Specialized S-Works Enduro 650B - Review

Jan 12, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  


For a company whose mantra is “Innovate or Die,” Specialized's reluctance to enter the burgeoning mid-sized wheel market was slightly unexpected. When they finally did decide to release their 27.5” models, it was with little fanfare, lacking the splashy marketing campaign you'd expect from such a large company. This hesitance to fully get behind another wheel size was likely due in part to the efforts they'd spent on developing their line of 29ers, bikes that had earned them countless accolades, including Pinkbike's Bike of the Year for the Enduro 29. Whatever the case may be, the brand has now firmly stepped into the 27.5" arena, with models to cover everything from trail riding to DH racing.

The S-Works denotation on the Enduro 650B we tested signifies that it's Specialized's top of the line offering, a bike spec'd with all the bell and whistles, including a carbon front triangle, carbon wheels, a SRAM XX1 drivetrain, a 160mm RockShox Pike RCT3, and Cane Creek's new DBInline shock. Those high end goodies do add up, bringing the Enduro's price in at $9300 USD, but there are less expensive models available, including the base model aluminum version for $3600 and the base model carbon version for $6000.



Specialized Enduro 650B Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro race
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Rear wheel travel: 165mm
• FACT IS-X 11m carbon front triangle, M5 aluminum rear triangle
• Cane Creek DBInline shock
• RockShox Pike RCT3 160mm fork
• Sizes: S, M, L
• Weight: 27.2 lb (size L w/o pedals)
• MSRP: $9300 USD
www.specialized.com @Specialized



Frame and Suspension Design

The Enduro 650B's frame isn't the complete redesign many expected to see when the bike was announced. Instead, it uses the same carbon front triangle that the 26” version uses, paired with a different chain stay, seat stay, and shock mount to accommodate the slightly larger wheels. The overall look of the bike remains unchanged as well, with Specialized's distinctive X-Wing frame shape that has the rear shock mounted in between the top and down tube, and then connected to the rear seat stays with a U-shaped mounting bracket.

Specialized Enduro 650B review
  The Enduro retains the distinctive X-Wing frame shape, with a carbon front triangle paired to an aluminum swingarm.

The derailleur and brake housing are routed along the bottom of the down tube, a design that's seen a decrease in popularity with the recent resurgence of internal routing, but at the same time it's one that we haven't had any trouble with, and also allows for easy housing swaps. The housing for Specialized's own dropper post, the Command Post IR, does run internally down the seat tube, but it soon exits on the downtube and runs externally along the underside of the frame as well. The lever for the dropper post is a close replica of the lever shape used by SRAM for their shift levers, making it one of the most ergonomic designs out there.

SRAM's 1x drivetrains have proven to provide excellent chain retention even without any sort of guide, but for a little extra peace of mind Specialized has included minimalist upper chain guide that uses two out of the three ISCG 05 mounting points, a creative way to save a few grams while still providing plenty of security against dropping a chain.

Specialized Enduro 650B review
  Creating a bike with 422mm chain stays and 165mm of travel, but Specialized have done it, all while keeping the time-tested Horst Link suspension design.

It should come as no surprise that the Enduro uses Specialized's FSR Horst Link suspension layout, a proven design that places the rearmost pivot on the chain stay in order to minimize the effects of hard braking on the suspension. This design is part of the reason Specialized has been able keep the bike's chain stay length down to 422mm, since the chain stays mount directly to the front triangle rather than using some type of secondary link in between. The Enduro 650B also uses Specialized's own 142+ rear dropout spacing, which is intended to increase rear end stiffness. This spacing sees the driveside hub flange moved 2mm farther out, while the end cap on that side is shortened by 2mm, a design that's intended to provide a better spoke angle and to increase wheel stiffness. Don't fret, though, because a 'regular' 12x142 rear wheel will fit just fine if for some reason the stock wheelset gives up the ghost, although it's worth noting that a 142+ wheel won't work on a 12x142 frame.




Specifications
Price $9300
Travel 165mm
Rear Shock Custom Cane Creek DB AIR Inline, high/low-speed compression and rebound adj., w/ climb switch, 8.5"x2.25"
Fork Custom RockShox Pike RCT3 650b, Solo Air spring, tapered alloy steerer, w/ lockout, 2-stage compression, rebound adj., 15mm thru-axle, 160mm travel
Cassette SRAM XX1, 11-speed, 10-42
Crankarms S-Works FACT carbon, custom XX1 chainring, OSBB, 34T, 104mm BCD spider
Rear Derailleur SRAM XX1, 11-speed
Chain SRAM PC 1195
Shifter Pods SRAM XX1, 11-speed, trigger
Handlebar S-Works All-Mountain, low rise, carbon, 8-degree backsweep, 6-degree upsweep, 31.8mm
Stem Syntace F109, 6-degree rise
Grips Specialized Sip Grip
Brakes SRAM Guide RS Carbon
Wheelset Roval Traverse SL Fattie 650b, carbon, 30mm inner width, 24/28h
Spokes DT Swiss Revolution
Tires Specialized Butcher (F), Slaughter Control (R)
Seat Body Geometry Henge Expert, hollow Ti rails, 143mm
Seatpost Command Post IR, 3-position height adjustable 125mm
Specialized Enduro 650B review






Climbing / Handling

Our test bike came equipped with Specialized's 780mm S-Works carbon bars, a good choice given the bike's hard charging intentions, although the 70mm stem that the size large comes equipped with is an oversight – a 50 or even a 40mm stem would be more fitting for all sizes across the board. Suspension setup is fairly straightforward, and although the number of adjustments on the Cane Creek DBInline shock can seem daunting at first, the base tune that Specialized and Cane Creek have come up with is an excellent place to start before turning any dials. Cane Creek have their reasons for forgoing tool-free adjustment option on their shocks, but it'd still be nice to not need to take out a tool for every adjustment.

165mm of travel, a 65.5 degree head angle – look at those numbers and you're probably thinking the Enduro will be another addition to growing “Mediocre climber, comes alive on descents” genre. That's a reasonable expectation, but the truth is, the Enduro 650B is an excellent climber, especially on the chunky, technical stuff, the type of obstacles that Sedona's trails were full of. Initially, I'd felt certain I'd be using the Climb Switch feature that's found on the Cane Creek DBInline shock, where the flick of a lever adds more compression damping while also slowing the rebound to aid with climbing. In reality, I found the feel of the shock in Climb mode to be too harsh for my liking, especially in the full 'On' position – it took away the grip that helped the bike climb so well. This hasn't been the case with other Climb Switch equipped shocks that I've been on in the past, and the custom tune that Cane Creek provides for Specialized may have been the reason for the different feeling. It was also a little tricky to actually reach the Climb Switch lever since the shock is hidden from view by the top tube of the frame. Luckily, the bike's pedaling performance with the shock fully open is nothing to scoff at, and I was surprised more than once by how the bike could clamber up menacing-looking walls of rock without any trouble. The bike's light weight certainly deserves partial credit, but it was the way the rear wheel hugged the ground without losing traction, even during hard, out of the saddle efforts that made the Enduro 650B so capable on the climbs.

Depending on your local terrain and fitness level, the 34t front chain ring may end up feeling a little tall - I was fine with it in Sedona, but I typically run a 32 tooth ring to help with the long, steep and sustained climbs in my neck of the woods back in the Pacific Northwest. Also, since there's no direct mount option on the S-Works carbon cranks a 30 tooth chainring will be the lowest gear option that's possible.

PB Test trip

Descending

The Enduro has a Clark Kent / Superman-like personality, one that's mild mannered and easygoing one minute and then transforms into a full-blown superhero the next. This is a bike that's just as comfortable cruising along at a casual pace as it is blasting through technical sections of trail at warp speed. Achieving this level of versatility can be a difficult feat, especially on a bike with 165mm of travel, but Specialized have done it, creating a bike with easy handling at slower speeds that can also be pushed hard on gnarly terrain without skipping a beat. The short, 422mm chain stays make quick direction changes a breeze, and when you combine that with the bike's weight, you've got a lively, nimble machine on your hands. The bike's ride height does feel a touch taller than some of the more low-slung, ground hugging offerings that have recently hit the market, but cornering was still quick and precise, and I didn't have any trouble moving the bike around underneath me in steep, chopped up terrain.

When it comes time to get airborne the Enduro shines as well, with minimal effort required to hop from one side of the trail to the other. There's a liveliness that encourages doubling up trail features and looking for obstacles to bunny hop over, while at the same time bike's suspension has a way of smoothing out rough sections of trail in a way that encourages going faster and faster. I plowed through every shape and size of rock imaginable, but the Enduro refused to get bogged down, even when faced with repeated square edged hits, the type that can easily cause a shock to pack up and lose its responsiveness. However, we did run into an issue with the DBInline shock - it lost its rebound damping after only a couple day of hard riding. Cane Creek quickly sent out a replacement, and after swapping out the faulty shock, it was smooth sailing once again. When it's working properly, the DBInline has a smooth yet supportive feel that's one of the best around, and not just for an inline shock either - its performance is on par with the top reservoir-style shocks on the market as well.


Specialized Enduro 650B review

Component Check

• Specialized Roval Fattie SL Wheelset: Wide, light, and as it turns out, strong, the Roval Fattie SL carbon wheels held their own in the desert, even when faced with miles of chunky sandstone that perfectly demonstrate the phrase 'square edged hit.' On more than one occasion the sound of a carbon rim smacking against sandstone had me fearing the worst, but each time the wheels remained true and unscathed. They did occasionally emit a 'thwang' noise under hard cornering or heavy braking that seemed to come from the straight pull spokes, but this didn’t seem to have any adverse affects. We currently have another set on hand for an even longer term test where they'll be subjected to the harsh conditions of a Pacific Northwest winter, but given their excellent performance in the desert there's no reason to think that they won't perform just as well.

• Specialized Command Post IR: It was the Command Post's lever that won me over, a near mirror image of the SRAM shifter on the right side of the bars. It's the most intuitive remote lever I've used, and the lack of a hydraulic line and the fact the it sits under the bar gives it a much greater chance of surviving a crash. I'd still like to see the post offered with an infinite number of stopping points instead of the three positions it currently has, but other than that nitpick the post worked well, with a quick return rate and a solid feel.

• Specialized Slaughter Tire: The Slaughter was an excellent tire for the hardpacked to dusty desert conditions we ran into during the test period, with even more grip than I'd expected. Even when it does lose traction it remains predictable, and it doesn't take long to figure out how to break it free to slide through a turn for even quicker cornering. Riders whose terrain tends to be wet and extremely steep will likely want something a little more substantial, but the range of conditions that the Slaughter is useful in is greater than its appearance belies.

• Cane Creek DBInline: As was mentioned previously, the DBInline is one of the best feeling rear air shocks currently on the market, but unfortunately ours only lasted two days before losing its rebound damping for the first third of its stroke. We didn't run into any issues with the replacement that Cane Creek sent out, but it's too bad that such a stellar performer seems to be having durability issues. Cane Creek is currently evaluating the shock to determine what went wrong, and this review will be updated when more information is available.

PB Test trip

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesLet's deal with the elephant in the room first, the number that many will see as an exorbitant sum of money: $9300. Yep, this an expensive bike - that's what happens when you spec a bike with high end suspension, SRAM's top of the line 1x drivetrain, and a set of carbon hoops. But remember, this is the flagship in Specialized's line, an eye catching aluminum and carbon creation that's meant to be the best of the best, with no cost spared in making the highest performing machine possible. That's why Specialized offers other versions, ones that are still well equipped but are less likely to require a visit to the pawn shop to find out the going rate for a kidney. The Expert Carbon is the next model down, with a very similar spec minus the carbon wheels, and a retail price of $2,700 less.

So, price aside, what about the bike itself - did Specialized succeed in creating a bike that can hold its own in the top tier of the all-mountain arena? If success can be measured by the number of smiles the Enduro's performance elicited, the answer is a resounding 'yes.' Whether climbing or descending (especially descending), the Enduro 650b is a treat to ride, and as an added bonus it feels at home on a broader range of terrain than some of the more race-oriented specialists out there, which means you don't need to have steep, rugged mountains with thousands of feet of vertical in order to have a good time on the trail.
- Mike Kazimer



Visit the high-res gallery for more images from this review.




369 Comments

  • 234 11
 How does it compare to other top end bikes, such as the Nomad? Both cost the earth, are 275/650b, are designed to do the same thing and are carbon. A little more comparison between similar bikes would be a great help, rather than just saying its a good bike (as most reviewers seem to say about all bikes nowadays).
  • 75 12
 While I also would like to see some comparison, it's not entirely fair to do so.
People will be blinded by a reviewer giving the edge to one bike over another - but the fact is that the "best between x and y" is subjective, and highly dependant on various factors.

Also, if you;re dropping this kind of money, you would be kinda stupid not to at least try 2 of the bikes on your shortlist, and figure what's "best" for you.
  • 12 1
 I think you can at least point out which facets excel on either bike with focus on frame and geometry as components can be swapped. A strating point would already be something like A climbs a bit better and B descends a bit better or A is for all-out EWS enduro racer, B is more for all mountain rider and such and such terrain, etc. From what i get from the review i would compare it mostly to the Ibis Mojo HD recently tested handling wise but this seems to climb better. But I am puzzled whether that is a fair interpretation so it would be nice if it was not up to interpretation but in fact mentioned.
  • 24 14
 I can't believe there would be any significant difference at this level as the parts are so high end. Maybe if you compared cheapest Enduro and cheapest Noma... wait there is no cheap Nomad. For that fact alone I'd go for Spec Big Grin Or... anything that comes at good value at the moment I will be after a new bike?
  • 33 47
flag flamshmizer (Jan 12, 2015 at 1:48) (Below Threshold)
 I tend to think most of the specialized enduro reviews were conducted by people used to riding steep 100mm travel XC bikes. Ive ridden several, and in a back to back ride the norco sight kills it in descendability. The enduro might be the most overrated bike I've ever ridden.
  • 22 34
flag rayy (Jan 12, 2015 at 2:09) (Below Threshold)
 How it compares? Both are bikes. Both are expensive and preform well. End of story.
  • 57 0
 Pinkbike really needs to do a shootout. I think everyone would like that. Great expensive sexy carbon bike!
  • 37 13
 Why do they always have to review the highest end model? Most of us can't afford that, instead the should review the middle of the line aluminum/ carbon framed model. IMO
  • 16 1
 I'm still waiting for a straight up head to head match between the 650b and the 29r enduro. Especially on some wet, steep technical trails like we have on the West Coast, that would be a great bonus!
  • 12 0
 ^Bike mag have a video that does the comparison and they go for the 29er...but the reasoning is about as much use as a fart in a spacesuit.
  • 8 4
 These reviews are from a climbing website and show good examples of back to back reviews. Some things can't be compared, others are very easy.

www.ukclimbing.com/gear/review.php?id=6513

www.ukclimbing.com/gear/review.php?id=6637

Simple things such as compare the given weight to the actual weight (they did this for wheel sets)
Components comparison.
Price.

These all count for nothing unless they have other bikes to compare to.

If I was going to spend 10K $ on a bike these are the things I looked at. My last bike was just over 3.4K £, so things such as "will I be selling the avids for zee" and "will I make any changes to the other components" were only possible by doing the comparison myself. Most of the reviews were similar, this is a good bike, this other bike is also a good bike. Nothing much about what I got for my money if I looked at more than one bike.

I do like the very indepth review pinkbike gives, please dont take any of that away but It would be nice to see a small comparison tables at the end.
  • 9 8
 IR POSTS ARE AWFUL ! work great in the short term

bought a new spesh stumpy evo last February, seatpost was faulty inside 4 weeks of British winter - wouldn't sit in any position with your weight on the seat which is more than pretty annoying when on a climb with bobs and bumps/ruts etc.
had it sent to spesh by LBS - came back 3 weeks later apparently fixed, worked for approx. 4 weeks, then went again, this time failing to hold air pressure for more than one ride, sent back again, came back apparently fixed 3-4 weeks later. all good then on the service although they could have been faster or replaced it with a new one......after 2 months it went again - so sick of sending it off I just spent the latter part of the 2014 season pulling it up when i wanted it up and having to place it in position with my hands when lowering it mid trail......I was told they need servicing to stop this from happening - BS ! a service should not happen every 4 weeks regardless how many muddy miles you are doing.

just bought a reverb - - hoping for better
  • 4 4
 Basically - CATS
  • 7 2
 A comparison could be as simple as taking 3 riders, pro, weekend warrior and newbie and sending them out on a loop on 2 different bikes while timing uphill and downhill sections and asking for subjective feel. Then you get objective time comparison and for those who prefer fun you get subjective feel that at least gives you a bearing on the character. The argument to go for tests is valid but in some parts of the world it would be very hard to setup a test of a nomad and a mojo for example. I know basically they are all good bikes and basically it is part of the fun to discover, adjust to and make use of a given bike's character but then again what is the use of bike reviews? Killing time between rides, sure, but maybe a bit more than that would be nice. Once you had many bikes maybe you are really looking for something specific and then you end up on something you already sort of know. Last change i did was from stumpy 26 to knolly endo 26, both 140mm but significantly different beasts.
  • 29 1
 So bored of hearing how every bike is amazing. That may be true, but it needs to be placed within the context of it's rivals. Comparisons please.
  • 9 8
 I think tests may be a tad too nice, yes. But that may be the effect of being grateful for getting bikes to test, even Clarkson is not too anal, he just makes stuff great in one way and suck in another so that you are A entertained and B totaly confused. Stuff he says just makes no sense, but you don't care because it's not supposed to. Now that is one side of the coin. The other is the the actual hoax, in my view, and that is that there are any bigger differences - these are all fantastic bikes that anyone would appreciate. Does it matter that Bronson is 0,1 overal points better than Stumpjumper or Tracer? No. Those bie really are all great and it takes nitpicking to show differences and because it is this way, it will be only a matter of taste, not actual performance. All those bike have same components. Enve rims on Nomad better than Rovals? Don't think so!

So... just ride what you like. Really.
  • 81 1
 Compared to the Nomad it feels a little more playful, as in quick direction changes are slightly easier. I'd give the Nomad the edge when it comes to high speed straightlining. The Nomad has more standover, and a lower BB - it feels (and is) closer to the ground. Both pedal very well despite the two different suspension designs. They're both excellent bikes, and on the same track under the same rider I imagine the times would be very close.
  • 24 2
 There's a big opportunity out there for a ballsy journalist with integrity to call it like it is.
  • 17 17
 yea, in ballsy journalist scenario you would read that Enduro is fantastic and Nomad is a piece of crap or Kona 111 is fantastic while Evil Following is terrible, V10 groundbraking and Session straight boring, Spark astonisihingly quick like mountain goat on steroids when Firefly is a fly with sht on it's wings. People of the internet would love that - like the frequent use of word "unrideable" Big Grin
  • 7 1
 Where's Anneke!?
  • 8 1
 @WAKI Aren't you a tad too cynical? I mean, sure, they all are great bikes, given. But isn't it part of the 'hobby' to dispute the fine points or even individual taste totally apart from any real performance benefits? Like comparing JC and Mark Weir, one probably faster but maybe a tad nerdy, the other a badass styler. Who has the better taste? Think of the American Psycho business card scene. Taste is the definitive question of style and i thought of pinkbike as a bike connoisseur's website where exactly the fine point and the taste could make the difference. Think of it as disputing between a Château Cheval Blanc and a Château Pavie. I enjoy it though i know it might be frowned upon as snobbish ; )
  • 5 16
flag Satn69 (Jan 12, 2015 at 7:15) (Below Threshold)
 PB you guys insane? Next time ask for bike that we can somewhat afford if we start saving $100/week for 1 year! Even if you liked the 10K bike you might think differently about a 5k bike of the same. Who's driving the bus with these test bikes? You or the Manufacturers?
  • 2 2
 So in the Nomad/Enduro debate, can anyone comment on how the Nomad jumps? Like a day in the bike park? In my limited experience, more traditional, higher BB bikes are more fun when ur on a lift and hitting tables all day.
  • 5 7
 @chyu - that's the best comment in this article... finaly someone asking some real questions! Yes I didn't realize how much I miss seeing a picture of her until you mentioned it.

@Sontator - it only depends if you like that kind of thing, I don't say it's a wrong, it's just that I personally really don't like comparisons if Canon is better than Nikon, Mac or PC... Pinkbike conneseurs? Wow I didn't realize, sounds flattering Big Grin Now if you look at NAHMBS... if you'd review THOSE bikes, then you'd have variety of opinions among testers, but don't expect that from reviews of mass produced bikes like the Enduro above. Cynical - always! Cynicism is a creative yet defensive act of being helpless in the face of a happening you cannot do anything about
  • 3 1
 I have a 2014 nomad and i ride big bear and mammoth on it no problem. There is a jump line at bigbear and i love it on my nomad even with the lower bb.
  • 5 0
 oh waki waki.. you again.. haha
  • 15 8
 specialized is the devil.
  • 64 12
 I prefer the gayer version of this bike, the 29er. 650b is like you wanna be gay but cant fully commit.
  • 27 2
 So $9.5k and I don't even get a carbon swing arm? Why not? Everyone else has figured out how to do that. GTFOH. And house-brand components? I'm sure they're good, but they're also cheaper to source. If I had $10k to drop on a super-bike, Specialized wouldn't get it, especially with whats available from Yeti, Ibis, Santa Cruz, Intense, etc.
  • 5 0
 The manufacturer offers bikes for testing to them, and want to show the best they have to offer. Pinkbike does not go out and buy the rig for testing.
  • 8 0
 I would like to see st*va times posted, I am having difficulty choosing between all these 9k bikes based soley on reviewers descriptions.
I just want the fastest one.
  • 10 0
 there is no fastest bike, there is only a bike that better suits your habilites and style. even if for example me, I'll be faster by a large margin with a certain bike, that doesn't mean you will too! that only means that bike suits better your style. maybe someday you guys will understand that! and the components just improve how the bike feels...... please understand that!
  • 2 0
 Mike, how does it compare to the bike of the year 29'er?
  • 2 0
 hold on, next someone is going to say 650b is not faster and grippier and more enduro?
  • 1 4
 Iffy, you must find the bike that suits your riding style otherwise you will be unhappy due to missing on performance. You bette find a way to be stoked bran!
  • 2 0
 Waki I would say I have a lazy/aggressive XC enduro street style, but I do not know how this translates to bike choice.
  • 2 0
 Caste is soooooo right
  • 4 0
 why bother testing if they are all great and it comes down to taste. just start calling the reviews what they really are: long winded advertisements.
  • 1 0
 If it's true that there isn't a lot to pick between the performance and reliability etc between the high end bikes, or at least that which the average mountain biker can feel, why are there so many bike brands? If your argument is competition, why is competition not making the pricing lower?
  • 2 0
 for the price you'd have to be a cottonheaded ninimuggins to choose this over the nomad. the spesh is priced to compete, but it just doesnt.
  • 1 0
 Hop off the Pinkbike nappies for a moment theyres one on Vital, review of 2015 machines that is, I know it has to be spelt out here! BOOM..
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer thanks for the review and the comparison. it would be helpful for some of us if you could score these bike on their different qualities like climbing, descending, and maybe a couple other common qualities on maybe a 0-10 scales to help us know what bike(s) better suits our style. Of course it would be better if we could try these bike out ourselves but trying different bike on the same/similar trail with similar build is almost impossible for me and I am lucky enough to live in a good biking area but not lucky enough so that I can try SC, Specialized, Trek, Banshee, etc...all good and thanks.
  • 5 1
 FACT IS-X 11m carbon front triangle, M5 aluminum rear triangle for $9300 bones! Pass pass pass....no internal routing Pass...aluminum rear triangle Pass...26 inch frame disguised as a 650b Pass...no Fox components Pass...defective dB inline Pass...Haha Why would you build a 650b when your 29er won bike of the year? Because your a follower not a leader.
  • 3 0
 @HardtailHucker03

Pinkbike is sent the bike by the company. I don't believe they have much choice in what they get. And specialized can't be blamed for wanted to show off their masterpiece. The frame geo is the same so this still gives you an idea of how it'll ride.
  • 1 0
 Ridden both and for me the nomad won. Felt like i could charge abit more on the rougher tech stuff that we have round here on the nomad. Always felt like I was abit higher up on the spesh on the steep stuff but it pedaled better on trail center type tracks. Hated the com post..
  • 2 0
 the very last time i used a review as the basis for my serious interest in purchasing a bike was ...mmm never. yes i will get a good idea of the way it looks, that may help me create a short list based purely on aesthetics and kit list but it ends there.

we have this strange thing called testing, find a dealer, arrange a day or weekend, ride the bike/s on trails you know and love. you will soon discover that the bike you think you want, may or not be the bike you actually want.
  • 1 0
 have to agree, demo the bike is the way to go.

the test riders opinions are still valid, but "climbs like a X" "and "descends like a Y" "turns like a Z" etc is entertaining but probaly due in large part to the setup and the rider in many ways.

one thing I would like to see a bit more of is more in-depth comment of the specific design features,compatability and service requirements etc. and the
possible benefits/pitfalls of them from the testers, most decent bikes can be dialed to suit any riders taste/style and go up/down/sideways adequately Smile

might help to make the short list shorter, and don't see why it would upset the advertisers Wink
  • 8 4
 Yes test ride is the best way to determine whether a bike suits you but at the same time, quite honestly I think people are too anal about issues like if Pike is better than 36, if Nomad is better than Enduro, I can jump on most of bikes out there and have a good fun, the details I would be eventually changing would be tyres, cockpit and suspension setup. I had no probs what so ever to ride a 275 Jekyll or LiteVille 401 in terrain totaly different from mine. My hardtail rides quite differently than my Blur Tr aaand... it takes me 3 rides to get totaly used to it. I really think people are down right spoiled and instead of being happy that they can afford such bike at all, they will go on an nitpick on numbers. Sorry for being an a-hole, I am fully aware of being one as I write this but some people don't need a good review, they need a good therapy.
  • 4 1
 A good bike review doesn't need to include a coparison to another bike unless it's a bike shootout and includes several bikes that can be compared to each other. Why we have to use the Nomad as a mesuring stick is beyond me and totally useless as popular as they are many don't own one or ever ridden one.
  • 1 0
 yea but we have all have sat in a comfy armchair- so we only need to imagine flying down a trail with it Wink
  • 2 1
 and i'm gonna give props to both waki and deadbeat cos we need more luv in the comments Razz
  • 1 5
flag J50005 (Jan 15, 2015 at 17:10) (Below Threshold)
 @lurch420 thank you for the link, having multiple bikes compared with numbers as scoring is much easier to read into than trying to compare "descends great" compared to "descends great". To the rest of the captain obvious dipshits who state "you have to demo to compare" wow thanks for the insight - really - I prefer to just use reviews to determine my purchases. No shit if I had that option I would exercise it but that would literally mean 2 weeks of travel and hundreds if not thousands of dollars in cost to accomplish. It would be a fun trip but work doesn't allow that option. In order to make a better "short list" graded/scored reviews are helpful. That was my point in my post. My point in this post is too many dipshits want to give advice.
  • 57 11
 Soooo they still haven't managed to figure out that clusterf*ck of loose cables handing underneath the BB?
  • 5 3
 Good point. I think they don't consider this as a problem, but in my opinion it would be just better if the cables went between bb and lowest swingarm pivots.
  • 6 6
 wtf is there underneath the BB of almost 10Gs bike???!!!
  • 11 4
 Yeah well. My C'dale Rize has a huge dent right on bb underside. I can only wonder what would happen to those cables if I had them routed like this. It's a brain dead idea to me.
  • 21 7
 You would die Kopaczus.
  • 3 1
 I have been wondering about that solution for years...

Apparently the problem isn't big enough that it needs fixing, but in my opinion it's just asking for trouble. This type of bike obviously isn't the most likely to get hung up on stumps/rocks or throw up big big rocks from the front wheel - but it does happen! I could easily see sticks and shit like that getting caught in that mess of cables though.
  • 18 2
 @WAKIdesigns I probably wouldn't exactly die but those cables sure as f*ck would. It's not all that great to be out in the woods with a non-functioning rear der plus brake fluid jizzing left and right.
  • 4 2
 My Rumblefish originally had the cables routed under. That lasted for a month until I couldn't use my rear derailleur because the cable was split. Bad design all the bike company's use imo
  • 1 2
 LOL
  • 2 1
 My moto carbon has the lines going under. for this bike, was expecting internal routing.
  • 5 1
 "Clusterf*ck" - two things neatly placed next to each other.
  • 4 0
 My Jekyll has a similar routing, if not cleaner routing. But no issues with smashing it yet, two years into riding it!
  • 5 3
 If I had this bike, I'd be jizzing left + right too
  • 14 2
 My 07 enduros routing goes under like this, so does my 2014's routing, 8 years of riding between both bikes, thousands of miles all across the country over any terrain imaginable, never had the cables snag on anything.
  • 5 0
 @keyul - I see your point. But it would be unwise to suggest that if it didn't happen to you, it didn't and won't happen to anyone.
  • 5 0
 Note: Those cables are too long. That's why they hang down like that. I have mine (on a 2010) trimmed properly and they are tucked in much better. In every review of Spec bikes I have seen they always have the cables hanging below the chainring. My cables hang about an inch below the bottom bracket and are protected by my bash ring. I hit my bash ring a lot, never had an issue. I guess an unlucky stick "might" be more likely to grab a cable here than elsewhere on a bike, but that has not been my experience.
  • 3 0
 @kopaczus Not suggesting that it can't happen, just highly unlikely. Every downed log I've bashed my chainring & bottom brackets on, all loose branches I've run over, there's such a small window for it to occur, it's protected by the chainring on the right hand side & your foot, protected by the cahinring/bashguard (whatever you may have) from the bottom, protected from from the left by your foot (a bit more or less depending on position) plus it's inline with your frame, I can't really picture it being a big concern for someone unless they like to skid around right hand corners into a bush on a frequent basis. But I do like what @thrasher2 was saying, perhaps I'll tighten my cables up a bit more down there too, never know when it could happen. But hey, if it does happen, at least I can take solace in the fact that there's 3 cables down there tied together for extra strength when it finally does occur lol
  • 8 1
 I've got thousands of miles on multiple Spec bikes -- including my current E29 -- with this cable routing. I ride in Arizona. I haven't snagged/split/caught/damaged a cable yet. Not saying it CAN'T happen, just saying I wouldn't worry that much about it. If Spec. were receiving real-world complaints, I imagine they'd change the routing.
  • 6 2
 One shift cable and one brake hose, looped beneath the bottom bracket is a "confusing cluster f&%k" ?? ........I am sorry you are confused.
  • 6 1
 I own this bike and have ridden on some crazy, high clearance trails and have never had an issue. In fact, I take the inverse approach and see it as protecting the frame (hey, why not see the glass as half full).
  • 3 0
 I've had my Norco Range for about 6 months and always wondered if the cables would snag (same routing conifig as the Spec), and sure enough just after snowfall I went through a cluster of downed branches and had my shift cable get caught up. No damage, just inconvenience. And it's routed much closer to the frame than the Spec.
  • 9 0
 To set mine perfectly:
1) Pull all of the slack out of the cables toward the front of the bike (I mean ALL) after cables are tightly attached to rear triangle with zipties.
2) LOOSELY clamp the cables with the downtube clamp nearest the bottom bracket.
3) Push the rear suspension through it's complete travel a couple of times. This pulls a little of each cable back to give the minimum amount of slack.
4) Tighten the downtube clamps, DONE. No cutting required.
There is a minimum amount of slack needed, otherwise you get funny shifts when the suspension moves. The picture above is way more slack than necessary and is just a lazy setup.

I then cut the slack at the control end, but this is optional, unless you have big loops of excess cable.
  • 3 0
 never have had an issue with mine and its seen many many hours of riding under various conditions..
  • 3 0
 Here is a picture of why I dont route my cables under. www.pinkbike.com/photo/11801379

Lots of rocks here!
  • 3 2
 I don't understand your argument @SirWilhelm. I would take a cracked cable over a dented down tube. Good luck selling that bike.
  • 3 0
 I have run the cables and hoses just like this for 1,000's of miles on my FSR. No issues whatsoever. Unless you include easier maintaince an issue. The slack is needed for the suspension travel.
  • 1 0
 @thrasher,Good advice!! The only thing i did different on mine was remove the shock,then you can easily see the full travel and how it pulls on the cables.. I also thought the cables look stupid hanging down until I noticed damage to the cables from stretching around the bottom bracket on full compression...

@keyul- I wouldn't tie the two or three cables together,their stronger and its better to rip one cable than all of them
  • 7 1
 Guys - it's not about snagging or the cables being long. The real risk here is smacking a rock into your brake line as my buddy did a couple miles into a 15 mile technical downhill run. He ran the next 12 miles with only a front brake. This is the area you see bash guards and frame protectors on most frames, so why would Spesh have a hydraulic brake line in the same spot that every other company puts in additional frame protection?

It's inexcusable that they are just ignoring common sense. I can just picture one of their managers saying, "we don't need a frame protector, the brake line will stop rock impacts!"
  • 3 0
 mines been the alps and survived - -plenty rocky - uk tracks are all rock, mud and roots, i am also riding in lots of guff at the minute on xc rides that are not cleared trails - I hate to say it as iit could be a curse but NO problems at all in one year of hard riding and two shitty british winters

fwiw I really wish they weren't there and were hidden away......damn you spesh you cheap ass mofo's sort your sh#* out
  • 2 0
 @jmbrit - lol

#SpeshSortYourShitOut
  • 1 0
 I run a SJ 29, only issues have been the rear brake hose rubbing against the ND side crank, caught it early so didn't need to replace it
  • 43 1
 ....I'm probably going to get mad neg-props for this, and I KNOW every comparison says this bike is the equal of the '9r, just for different terrain, and I KNOW it's a fully spectacular bike in its own right, but I'm still a little sad that it exists... it makes me feel like Spesh sold out a little bit to stay current and make sales quotas. Everyone loves to yell "marketing ploy" these days, and we all remember when 29ers were the primary recipient of that yelling (before "enduro" became the next target). But the way Spesh has treated the release of their 27.5 line gives me the impression that they're falling victim to OTHER companies' heavy marketing, in favor of 27.5 over 29. That they feel they have to make this bike to COMPETE - not because they feel it's the best they can do. It feels like an amendment to a truly magnificent piece of engineering, an acquiescence, regardless of how effective it is on its own. I'm not sure what I'm complaining about, honestly; I've rewritten this comment four times and even left this post once just to come back and try again. More options are better - I say it all the time. I guess... I can't help but wonder how many people will buy the 650b in preference to the wagon-wheeler JUST BECAUSE it's not a 29er, JUST BECAUSE they assume the 650 will have certain excellent handling characteristics (which it has), and that the 29er will handle poorly (which it absolutely doesn't).
  • 12 0
 I worry that this bike will succeed for the wrong reasons, and in doing so, that it will dampen this community's acceptance of the largest wheelsize, which has been gaining a lot more traction (sorry) with designers and consumers as of late. I love the mountain biking world; I love the people who inhabit it. So it makes me sad when I feel I have to pose the question of our maturity as consumers. But I think it's an important for us to keep in mind - we are ALL affected by irresponsible marketing, whether we realize it or not, from the grom dipping his tires in fire road for the first time to old Sinyard on his golden throne.
  • 14 3
 I for one, tested last year 29er - I didn't feel safe and assured at high speed, or at least it was not my bike. So I was looking forward for 650b. Happy they did it.
  • 11 0
 @angueloff: See, what you said makes sense to me. THAT'S how everyone should evaluate product, by testing it and deciding whether it works for them or not. "or at least it was not my bike" If the 29er wasn't your bike - that's fine! Maybe, upon testing, you'll find that the 650b is the machine for you. And maybe someone else will find that the 650b is too squirrely and active, and that the 29er suits them better. We live in a beautiful world, a golden era when you can CHOOSE. I just worry because I know not everyone makes purchase decisions in that rational way, and because making irrational purchases hinders the market - hinders progress for ALL of us.
  • 4 0
 @Bluefire I'm pretty sure that's exactly why Specialized did it, didn't they even say that they were doing a 27.5 because that's what consumers were buying?


However, I wouldn't give Specialized any plaudits in the first place for sticking with 26/29, they make great bikes, granted, but they are as much money oriented as any company (even more so than some of the smaller ones) and I'm sure their initial push back against 27.5 was a subtle marketing ploy in the first place.
  • 3 0
 I hear you. I am at the point where you put 2 equal riders (not pros but good average riders like 90% of us) on a real AM trail system with legit steep rooty ascents, flowing fast singletrack, and quick nasty descents and they come out at the end at the same time. Why? The FS 650b excels on the downs and does relatively well everywhere else but the Carbon Hardtail 29er pulls away from that bike everywhere else no doubt.

There is no perfect bike for anyone. It has to be determined by where you ride most regularly and what you actually WANT most from the bike.
  • 3 0
 for me personally being introduced to the spesh 29er and buying it was the best thing ever for my renewed enjoyment of XC / MTB riding / ahem enduro cough spew

insane speed, grip, ascending, descending, granted they are not for everybody, then again neither are 26 inch versions of this or any other bike.
  • 5 1
 I am 1.72m tall, I was curious and tested a M-sized 29er enduro comp in 2013, and I did'nt like it. The bike feels not "natural" to me : it handled like a truck. I had to put a lot more of physical inputs to get the result I used to have with my current bike (Lapierre Spicy 26, M size). The bike was hard to turn and corner on the downs, and technical climbs were painful because of the difficulty to place my front wheel where I want to and to build and keep momentum in these conditions. The bike feels stucked.
I've no problem with 29er, I'm sure it makes a lot of sense for taller people, but I strongly believe that there is a kind of ratio between user mensuration and wheel size that discard 29er for not so tall people, as well as 26 wheels for taller people.
So finally I demoed a Devinci Troy, a Kona Process and bought the Troy.
Sure if spesh released the 27.5 version at this time, my choice would have been different.
  • 4 2
 I've tested different bikes of similar travel, 27.5 VS. 29 and my race times are pretty consistently faster on my 29er. I've even grown to love the "sit in geometry" of my 29er vs the sit on top feeling geometry of my 27.5. I agree that it's too soon as I think we were getting to the point where we were seeing leeps and bounds of engineering genius on 29er's, now they are on the back burner and all the focus is on 27.5 that every bike I try, I'm really not a fan of. And to think, a couple years ago I was a die hard 26er guy! One benefit I guess, is being able to find a deal on a used 9er...
  • 3 0
 I don't like how 'large' the 29" wheel feels. 27.5 feels more natural.
  • 5 0
 @gnralized I'm 5'7" and am loving the 29 so definitely don't think it's a height issue. The problem comes that there is an adjustment period compared to 26 which takes a few rides to get used to, for me having to put in that additional input is what makes the 29 fun and interesting, you really feel like you're hanging off the thing rather than just riding it round a corner, but once the adjustment has been made the additional grip and rolling pace is definitely there to be enjoyed.
  • 2 0
 @Bluefire it has already started to happen. The 27.5 is creating the most buzz and the 29ers are being pushed to the wayside. This is great for the smaller riders who like the 27.5 but for the big guys like myself, the longer travel 29ers may get phased out. Don't get me wrong, the 27.5 is a better compromise than my 12 foot legs on a 26" but I have never been more in love with a bike now that I have my 29. Hopefully the sales stay high enough until the buzz of 27.5 mellows out.
  • 6 0
 @utahspines
I totally agree. Only one wheel size to fit the whole variety of human body height, shape and weight is a non-sense (except for scale savings).
A real progress will be to conserve the three wheel size in the future, not to try to impose one over the others.
  • 5 0
 I guess that is only a matter of costs, for a given market (retail) price, a company producing 5 frame size with 3 different wheel size will earn less money than for one.
That's a bit what happen with spesh, last year 26 and this year 27.5 enduro shares the same front triangle, 29er stumpy and 27.5 shares the same front triangle too (and the fact that the 27.5 stumpy gets a head angle of 68.5° (!) is no problem for spesh).

Talking about savings, spesh usally update it's frame line-up each two years, meaning new carbon molds, new structural studies, frame certifications, etc... each 2 years.
Following this, they theoritically had to update in 2015, but they didn't.
Instead of what, 27.5 bikes appeared, based for half on already existing frame, with conservation of the 2013 enduro 29 and stumpy 29 frames...

One last funny thing, 2014 and 2015 enduro comp spec are the same, except that C1 formula brakes on 2014 are replaced by deore in 2015 (which are 100$/brake cheaper than C1 on CRC), and 2015 lost its front derailleur, one front ring and front derailleur shifter.
Despite that, 2015 is 100$ more expensive than 2014.
Damn inflation.
  • 5 0
 I love it when people say that 27.5 feels more "natural" . What you really mean is it feels like a ....dare I say it. 26er.
This the whole point why this industry push to 27.5 was such a cynical money grab. It isn't THAT much of a change from 26, but as sold as this amazing thing (which it isn't). 29ers are definitely a different thing and have significant advantages and few disadvantages but at least provide a real measurable change in characteristics.
I don't really give a shit about 27.5 wheeled bikes. I may buy one someday, but it will have nothing to do with the wheels size. I will probably go with 29" on my next FS bike because I am learning to like the way they ride and the promises of better stiffness from 148mm axles (coming) and wide light CF rims.
  • 3 3
 It's hilarious how clueless the Pinkbike commenters are regarding wheelsize. It ain't the wheels kids, it's the mass location relative to the wheel centres.

A 29" could ride very similar to a 650b if the geometry was compromised enough. The Enduro 29" was compromised to feel more 26". Head angle/wheelbase/bb drop. Subsequently it's feels more nimble at slow speed than the Nomad IMO. People who find them hard to manoeuvre tend to come from a trail/XC background. They're definitely not as hard to manoeuvre as a long, low 26" DH bike. Funny enough nobody had an issue hauling those tanks around.
  • 1 0
 I am certain that height isn't an issue at all, at least for me and most of the people I ride with. At 6'2, I've been on a 26 inch giant trance and loved it for the past three years. I started to move more to the endure/downhill side of riding recently, so I bought a trek remedy with 27s because I could not find the 26er anywhere. The bike feels awesome, especially after using it for a month now, but I do miss the easy flick ability of my old 26. I've got no problem with the bigger wheel sizes, but I don't think they should be replacing the ride that started it all.
  • 3 1
 It's hilarious how people just consider a bicycle and his rider as a static setup.
Have you ever considered the ratio between the bicycle weight and a rider's weight ?
Have you ever considered the effect of a shorter stem or of the position of your feets on the pedal on the mass distribution, as well as the immense variety of body shapes ? Same for bb height, given a riders habits, compression tune of the shock, pedal thickness, more or less sag, rider's inseam, etc... it is an illusion to think that you can fine tune the mass location.
Head angles, wheelbase and wheelbase to chainstay ratio makes sense in that they allow to define the overall bike handling whatever the rider's mensurations, and mass distribution is just a consequence of these choices. That's why the Nomad feels more planted at low speed (longer WB, CS and slacker HA). Any bike with steeper HA, shorter WB and lower WB/CS than the Nomad will feel nimble at slow speed, and that is the case of the enduro 29. But as soon you accelerate, (non-linear) increase of wheel inertia and gyroscopic effect cannot be compensated by (static) angles.
bb height as to be dropped on a 29er in order to compensate for the increased height of the center of Gravity due to increased ground to hub distance (relatively to a 26er), and then maintain it in the same value than a 26er.
So as a comparison, if the Enduro 29 doesn't feel as nimble as the enduro 26, it has nothing to do with mass location, but mostly wheel inertia. The only way to compensate for it is to increase the lever action to the center of inertia (hub), that's to say increase your bar width. But, of course, this only work for the front wheel.
That's why "geometry" tuning of 29ers is a kind of an hoax since all the trick is -given wheel size- to set the geometry the closest as possible to a bike with smaller wheels, and that's why so much effort is spent in making lighter tires and wheels for 29ers, by spesh in particular.
  • 1 0
 good points - so many people don't change the small things to find a "suitable" or "perfect" feel. a stem and bar change will alter the bike so much, as will a seat angle change or change in position.

FWIW I run dual ply minion DH tyres on my stumpy 29....I can tell you now that its very very easy to move around. rider style, strength, flexibility etc etc all go into how a rider perceives the bikes handling, I don't mind the extra weight for the abuse I give the tyres, i get much more in return.
  • 1 3
 Genralized, none of that makes much sense. Gyroscopic effect on two wheel vehicle stability is negligible. If it wasn't Moto GP bike's with 5 kilo wheels wouldn't be able to corner at 150kph.
  • 2 0
 I've always noticed handling difference in rotational weight... I remember my first wheelset upgrade, my bike felt like it 'came alive' in handling and it wasn't even close to the lightest wheelset (OEM wheels were abysmal).
  • 2 1
 Yes lighter wheels with equal rim width and tires offer better performance. Hardly surprising is it?

Gnralized, you are incorrect regarding mass location. If you don't think 40mm of BB drop doesn't make a massive difference to bike handling I suggest some more reading. Especially on compound pendulums.

Here's another fact, imagine a bicycle with a third wheel with twice the mass of one of the others rotating in the opposite direction. By your reasoning that bike with have zero gyroscopic energy and would be highly unstable. Guess what? It rides identical with the third wheel installed or removed.
  • 1 0
 Good discussion here. Taller rider on a 2015 XL Enduro 29 expert. Came from 26 endure, Nomad, blur, remedy, stumpy EVO 29 previous. I am looking hard a 27.5 because I feel like when I spin it up it is hard to stay low and fast. Would carbon hoops really make significant difference? Love the 29's as a bigger guy just plowing everything, rolling flats and hills they smoke but Jumping bigger air - 10-15 you start feeling like your hanging on rather than in total control. Only other complaint is tight switchbacks when going fast. I know the wheelbase is shorter on my XL 29 that most 650 size L's but I think its the speed/wheel spin up that is actually making it hard to flip back and forth in the tight turns. thoughts??
  • 1 0
 patander, it's mainly BB drop. I bet you found the Evo 29" even slower through direction changes? They have 40mm BB drop! The E29" is one of the more nimble (unstable) 29". I wish it was less so personally but it's al personal preference.

I'm not sure what you mean by "low and fast"?
  • 1 0
 Yes - direction changes! that's a better way to say it. Direction changes, tight switchbacks on steep downhill and bigger jumps with some airtime are the only things I wonder if a 27.5 would be better for race times. That being said, I am not sure I will part with it anytime soon as it really rips up and down and the suspension is about the best I have ever had.
  • 3 0
 I never got into the bike park on mine this year (14 E29 with Monarch Plus) so I can't really comment on the jumping aspect.

I kind of agree regarding the steep tight stuff. I think the head angle should be a degree slacker to be honest. You have to work out it's strengths though. There are times when I'm behind guys on good 650b's and it just rolls up behind them like they have their brakes on.

I agree regarding the suspension. They got the kinematics bang on.
  • 30 4
 Canyon and YT have already proven that you can make bikes cheap and have top of the line components. Even though Specialized aren't selling all their stuff online the price is still really high. I just cant understand how people can justify buying this bike.
  • 36 4
 I think it's a dick measuring contest. People will blindly pay double price (give or take) for the big S, or any other highly regarded brand, just to own "that bike" - although there are just as good or even better options available.

I own both a top-of-the line YT and Canyon, and there is no way in hell I'm trading any of them in for a Specialized, Santa Cruz, Trek, etc. They are both examples of brilliant German engineering, they stand out in the crowd AND they are actually worth their price.

I understand why people are skeptical though, as I was years back: "How can a bike at half the price be as good as that $10.000 bike? Yes, the components are the same, but they MUST have cut corners elsewhere then?"
The truth, however, is that we were just so used to being f*cked over that we didn't even realize how sore our asses were! Specialized's profit margin is ridiculously high, and that is the only reason that their bikes are so expensive. It's not R&D, it's not the high-end 3rd party components, it's not those sexy carbon or billet aluminium pieces - because other companies are doing the same at half the retail price. It's nothing but greed.
  • 5 7
 I have tested YT Wicked (around 2000 EUR) - absolutely fun to ride, very stable and well equipped. Canyon Spectral AL (again around 2000 EUR) - hmm, I don't believe German media since, boring, stupid bike. Now I don't know about the new Strive, but reading between the line it is "interesting" bike with "innovative" (!?) Shapeshifter technology. I think that's sums it up.
But when it comes to big 'S' - wow-effect all over. And not only MTBs, road as well. These guys thinks on a different level. Well - I agree that base models are compromise and hard to upgrade somtimes, but nevertheless the feeling is "Spesh".
  • 2 0
 Tho for me cash is no issue ive been looking at canyon YT YETI and many others I would go for a cheaper modal if it's for me . I'd really like to hear somone like pinkbike stand up and say this is the bike of the moment and the one to have for its kind of use . Tho after reading and seeing a few vids from here and the bike bible one bike does stand out 2015 evil 29er need I say more ?
  • 10 14
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 12, 2015 at 1:55) (Below Threshold)
 Nyygard - I rather sense dick measuring contest between commenters everytime an expensive bike comes along. If you just shut off any opinions, presumptions about elaborated network of relations that this bike may create in the world, you may see nothing more but... a bloody bike that has nothing to do with your life?
  • 11 3
 @WAKIdesigns - As a person who buys high-end bikes this is obviously interesting to me. But, as many times before, my conclusion is that this bike is simply not worth the asking price. There is nothing about it that justifies a $9300 price tag, and that is what I am commenting on.
  • 9 12
 The fact is that this is not a place for this talk because majority of people discussing stuff here are informed enough, to get bikes either second hand or for good deals. I have a bike specced with stuff of identical if not better properties, and I paid 3k for everything. It doesn't change anything though Big Grin If I go on a local forum here in Sweden, I see people buying new complete bikes from LSBs or online stores, usualy at some sort of discount 20-30% off, sometimes even at asking price - and then We are the freaks, mean scrapheap collectors to be laughed at for contriving and waiting for a deal. There is simply not much worth talking about haha Big Grin
  • 19 1
 @WAKIdesigns - Wait, what?... Pinkbike "is not a place for this talk because majority of people discussing stuff here are informed enough, to get bikes either second hand or for good deals"?...

If no one was talking about it, how would people (especially newcomers to the sport) become informed? Isn't discussion, whether it's about function, reliability, comfort, price, etc. the EXACT point of having a forum such as Pinkbike? To unite people with a common interest and learn from each other?
If no one was pointing out that product X (in their personal opinion) isn't worth it's price, poorly constructed or otherwise flawed, then how would a less informed individual learn this information?
  • 6 11
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 12, 2015 at 3:04) (Below Threshold)
 I don't want to get too deep into it... what are you teaching them? That you don't need so expensive bike? Trying to save them from themselves, so that when they get a job allowing them to buy one, they won't do it and they will go ride on whatever they have? Where do you draw the line what is too expensive? I think you are overestimating the power of internet because the only thing you should tell them is to shut the window and never open it again, point o some MTB skills clinics and practise...
  • 6 3
 Lifetime warranty on a carbon frame with really good customer service.
  • 8 1
 Porsche could easily produce the 911 for 50% less. After all, they're the most profitable car brand.
You could easily argue that you get two fully loaded Nissan GT-Rs for the price of a single base Turbo 911. So, why does anybody buy those overrated overpriced Porsches anyway?
Now for the funny thing: People wouldn't buy the 911 if it just cost just $50k. As simple as that. Porsche is a premium brand and people who look into buying Porsches expect to be charged what Porsche charges them.

Next. Apple could product the iPhone for much less and would still earn a premium with it. They don't do it, however. Ever wondered why?

The final price is not a calculated by summing up the price of the components. That doesn't make sense. Specialized is a premium brand and charges as such. As simple as that. If you feel that's too expensive, fine. Don't buy the big S then.
  • 3 6
 Porsche being most profitable? Maybe, I haven't seen any for mof data on it, but I'd check with Daewoo first Big Grin
  • 2 1
 @dualsuspensiondave - IMO the lifetime warranty is a gimmick. Everyone I know that spends several thousands on bikes also upgrades at least every 2-3 years. What's the point in a lifetime warranty (that often only applies to the first owner), if the original owner sells it again after a couple of years?

As far as customer service goes, YT Industries is by far the best company I have ever had the pleasure of dealing with. Last year I received a complete hub and axle rebuild kit for the e*thirteen LG1 wheels on my TUES WC Edition, because the freehub could potentially (as in a couple on known cases worldwide) lock up if not serviced and maintained correctly. They even offered me to return the wheel and kit id I didn't knew how to perform the work - all free of charge. This year (two years after I bought the bike) I received a new Rental Integra stem from YT, because stems from that period could potentially have a weakness due to off tolerances. Again, totally free of charge and on YT's own incentive.
Unlike most companies it seems like they actually care about their customers and reputation, and do their best to solve problems before they even occur.
My point: A bike doesn't have to cost $10.000 to come with great customer service.

@tomtom80 - Yes, but Porsches and iPhones aren't bikes, are they now? They are highly customized products, designed and build from the grown by the manufacturer and/or their OEM suppliers - and in case of the iPhone, part of a very elaborative ecosystem and "free" software that all has to be paid for somehow. Bikes, on the other hand, are build primarily from off-the-self parts, and the only thing that makes them "special" is the frame.
I can assure you that Porsche wouldn't be able to charge the prices they do, if all they did was stick 3rd party off-the-shelf parts on their own platform.
  • 3 3
 It is the brand that makes it expensive. My gf just told me she wants to get a bike, she has no clue about the bike world...but she said that it has to be either Trek or Specialized any other brand would look like she bought it at walmart.
  • 1 0
 One way or another the top of the line Giant Reign is still almost a thousand dollars cheaper for a very very similar build but with nicer suspension design, just sayin...
  • 3 0
 Some good points. If at all possible, I prefer to give my money to the company that deserves it the most (this goes for almost all products). The bottom line is that amongst virtually all high end (especially carbon) bikes, all are manufactured in Asia and all are a pretty dialed ride. So, then how to choose? For me, innovation (and I'm not talking new BB or axle standards here) is the highest priority because the innovators are the guys that continue to advance the sport. For that reason, I will always support Derby and his efforts to bring wide carbon rims to market (as a one man start up no less!) versus buying the late to the party Roval SL fatties. Similarly, I like that SRAM really pushed the envelope to bring XX1 to the market and I think they have earned my money for that innovation. When I buy a fatbike, I'm going to look hard at Surly (for all of their efforts to bring fatbikes from a custom only world into a production bicycle) or one of the companies that started doing fatbikes in carbon first, not the late to the party big brands. Does that mean I won't consider a Specialized? No, I'm just going to limit it to the Demo (which has a lot of really cool innovative things going on in the frame) and the Enduro 29 (which is a truly great effort to try and get the most out of the limits of 29er engineering). But it is certainly not going to be an Enduro 27.5 when Specialized openly mocked 27.5 for over a year and then did nothing more than stick a new rear triangle on the 26" frame to appease the masses that they clearly don't seem to care about.
  • 4 0
 @soloc350 EVERY comments section for a Trek, Specialized or Yeti review includes this nearly identical comment: "Why don't you just by a YT or Canyon?" Then someone has to say "they are not available in the US."

It would be sweet if we had access to them but for now we'll continue to support our local shops to pay slightly more for the same thing. I paid $5,000 for my Spec Enduro Carbon Expert.

@katmai I see Specialized reversing their stance on 27.5 as a willingness to admit they were wrong. The fact that they were able to utilize an existing carbon mold is relatively simple geometry, not lack of effort. I'd be willing to wager that there were grumpy people at Specialized eager to roll out this bike sooner knowing that it would be a great option in their line-up.
  • 1 0
 @HubDirtrider: The Reign comes with a Reverb, too, as opposed to a house post, but you can probably ascribe the price difference to the carbon Rovals - which, while only 65 grams lighter than the Giant's alloy DT's, are almost 8mm wider between the bead hooks.
  • 3 1
 @Nygaard- The difference is I've seen that lifetime warranty in action. Multiple customers brought in their for example 6 year old frames (mostly road bikes granted) that had been through hell that no bike could handle. Sent pics to the sales rep., then Specialized sent frames 6 years newer that are insanely better. Now the customers have a brand new frame, with much better technology without spending a dime and no hassle. YT may have good customer service, but from the sounds of things, they need to make sure they button up their quality control and testing. Sick bikes for sure though.
  • 1 0
 Hopefully someday YT and Canyon will sell to North America, I believe their yearly sales would triple! Til then, I have to go with the low end Enduro cause it is all I could ever justify spending for my skill level, while knowing I am missing out on the Capra, which would give any super bike a run for the money....
  • 3 1
 reading all these comments from people eagerly waiting to buy a YT from all over the world I wonder everytime why they always seem to equalize YT with all these premium companies...
having seen and ridden YT bikes often I can assure you, there is a difference. mostly build quality. they also have a lot of quality issues during first model launches...
after buying a Yeti (first with a lot of hesitation because of the price) and I held the frame in my hands for the first time, this difference occurred to me. the haptics, details and beauty are a different world than YT (and even speci, giant etc.) and you do get "more" for your money. is it a lot more? is it worth it? from a rational perspective, probably not. but I just love it. I couldn't go back.
BUT, in all fairness: looking at specialized frames, they are nowhere near the haptics of a Yeti and so it is just more irrational to ask for this price... these mass produced frames are all very similar ragarding haptics and details.
same goes for the car analogy: when you have driven or even just sat in a porsche, beemer or merc you suddenly realize the quality. and you start to appreciate it.
  • 1 0
 Status thats why, not pefromance, Id take the GTrs for performance any day, another reason I dont ride a Specialised too muc status not enough riding with punter dudes on big S, its like buy the bike turn into a cock!
  • 4 1
 @Nygaard your original reply is one of the most uninformed, pandering, simply wrong comments I've seen on this site. I am by no means a Specialized fan, but pretending that you actually know what their profit margin is and calling their entire company (that, by the way, puts a massively larger amount of money into sponsoring top level DH racers than YT does) greedy is just childish and ridiculous.
  • 7 3
 Isn't it sad, that everytime someone has a counter argument to some btchn on Spec, he needs to explain himself that he is not a fan of theirs. Well I am a huge fan of Specialized A.because their bikes ride fantastically B.because they are one of best looking C.because ther is such a witch hunt bullcrap going on, people make such scape goats out of them that I sympathize with them. I feel proud that I bough two Specialized bikes to my kids, the red hotwalk is awesome!
  • 25 1
 For a company whose mantra is “Innovate or Die,” Specialized's reluctance to enter the burgeoning mid-sized wheel market was slightly unexpected.

Could that, perhaps, be because the famous mid size isn't exactly innovative?
  • 6 1
 Or...another opinion might be that the mantra is B.S. They didn't produce a 29er until well after they were accepted by the market and there was no risk involved...years after Fisher/Trek had started to mass produce them.
  • 2 4
 Every mantra can be BS, it is extremely personal, it has as much power as you bring to it by your actions. If you live, act by it, it is true, if you just toss it away for everyone to see, it's BS. Everyone believes in something Big Grin We will never learn why they were reluctant to go 650B, there's no point to know anyways. Maybe they were working on, how to put bigger wheels on with least effort. For istance that 650B enduro has front traingle from E29, Stumpy from Stumpy 26". As much as optimization bullcrap goes around, I think it makes plenty of sense. But that is just a theory made for fun of making up a theory Big Grin
  • 3 0
 Or what about the fact this this bike was essentially made from spare parts, the front triangle was designed for the 26 inch enduro and just got forced onto this bike? Seems half assed rather than having a dedicated 650b geometry
  • 4 3
 Dedicated 650B geometry? What's that other than 1deg steeper HA in favor of bigger fork offset (which is an arguable move) and slight adjustment for BB dropping for half of an inch? Even 29ers got closer to what 26ers used to be before the 275 meltdown, this is what made them work. The biggest difference being stack height and BB drop, but in terms of fore aft balance, this is as close as it can be to a pre-extinction 26er as much as big wheels allow. Many 275 bikes are simply what updated versions of 2010-2012 bikes that would look like today if 26ers were to stay, that is longer reach and even slacker head angles, prolonging wheelbase.

But off course I am a biased lunatic, I believe in significant superiority of a man over machine and relate all bicycle design to particular feature that characterizes human kind above other species, thing that made us the rulers of this planet: adaptability Big Grin
  • 2 0
 I will agree the differences are not too drastic but they are still significant. Reusing old frames just seems like cheap bullshit move. You know they are saving money that way but none of the savings is passed onto the customer.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns I think it is vice versa: 650B Stumpy has the 29er front, 650B Enduro has the 26" front.
  • 2 0
 @poozank - if you use adjective "significant" to express the magnitude of difference between geometry of theoretically half-arsed Enduro650B and what 650B specific bike should be, then which adjective would you chose to describe the difference between Epic and Demo? Something from Astronomy or Bible? whatever floats your boat, in my opinion the best adjective fitting it is nothing of "none" or "identical" but ironically "insignificant"? You might want to have a chat with designers of Blkmrkt Roam which can take all 3 wheel sizes in one chassis.

@Vanguard - yea, it seems so.
  • 1 0
 @poozank I think the only really significant part of it is that we might see a new (i.e. second generation) 650B Enduro and Stumpy frame earlier than usual (i.e. before three years have passed).
  • 23 3
 but will it blend?
  • 5 2
 Do you even lift? Smile
  • 16 0
 This is £7000 in the UK.

£2800 - frame
£550 - forks
£750 - groupset
£1200 - wheels
£250 - brakes
-------
£1500 for a finishing kit? Something doesn't add up...
  • 14 2
 £1500 for the brand name
  • 6 10
flag Mcfc1987 (Jan 12, 2015 at 3:47) (Below Threshold)
 Not taking into account the massive discount specialized will be getting on bulk buying direct from SRAM, the frame will cost them £500 to make? mark up of around 70%

wish people would stop saying "high end spec" when it has pikes, they are the cheapest fork you can get, zocchi, fox and BOS are all more high end
  • 1 1
 And dont forget the wheels price I quote is £1200 but they are specialised too, massive profit for spech on those too...
  • 1 0
 In that case pay a visit to Hungary, you can get it for 6250 by paying in Forints Smile (it does sound unfair)
  • 1 1
 Low-end Spec. builds are way better value. Buy the base model and swap out some bits you don't like and save thousands!
  • 2 0
 People keep buying them. Thats why they are so expensive. Spech can mark them up as long as people buy them.
  • 5 0
 Do you understand how any business that sells anything works?

Unless you 100% create something for yourself, you're never going to buy a product from a company and only pay them the exact amount they used in materials to make it. There are so many other costs that a company has that drives up the price of any product they make. Because remember, at the end of the day they are a company and their goal is to do what? Make money. And remember, comparing bicycles and cars is completely irrelevant solely due to the demand and numbers produces. How many people in the world spend $15000 on a car at least once in their lifetime? Now how many people mountain bike at a lever where they'd even remotely consider spending >$1000?
  • 5 0
 You do realize the cost of bikes is more to just cover the costs of the parts right? All that extra stuff Specialized does, such as their race teams and all the riders they sponsor, not to mention paying the salaries of all their workers, that all comes from the cost of bikes. And obviously people are willing to pay that much money for a bike, so why would they sell a bike for less money when they know people are willing to pay more for it? It's simple business.
  • 15 3
 "No cost spared" is contradictory with the fact that they used an already existing front triangle.

I get that the spec is top notch but the use of older molds for the carbon parts of the frame means that they save quite a bit of money. Savings that don't get passed to the potential buyer.
  • 4 0
 At least it's not like the stumpy where they had to add a big shim to the crown race to make it handle decently. Isn't the stumpy 650b a 26er front with the 29er rear triangle?
  • 3 1
 Ι think it's a 29er front, hence the need for a shim. I wonder how much R&D it took to decide to go with the shim instead of a new frame. I feel the marketing department was heavily involved...
  • 2 0
 @justwan-naride

@timkoerber

this grim creation? It just felt so wrong to ride. Probably the first Specialized bike I've jumped on for a test ride and thought "Yuk!"

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10781376
  • 3 0
 @justwan-naride: You're right, they did save money when it comes to the frame design. I was thinking more about the parts spec - XX1, carbon wheels, etc.. when I wrote those words.
  • 3 0
 If you want to understand how committed a company is to a product, look at what they spend on it. The Stumpy Evo 650 uses stumpy 29er front triangle and the Enduro 650b uses the old 26" Enduro front triangle. Clearly they were given the directive to get a 650b product into production as soon as possible.

Coming from a 26" Enduro (2010), I was recently in the market for a 650b trail/enduro bike and went with Giant for the reasons above. If Specialized put in the time, money and effort they did with the Enduro 29er, I think this would be getting much better reviews and accolades. Oh, and they would have kept me as a customer.
  • 1 0
 I would like to see big bike companies offering frame sets again. For someone looking to spend $10k on a bike i'd be wanting to build it to my own spec with the parts i want and the bars, grips, saddle etc that i like. Got no issues with anyone spending $10k on a bike but i would never be happy with an off the shelf bike regardless of price.
  • 16 6
 Let me make a small comparison: a basic, new bike costs 600$ (it has 2 wheels and rides). This one costs 9300$, so it's 15,5x more expensive. A basic car costs 10000$. I wouldn't buy any of them basic ones. But if you get my point, it's like reviewing a car for 155000$. It's nice to read but still a pure sci-fi.
  • 10 0
 That's fair, but in defense of this review, how much time does Kazimer spend extolling the virtues of the parts that MAKE this bike cost what it does? I mean, we don't all just skip to the bottom, see that the reviewer gives it his seal of approval, and then go out and buy the thing based on that alone. What changes make this bike more expensive than the base version? First carbon (wheels, frame, cranks, components), then the 1x drivetrain, then suspension parts. He doesn't spend much of the article talking about these things - he mentions the shock performance and the bike's low weight, but most of the article is dedicated to the Enduro's handling, its suspension KINEMATICS, its personality. These things aren't dependent on the expensive parts nor on the carbon construction - they're determined by the geometry and linkage, both of which can be found on the cheaper Enduro models.
  • 9 0
 For a change it would be REALLY interesting to make a comparison review of the high-end bikes VS basic model (S-WORKS VS COMP model).
Now this is a complete review! I don't give a s..... if the the S-Works rides like a dream. Of course it does and it should ......
Pinkbike get serious with the reviews and give us what we actually want to know......
  • 11 1
 To be fair, I think this S-works has a lot more in common with the entry Enduro than a $150K car has in common with a Tercel.
  • 2 1
 I've never heard of anyone hating driving a Bugatti, same thing applies here...
  • 4 0
 Quite possibly the worst comparison theory ever. Why does everyone get hung up on the price tag? The frame/geometry is really what determines how the bike rides and the enduro comp can be had for $3,600.
  • 1 0
 Would you like to have the base version of Veyron? On 17' rims and with no leather seats?
  • 2 0
 Of course. You buy a car for the chassis and the engine. Not the upholstery or wheels. Even with a cloth interior and steel wheels, the veyron's price isn't going to be cut in half. Again, cars are a terrible comparison. It's hard to find a car where you can double or triple the base price through purchasing options from the factory. I would much rather have PinkBike them review the top end model then the bottom end model. That way the components are less of an issue for the reviewer and they can focus on how the frame and it's geometry performs. You can easily find reviews of the components that come with the price point model you're looking at.
  • 3 0
 I see alot more 10K$ bikes than I see 150k$ cars.
  • 12 4
 PINKBIKE!!
Please do a review of some lower cost enduro bikes, there are international viewers too, not just Canadian, and American, but even for a lot of them these bikes are very expensive (as a lot of comments are proved this).
Commencal's Meta AM V4 is a serous contender with the 2000€ price range, or ROSE Uncle Jimbo, even Canyon's new Strive...
I bet a lot of folks would appreciate that too.
Apart from this, this is still a WANT NOW bike, and a good review.. Smile
  • 3 1
 I don't really agree with the price complaint as I generally just read the reviews for how the frame is going to handle the trails (I can't understand why people cant research the bike afterward to find a model in there price range?).

But I 100% agree with a Meta AM V4 review!!! It's so far at the top of my list for my new bike, but there's hardly any ride info out there! I meant there are a few reviews on how it handles but I want more convincing before I pull trigger.
  • 4 0
 Because there aren't a lot of review for the base spec models, none! Just search it, there are usually mid or high spec model reviews, but a lot of folks like me, would buy the base, cause its cheap, then upgrade it minimally to suit my taste.
  • 1 0
 Sorry I wasn't meaning find a review for other models but meaning if you like the review for the higher spec bike price out the lower spec models (majority of the time the frame is the same so will ride pretty similar) and as you say you can upgrade over time.

Anyway if your curious I found a video of Nico Quéré shredding on the Meta V4, there's only a minute of riding in the video but it is awesome riding!

www.26in.fr/videos/megavalanche-reunion-2014-ni.html
  • 1 0
 Thanks @orangenut Smile Other than that I really like the Meta SX 650b too, even in that pink-ish colour. And the video on their site about the sx and am is nice too Smile
The v4 am has a sleek design, and I dont like 150 travelled bike, I believe in 160 for my application but it seems to be nice, if I could buy one lower model, I just swap the brakes and the shock for a Monarch plus and its good to me.. Smile
  • 2 1
 I'd recommend ehading over to dirtmountainbike.com/bike-reviews#TaEErw8026xmcFFO.97 for reviews on other brands that make it to PB. Maybe not at the moment, but they just did the dirt 100, and there were a suprisingly number of euro brands (canyon, lapierre etc.). Many that have direct-sales, which cuts a chunk of the retailprice.

I think the reviews are just as subjective as the PB ones but sometimew it's nice with some euro bias for a refresing change.
  • 1 0
 Great! THX Smile
  • 4 0
 They ride what they get sent by the manufacturers, & everybody sends them their best bike, because they don't want a crappy review of a good frame due to components.

Unfortunately, they just don't have the cash to buy the bikes outright generally, & therefore have to depend on review samples from the company.
  • 2 0
 Man, I want that meta AM.
  • 6 1
 Don't worry, there are reviews of European brands' offerings on the way, including Mondraker, Canyon, and Radon.
  • 1 0
 Great to hear that Mike! Smile
  • 3 3
 I agree. I'm really disappointed that Pinkbike hasn't done a full review of the YT Capra or the Canyon Strive. These bikes offer outstanding performance at an incredible price that the average rider (in Europe) can afford. I would like to buy the new Enduro but the comparably specced Canyon and YT are both £1,200 less. I'm not going to pay over a grand for a specialized sticker on my frame. Direct sales is the future and PB is way behind the times.
  • 3 0
 @skill7: We reviewed the Canyon Spectral last year (www.pinkbike.com/news/Canyon-Spectral-AL-90-EX-2014-Reviewed.html), and the Strive review will be up sometime in the next couple of months. It's true that we haven't reviewed a YT yet, but that's not for lack of trying. Hopefully we'll have one in for testing in the near future.
  • 2 1
 Cool, thanks Mike. I will look forward to reading your review of the strive as I've got one on order. You guys should do your best to ride the Capra as it will blow you away. It's Porsche performance for Ford money. Once the direct sale guys get their North American set ups sorted I anticipate them taking the continent by storm and turning the whole market on its head. The good news for PB is that these type of reviews are even more important when some one is looking to spend of few grand on a bike that can't be easily demoed.
  • 3 3
 I saw Spectral in Alu in person, it is still a Canyon, with all due respect, I'd pay extra for Spec Enduro Big Grin
  • 2 1
 I will take the extra £1,200 and spend it taking the Canyon on a trip to Whistler.
  • 4 2
 Whistler trip for 1200£? Are you taking a dingy through North Atlantic, North-Western Passage and Bering Straights? Just don't buy anything and you'll have money for Whistler, Vegas and a bag full of blow (that would be in a suggested and natural order). Bikes suck, they are expensive, look what you can have instead!
  • 9 1
 I've tested exactly this version of the Enduro and 29" version. 29" was a fast bike, but I felt like I was just a passenger. 650b was a fast and playful bike. I'm sure I would have gotten used to the bigger wheels eventually. But on the 650b I felt right at home. The point of this post? Don' t know really. Just wanted to share my experience.
  • 5 2
 to summarise, 29 u r passenger, 650b u r fast and playful and 26 u r slow and playful?does it sound about right?
  • 1 0
 That's just what I tried to say. Smile
  • 8 0
 i dig mine. i bought a frameset and transferred parts over from my bronson carbon. i haven't had the opportunity to push it hard, since i am still recovering from a nasty achilles injury.

ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb11799716/p4pb11799716.jpg

i'm not sure you guys are interested to hear a Bronson C vs. Enduro 27.5 comparison but here goes...
-both have the DB inline shock
-rear end is shorter on the Enduro, i reused the same chain that was on the bronson (the chain was recently replaced) and had to shorten a few links.
-both are L frames. The L Bronson is like a medium for other companies...the L Enduro has a reach nearly the same as the XL Bronson. Being a lanky 6'2", i felt more comfortable and centered on the L Enduro.
-the Enduro frame is a tad heavier than the Bronson C
-the ride was alittle surprising. I used to have a 2010 Spec Stumpy FSR and ditched it because it felt inefficient climbing or hammering the flats. This current FSR kinematic on the Enduro has very little of that. I agree with Mike that I would only feel the need to engage the CS on an extended climb.
-flickability and cornering is at least on par with the Bronson. easy directional changes, and holds the corner very neutrally, even tho it is slacker.
-I did not take it on any gnarly downhills (as I am still healing/recovering from an achilles injury), but the FSR outshines the Bronson VPP on the easy downhills I did ride. I was running a pretty conservative XC-ish sag at 20-25%, and the rear end felt supple and responsive to the chatter but great support through the entire stroke. The VPP on trail bikes and with an airshock has a sort of unsupported dead zone on big hits. It had great small bump sensitivity, but on fast square edge hits or landing to flat inadvertently, it would just blow thru the midstroke.

In summary, I thus far like the FSR Enduro. I would love to compare this to the Ibis HDR. I hope to update this summer after some solid time on it...
  • 7 0
 Bikes are so good these days that these reviews are becoming moot. What are we expecting to hear? Imagine if this bike was terrible. Now that would be a review worth reading. The parts spec on bikes are different combinations of the same stuff that is available. The differences come down to brand loyalty and / or flashy / en vogue paint jobs. We sit and argue about minuscule, perceived performance advantages. Ride your "low end" $4000 bike and enjoy the hell out of it! Leave these $10k status symbols to the sponsored and must have guys.
  • 6 0
 Mountain bike is an ecologically clean sport but I have a question that seems important today.
Is it posible to recycle a carbon fiber frame ?
  • 3 5
 Interesting question. I used the latest solution for answearing interesting questions. Maybe you heard about it. It's called google. Here's what I found in 0:39 of a second: www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWC-sl78UNI Maybe you can find more.
  • 3 0
 No which was pointed out by Max Commencal when he stated he would only ever use ally as it can be recycled
  • 6 0
 Of course I heard about google, but I was not exactly sure, and I though it was interesting to open this debate here.
  • 4 0
 I believe Trek is one of the few making efforts to reprocess carbon frames in their Wisconsin manufacturing facility.
  • 2 1
 Nice debate.
  • 8 1
 How does it compare to the 29er version?
I think that's what everyone wants to know...
  • 7 1
 I could take my 26" Enduro riding in Iceland and Peru for the price of one of these 650b S-Works Enduros....... and if I owned one, it'd probably be worth it.
  • 1 0
 Oz you nailed, I'd rather travel to amazing places to ride, than buy the latest and greatest for my local shit trails!
  • 12 4
 Why review so many bikes 90% of people can't afford to buy?
  • 5 3
 Do people watch Top Gear to see a review of a base model Ford Fiesta? Or do they want to see Ferraris and Lambos drift around a track? Pikebike reviews the best of the best, because it makes the best reading and the coolest photographs. And that's cool.
  • 4 0
 I get your point, and I do like reading the reviews but it is nice to be able to have an honest detailed review about an affordable model too!
  • 2 0
 It would be nice to see them do a dual review. Review the "superbike" and the more affordable build at the same time.
  • 1 1
 All these bikes have lower-end counterparts. It's not too hard to make the leap, in my opinion.
  • 2 0
 If there wasn't much of a leap there'd be no point in providing a 9000 dollar version.
  • 4 0
 There's some commentary here about the DB Inline having a problem, and this being generally in line (sorry, couldn't help it...) with what you'd expect for that product. Which then makes me wonder (being the owner of a Fox Evo fork, another product with a reputation) whether we can't do better than this word of mouth crap. Most suspension components failing due to problems with the product do so in the first year and result in warranty claims - which are handled through LBSs. Wouldn't it be cool if LBSs tracked number, model, type of problem, and customer outcome (claim denied, partially awarded, full warranty, time to resolution) of all shocks and forks resulting in warranty claims from their shops? That data could then be aggregated by a trusted party (such as PB) and published. It would be a great opportunity for suspension manufacturers to show how reliable their stuff is (if, in fact it is) and how good their customer service (if, in fact, it is), so people badmouthing a particular brand can't get too much traction. It would also point out real problems in a transparent manner - so if things fail in tests (or there are anecdotal reports of parts failing), the manufacturer couldn't hind behind the veil of "pre-production" issues (in tests) or "early production" issues (for consumers) that have "long since been fixed." Seems like a win-win for manufacturers (they all want to build a quality product) and consumers (they all want to buy a quality product). And given that suspension is really the only dodgy part left on bikes, with significant cost and hassle attached to failure, there may not be much need to expand it beyond that.
  • 5 1
 I gotta be honest, I at the 9300$ price tag mention, I stopped reading and scrolled to the summary. At 9300$, this thing better teach my kids to read, clean my house and clean up after the dog, and the comment that says its a "treat" to ride does not sell it enough to warrant this kind of price. Hell, at this kind of price, it's hard to even fantasize over. I guess I'll keep dreaming about the YT Capra... only two hurdles to get it into my hands, price and delivery into Canada, should be easy. Wink
  • 3 0
 Or you could get the same bike with cheaper spec for 3600 and still have all the positive ride qualities.
  • 1 0
 @ArnoldBabar Thanks for the info. Smile Since they don't publish MSRP online, I was not sure what the price range is on the 10 different Enduros they offer.
  • 2 0
 The Meta AM V4 should be coming to North America tho right?
  • 1 1
 @twebeast Yup! I had not seen that bike until someone else had mentioned it on this article. Looks so awesome. Capra is my dream bike, but way out of my price range. but the Meta, now that's a bike I can save up for! If the year goes well, maybe a Meta AM v4 and a DH Park for the same price as a Nomad or Capra (by the time I get them here).
  • 4 0
 Far out, how much comments can a review get? Why is that, because its a damn nice bike or because its a Specialized? I love my Enduro 29, well I love even Specialized. I do know that they put this bike on the market because of the market but thats what companies do. A company like them has thousand of employees to pay, not hundred, not a handful, thousands and of course they need to make money. Blame them for wanting to make money is just plain stupid. They are not the church, they will LISTEN to your prayers and will put the bikes on the market people will actually buy. I will stick to my Enduro 29 as its the best bike I've ever owned and I do hope Specialized will stick to it as well but I DO understand why they made this one and it seems as it works as well.
P.S. Stop complaining about prices people, Pinkbike reviews what they get and the companies just dont give them their lesser equiped bikes.
  • 3 0
 "Don't fret, though, because a 'regular' 12x142 rear wheel will fit just fine if for some reason the stock wheel-set gives up the ghost, although it's worth noting that a 142+ wheel won't work on a 12x142 frame."
FYI that's not written in stone Mike. I've been a running Roval DH 142+ wheels on my 2013 Trek Slash for the last 2 seasons hard and fast.

I think everyone would rather see reviews of these bike models in there more affordable builds as well. Side by side. I want to know how good these ride without all the carbon. Then you could explain to us just how different they feel and how much performance is lost.
Personally this bike in the 29er base model is on my hit-list of wagon wheeler's but its a gamble to buy one based on the review's of the highest priced models.And thats all ive been seeing.
I know its not PB fault every manufacturer wants their top dog at the show but throw us mutts a bone we can chew on,
  • 1 0
 I think they are just saying that 142+ wheelset on a 142 frame may not shift well because you've moved the cassette / derailleur alignment 2mm out of "ideal." I don't understand why that doesn't hold true for moving it 2mm the other way (142 wheelset on a 142 frame). Can't help think this is the BIG S' way of saying buying their bikes is future proof, while making their wheels exclusive to their frames... lame.

I know 2mm may not be a big deal, but I want my rim dished properly dammit! Hence, why I am never buying a 142+ bike. Proprietary can kiss my ass.
  • 1 0
 I never had a problem with shifting because i was using 9spd X9 the most easily tuned dt in existence. Im now running a frankin-sense One-up 42 with merth cage and stx derailleur. I now have some serious when the F will this "B" shift.
So in a word my shifting could be better but holds when Its needed so far, and those 2mm are a bitch. Strong wheels though.
  • 1 0
 The aftermarket 42 teeth chainrings and shimano derailleurs definitely have issues. I've got the One-up RAD cage, but haven't installed yet. Hoping that does the trick. X9 definitely a better RD.
  • 3 0
 a simple review on the bike, and everyone goes a-wall, ive owned the 2015 comp since day 1 still steep at 2.6k mark but I have no faults with it was so ever, 9.3k is steep but if it had it id pay it any day to have the carbon version, great bike, great review.
  • 4 1
 This would definitely be on the list if I was in the market for a super bike, beautiful looking and specced so I wouldn't change a thing. You can say what you like about Specialized's business practice but every bike of theirs I have ridden has been dialled geo-wise. Just need a lottery win or a rich long lost relative to die.
  • 3 0
 I have a 26" enduro and thought I was gonna love the 650b, especially all blinged out in carbon and the latest and greatest. I really wanted to love it- but didn't. Yeah it was a really good ride but just didn't put a smile on my face.
  • 3 0
 I bought the 2015 Enduro 29er Comp about 4 months ago. And I have to say its the best thing I have ever ridden. I can not justify the price of the top of the range. I got an amazing price on mine I am very very happy and will not part with it. I have upgraded the brakes to XT I have put on a raceface 35mm stem and raceface 800mm carbon bars I also took out the 17th gear and put a 42 on to make climbing a bit easier. Also spesh upgraded my wheel set free of charge which was a lovely surprise I now have the set the carbon elite model has. Just an amazing bike full stop have not tried the 650b so cant say how good it is to the 29er
  • 3 1
 The DB inline does seem to shit the bed, particularly for heavier riders, or on bikes where you need to run quite a bit of pressure (i.e: Longer travel higher leverage ratio bikes).

While I love mine (working well on a low leverage ratio 140mm travel bike), I would worry about it on the Enduro.
  • 2 0
 Can't see why they would spec the regular DB air here?
  • 1 0
 Why they wouldN'T spec the DB air...
  • 2 0
 Cos the Inline is new and shiny.
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike , granted the shock length is relatively long for the amount of travel, the CCDB XV would be more suited, given the bike's intentions. The inline is aimed at the trail bike circa 140mm range bikes.
  • 1 0
 Water bottle.?
  • 2 0
 Inline is lighter and cheaper.
  • 5 2
 If you really understand how this bike is speced...it's not all that special! For the record, I'm calling "rip off!" But they are making a niiiiice margin! At your expense.....
  • 1 0
 I'm calling "rip off!" But they are making a niiiiice margin! At your expense.....

Brilliant. And applicable to quite a lot of today's big business if you think about it.
  • 3 1
 We need to see more bike more ride reviews please . Back in my day choosing a top end bike was so much easyer only 1/2 top end bikes to choose from but now I'm in the market for a new bike my god my head is fried from all the choice
  • 1 0
 welcome to the WWW
.-)
this bike is great ... but expensive
  • 7 0
 Does it back-pedal too?
  • 2 0
 "the sound of a carbon rim smacking against sandstone had me fearing the worst"....

I am interetsed in your choice of words Mike, and would like to ask a question if I may, about your inclusion of the word "carbon" in that sentence. By including it, it could be read to mean that you were thinking "God, this rim is Carbon, I hope its OK"...



Were you fearing the worst becuase
a) the hit was big enough to warrant a "Lordy, that's torn it" on any rim, carbon, alloy or other?
b) the hit was on a set of carbon hoops?

Also, do you think you would have included the word "Alloy" in the equivalent sentence had it been, say a Stan's Flow?

We get to hear a lot about how xxxx is as strong as / stronger than / more flexible than yyyy etc etc, so It would be interesting to hear what someone who gets to ride a lot of bikes takes into consideration when writing....Thanks.
  • 3 1
 @orientdave, I was fearing the worst because the result of a carbon vs. rock impact tends to be worse than aluminum vs. rock. Carbon is strong, and Specialized claims that these are the strongest rims they've ever made, but it also breaks instead of bends. A dented aluminum rim can sometimes be straightened, but with carbon that's not the case. The hit was definitely big enough that I would have been worrying about denting an aluminum rim, but in this case the carbon was just fine.
  • 4 2
 Rode both the 650b and 29er comp versions recently at a demo day and the 27.5 version felt like it handled slower in the tight stuff but was a little more confident when belting through descents but the 29er was just wayyy more fun and felt like a big p.slope (as weird as that sounds) to me so ended up going the wagon wheeler and haven't looked back.
  • 7 1
 So it uses the same front triangle as the 26er. Yeah, innovate or die.
  • 3 1
 The Reign 0 advanced is about 1k$ cheaper sounds as if its this bikes equal or better. That said, the Euro brands are showing up the $ hungry US bike brands if you want value. This or a Capra for half the price? You have to be stupid to by the enduro if you have that choice.
  • 2 0
 About the remark regarding the Specialized Command Post. I have a KS LEV on one bike, and a new Specialized Command Post on another. I found that it's near impossible to hit ANY adjustment other than all the way down or all the way up on the KS LEV. It's a great post, for sure, but when the trail is moving around I cannot hit anything other than all the way down or all the way up with any of the consistency needed. With the Specialized Command Post I find myself using the one inch drop often! It's very easy to "hit" that adjustment while out on the trail and it's very useful. I kept wishing I could do the same with the KS LEV, but it's just too difficult to hit that "just right" adjustment in real world conditions. I think the infinitely adjustable seat posts are not as good as the ones with three choices. Now, if we could set where those three points are...
  • 3 0
 So what's happened then is that they weren't selling enough of the 26" version, so they kept the same front triangle, binned the swing arm, popped an aluminium one on... hey presto we can make more money!
  • 5 3
 I am so sick of hearing about how YT Industries is revolutionizing mountain bikes with great value. If they're so awesome, why don't they sell their bikes in North America? Oh yeah, as I think I recall reading in another one of these new-bikes-are-so-expensive whine fests (maybe it was the Nomad review, or the SB6c), it has little to do with distribution and more to do with legal costs. Well guess what? Specialized sells bike in North America, and their bikes are more expensive. Think there's a connection? Just maybe?

Until YT Industries becomes a global brand and competes in every market, rather than just their safe little corner of the world, you cannot compare their prices directly. Buy YT if you want, but you can't compare them fairly with any brand that sells in a market they won't touch.
  • 9 1
 In unrelated news, EU is not a "little corner of the world". Peace.
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure YT is going to open a North American market this year.
  • 3 0
 Safe little corner of the world? Are you sure you're not American with a comment like that? From a population perspective Europe is far bigger (743 vs 529 million, based on 2013 data). So would it not be a prudent to consolidate the potentially larger ‘home’ market first before entering a market that is reaching saturation with regards the variety of established and new brands. Also given the propensity for north American’s to through lawsuits around like they are going out of fashion, a small European company may question the value of entering the market.
  • 2 0
 From Wikipedia:
"With a combined population of over 500 million inhabitants,[23] or 7.3% of the world population,[24] ..."

That's about the same population as North America. Neither one is a particularly huge market on the global scale. I supppose both buy more "stuff" in general than our fair share per capita, but we're just not that big. Nothing I said was in any way a shot at Europeans.

The fact is, YT is not (currently) a global brand, so until they have a few years of facing the same pressures and challenges of serving a lot of varied markets, you can't fairly compare them directly. It's easy to be cheap when you don't serve the more difficult markets.
  • 4 1
 this is how l read the bike reviews on PB. l look for the price and if it is over 5 grand (which is also crazy expensive & stupid) l stop reading. l will never ride said bike in reality world.
  • 8 4
 Why? If you were reading a car magazine and came across a Lamborghini review would you stop reading just because of the price? There's nothing wrong with a little daydreaming one in a while.
  • 2 0
 They make an aluminum version and it can be found for around 3 grand and they are very very good. It's out on the trails locally was we type.
  • 6 0
 i just bought a 2013 s-works enduro in 26" for 3grand in near mint condition. looks like new without any flaws. thanks to the 27,5" and 29" hype you can make good deals on that old unrideable 26" dinosaurs...well i still love 26" and cant find something wrong with them.
  • 1 0
 hey mike. you are in bellingham…let me borrow one of these high end bikes sometime and l'll let you know what l think. no more daydreaming. haha

BTW… 5 grand is daydreaming!!
  • 2 0
 The actual question is: How does it compare against the 26" model?

With 650B as close to 26" as it is:

If you're racing, an E29 will be the more competitive choice in most situations.

For the fun of flickability, go smaller wheels, but then, ideally go all the way to 26", because the 650B version's wheelbase is actually bigger than the E29's.
  • 2 0
 9K is a lot of money, too much, but most everybody on here has spent hard earned money on a bike that was way to expensive. If you love the bike you never think about the price after you've crushed single track with it. I spent close to 3k on an aluminum enduro 5 years ago. 9K doesn't sound all that bad in comparison. Get the high end bike if you can afford it, if not get a different bike at a lower price point. Complaining about a bike that you won't get doen't make sense. The price tag of the Bugatti doesn't bother me a bit as I would never buy one. Just my opinion
  • 5 0
 Never gonna give you a cent, S.
  • 4 1
 I used to hate specialized bikes and everything they represented...always bought boutique brands...then I rode an Enduro, hate was gone, bike was awesome.
  • 1 0
 Now it makes me wonder. . Was the bike I rode at the dealer intro a case of someone screwing with the rebound or a bad shock?

I rode the E29 and loved it and was really looking forward to see how the 650b felt in comparison going back to back. But, the 650b tried to throw me over the bars on the first jump I hit. I quickly took the bike back and got on something else. I assumed someone messed with the rebound on a previous ride. Interesting to hear what Cane Creek will have to say on this.
  • 1 0
 Interesting to see that spesh still leave the cables dangling beneath the bb..... Cable to the rear break is also very close to the rear tyre wall and rear spokes which rubs occasionally if it's real muddy... I have severed many a cable on my enduro and I have had it since 2010, surprised they have not change the design for the better with a 10k bike,
  • 3 0
 Not sure why they had to come out with a 650b option, the enduro 29r is easily one of the best bikes on the market in it's category, regardless of wheel size.
  • 1 0
 I have been riding this bike since August and I love it. I could not agree more with this article. In fact, it is so in line with my opinions its scary. I agree, climbing in the descend mode is best on technical, the 34 ring is a bit tall for me, and I immediately switched out for a 40mm stem and loved it. This bike is the best trail bike ever. I have ridden/owned nomads, sb-66's, you name it. (but I haven't ridden a tracer, so I can't speak for that)
  • 4 0
 The Cane creek shock was a pre production prototype. This will not happen to the bike you buy.................
  • 1 0
 I heard the U.S. government is going to pass legislation requiring anyone over 5'9" (~175cm) to exclusively ride 29ers. 27.5 will be required for anyone between 5'3" and 5'9" and 26 for under 5'3". This will make it "fair" to all wheel sizes and none will ever die. Typical Washington b.s..........
  • 1 0
 its nice.
but way way too expensive like most bikes now, you cant justify car price tags for push bikes its simple as that, plus 90% people on here wouldnt tell the difference between this and a bike half the price back to back
also i doubt you would have any less smile at the end of a run on a cheaper model, unless its an ego thing in which case u got it for the wrong reasons anyway

ive been into bikes for best part of 30 years now but can barely afford to enjoy my lifelong hobby thanks to insane pricing , old low end bikes.. like most things now joe average is pushed out

still its a spesh so it would get my vote
  • 1 0
 Ok so I have read these comments with interest as I actually just bought the Specialized Enduro Expert. I agree that it is a shame that they didn't review the Expert because in reality that is the bike that you will see ridden the most out on the trails, it has a price point closer to the bikes it competes with (£4,600/$7,000), shares most of the same kit as the S-Works and is pretty much the same ride minus the carbon wheels and a few expensive bits and pieces.

The bike climbs brilliantly. I have found the command post to be really solid and you can hike it really high, lock out the rear shock (if you need to) and hammer it up trails...coming from an xc background I have to say that this really surprised me. Descents are mega fun though. This thing takes a serious amount of punishment and you can plough over/through pretty much anything that your skill levels will allow. In fact its so good that I am taking myself off on a skills course to practice my big jumps so I can do more and more, really this thing can handle anything - just look at the YouTube series following Curtis Keene in this seasons EWS if you want proof!

I don't ever buy into the really technical aspects of bike reviews because thats just not my language. But if you want a bike that is serious fun, gives you a ton of confidence, climbs great and will handle pretty much anything you can throw at it then I can't recommend the Enduro enough. For the Specialized haters, you should re-consider because this thing looks the bomb, isn't actually 'too expensive' if you buy the right model and trust me it gets a lot of compliments and attention out on the trails. But the main thing is that it just puts a massive smile on my face!

Next stop, the alps Wink
  • 2 0
 this vs the nomad vs the sb6c vs a reign vs that intense whatever its called vs an evil uprising vs a mondraker foxy carbon vs a gt sanction vs genius LT
  • 1 0
 Owned a '14 Enduro Comp 29er. Fox Evolution "Auto Sag" was the worst rear shock I've ever used. Aluminum version almost had zero downtube protection. It dented like a pop can.
  • 2 0
 ...gives up the ghost...
Wahhahaahhaa, I cannot believe this is actually a common english expression. Do people really say that?
  • 2 0
 Who on PB is going to shell out $9300 for a mountain bike? Please start reviewing more affordable versions of bikes like this.
  • 2 0
 compare the speci enduro to this one: (cost about the half) www.conway-bikes.de/?portfolio=wme-1027-carbon .. nothing more to say i think..
  • 1 0
 I know this may sound silly to some guys but can you put a set of 26in wheels and UNO 650B forks on to a 650B frame.? (I know you can put them on the frame) And if so would it change the ride so bad you couldn't ride it.?
  • 2 1
 That tire tread is smoother than a porn stars... For such an aggressive bike I'm surprised it's not rocking more serious rubber.
  • 3 0
 Well they spec the Slaughter on a Demo.. It isn't actually terrible, but I wouldn't want it on my bike - I like riding steep, and doing that in rain on the Slaughter made me rethink a lot of sections I usually try to hit at race speed on my bike.

I have to admit though, after the rethinking, I've done it all and it actually felt alright, just a bit faster..'cos the braking didn't do quite as much as I'm used to. And I do brake too much. Still, I think it[the tire]'d possibly make me faster, but a lot more likely to crash.
  • 2 0
 Less rolling resistance and it probably has a ton of grip when riding slick surfaces. I bet they're amazing in some situations but we rode them on a muddy day and to be honest, they're quite terrible but thats no big news as you could tell that from looking at the tread pattern. I see them as a specialty tire.
  • 2 0
 The Slaughter actually has pretty decent traction with so many small knobs. I was expecting to take it off in the first week, but I like it. Only time I wished for more was steep technical riding when it's wet out and it just helped me polish my skills... Smile

That said the Control sidewalls keep burping my tire so I've ordered the Grid casing.
  • 2 0
 The slaughter is amazing I love it. I have not replaced what came with the bike yet found them to be amazing in all conditions so far. I think having the fatty rims really helps these tyres feel more planted as there is more spread to them. I have maxxi high roller 2 evo that I was going to put on but so far have found no reason too.
  • 4 1
 $9300. i think i just threw up in my mouth a little bit
  • 1 0
 Not that I'm going to buy it, but I was surprised to see it come in under $10k!
  • 6 4
 Ive ridden the 26 enduro and it felt spot on.
i bet it handles better than this $9300 'mid wheeler'
  • 3 0
 How's it compare to the 29?
  • 2 0
 Perfect answer to my questions.
  • 2 0
 New 2015 KTM exc 350 for equal money! But the enduro you get the ccdb inline!
  • 2 0
 "Creating a bike with 422mm chain stays and 165mm of travel, but Specialized have done it"

Some editing needed
  • 4 1
 No 26" version ????

What a Shame!
  • 3 0
 I could buy Honda 450R that could beat it for less
  • 1 0
 You could get a two year old crf with air forks for under 5 grand but where are you going to ride it! You could also buy the aluminum Enduro for 3 grand too. Soooo many choices!
  • 4 0
 $9300?! No thanks
  • 1 0
 Don't agree with the stem comment, since when has one size fitted all, its a bit like telling me I'm wearing the wrong size shoes without actually knowing what size I take?
  • 2 2
 If I paid $9600 USD for a bike, I'd want the chain guide to have a taco to protect my uber expensive narrow wide chainring...
  • 3 0
 If you can afford $9600 bikes, the cost of a few chainrings is not really an issue.
  • 2 0
 I have the 650b SW on order! Big Grin i don't get it before March thought.... Frown
  • 1 0
 Same with the new Demo
. First Nov. Then Jan, now March (FFS).
  • 1 0
 I was told Specialized was done with their components but was waiting for Sram and Rockshox parts the get the bike complete.
  • 1 0
 Not to sound intentionally like Chris Porter, but he's right; "too small, next."
  • 3 0
 yawn.....f..k it!
  • 1 0
 I can see why they spec'd a 70mm stem as there is no XL by the looks of the spesh website.
  • 2 0
 The bike also has short reach for a large which im surprised wasn't mentioned and having no xl is really annoying.
  • 1 0
 too many frame bearings to change. how does carbon hold up to multiple bearing changes?
  • 1 0
 The bearings are housed in aluminum links, not carbon, so there shouldn't be any issues.
  • 1 0
 I'm just waiting to see what TeamRobot says about yet another rear axle spacing variation.
  • 1 0
 If you don't ask for the. Heaped bike then you will never get the chance!! I'm just sayin!
  • 2 0
 Carbon and Base Model should never be used to reference the same thing,
  • 2 0
 70mm stem.........................leave orffff!!!
  • 2 0
 So what about fitting a 650b rear triangle to a 26" version of the enduro?
  • 2 0
 Pick your high-end enduro bike and be a dick about it!
  • 2 0
 I'll stick with my 29 enduro comp.
  • 2 0
 oh look specialize's new richoldman came out for 2015!
  • 2 0
 $9300 ! I don't even earn that much in 2 years.
  • 1 0
 comparison to N3 would be nice
  • 1 0
 Tells us there's an XL... ....leaves off the XL geometry and digits.
  • 1 0
 There is no XL.
  • 1 0
 They've edited it bud. You seem to be right now though, but that's not what it said earlier.
  • 2 0
 Why is there no XL???
  • 3 1
 Because specialized say people that tall should be riding 29ers. I say that it means they don't want my business.
  • 5 0
 Haven't you heard? We tall people don't like fun. I thought you knew?
  • 1 1
 Only thing that springs to my mind is: 9300 reasons not to buy that thing Big Grin
  • 1 0
 So why would they not make a 650b XL ???????
  • 2 0
 Will it Enduro though?
  • 1 0
 No more 29 frame with spacer in the head set??? Finaly a real 27.5 frame
  • 1 1
 Oh shit they took the 26 framr and adapted to 27.5??? Thats a shame. I have a nice Demo and was looking for a 27.5 on a Specialized dealer in Rio de Janeiro. When a sow that spacer in the head tube of the 27.5 I was so disapointed and dicided to wait for a real 27.5 bike
  • 1 0
 What is attached to the bottom of the bottle cage?
  • 1 1
 It's time to breathe in that second mortgage!
  • 1 1
 I'll stick with my more than elated carbon spartan. Smile
  • 1 0
 Still 9Gs. Fuck that.
  • 1 0
 it would suit darth mual
  • 6 8
 Um 9300 for an aluminum rr triangle, WTF! I'll take my 27.5 jekyll over that any day of the week.
  • 2 0
 specialized is afraid it would brake hence alu rrt
  • 3 1
 Just add more carbon.
  • 4 2
 Nothing to do with strength. Cheaper than creating nfew molds for carbon rear triangle pieces... Bike basically costs them nothing to manufacture since the front triangle is the 26" mold...
  • 3 4
 *queue crying about cost.......... now*
  • 3 3
 damage, not 26" Wink Smile
  • 4 6
 Go home Specialized, you're drunk! Leave the high prices to the boutique brands e.g. Intense, Santa Cruz, Yeti etc!
  • 1 2
 beautiful bike!
  • 6 8
 How much did specialized pay pink bike for this review?
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