First Look: Roval's 1,240 Gram Wheels Are Designed to Protect Your Tires

May 26, 2020
by Mike Levy  

While it's easy to convince ourselves that we'd be better riders with the latest widget or if we were on the newest bike, literally buying speed is a difficult thing to do if you already own a high-end rig. But one of the most effective methods is to bolt on a lighter wheelset. And at just 1,240-grams for the pair, or around 100-grams lighter than a single 29er Assegai, Specialized's new Roval Control SL Team Issue wheels are among the lightest.

Not only that, but they're also saying that the new rim design means that much more force is required before you'll slice a tire compared to the old version. Okay, so they're lighter and more reliable?

Roval Control SL Team Issue Details

• Intended use: cross-country
• Wheel size: 29"
• Weight: 1,283-grams (actual, w/ valve stems)
• Rim width: 29mm (internal)
• Rim material: Carbon fiber
• MSRP: $2,650 USD
• More info: www.specialized.com
I always refer to this kind of stuff as 'no excuses components,' for obvious reasons, but not being able to blame your gear doesn't come cheap. The Control SL Team Issue wheelset goes for $2,650 USD.





The Details

If you come to Pinkbike for the downhill and enduro content, or if you're more concerned with sending gaps than saving grams, the 358-gram Roval rim might sound fantastically light. And it is, no doubt there, but it's also in the same ballpark as other options; ENVE's M525 comes in at 341-grams, Crankbrothers' XCT at 365-grams, and it's Stan's 300-gram Podium SRD rim that takes the barely-there title. But all of those are between 23mm and 26.5mm wide internally, whereas the Roval rim is a huge-for-cross-country 29mm wide inside.

A wider rim can mean more sidewall support and less tire squirm at low pressures, especially if you're using lightweight racing tires with toilet paper-thin sidewalls.

It also gets rim walls that are 4mm wide, which is almost twice the width of what you'll see on most rims. Think of the top of the rim sidewall as a knife's cutting edge, which it can certainly be when you slam your rear wheel into that same rock yet again; Specialized is essentially making it wider and duller to lessen the chance of you having to walk out of the forest. They're saying that it takes 22-percent more force to pinch a tire than it did with their previous Control SL rim and its more traditional design.

All I'm reading is that I can take lines that are 22-percent dumber when I'm on my cross-country bike. And if you were considering a tire insert, it might be redundant if you're using these wheels.
The new Control rim is in green, the previous in gray.

The rim's shape is actually much more complicated than its predecessor, with an asymmetrical design that, with the Roval hubs, means there's a single spoke length all around and more even tension. The rim bed is stepped to make tubeless setup a bit easier as well, and there are the usual claims about more vertical compliance and improved (by 29-percent!) strength.

More importantly, they come with a lifetime warranty and no-fault crash replacement promise.


There's a set of Roval hubs at the center of each rim, with the rear using DT Swiss' new EXT clutch system, along with Competition Race straight-pull spokes and Pro Lock aluminum nipples. "Straight pull spokes use slightly less material than j-bends, so they were used here," Specialized says, which is hard to argue with. They're bladed, too, which makes truing and tension adjustments much easier.

So, what's the deal with the new Roval wheels: Can they actually be this light and, as Specialized claim, stand up to rowdy cross-country riding? My test wheels just arrived yesterday so I don't have an answer to that question yet, but I will soon. They've have been installed on a high-mileage test bike, so expect a full review of these apparently lighter and stronger Roval wheels later this spring.



195 Comments

  • 221 19
 You know what also protects your tires? Proper air pressure...
  • 133 3
 you get out of here with your simple and sensible solutions
  • 20 11
 Just run dual ply tyres ? Thin tyre plus big foam ring is about the same as just running dual plys.
  • 23 2
 @rickybobby18: But have to keep it hush, don't want the tubeless/cushcore lobby coming and knocking on my door Big Grin
  • 11 7
 @bigburd: Dual plies and a foam ring is better.
  • 7 0
 Air pressure is cool and all, but I need a 29'er specific tire protection.
  • 11 33
flag scottlink (May 26, 2020 at 12:05) (Below Threshold)
 @bigburd: tubes and dh tires still work best
  • 16 5
 @bigburd: Weight wise it might be almost the same but performance wise it isn't. Cushcore with lighter weight tires provide more grip, more sidewall stability than tubeless and DH casing.
  • 5 3
 @SintraFreeride: added bonus, rocks can go right through the tire and destroy your tire, foam ring and your ride! If you act now, you might even trash your rim! (Said in my best “as seen on tv” voice)
  • 17 0
 @epideme: yeah you dont want to know what the Cushcore lobby does to naysayers with their new tire lever
  • 3 0
 @bigburd: thin tire plus tire insert is still very fragile, even with higher than trendy XC air pressure.
  • 10 8
 @SintraFreeride: that’s some wishful thinking. It all depends what trailsyiu ride on what sort of bike. I fkd up Aggressor DD through procore on a rough track in proper mountains, then I punctured Rockrazor 1ply with procore inside on a flow trail which effectively is a huge pumptrack. I currently use pepis noodle in XR3 for local trails but for real mountains: DH casing + tube please. I am done getting jizzed all over with sealant and then carry the noodle dripping white crap all over me.
  • 4 2
 @SintraFreeride: I wouldn't ride without Cush Core now that I have them. I can't wait to see what they look like when it's time to get new tires.
  • 2 0
 @scottlink: no they don't. If that was true every tire in the world would use inner tubes.
  • 29 2
 You know, how about using oxygen to inflate the tyres. I know oxygen does many many wonderful things for the human body. I have people....people working on this.....good people, great people. They’re doing an excellent jobs. I have friends calling me at 2am. Good friends, close friends and they’re telling me it’s a great idea, great idea.....

There goes my downvotes.....let’s see how much downvotes I can get til November
  • 1 1
 @Busted-Up-Biker: if you’re running lower than normal pressures then it might be toast as well as your tire. That gets expensive rather quickly.
  • 6 0
 Less air in tire = less weight. Duh.
  • 4 0
 @bigburd: the same for snake-bite resistance, but dual ply tyres ar far more supportives and precises. I just don't understand this trend of undergunning the tyres and (trying to) making up it with rim engineering, and foam, and 500g of sealant, etc...
  • 5 1
 @vweb: insert does one good thing though, it feels like you have a bit more suspension. But I am not willing to put insert into DH tires. My guess is that in line with what Milyard wrote lately, what folks at schwalbe have been saying: harder casing may roll worse on small bumps, but it is quite probably better on bigger hits since being stiffer it activates suspension earlier. With soft tire, you have 3-5cm of undamped travel and slimmer casing you make the worse it gets. If you add insert it gets best though. Last year I punctured DD tire on day one of riding in Hafjell. Changed to DH casings for day 2 and I was off the brakes quite a lot more. I mean, I was doing much less brake checks, I felt this much more confident. I felt like I had more suspension travel and this suspension was smoother. Same pressures.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: So you say it is a tire lever???
  • 7 0
 @epideme: Big Phoama.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: it reminds me a Troy Brosnan quote, where he basically said that he is not running inserts because if he punctures it is because the suspension is not setup well enough.

Anyway, I tried tubeless + HuckNorris with light tires (Michelin Force AM Performance Line) as heavier ones (Schwalbe Hans Dampf SuperGravity), light tires with tubes, DH tires with tubes, the same SuperGravity tires with tubes, etc..
I hate when I have to pump up the tire just to compensate its tendancy to fold when putting pressure on. I mean, it's not by accident if track cars have extra-rigid casings to allow better feedback and most of all to avoid tires to fold on them when putting G's on.
  • 3 2
 @vweb: Looking at all options on the market, Huck Norris is a rather bad solution in all possible ways. It's ok for XC but inferior to Pepi which is only few grams heavier but has better puncture protection and providing more support for the tire and less chance for burps. Procore is best in theory, since it eliminates chance of burping, but it's a fricking hassle to work with. Cushcore is theoretically better but you trade simplicity for burping even if it lowers the chance of it happening to some point it doesn't eliminate it like procore. I am keen to try DeanEasy.

But then... I have no will to fk with it to be honest. On my home trails I run 1plies with pepi and it's a rather low chance of puncturing, then for big mountains I can't get arsed anymore - DH casing+tube. I may try pepi+sealant in DH casing to get the said damping effect in the tire.
  • 2 0
 @epideme: you dont run tubeless?!
  • 2 0
 Increased tire pressure is only partially effective. Add a second method of protection for added piece of mind. Pulling out may work for a while, but more than likely, you'll soon end up with something more expensive than carbon wheels.
  • 3 0
 @zyoungson: Dual plies, foam donuts and 1200 gram XC wheels are where it's at.
  • 2 0
 @BenParfitterole: No, why would I? Cant run less than 25psi front and 28-30psi rear without smashing my rims, I get around 1 flat a season, dont get slashed tires and seen way too many smashed rims after running low pressure and cushscore failure.. And I am still faster than most of people on Tubeless.Tubeless has 0 benefits for me... But I didn't want to bring it out as it is personal preference and don't feel like fighting with people over what's better...
  • 51 0
 Rims haven't cracked yet... Good news for a Pinkbike carbon wheel review....
  • 29 2
 I think these could be really cool for my 2019 transition smuggler. For where I live in the mid west its proving to be a bit of a quiver killer bike. Handles the rough stuff super well, but is also efficient enough for long rides. The only problem is its a bit portly. Id love to run Two wheel sets for it. Think Smash and Dash. I typically know what ill be riding before I head out. So just toss on the appropriate wheel set and go. Smash wheels with burly casing tires for the gnarly days. And the lightweight XC wheels for the days I just want to go pedal.
  • 16 1
 This is what I did with my SB100. Two forks, and two wheel sets. It kills everything.
  • 31 3
 @GregorHayes: I've thought the same, but then I get in trouble when I'm hammering the XC loop and decide to turn down a rocky trail. "Oh it'll be fine, I'll just ride more carefully," I think. Then a jump into some jank approaches and I just can't help myself, and I pinch flat or break something on the landing.

Unless you're racing, IMO it's just worth it to run the burly stuff. What's the goal of running light wheels and tires - Strava KOM's? Getting home a few minutes faster? I ended up telling myself I'll get home a little slower and that I'm done chasing uphill times, so it's better to run the Smash setup all the time and be able to do stupid things on my bike, because doing stupid things is fun. And actually on average it probably saves me time because I never flat or have to call my wife to pick me up when my rim detonates.
  • 5 0
 I run a smuggler too and live in Nebraska. I have two wheelsets, but I will say, I cannot keep my light wheelset true for the life of me and keep breaking spokes. I think part of the problem is, that bike always makes me want to party, even when I'm trying to smash XC laps. I end up keeping my heavier duty wheelset on it almost all the time because it is far more predictable and reliable. That said the bike does change quite a bit with a light wheelset and different tires.
  • 22 2
 @rickybobby18: if you ain't first ur last
  • 2 0
 @twhart20: My local trails have two flavors. Super buff black dirt or rock. The ingredients never get mixed. This is why I feel like I could get away with a secondary lighter weight wheel set.
  • 3 1
 When I upgraded to Nox Teocali wheels from some very narrow/twitchy/heavier wheels, I saw big increases in speed and big decreases in time (I took a KOM from a local shop pro on my first day out).

And +1 on the wheel swap; this is also great when you have different tire setups. Hot-swap wheels with burlier tires in 1min, vs 15min for a new Tubeless install.
  • 18 2
 Pretty cool story
  • 2 0
 @rickybobby18: I run the light stuff for xc racing where it matters, and gravel and training rides, then throw on the burly stuff for normal trail riding. But I also go for those KOMs XD. The difference between two forks and wheel sets is insane.
  • 5 0
 I'd have to bring 2 wheel sets cause I typically change where I'm riding when I head out... Smile
  • 1 1
 @rickybobby18: AGREE... if you build a bike too heavy or too light you'll end up on the wrong bike too often. Who wants to run into their friends shuttling and end up tip toeing down the trail on pins and needles cause you don't won't to break your near three thousand dollar wheelset while everyone else gets stuck waiting for you at the bottom... MEH!
  • 1 1
 @High-Life: but 26 ID, eeeewwwwwwww (shudddders)
  • 3 0
 Though I think it would be cool to have different sets of wheels etc., the way I’d go for variety is purchasing a shorter travel bike and then with the money I’d spend on lighter wheels like these roval hoops, I’d go buy a ripmo af or privateer.
  • 5 0
 @stiingya: it's an XC wheel set ffs, that's perfect for a 2.3-2.2 XC tire.
  • 3 0
 Or for just about the same price as these wheels you could by a YT Izzo and that would be your dash bike.
  • 1 0
 @High-Life: Taking a KOM from a roadie doesn't count.
  • 3 0
 @clink83: AND... this article is about a XC wheelset with a 29IW rim => for the WIN!

BUT... I was mostly just joking around. Smile
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: inb4thecoffee lol
  • 2 0
 @jwdenver: I waiting for the documentary to come out.
  • 1 0
 @werts: or for the same price build a damn nice hard tail?
  • 1 0
 @GregorHayes: yeah, you do!
  • 28 5
 Cool article. How many spokes on each wheel? How many POE? What bearings do you get for $2750? That single spoke length: how long is it? Is it available in 27.5 or only 29? What about the new hub shell design vs. the old one? What are the available hub dimensions? For all I know I could be looking at a 135x10 / 15x100 wheelset. All things that could be included in a first look wheelset article.
  • 10 0
 Also here's the link to the wheelset on Specialized's site, instead of Specialized's main page: www.specialized.com/us/en/roval-control-sl-team-ltd-29/p/186971?color=299040-186971&searchText=30121-2600
  • 5 0
 24h front and rear, Aerolite spokes, Ceramic bearings (DT 180 internals). Completely redesigned front and rear hub shells. 110 / 148 spacing.
  • 5 0
 @xvxbg: And 54 POE.
  • 2 0
 @hifiandmtb: and it's for XC racing, so obviously 29.
  • 2 0
 @xvxbg: they went big on the specs for this Wheelset.

Big S gets a lot of shit, but they do their wheels right.

I could get convinced to drop my DT aluminums for this... But not that that kind of money.
  • 1 0
 Come On! Only in Blue? They need to make them in RED! LOL
  • 18 2
 Though they do cost more than a solidly specced XC hardtail or used enduro bike, I'm really liking the no-fault replacement policy. You can abuse these rims if you're racing at top level without worrying about having to shell out another couple hundred for a new rim every couple of months. Not for everyone, but I think a good idea for that use case.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, exact if you’re racing at top level and you abuse them, you probably won’t finish many races.
  • 4 0
 Sounds great in theory, but I broke a Roval CLX32 rim (their top end road wheelset) on my road bike after about 1000km and got offered 20% off. Turns out not everyone honors their lifetime warranty the same.
  • 1 1
 @crs-one: You are correct, but, for instance, I myself (as well as a few buddies) have had warranty issues with Specialized bit, our local Ocala Fl Specialized warranty ALWAYS says that "this is not covered" or whatever - then, go to a Specialized shop in Gainesville FL for almost instant warranty replacement for the exact same issue.

More recently (all have been within the past year) a friend blew out the XFusion shock on his bike. Local dealer said something to the tune of "8 weeks" to get a warranty replacement IF it was under warranty, and they doubted it. The other shop gave me a phone number and XFusion had a new shock on the way almost instantly.
  • 2 1
 @crs-one: Similar story here. I even have an email from a Specialized rep saying “we stopped producing this part because it was a known issue” that they kept breaking. Was offered 35% off a new in stock bike. What kind of lifetime warranty is that? I need to go spend $6k in order to replace my Specialized with another equivalent Specialized because of a known-to-them defect? Nope. Never again buying anything from the big S.
  • 1 0
 @lebca: My point was Specialized did cover the warranty, but, had to go to the right shop to get it done. In my case, Super Cool (www.supercoolbikeshop.com) on more than once occasion had items covered under warranty when my closest S shop said it could not. In my case, I purchased my bike from the closer shop for an issue that was under warranty (roval wheel, oddly)
  • 17 0
 " They've have been installed on a high-mileage test bike". Assume that test bike is the GRIM DONUT. We have all given up on the review of said product..........
  • 13 0
 I can't believe how few people can appreciate how impressive the weight of this wheel set is. Of course they're expensive, it's one of the lightest MTB wheel sets you can buy!! You have to be able to appreciate the engineering that goes into creating a holistic system like this with performance being the only metric. Truly an impressive feat of engineering!
  • 9 0
 I'm truly amazed that it's taken this long for some of the industry giants to get on the asymmetric rim gravy train (looking at you also Uncle Stan)
  • 3 0
 I also wonder why DT doesn't go asym. Regardless, they're the only rims I buy these days.
  • 11 1
 @mikeklevy: Hows the new epic ride?
  • 9 0
 "Wheels designed to protect your tyres".......@$2,750 USD how much do tyres now cost? $50,000USD. Nice one Pinkbike
  • 5 0
 Interesting that the beginning of this article compares these to narrower internal width rims....but then completely fails to mention the Bontrager Kovee XXX which is also sub-1300g AND 29mm internal. So the Bontrager seems to be the benchmark, but the article only mentions the narrower options giving the impression that the Roval is the first sub-1300g wheelset with a 29mm internal width but it is not. The Bontragers have already been out for a whole year -> racing.trekbikes.com/stories/equipment/bontrager-kovee-xxx-mtb-wheel
  • 6 0
 29mm internal width coming to strictly XC wheels. That probably means 35mm is getting close to ideal for Enduro.
  • 3 0
 Depends on what tyres youbarr running for enduro i think. XC now goes for 2.4 so its naturals that rims are wider
  • 10 0
 Ibis wheels... solidly 5 years ahead of the game
  • 9 0
 All of which is happening while Bruni still rides 24mm internal
  • 1 0
 @SickEdit:
really? Where u read that
  • 6 0
 @Madfella: a lot of the DH rider's are riding the DT Swiss 471's. They like the smaller rim for precision (Bruni's words)
  • 1 0
 Been pretty happy with Arch MK3 26mm internal with X-King 2.4.
  • 1 0
 @ericolsen: And solid wheels for 5 or more years as well.
  • 3 0
 @SickEdit: narrow alloy 25mm rims with 2.4 tires and an alloy bar and frame... but they said it couldn’t be done!?
  • 2 0
 @jaydawg69: I run 35 mm and it is true ,the wheel placement is not so precise,but it is something you can get used to.
A 2.5 WT and 35 mm internal works like a dream to me.
  • 1 0
 @homerjm: How do you mean not so precise ? Like steering the bike is not so precice ? Or grip ? Or just feel ?
  • 1 0
 @bigburd: the steering feels little more vague,you have more rubber touching the ground. The grip is really good.My setup is 27,5 WT Assegai DH front &rear and hucknorris just in case. You need to dial tire pressure too to have a good feel overall.
  • 3 0
 EIE Carbon has some very similar looking profiles (wide bead, asymmetric, inner width). I had a pair built and they came in at 1370g. Build quality is solid, and they've help up well, so far. Under $900 for the pair, including shipping.
  • 1 0
 I think EIE rims are going to be my next XC build
  • 1 0
 I've put 2000 miles on the set of EIE rims I built two years ago. Not a single issue. Their A29C30D29S is competitive with this Roval rim. However, Roval's hubs must be incredibly light to manage a 1280 build at the same rim weight.
  • 1 0
 @alexdi: they are DT 240s right?
  • 1 0
 @clink83: Apparently a version of DT's latest EXP hubs. 95g for the front and 185g for the rear. That's incredible for a reliable Boost hubset. Given that the hubs are over $1000 with DT branding, the wheels in aggregate might not be so bad of a deal. For comparison, the latest XTR M9100 hubs are 135g/245g and DT 240S is 130g/220g. Something more typical like an I9 Torch is 160g/290g.
  • 4 0
 The overuse of the hyphen strikes again... a 300-gram wheel weighs 300 grams, and if you reduce the weight by 25 percent it’s a 25-percent weight reduction.

Sorry. Shoot the punctuation Nazi at your leisure. Smile
  • 2 0
 Not many specifics regarding the hubs and bearings. DTSwiss180 hubs come with Ceramic bearings - I wonder if that is the case here (give $2700+ price). I'll see what the Roval web site has to say...
  • 2 1
 yep. all ceramic, all the time.
  • 5 0
 Simce when are DT Swiss Competition Race spokes bladed?!
  • 1 0
 these wheels use DT Aerolite spokes
  • 4 0
 @xvxbg: Sure, but the article states that they use DT Competition Race
  • 1 0
 I run Stans Arch MK3 rims with DD Assegai AND Cushcore F/R on a 39lb aluminum Enduro. Have run stoooopid low pressures as a test and then settled on 22ish PSI. I've never had a puncture and basically ride like i don't give AF It's not stiff but I don't really notice that the bike feels too laterally soft.. Could this tire system I run on the Arch be done with the above Specialized wheelset? I'm curious...but way too much money.
  • 5 1
 Bladed are easier to true and tension? How so?
  • 17 0
 You can hold them tight innplace while twisting the nipple
  • 11 0
 Bladed straightpull spokes can be kept from twisting / turning by using a blade holder. With round straightpull spokes, tensioning is more difficult because the round spokes are harder to hold.
  • 6 0
 Oh, I see... this is about straight pull. Thanks.
  • 27 0
 @GZMS: I love it when you talk dirty
  • 2 2
 @GZMS: You mean you Have to hold them because they wind up way more than round.
I do not see any benefit on a mountain bike.
  • 2 0
 @lake-st: it's not about windup. It's about the fact that straight-pull spokes tend to spin in the hub. Either round or bladed may need to be held, but bladed is easier to hold.
  • 1 0
 @lake-st: also, I don't know whether one is more prone to windup than the other, but with bladed spokes, you can see the wind-up.
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: KK I was thinking j bend, with straight I assume you would have to get a minimum torque on the spoke to stop it spinning.
Tks
  • 1 0
 @lake-st: yes, but i think they also tend to spin again as you bring them to torque. Idk,I only build with j-bend
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: I don't own any straight if you break a spoke, you have to hunt around, J bend they can cut an thread a new one in 2 minutes.
  • 5 1
 "using DT Swiss' new EXT clutch system" It's EXP not EXT.
  • 4 0
 Now all I need is for someone to design tires that protect my wheels.
  • 10 1
 There is a device that is called "a pump", try that Wink
  • 1 0
 delete, mistake...
  • 2 1
 there are only 3 weeks left till the first day of summer, he's promising a complete review by the end of spring, and we still don't have a complete review on the grom dig-nut. when mike, when?
  • 2 0
 This has excellent specs but man that price is steep!

And what exactly does "lifetime warranty and no-fault crash replacement promise" mean??
  • 3 0
 They don’t spin when you are trying to tighten them for starters...
  • 2 3
 Thanks Mike, I love seeing the latest high end gear despite all of the naysayers. I can't believe No One has said the word Dentist yet! Another option would be DT 180, similar spokes, and Enve 630. 100grams more, similar guarantee for rims, but would be more durable with 28 spokes rather than 24.
  • 2 1
 Dentists ride yetis...
  • 4 1
 Dentist are rich, but not stupid.
  • 1 1
 A US $1 bill weighs approximately 1g. This wheel set is priced at ~2.137x its weight in dollar bills! It's not worth $30 more than en entire Epic Comp to me, but damn is that some pricey tech.
  • 3 0
 How many water bottles will it hold?
  • 1 2
 Straight Pull Bladed spokes easier to adjust?!
I love it when reviews regurgitate marketing BS which doesn't hold true in real riding conditions.


(the only time straight pull spokes are easier to adjust is under lab conditions in the shop. And perhaps the occasional ease of replacing one without running into the cassette like J bends).
  • 2 0
 Will they now sell just the hoops or do we have to keep buying complete sets every time?
  • 11 9
 Yass! Just ordered a set for my turbo levo.
  • 7 0
 You can order even more pairs as spares.
  • 32 1
 @Grosey if that was a joke it was a good one.
  • 3 0
 @NotNamed: Yeah, he should pick up a couple, 2, 3 just to have.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a trek bontrager xxx kovee
  • 1 0
 Funny you mention that. New Bontragers likely to drop this week. Hoping they're more durable than the Line 30/40 Pros as I had a disappointing experience with mine. Too stiff, and not durable enough.
  • 1 2
 @sngltrkmnd: you should try aluminum. Nice and compliant. Durable. They’re pretty sweet.
  • 1 3
 That 6-bolt rotor bolt pattern machining is dangerously close to the edge... I had this happened to my brand new Race Face before, and the retailer gave me a replacement for free. I'd would not accept this level of quality no matter how much they cost, especially when it comes to breaking related issues.
  • 3 0
 I believe this was done intentionally to minimize excess weight. The brakes are only loaded (torqued) in one direction. They left more material on the side of the bolt that needs the strength.
  • 2 5
 weight is impressive, but I had an older version and cracked a rim and multiple spokes broke. Moved to Reserves and immediately noticed how much more solid they felt. No problems whatsoever so far. Maybe these work if you are 120lbs.
  • 15 0
 Or maybe that was the reason for the complete redesign...
  • 1 3
 @blkmrktrider156: you may be right, but i doubt they feel more solid. will wait for a long term review....
  • 5 5
 Did you know that more air in your tyres also stops flats and saves you 2000
  • 15 2
 So does staying home.
  • 5 0
 Sssh, riding on your rims with almost flat tires, so hot right now!
  • 3 2
 More air definitely does not stop flats, it may help reduce the likelihood of a pinch flat but there are many more failure modes for a tire than pinch flats. It also increases your likelihood of blowing that loose corner...
  • 3 0
 @hardcore-hardtail: More air may not stop all flats, but it helps with pinch flats, which is the only kind of flat these rims address.
  • 1 0
 @hardcore-hardtail: more air would help the tyre not blowing off in the corner and the rims are only supposed to help with pinch flats
  • 1 1
 Is there an echo in here?
  • 1 0
 I blew a huge hole in my sidewall this evening, first flat of the year on my super light carbon wheels with light tires and low pressures. Oh the irony...
  • 1 0
 @hardcore-hardtail: no it’s a pb forum r u stupid
  • 2 0
 Great value!
  • 2 1
 In before "HUCK TO FLAT!!!"

Oh: HUCK TO FLAT!!!
  • 2 3
 Weakkkkk! The traverse carbons couldn’t even handle XC riding without failing. IMHO. There warranty coverage is bad too. IMHO.
  • 1 0
 But will it protect your teeth?
  • 1 1
 Are you telling me 29mm width is XC? What are my old trusty 21mm deemax? Road wheels?
  • 3 0
 Actually yes. 21 mm is a common width for recent models of road rims.
  • 1 1
 Does anyone care to explain how bladed spokes can be easier to true/ tension!?
  • 1 0
 Easier to hold to prevent straight-pull spokes from spinning, and allows you to more easily detect spoke wind-up.
  • 1 0
 Roval carbon = 109kg max
Roval aluminum = no limit rider
Why?????????
  • 2 2
 I just orderer a MDE Damper Frame with custom geo. It costs less!!!!
  • 4 4
 Does the $2750 get you a free bike with the purchase of these wheels? LOL
  • 2 2
 Can I use them for enduro and still get a replacement when they break? Wink
  • 1 2
 3k for wheels, wow, that’s more than I spent on my frame, fork, and shock. Lace
  • 1 3
 Big thumbs up for Specialized and Sram wheels. They keep many wheel builders busy thanks to their “awesome” and “durable” products.
  • 1 2
 Sooooooooo..... I'm supposed to spend $2700.... so I can protect my $70 tires?
  • 2 5
 Makes me wonder. Specialized already uses an asymmetric rear end to get more symmetric spoke tension etc, why would they also get asymmetric rims?
  • 3 2
 Do they actually have an asymmetric rear end like Cannondale?
  • 6 1
 @sevn: I don't think Specialized uses an asymmetric rear end on their bikes. I think @vinay is referring to asymmetric spoke flanges
  • 1 4
 Oh, don't they do that anymore? I've got a 2006 P1 dirtjumper with a full HG freehub body with spacers to make it singlespeed. Even that one has an asymmetric rear end. Wouldn't have expected they'd drop that now that everyone is going on about zero dish etc.
  • 2 0
 Depends how much asymmetry is involved. If neither one alone results in perfectly symmetrical spoke bracing angles, then why not use both? As sevn said, it's my understanding Specialized is not using asymmetric dropout spacing on many models (just the Demo?).

Another way to look at it: an asymmetric frame is a great solution, from an engineering perspective, but it's a hassle for consumers who may want to spec other wheels. Asymmetry in the rim is a more universal solution, but produces more engineering challenges to ensure both sides of the rim have similar impact strength.
  • 1 1
 @R-M-R: Is it that much of a hassle for customer? When lacing up new wheels you can obviously get it good from the start, but I suppose (considering how much out of true wheels can be when you get it wrong), it doesn't take much to shift the rim a few mm sideways. It doesn't require new spokes I suppose. Unless the customer is using cast magnesium or full carbon wheels. But I think these are uncommon.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: Minimal hassle when building up a wheel from components. Most people buy complete wheelsets, which is where the hassle comes in.
  • 1 2
 @R-M-R: But really, how much hassle is it? Tighten a couple of spokes one side, release a couple of spokes the other side and you're there. Tiny bit of a hassle for someone who may not be comfortable truing wheels but then again, there is always someone who could do this for them. If it gets you a stronger wheel (with equal spoke tension left and right) it seems like well worth it. Heck, they could ask their lbs to do it. If they're spending the extra money on a pre-built wheel then paying someone for some truing (they'd have to do at some point anyway) shouldn't be a dealbreaker.

Makes me wonder, I currently ride with 142x12 rear hub. If I'd get another bike with a 148x12 spacing at some point, if I'd use a 142x12 hub there with boost adapter (which shifts the hub to the right and moves the brake rotor to the left, wouldn't that make the wheel more symmetric too? If so, that would be something a lot of people could try (considering the popularity of boost at the moment).
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Not much hassle for you or me, clearly, but enough that it puts some people off. You only need to look at the complaining that pops up every time a bike is released with an asymmetric rear end. Except Liteville, of course, because their customers are nerds - and I say that affectionately!

Yes, you could shift a 142 mm hub. Compared to a Boost hub, you may get more symmetrical bracing angles, but you would accomplish it via weakening the disc side, not strengthening the drive side. A better solution is to use a Boost hub with asymmetric rim and compensate for any remaining imbalance via different spoke diameters on either side.
  • 1 2
 @R-M-R: Yeah, but from what I've heard equal spoke tension contributes more to wheel strength the wider flange distance could. Shifting a non-boost hub to the right in a boost spaced frame would probably do the same as what those older (135/142 spaced) Specialized were having. Obviously the current Cannondale (Ai iirc), Syntace EVO6 and possibly a couple of others who shift a boost hub to the right (creating an asymmetric rear end) would make things even stronger though obviously you always have that. I think changing axle standards (making super durable stuff like Chris King etc obsolete) is getting more stick than just requiring a little wheel truing. But I may be wrong there.

Speaking of EVO6, Liteville/Syntace kind of do the same. I'm running the Syntace W35 wheelset in my bike. I've got symmetric spacing front and rear but the rims are asymmetric. 29mm inner width, look a bit (or a lot) like the Ryde Trace 29. Wouldn't be surprised if these actually are Ryde rims, considering they also use Sapim spokes (who own Ryde). They use different spoke gauges left and right to equalize spoke tension so they've gone quite the distance. To then realize they actually primarily make their stuff for Liteville bikes (which have asymmetric rear spacing) it sure is kinda odd.

Got to say I'm kind of a brute in the wheelbuilding dept. I almost always build with DT Alpine III spokes, these just never break even though they're only a fraction heavier than DT Competition (and it is weight added close to the hub). Even if I'd do a horrible job at building my wheels, they'd probably never break.
  • 3 5
 Are they made of gold and diamonds to cost 2750 usd? Bike industry are you insane?
  • 1 3
 Roval wheels flex too much with their low spoke count for my 200lbs weight. They are pretty though.
  • 4 0
 Not every product is ideal for every rider, nor should it be. Options are good!
  • 1 4
 These will break swiftly on anything other than an S Works Epic and a 65kg rider.
  • 1 4
 wait $3000 for a pair of tubeless wheels that prevent pinch flats. Who is going to be running tubes on a $3000 wheelset? This makes no sense...
  • 3 0
 You have obviously never pinch flatted a tubeless tire, but it is actually pretty common.
  • 1 4
 Let me run a set down Bennett Gap and report back. Levy is feather light. I'm 185lbs of straight line caveman. Wink
  • 5 0
 Bennett gap isn’t even rocky
  • 1 3
 @CullenHerring: did I say rocky? No

Do I live here? Yeah

Do I know how to destroy a wheel? Yeah
Can I do it on Bennett? Yeah
Have I? Yeah
  • 1 2
 24 spokes, not for me.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.030682
Mobile Version of Website