Spot Announces New Mayhem 130 and 150

Jul 22, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  
Spot Mayhem

Spot have added two new carbon-framed bikes to their lineup, the Mayhem 130 and the Mayhem 150. Both models use Spot's signature Living Link suspension design, which uses a titanium leaf spring on the lower of the two links, a design that's intended to create an extra-efficient pedaling bike. As you'd expect, the number in the model name indicates the amount of rear travel (in millimeters), with the 130 aimed at all-around trail riding, while the 150 is geared toward riders who plan on venturing into more technical terrain.

Compared to Spot's previous Living Link-equipped models, the suspension curve of the new bikes is said to offer improved small bump compliance and more end-stroke ramp up. There's also a geometry adjust feature that allows the head angle to be altered by .5-degrees, and the bottom bracket height to be changed by 8 or 9 millimeters with only one tool

Both bikes' claimed weights, if accurate, are quite light – a medium 130 frame weighs a claimed 6.4 lb, and a medium 150 frame weighs 7.4 lb, numbers that allow complete builds to come in around 27 and 30 pounds respectively. All Spot frames purchased after January 1, 2020 are covered by a lifetime warranty.


Spot Mayhem

Spot Mayhem
Spot Mayhem

Mayhem 130

● 140mm front travel, 130mm rear travel
● Frame material: carbon
● Available in 29 or 27.5+;
● Weights start at 27.2 lb (12.3 kg)
● Prices from $4,999 with four build levels.
● Frame only: $3,199 USD

Geometry
Spot Mayhem


Spot Mayhem

Spot Mayhem
Spot Mayhem

Mayhem 150

● 160mm front travel, 150mm rear travel
● Frame material: carbon
● 29" only
● Weights start at 29.3 lb (13.3 kg)
● Prices from $5,199 with four build levels.
● Frame only: $3,299 USD

Geometry
Spot Mayhem

Spot Mayhem
Spot's dual-link design uses a titanium leaf spring at the lower link to alter the feel of the suspension. It's relaxed at rest, and then begins to load as the bike goes through its travel before returning to a relaxed state at full compression, stages that are intended to create an efficient, lively bike.


More information: spotbikes.com


141 Comments

  • 36 1
 It certainly seems direct to consumer brand pricing is trending up rather LBS brand pricing trending down. Really wish it was happening the other way around. Apparently the release of the updated Mayhem made the unchanged Ryve 115 $500 more expensive across all builds. Was interested before, but now not such a good deal for the spec.
  • 13 1
 I have been noticing that too, I have also seen some much better deals at bike shops with "end of season" sales. (and steals with demo bikes)
  • 15 0
 COVID-19 and trade battles aren't really helping the prices either. Hopefully some stability is in our future.
  • 24 1
 It's ridiculous that direct to consumer brands aren't way cheaper. I see little incentive not to go with a shop who can help me with service and warranty issues as opposed to buying direct and then having to ship problems out.
  • 26 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: Agreed. They used to be significantly cheaper. If their prices rise to the point of being inline with LBS brands their entire value proposition is essentially eliminated.
  • 64 1
 I mean...this should not be a surprise, right? Hasn't everyone seen this before?

Remember when the primary benefit of using Amazon or Wayfair, etc. wasn't only the selection and convenience, but they could offer lower pricing because they didn't have to pay retail employees and storefront rents everywhere and it was just some massive warehouses with economy of scale? Or online bike stores like Jenson, etc. that could do the same thing?

Guess what? They all figured out that once customers got hooked on the online convenience and the retail competition starts to die, they could just raise the prices to "normal" and make even more profit. They don't need to worry about retail problems like offering any deals just because a new shipment is about to arrive and shelf space is an issue. And they can better control and automate prices.

Go check for yourself. It used to be that you could go online and find most products for a bit of a discount. Now it's trending the opposite--you're probably as likely to find a better sale price at a big retail store than online, and you can actually look at it and talk about it with a semi-knowledgeable person before you buy.

Bike stores aren't any different. If you're not just window shopping and buying online for 10% cheaper and bringing it to them to do the work, they'll give you that 10% back--whether in free advice, free labour or help, and increasingly price matching (or getting close to) online retailers or offering better bike deals, since those online prices are creeping up a little.

Just watch. If the trend continues like it has elsewhere, we'll all be shopping online but paying the same price we always were--and it's not like you'll be able to convince them to knock a few bucks off, like you can your friends at the shop. I hope we can manage to keep good shops that know what they're doing and really help with buying, advice and maintenance.
  • 4 1
 @shortcuttomoncton:

To that intent, you can add the fact that as soon as the product gets some traction, online prices are not a good option anymore; the bigger the store, the bigger the price.

The last example that comes to mind is 2020 spez enduro elite.

Bike24, one of the largest online retailers in EU: 5999.99 Euros
A small (also online)bikeshop in Italy: 4059 Euros.
2000 Euros is a biiiig difference. Not only that but, the base/retail price of the bike in the Italian store is 5799.99 Euros. So, bike24, not only sells the bike without any discount, it also has a 200 Euros higher RRP.

Why is that..well..because they probably get away with it. Bike24 probably does 100k in orders only in weekends. That Italian shop, I'm not really sure it makes 100k in orders per month. Although..these months have been higher than average for the industry.

Probably there are numerous other examples as well.

Personally, I would really like them(the big retailers) to stop doing that.
  • 6 0
 @BornOnTwo: But there won't be any bikes left this year for "end of season" sales.
  • 3 0
 @BornOnTwo: Yea but you're not going to find "end of season" sales this year.
  • 2 1
 Not necessarily. Some brands are still super reasonable (YT, Fezzari, Canyon, Nukeproof, etc.). Spot just seems to have more expensive direct-to-consumer bikes.
  • 2 1
 @jesse-effing-edwards: YT and Canyon do direct to consumer and still offer pretty decent deals, compared to Spot at least
  • 7 0
 @rickybobby18: more expensive, and not worth it. I like my Spot, but I won’t pay such prices without good support, which they cannot provide like a shop can. I have no interest in any DTC bike mfg if they can’t offer a significant deal, and this is coming from a competent bike mechanic who doesn’t need a shop’s help.
I am not a fan of normalizing the >$3000 frame + shock. Chinese- and Taiwan-made bikes don’t cost that much to produce, and should be cheaper to the consumer as a result. BUT, I bet the profits are a nice way to support that new supermoto you took on your fishing trip while you dream up the next brotastic marketing video to distract from the fact that your bikes aren’t anything special.
  • 1 0
 @erikkellison: I would love to know what the cost of all the marketing and sponsorship adds to the cost of my new bike. Especially when you factor in that there will be at least a tripling off the price between factory and consumer
  • 2 0
 @MTB-RVA: yea if they had the $500 off perma-sale that was going until Covid hit it would bring me a lot closer to pulling the trigger...
  • 7 0
 What I find interesting about pricing is how small and/or new companies (like Revel for example) are charging premiums as much as established companies. Usually you have to be price competitive when you're the new guy.
  • 1 0
 @foggnm: Yea but Revel puts Crankbrother droppers and i9 wheels on there gx builds, pretty solid for $5k. Plus they have to pay to use the CFB and more per frame since they're doing smaller batches.
  • 2 0
 @foggnm: it’s not impossible to hit it out of the park on the first try. It seems like most new bike mfgs are not new to industry, but are actually quite experienced and just wanted an opportunity to let their dreams fly instead of being squashed by the corporate “man.” I’ll pay more if the quality is there, they are innovating in a way that’s meaningful to me, and have a warranty that covers me if they screwed up. I’ll also pay more for non-mass-produced, and would rather support local riding community/industry, if possible.
That being said, the value from some of these companies (Guerrilla Gravity, Canfield, Canyon, YT) is awesome, and should be the standard. There are a lot of non-boutique/not-high-end bikes that charge boutique prices. I honestly don’t understand why people waste their money.
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: Not to mention you could receive a bike that doesn't fit. Big hassle boxing it back up waiting for another one to show. I don't see much of a advantage.
  • 2 0
 @johnd2: For sure. I like making my problems someone else's. Unfortunately not all shops can carry exactly what I always want but there's enough out there that I don't think I'd order direct unless it was stupid cheap or damn unique.
  • 2 0
 Yes, prices have been going higher for sure on a lot of brands. With that said, this is a rather solid endorsement: www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/mountain-bike/a33378796/the-spot-mayhem-130-review/?_ke=eyJrbF9lbWFpbCI6ICJzdHJlaWdodHlAZ21haWwuY29tIiwgImtsX2NvbXBhbnlfaWQiOiAiTmNENTNFIn0%3D

I've had the Rollik for just over two years and it has been a great bike.
  • 29 0
 I thought the living link is made of carbon?
  • 38 0
 It was on previous models - it’s titanium on these new ones.
  • 12 22
flag just6979 (Jul 22, 2020 at 7:16) (Below Threshold)
 @mikekazimer: "Both models use Spot's signature Living Link suspension design, which uses a titanium leaf spring on the lower of the two links"

That sentence implies that the "signature ... design" _IS_ a titanium spring. Except it's not, it's CF or Ti, depending.

Literally no mention that they switched from carbon to titanium. There must be a reason for it... but it shall remain a mystery, it seems.
  • 14 0
 @just6979: @just6979: Not everything is a mystery or a conspiracy.

Titanium as a leaf spring is used in lots other brands. It is a wide flat piece of material that is shaped to flex. It doesn't have to be composite.
  • 4 1
 @mikekazimer: Interesting!

I thought titanium is susceptible to work hardening? That doesn’t sound like a property a leaf spring should have. It also doesn’t have the ability to control the layup like carbon can. I’m interested to hear Spot’s reasoning behind the change.
  • 4 0
 @MaplePanda: titanium, like steel has a fatigue limit and therefore if not bent too far can easily bend for the life of a bike. This is why steel and titanium springs can be found in every industry. What you don't want is aluminum springs.
  • 3 0
 @MaplePanda: As mentioned the fatigue life of titanium is functionally infinite when properly implemented. And there is no layup, it's a homogeneous material. Carbon is a composite and requires some sort of layup or engineered matrix of materials. With the Ti, you choose an appropriate alloy and your "layup" is the shape and thickness of the spring.
  • 32 11
 Refreshing to see a steeper ACTUAL seat angle rather than the kinked ‘form over function’ usual designs.

This means for riders with long legs who need more post, we dont end up sitting over the cassette like on an evil, Santa cruz etc.
  • 14 7
 But it isn't. The seattube doesn't end in the BB. The BB is noticeably behind the seattube...
  • 6 2
 @kornbrot: But way less than many other brands, plus the effective angle is also quite steep.
  • 11 5
 Design looks Spot on.
  • 25 1
 Are you sure you know what 'form over function' means?

most (all) suspension frames that have a kinked ST do so to allow full wheel travel without the need for 7.5 foot long chainstays.
  • 3 1
 @thedirtyburritto: why does a seat type need to bend backwards towards the rear wheel to allow for the wheel path? A straight tube would put the seat clamp further forward than a linked one
  • 1 1
 @thedirtyburritto: not the case

Look at the earlier Intenses. The spider and recluse had straighf seat tubes with sub 420mm chainstays.
  • 27 8
 Ngl, not a fan of the curves
  • 5 2
 Yeah, the top tube makes it look like a swaybacked donkey IMO.
  • 2 3
 looks feminine
  • 7 1
 these bikes look great - but serious question...has anyone ever seen a modern spot MTB out on the trail? ive only seen their single speed bikes from years past. im just curious whos buying these and if they can continue to keep making high end mtbs.
  • 27 0
 Granted I live in CO, I see them all the time.
  • 2 0
 I know 1 person in PA who has one. He likes it.
  • 2 0
 I had a spot SS and absolutely loved it. It was a beautiful bike. I've seriously considered SPOT for a trail/enduro bike but prior to this release their geometry was getting a little outdated, and riding in BC the slack head tube angle and something with 160/150 travel is something to be desired. With this update, they're in contention in my books again
  • 12 0
 Golden, CO is littered with Spots.
  • 5 0
 Same here, SW colorado has quite a few of these bikes
  • 6 0
 I get passed by guys with shaved legs and giant calves riding Spots all the time.
  • 1 0
 Seconding the "I see them all the time in front range CO" (COS specifically) and that's not surprising. Don't really see them anywhere else though.
  • 2 0
 I've had a few spots. It's nice riding something that not everyone else has (especially when they ride like they do)
  • 9 12
 Last time I saw one was when single track sampler almost died
  • 1 0
 See them all the time in western Colorado. Surprised?
  • 1 0
 I bought the Rollik and love it, riding in Northern California area.
  • 2 0
 I’m in Texas and haven’t seen any in the 6 months I’ve been riding.
I own a new single speed Spot Rocker and absolutely love it! Fantastic bike.
I also own a 2011 geared Spot Rocker and love that too!
The Spot Rocker is the best hardtail I’ve ever ridden. I love Spot so much I ordered a Spot Mayhem and I’m waiting for it to arrive in a week or two.
I can’t wait for @hardtailparty to one day review a Spot Rocker.... love your channel Steve!
  • 2 0
 Buy local, organic, and free range.
  • 1 0
 @jpat22:

Oh awesome! Happy to know they’re being supported locally. Very cool.
  • 2 0
 I've got a 2018 Spot Rolik 557 I picked up used with a DVO suspension. I love it. I sometimes feel a little guilty because it is a much better bike than I am a rider.
  • 2 0
 I have a 2020 Ryve 115. It replaced a 2016 Intense Primer as my all around trail bike. I have kept it set up with a XC focus - light and fast. Great climber. Feels like it punches above its weight on descents. I've been very happy with it. Happy enough that I am almost considering the Mayhem 150 to replace my Megatower (probably not).
  • 1 0
 I’ve seen one Spot here in NC. Dude let me rip down a quick DH on it. Felt amazing but so does my 3000 dollar Jeffsy.
  • 1 0
 @Wermuth44: thanks for the kind words. I've only ridden a rocker around the parking lot. I'm hoping to review one soon. Fingers crossed.
  • 1 1
 @srstudent: @srstudent: The only time I see a Spot is when I take my gravel bike to Green Mountain. I've never seen a Spot on a legitimate trail system.
  • 8 0
 Dam. Spot just made a hell of a nice looking bike. I really dig it for some reason. That boutique price though.
  • 11 4
 The geo numbers are Spot on!
  • 1 9
flag Cashman39 (Jul 22, 2020 at 2:26) (Below Threshold)
 @eugenux: for 2015. Norco Optic 2020, now there's some geo numbers.
  • 5 0
 @Cashman39:

I think you didn't quite Spot my intention with the comment.
  • 6 0
 Curious to see a force chart of that suspension
  • 8 1
 Looks like a bike!
  • 6 0
 That is a good looking bike!
  • 3 1
 Nice looking bike, but I don't get the trend for the dropped top tube. Do people ride sitting on the top tube or something? If the top tube was straight across from the headset to the base of the seatpost then there would be a lot more room in the front triangle for stowing water bottles, spare tube, tools, etc.
  • 1 0
 The alternative would be a sort of shark-fin mounting point for the forward bolts on the shock, which gets odd for the carbon (molded solid) and would be different for each size of bike - like on a XL it would be a really big sharkfin. I bet it more directly supports the action of the shock too. Agree it can be goofy looking and the frame designers have accentuated it on these bikes.
  • 3 0
 @twozerosix: look at the Fezzari that's on the front page, they have a similar shock position with straighter top tube and 2 bottle mounts.
  • 2 0
 I have the previous version mayhem 130, best bike i have owned and i have had plenty! It really shines with 27.5+ and i love 29" but for some reason 27.5+ is great on this platform. Minnesota rider here so tight singletrack, punchy climbs not too chunky.
  • 6 1
 Oh yes, that’s a good looking bike
  • 5 0
 Same day Fezzari Delano released, nice
  • 2 3
 Weird that PB doesn't even mention it...seems like addition to the category.
  • 4 0
 The Delano Comp build is FIRE. Full SLX, 4 pot brakes, DVO shock and fork for $3500.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: (I meant to type "nice addition"), but yep. Press release: get on it PB!
  • 1 0
 Whoah, that's a handsome ride actually and the $3,500 comp build with DVO suspenders and SLX drivetrain seems like crazy good value.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: It's got me reconsidering some decisions.
  • 1 0
 @smartyiak: pb didn't mention the spot either - this is a paid press release. Fezzari has not paid for their spot yet.
  • 1 0
 @onemind123: I knew it was just a presser. I meant: the press release is on their website. I assume Spot sends it to PB and PB decides whether or not it goes up.

Honestly, I don't know how internets works. Is that one way sites generate income?
  • 2 1
 Both manufacturers are guaranteed to give you a cracking good time.
  • 4 0
 The Fezzari article is now up and it's an actual, full review and not just a press release. Looks really nice!
  • 4 0
 @smartyiak: mr impatient
  • 1 0
 Is the link Ti or CF? Almost everything on Spot's site about the Living Link indicates CF (There is one mention of Ti on the Mayhem 150 page).

Only 2 of the 6 articles I found about the new Mayhem models mention Ti, and 2 specifically mention CF spring.

Is it going to be Ti going forward? What happened to the tune-ability of using a composite spring?
  • 2 1
 Seems like Titanium is the way forward. Easier to manufacture and attach to the frame. Same performance. Maybe better?
  • 1 1
 @Sycip69er: "Same performance. Maybe better?" That's the thing: we don't know. The leaf spring was their magic bit, built whole bikes around it. Turns out the composites weren't that magic, it seems.
  • 5 1
 @just6979: Bro. It isn't a conspiracy. The leaf spring on every bike that Spot come out with has been modified for each bike. Different thickness, width, layup, etc. With titanium it is easier to manufacture, bolts together with the frame much easier, and no longer needs to be tapered. So it is an improvement for several reasons. it isn't magic, it is just material design.
  • 1 0
 @Sycip69er: Why do you keep bringing back conspiracy? I never said conspiracy. Just wondering why Spot didn't include everything you just said in the press release. It's a significant change, especially how much they talked about only their fancy composite leaf spring being the only way to make this work, just a couple years ago.

It seems like a pretty good improvement according to everything you've said. Maybe you should go work for their marketing dept.
  • 2 0
 @Sycip69er: As @just6979 said, why are you arguing so hard against a conspiracy that no one is arguing for?
As to the switch from carbon to titanium, I, and others here, just find it odd that they don't discuss it more, for the simple reason that most companies are eager to tout any change on a new model as "20% stronger" "16% lighter" etc...so, to just in passing, mention a materials swap on the defining part of their design goes against the norm for bike marketing. Imagine if Commencal (a company we all associate with advocating aluminum frames) came out with a carbon bike, and just said "Oh, BTW, its carbon", with no further explanation for the change in strategy. My guess is that most companies go bananas on the marketing, touting all sorts of stuff that actually isn't that big a deal, and occasionally end up having to either backpedal or hope everyone has forgotten about what they claimed a few years prior when the company decides to go a different direction later.

As for the actual materials science, you seem to both be saying that the swap to Ti is no biggie, and you can "tune" metal just as much as you can "tune" carbon while at the same time arguing that the engineering behind the old carbon link is important enough to modify and tune for each bike, and they modified the layup as part of the tuning. As you presumably know, carbon is anisotropic, whereas titanium is isotropic, so if they were getting creative with the layup on the old carbon link then it is actually possible that there could be characteristics of the old carbon link that they couldn't simulate with Ti. I actually agree with you 100% that either Ti or carbon could be fine in this application, so if the titanium one is close enough in behavior and is easier to make or attach to the frame, then that's fine. What I am pointing out is that it's not unreasonable for a consumer who might spend $5k+ on a product to want to understand why it had a seemingly big shift in materials selection.
  • 1 0
 @thekaiser: hey Spot did you hear? You need to discuss with everyone the reason you changed it so they can judge if it is worthy.

Dude listen to yourself. This is why I say conspiracy. Because some of you bike geeks just go so deep in your mind of not trusting actual design engineers who test their stuff constantly to prove its worth. They don't have to give you all the lab analysis data to prove anything. They have riders on prototypes months before release. They get real feedback. Not internet feedback. Real bad ass riders who can notice slight changes.

It isn't a big shift. Go back and read about the original link. Look at a link alone. Pinkbike posted it several times. That link could be steel or titanium easily. In fact the first prototype was metal.

www.mountainflyermagazine.com/view.php/spot-brand-to-enter-full-suspension-market-with-leaf-spring-design.html

How it turned into carbon is another story. A mystery perhaps
  • 1 0
 @Sycip69er: No one said the Ti spring is not worthy or not good. Just wondering what pushed the change. You've made some guesses, but would be nice to hear straight from the horse's mouth, especially since the carbon spring was a big deal on the previous models.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: Yeah let's call them informed guesses lol

A horse just told me your wish was granted on instagram.
  • 1 0
 I appreciate the rear caliper being guarded inside the rear triangle. However, this makes me wonder what the rear hub width needs to be for this extra bump out and if a person can utilize any standard 148mm hub or proprietary only?
  • 2 0
 Super happy with my ryve 115. It’s a very light, fast and comfortable bike. Customer service was top notch as is the engineering. So excited about ordering a mayhem 150. I need more mayhem in my life.
  • 1 0
 A couple of questions about the 150.
1) I just switched the shock on my 27.5 to the Fox Float DPS. It has a 3-way switch that I love compared to the 2 way shock that I had before. The middle setting works great for so much. Will the 2 way switch that comes with the 150 builds be a downgrade?
2) Does the 150 make for a good alternative to something like the Pivot Firebird which is bigger and which is super popular here in CO. Or is that apples to oranges comparison?
  • 4 1
 Light compared to claimed weights for Tallboy, Following, etc, but don't Ripley and Trance have claimed weights of 5.6lbs?
  • 1 1
 Wasn't the selling point on the "living link" that they could tune the carbon to have certain characteristics at different points in the travel thus the marketing term "living" link? How would they achieve the same results with titanium.
  • 7 0
 Because you can "tune" metal just the same as you can "tune" composites.
  • 1 0
 The tune is how much the link is flexed at any specific point in the suspension travel, the link is just a spring in that equation.
  • 2 0
 Seems like a worthy contender. I wonder how well they pedal. The light weight and proper geo makes the 130 an interesting candidate for a do-it-all trail bike.
  • 3 0
 Pedals really well. Never touch an adjustment knob again once you get your setting.
  • 4 0
 So stoked for these. I've lived every spot I've ridden.
  • 1 0
 Looks like they shortened the chainstay a bit, which was the only problem I had with the older model (at least on paper). Can't wait to see some reviews. The 130 might be a strong contender against a Ripley later this year.
  • 5 3
 I think it looks pretty cool, even that top tube design, makes it look sleek. I have never seen a bike that i found ugly.
  • 29 19
 Try googling Orange bikes.
  • 20 3
 @YanDoroshenko: Simple single pivot, I like them
  • 5 22
flag seraph (Jul 21, 2020 at 23:38) (Below Threshold)
 @YanDoroshenko: or Knolly. Or Mondraker for that matter.
  • 28 1
 Maybe you aren’t familiar with Ellsworth bikes.
  • 4 6
 @Spech @seraph I'm actually quite surprised. I find Knolly and Ellsworth to be reasonably pretty and Mondraker to look awesome while Orange defines ungodly abomination of a desing for me. Guess it's all in the eye of the beholder.
  • 8 0
 @YanDoroshenko: Think you are right there. In my opinion Mondraker make some of the prettiest bikes available and while you could call Orange ugly, I think its more a rugged northern look and one they have not deviated from which I like
  • 15 0
 Check out Redalp bikes. Please.
  • 5 0
 haha, those redalp bikes are crazy. I want to see Levy do the hot lap on one
  • 7 1
 @seraph: yeah knolly are weird looking, sure, but Mondraker? They make some of the best looking bikes in the business.
  • 1 0
 Look up structure cycle works
  • 4 1
 @Spech: ...or the Marin Wolf Ridge.
  • 6 1
 I think Marin Mount Vision takes the title as ugliest bike of all time
  • 2 0
 @Davec85: I could never get past the looks of the Mount Vision. Despite the hideous looks, some of the reviews I've read say the bike rides incredibly well.
  • 1 0
 @HamishPalmer: those bikes look better in person - I saw a few at a bike Show in BC - however I've never seen one in the wild. To crazy for me though.
  • 1 0
 @tobiusmaximum: Maybe my age is showing, but I think Mondrakers are hideous. I prefer a more traditional-looking frame.
  • 2 0
 @kanioni: I did not think I cared about aesthetics... I stand corrected.
  • 3 0
 What a beauty! Serious eyecandy here.
  • 3 0
 Sick looking bike. And their 3D viewer on the website is super trick.
  • 1 0
 Suspension design looks very DW-link'ish; unless i'm missing something.

Good looking bike, i'd definitely consider it after the Firebird
  • 1 0
 so i am wondering how their direct to consumer model works when they frames are about $300-400 more than say ibis ripley v4 frame or ripmo respectively.
  • 1 0
 very similiar to the norco optic
  • 1 0
 Bold design. I kinda like it.
  • 1 1
 Is it just me or does anyone else think their bike names are too similar to Yeti?
  • 1 0
 Curious how it compares to a Ripley V4 or Ripmo V1 (pretty similar geo)?
  • 1 0
 Guess I'm the only one who wants 27.5 bikes still
  • 1 0
 super rad looking bike!
  • 1 0
 Thats a chunky monkey
  • 1 0
 Beautiful looking bike
  • 1 1
 Looks like a Pivot, but not quite as attractive.
  • 1 1
 Fugly like bh
  • 1 1
 Wow so hidious
  • 4 5
 Quite the spot
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