Micro PRO Pill and Wolf Tooth chain tool just fine. If you use a Tubolito Tube you've got all kinds of room for other stuff since only about 1/3rd the size of a standard tube, The SWAT Box is also light and easy to access in a hurry. Super piece if kit.
  • 2 0
 I just wear the SWAT bibs. They are amazing.
  • 1 0
 @Augustus-G: agree, I use the lunch box for races, but for now I stick my tube & extras in a bottle-box. Most rides I'm ok with one bottle anyway.
I'm a big fan of the SWAT room on the Stumpys, but I often neglected to keep the contents clean and lubed, leading to rusty tools & frozen cables during winter. Too lazy.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: @iamamodel: Love those with their Enduro shorts when I'm out on my AM/Trail Bike.
When I'm in XC mode I already have a bunch of stuff in my jersey pockets, food, gels, etc. The SWAT box is a great way to get all of the stuff I mentioned off your body. Lower on the bike too. I really wish they made one that fit the Stumpy too.
  • 4 0
 @knutspeed: A good option for your latitude. I have an alloy Stumpy and wish they made a SWAT box that would fit it as it doesn't have the internal one.

Here in the US desert SW two bottle are needed for anything over 20 miles or so. I do a lot of 40-50+ mile rides on my Epic so two bottles and good route planning for refills is essential. At least in the months outside of Nov. - Feb. The heat here literally kills people. If it doesn't kill you the kidney stones from dehydration will make you wish it did. Right now it's after 1AM and it's still 95* F outside.

As for the "lazy" issue all I can say is take care of your tools/toys and they'll take care of you.Smile
  • 1 0
 @Augustus-G: Agree, we've had few days of proper hot weather this year (in the 25-30C range). I ran the box on my old Epic in 2018, and that was an insane summer where I definitely needed two bottles for every ride. But we have lots of lakes & creeks in my riding areas, so not normally a problem to refill & refresh - unless there was another 2018 drought..

I sweat a lot, so desert riding would probably make me go blind from salt before death by dehydration Wink
  • 1 0
 @knutspeed: That's what we do here, sweat and grow rocks! LOL
30* C = 86* F, an absolutely beautiful day around here!
I would absolutely freeze to death in your winters. Anything under 80* F and I'm looking for more clothes to bundle up in.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: Second that. Haven't worn a camelbak all year.
  • 1 0
 I'd love to see Sarah and Mike take their favorites and change the things they didn't like and see the differences in the numbers. What is the difference in out of the box vs tuned up?
  • 1 0
 With the same front triangle but a slacker head angle, is the seat tube slacked out compared to the regular Epic as well?

A single degree can be adjusted in the saddle rails, but still not ideal.
  • 4 0
 $3525sworks frame set seems like a great start for a home build.
  • 5 1
 Yeah... you can build this same bike for $8-9k... same for the Pro, Expert, and Comp versions. Not sure why Spech sells the bike for more than the sum of its parts... buying a complete bike is supposed to be cheaper than the total retail cost of parts.
  • 1 0
 The comp is great if you're a Shimano fan. SLX, slightly dumbed down suspension (but this is DC, don't need hsc/hsr), just need to throw on some light wheels. $4200
  • 1 0
 Forgot to mention the only difference in frames is the rocker link, ~100g.
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: Yeah, it's driving me nuts that I want this bike for that exact reason. I have all the parts to build it up nice but then I'm stuck paying $3600 for a frame, which is basically like buying an extra fork compared to the other frame costs in this test.

I think the only bike you can get close to even on the frame cost is selling the pro parts but even then it's not really worth it.
  • 1 0
 @bigwheels87: Really they should sell the non-Sworks frame by itself for $$2800-$3000.

I consider buying a Comp, or expert and selling the parts, but they kinda go cheap on the parts. The SID Select shock and fork don’t get much on the private market, the wheels, drivetrain and bars on the Comp are worthless. The Expert doesn’t even have full XO, and those Rovals are only worth $800-$1000.
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: Yeah, it's not cool. I feel like I'll sucker myself into buying the Pro even though I just want XT/Fox performance and don't need carbon wheels. Then I'll probably just give up and keep the bike as is and feel like an idiot. They definitely priced it so you were forced to buy more than you want. Guess they know what they're doing.
  • 2 0
 @Baller7756: I just bought the s works frame set, blue and black. Got 7.5% off frame. I will now build it up with the exact parts I want. For example save money and weight by not going with AXS dropper. Will save money by going XTR instead of AXS. By shopping deals I expect to beat the s works weight at a price around 8k total. Still crazy expensive but not 11.5k.
  • 1 0
 @Bikerburt: Where did you get the frame... not to mention, how did you get anything off? Must be a size Small?
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: By constantly checking in stock inventory at various shops in my area. It is a size large. They also had a medium frame in the green color. I am a very longtime customer of shop, so they threw me the small discount. I almost bought a comp with the plan to upgrade almost everything on it.
  • 1 0
 @Bikerburt: I was looking for that exact frame and size, but everyone I called said they couldn't even place a pre-order with Spech… they said it would probably be first of the year or so.

I was able to find a couple rides old Spur and been on it a week or so.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy would this make an awesome this a Leadville Trail 100 bike? i just orders the expert model and want to use it for that type of riding. I want a bike for multi-hour disgustingness and hope thsi is it.
  • 3 0
 "Uphill KOMs"? Unfortunately Mike, these are all extinct.
I'm not anti ebike, but they have them all Frown
  • 10 9
 ...yeah but how does handle at slow speeds, do a real-world test Levy, you can't be rich enough to afford this and fit enough to ride it...
  • 4 5
 Do you honestly believe that last part of your comment? If so, I have some shocking news for you...
  • 3 0
 rich people have far better health..rightly or wrongly
  • 5 4
 Levy knows his audience. He can tell we were all rooting for the Spur and Ranger to kick this thing's butt. No surprise an $11,000 specialized is great.
  • 9 0
 Why would you root for a brand if they're not paying you?
  • 4 6
 @tempest3070:
Totally get that. But Specialized sues people at the drop of a hat, so rooting for stiff competition/choice away from the major brands would be nice. Those options exist, but aren't as well-rounded. The Spur is gorgeous and I wanted it to be my next bike, but I care a little more about climbing than descending performance.
  • 2 1
 @aquanut: When has Specialized sued people? I'm clearly missing out on some industry drama.
  • 1 0
 Deleted duplicate
  • 11 0
 PB should have tested the Evo Expert at $5925 MSRP instead of the $11,525 S-Works model.
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: I know that they forced Giant to ditch the NRS suspension (designed by Renault F1) as it clashed with FSR / Horst Link. Giant had to put a Specialized sticker on their bikes until they replaced NRS with Maestro.
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: and there was a cease and desist letter to a bike shop 'Cafe Roubaix' as Spesh had the trademark on 'Roubaix'.
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: look at the Specialized Wikipedia page under Litigation. Seems nearly all were legit though. I guess it is the reputation people don't like.
  • 3 0
 Wow... I want it! Not the S-Works though...
  • 1 2
 The geo and suspension design is very close to my 2016 Orbea Occam TR 29 Team. It is a good design. With 2.6" wide Ikon on the front and a 2.35 on the back and 30mm internal width on the rims and an XL frame I'm at 26#. Running a 150mm Fox Transfer, 800mm low rise bars, and a 130mm Fox 34.
  • 1 0
 is that an internal hole for a rear lockout cable on the frame? would be good if you could fit a rear lockout when sprinting up climbs
  • 2 0
 What’s with the 29x2.25” test tires? I thought this was the Down Country category @mikelevy
  • 1 1
 I thought they were 2.35"?
  • 2 1
 It was all going swimmingly until the price of ... $11K USD? That's about $7K more than the most expensive car I've owned. O.O
  • 1 2
 I am glad they picked more of an XC tire vs the (yawn) DHR / DHF combo here. This was as close to a review of the test tires as we heard yet. For being such light tires and relatively conservative there did not seem to be traction and control issues with these bikes. Probably should have used the 2.35 versions of the tires with all of the 30mm internal widths stock on so many of these bikes.
  • 6 7
 All you damn socialists complaining about how expensive an *incredible* bike is... profits recruit investment and steepen the r&d curve. Good for specialized. By raising the prices as they have they’ve also made room for all the boutique and micro builders to also make profitable, amazing, bikes. I think we all owe lance armstrong and trek a great debt of gratitude for making bikes in to a thing people will spend thousands on... but that’s another rant for another thread...

Low(er) margin bikes would keep us all on square wheels and 3x drivetrains. You can have your low budget build from the parts bin, but after the business I’ve built to support my family and myself blooms and profits come in I’m buying the nicest damn bike I can afford. It will cost more than my 01 Tacoma.

It isn’t about the bike, it’s about kicking ass and reinvesting in to something that I’ve sacrificed for a long time to shift focus elsewhere. If you don’t like it, that’s your prob.

1) set goal
2) kick ass
3) reap rewards

You really wanna tell me you can’t count a bike as a reward? Like there’s some moral tie-in with the dollars paid... wtf

Get over yourselves
  • 3 0
 I have no issue with 99% of your post, but ad hominems about being "socialists" because you're amazed there's a company that wants 5 figures for their mountain bike and the fact that there's people who support that market niche? Really? Wondering about the viable financial decisions of others is arguably more conservative than socialist. Y'know, since classic conservatives wouldn't dream about a purchase such as this. Sounds like you need to take your own advice there, Mr. As Yet Unprofitable Businessman.
  • 1 0
 where is the Salsa Spearfish in all this chatter? it may be a lead balloon compared to the bikes in this test, lets just test the most expensive rigs out there shall we?
  • 2 0
 Great review series. @mikelevy: how would you describe the main difference between the epic evo and the sb100?
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy wondering how you'd place the Mondraker F Podium DC (that I think I heard you say you have been riding, and like) amongst the bikes in this test?
  • 1 0
 I bit the bullet and bought myself Epic Evo comp practically the same frame with SLX and basic rockshox suspensions. Component upgrade in progress (o:
  • 3 0
 Pretty awesome bike
  • 6 3
 $11,500 for a bike? NFW
  • 2 0
 PB tested the wrong model Evo. Try the Evo Expert or Pro models for more affordable bikes.
  • 1 0
 Great video; I've been waiting for this one! So you didn't try riding it with the flip chip flipped?
  • 1 0
 So can I sell the parts off the EVO Comp and make out better than the S-Works frameset?
  • 2 0
 Probably could! But the carbon material is different between the two, there is a difference is shock cost (SIDLuxe Ultimate vs Deluxe), and the Comp frame uses an alloy extension to make up that price difference.
That being said, stiffness is comparable and the weight penalty is ~100 grams.
  • 6 2
 @xvxbg: Yeah, I also just did the math and it doesn't even add up! So you're either paying $3600 for a frame/shock or $8200 for a bike I'd actually want to ride. Would be awesome if they offered it in an alloy rim, 12-speed XT, Fox Performance edition for the folks who know what actually works.
  • 1 0
 So I guess Mr. Levy you are trying to say can I buy these wheels at dealers pricing?
  • 1 0
 Those wheels look awesome. Probably feel like putting a motor in your bike. If only I had an extra kidney to sell...
  • 1 0
 Man, if only Specialized's frame prices were more inline with other manufacturers ($2,700-$3,000). I'd buy one real quick.
  • 2 3
 Let’s see I can get a yt jeffsy and a yt Tuesday and a yt decoy , or that specialized , ride the piss out of the yt and not worry, or get the specialized and constantly worry I might scratch it, Hmmmm???
  • 2 0
 Well thankfully it’s affordable.
  • 1 0
 Make mine with an aluminum front triangle and an XT kit for under 4K please.
  • 1 0
 Wonder how many folks will need to tap into their 401K....
  • 9 12
 Since this is the last bike, I'll harp on it one last time: the Spur was a L...which has numbers closer to an XL Epic Evo. The Spur was (paraphrased) large and cumbersome in tight technical climbs.

However, if you compare a M Spur (which is more equivalent to a L Epic Evo)...a 25mm decrease in WB (compared to Epic) or 29mm (compared to L Spur) along with corresponding decreases in stack and reach...and you'd have to have a more nimble bike.

I'm sticking with: Levy had the wrong sized bike to compare to the rest of the field.
  • 3 4
 Guy literally rides bikes for a living and can probably make a better assessment of what size bike to ride than you sir. It's fine to have a different opinion but chalking up the review to an issue in choice of size is a little bit of a stretch.

Also, if he was the "right" height, how would that have compensated for the issues he noticed in those specific situations? The bike is still the same size and I doubt just being 2" taller is going to change skill, rider positioning, line choice, etc.
  • 4 0
 Yeah according to Transition’s size guide he’s smack dab in the middle of a medium or large sized frame. Probably leaning towards the medium if anything. I totally understand why he went with the large for the test, since all the other frames were large, but it would be interesting to see how much of a difference that would make in the technical bits
  • 3 5
 @bigwheels87: The cool thing about numbers (and science) is that they're true...whether you believe in them or not....regardless of what one does for a living.
  • 5 1
 @BamaBiscuits: I get it too...I'm just wondering if the "issues" he had with the Spur would be non-issues with M.
  • 3 0
 @smartyiak: Can you explain why you think a M Spur is closer to a L Epic Evo? The L Spur and L Epic Evo have nearly the same effective top tube length, which is usually what's used to size bikes. The reach is 20mm longer, but the 1.7 degree steeper seat tube angle puts the saddle 20mm forward (at least at my saddle height). Not saying he shouldn't have been on a M Spur, but I think testing the L stays true to what the bike was meant to be. It's supposed to be longer reach than the Epic.
  • 8 5
 @smartyiak no, he wasn't on the wrong sized bike. He was on the size each manufacturer recommended for his height.

How hard is it to understand that those bikes quite simply had different design goals? Transition intended the Spur to feel long and stable in the recommended size and Spec intended the Epic to feel racy and nimble. It's that easy.

You can experiment with sizes all you want when you buy your own bike but it would be absolutely dumb for Levy to choose test bike sizes to match the reach or WB between bikes instead of evaluating them as the brands intended. It would totally screw up the results.

PB actually have done what you're suggesting in the past and it was so stupid. For example it resulted in them saying the Process (then still at the forefront of long geo) was short and twitchy (LOL) because they had it in a medium to match the reach of the other bikes in large - completely missing the point of that bike's geometry and its intended ride characteristics. Glad to see they've changed their approach.

It seems like you really wanted the Spur to be brilliant at everything and don't want to see it's got pretty out there geo for what it is, sacrificing versatility to excel in the fast and gnarly stuff. Of course you can buy it in a size too small for you and pretend it's nimble if you really must have it. I mean, you can downsize a Geometron too if you want, it's your money. Or you can admit it's not the bike for you and get a different one that's been designed to handle the way you want in the right size for you.
  • 5 1
 @acedeuce802: effective lengths/angles are the least meaningful measures in a geo table, as they're dependent on leg lengths. L Evo and M Spur wheelbases are 4mm apart. Transition's size guide shows that M is more recommended for 5' 10"
  • 4 0
 @bananowy: Right back at you.

For example: b/c PB says its for the downs...so that's what it has to be? Transition says: "...with all these lightweight and uphill oriented character traits the Spur requires no adjustment to descend like you're used to..." Well gosh...that doesn't sound at all like it wasn't made just for descending? Is it the 66 deg HTA...well I guess the .5deg less that Epic EVO really messed up the Spur's climbing chops????

Re size: As others have noted, 5'10" is exactly in the middle of the size. I can just as well type: he should have chose a M Spur, b/c that is the size recommended for his height...and not be any more wrong than what you typed.

As I wrote in another post: would a M all of the sudden be a brilliant climber and still stable...or would it not climb much better and lose descending stability? Would a XL EVO climb worse than a L? Compare like things to like things.

I don't care if the Spur is brilliant...but, I'll go with what ceecee wrote.
  • 3 3
 @smartyiak: wait until the cheerleaders find out that a M Optic has 15mm more trail than a L Evo. Then they'll really lose their shit, measured in props.
  • 3 0
 I agree 100%. Mike's reasoning for choosing the large over the medium Spur didn't make a whole lot of sense to me -- especially given the geo numbers for most of the direct competition.

At 5' 9.5" -- just a half inch shorter than Mike -- my medium Spur climbs like a billy goat, hops around on every small jump like a rabbit, and still descends like a rocket with only slightly more concern for line choice than my longer travel trail bike. I feel extremely comfortable with the medium geometry and can't imagine the extra long reach and wheelbase of the size large would provide any tangible benefit for me.

Then again, I don't ride 99% out of control like Mike, so maybe that's the only distinction and reason for upsizing? He's obviously much more skilled than the average mountain biker. I guess that could be enough to explain the larger size preference, but it still doesn't resonate with me since I can't relate at all.

Oh, and Transition themselves recommended the medium for my height. I communicated with them directly on that subject.
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel: I’m mad jealous you actually have one...found small and mediums around but I’m an XL and had to pre-order. They went from saying end of August/early September to December....
  • 1 0
 @BamaBiscuits: Yeah, got extra lucky after calling half of the resellers in the western U.S. and finding mine at a shop just nine hours away. It definitely sucks that supply is so limited right now, but It's very much worth the wait, I promise!
  • 1 0
 No mention of the low/high setting with the flip chip?!?
  • 2 0
 I want one.
  • 1 1
 I am over the moon with my Evo. But lycra and 66.5 HTA on Pinkbike? A first?
  • 1 0
 look like commencal are on something there! i though it was a meta.
  • 2 1
 I quit watching when he said down country
  • 1 0
 Can't say I like the look of that casing on the huck to flat... (06:43)
  • 1 0
 I think I just found my next bike!
  • 2 2
 You don't HAVE to wear lycra......unless you are racing, you look like a nob
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy you were slaying that track
  • 1 0
 Shvy-buh
  • 1 1
 Truly ridiculous amount of $$ for a "Trail Bike" Crazy.
  • 1 0
 You don't have to spend $11.5k to own an Epic Evo.
  • 1 1
 My rocky mountain thunderbolt is better then that rip off.
  • 5 6
 Will you & Sarah be doing any comparisons with Norco's FS Revolver?
  • 5 3
 Who downvotes this??? It's a question.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: I guess more people than you thought. They came back to downvote you as well. For good measure, I upvoted both you and gdevins, although I don't really care about a comparison with Norco. I guess the Big S fanboys are afraid of having the Epic compared to another bike.
  • 1 1
 Jeez. Eleven of em!
  • 2 2
 "idiotalized 2020-2021"
  • 2 4
 Nobody seems to mention that the bike is frumpy looking. The one tested is not a looker. (Barf emoji)
  • 1 0
 That's a paint color issue (and is subjective).
  • 2 3
 Levy shreds
  • 2 4
 A $12k bike without a motor, what the hell is going on.
  • 2 2
 It's equivalent to a $100,000 bike with a motor. Price out a road or mtocross bike that's chock full of titanium and carbon fiber parts.
  • 2 1
 @hllclmbr: The "best" Ducati (Superleggera V4) costs $100k.
  • 1 0
 Guess nobody saw my tongue, firmly stuck in my cheek.
  • 1 3
 At least it's not as expensive as a Yeti. Ha! Dentists!
  • 1 4
 Ugly but gold
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.038908
Mobile Version of Website