Update: A Better Look at Norco's New Long Travel Bike

Aug 7, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  

The problem with trying to guess how a bike works from looking at grainy photos is that sometimes you miss a key detail that wasn't quite clear in the 50 pixels that made up the actual frame. We speculated last week that the new Norco long travel bike may use flex stays for its suspension system, but now that we've had a better look at it under the team riders at Kicking Horse we've changed our opinion slightly.


The key detail we missed is that there's a (now) very obvious pivot on the swing arm. It's still a pretty unconventional design though and it looks like a similar layout to the Antidote Darkmatter's high pivot system.

Some other things we picked up are that it's a 29er front and rear and we're also no longer certain this is a new downhill bike. It's very definitely a long travel bike of sorts and the pros are running it with a dual crown fork for the rebirth of the Psychosis, but is it a full on downhill bike or an oversized enduro bike? At this point, we're not entirely sure but we think it could be a long travel bike that can be run with a single or double crown fork, a bit like the Slayer from Rocky Mountain, hence the bottle mounts. Either way, it definitely looks to be one of the most interesting bikes of the year and we look forward to learning more when Norco releases it.




Original article


We may not be getting much downhill racing this year, but you can bet that brands haven't been sitting on their hands. Instead, they'll have been using this downtime to find any mechanical advantage they can for when the World Cups get kick-started again.

One brand that we think has been doing just that is Norco, and this looks to be a brand new downhill bike underneath one of its riders spotted in British Columbia. Pinkbike user Tonkatruck went above (or should that be below) and beyond to get this spy shot from underneath a truck and then uploaded the pictures to our forums for us to pore over.

Norco's previous downhill bike used the distinctive HSP system. HSP stood for High Single Pivot, and it marked the first non-Horst Link bike that the brand had designed since 1995 (that would be the FTS-1 for any completionists). It used the same theory as classic Sunn bikes and more recent Commencal Supremes, where a high pivot provides a rearward axle path that lengthens the wheelbase as the suspension compresses. This should make it more stable through the rough stuff. Unlike the Commencal though, where the shock is compressed from below, the current HSP system uses an A.R.T pull-link to tug on a rocker that compresses the shock from above. Norco said that this allowed them to create a more progressive and tunable linkage than other similar designs.
Norco Aurum HSP Review - driveside swingarm
The current Norco Aurum uses a high single pivot that is compressed from above.

It looks like Norco will be sticking with the high pivot design on this new frame, but there are definitely some changes going on with the linkage. Unfortunately the meat of it is obscured thanks to a handily placed leg, but we do think we've spotted something interesting about the way this bike might work. Pinkbike's tech editor and engineer, Dan Roberts, has run some numbers and believes that this bike could be using flex pivots to make the new design work.


bigquotesIt's still a high pivot but now the shock is driven by the large link that is concentric to the BB. From what I can see, they need some flex in that rear triangle to make it work. That would also explain why the carbon tube is constant and smooth, and the dropouts bolt on over a small patch to not impede the flex.Dan Roberts, Pinkbike tech editor

Flex stays are fairly common in XC racing, where the low travel amounts mean that the chain stay and seat stay don't move apart very far, but we can't think of a downhill bike that has ever used them. We also think the aluminum drop outs could be used for some extra adjustability and could allow riders to tune the length of their chainstays, similar to the ones we've seen Greg Minnaar using on his V10 29 this year.

We're still just speculating at this point and reached out to Norco for more information, but at the moment all they said was, "This bike is part of Norco's Research and Development program and is purely an information-gathering exercise at this time. No details to share with you as any information about any bikes in R&D are under embargo." Hopefully we get to see more of this wild looking bike when racing restarts.


233 Comments

  • 165 5
 and a bottle cage mount!!
  • 47 0
 New Range?
  • 38 0
 @Arierep: I’ve been asking for a bottle cage for my dh bike for a while lol. At least then I don’t have to run back to the truck between practice runs for a quick drink.
  • 6 0
 @Arierep: check vital for that
  • 3 8
flag jaydawg69 (Jul 23, 2020 at 10:39) (Below Threshold)
 not the Range...
  • 6 1
 @Mattysville: this is tabu commentary to ask here botle cage on a DH bike... which I suffered many times.
  • 16 3
 @Mattysville: I totally agree. Full laps at whistler are long and I hate wearing a pack at the park.
  • 2 0
 @nskerb: thanks for the heads up
  • 23 0
 Its get hot doing park laps, the people need DH bikes with water bottles! Maybe this can be Mike Levy's next point of contention he never lets go of...
  • 3 0
 @BrianColes: it's on their tech rumours and innovation thread
  • 46 0
 The people have spoken. “With these ‘challenging times’ we are all facing, drinking from the fountain seems even RISKIER than before. That’s why we at Norco, driven market leaders, have listened to feedback from pro’s and Joe’s alike and we are proud to announce the 2021 Aurum HSP, the first DH bike so smooth we put a beer can holder right there so your lift rides are never dry.”
  • 6 1
 I started using a 0.5L flexible Platypus bottle I stash in the back pocket of my Race face stash jersey under my long sleeve. It works great and reduces the number of trips to grab water.
  • 8 2
 @mtbandskiforlife: i use one as well. Unless you are in Whistler during COVID-19 where they hide all sources of water. More people will go to the hospital for heat exhaustion than Covid!
  • 1 0
 Needs internal dropper post routing too
  • 3 1
 "water bottle cage"... on a DH bike, it'd damn well better be a "beer cage". XD
  • 1 0
 Looks like it has a twin spar down tube? Or a U-shaped profile with a cover? Maybe that's why it has "bottle mounts"? Or is it a weird shadow behind the head tube making it look like it's split in half? Also possible to use eccentric pivot points to make up for the missing link...looks good either way.
  • 2 1
 @Mattysville: and while we're at it, can we get integrated multi tools. It sucks to have to push back down, and DH and park had a pretty high risk of an off that means something needs a tweak. Ahem
  • 3 0
 @bikebums: I guess the point is to bring your own. Really not a big deal to wear a pack or bum bag at the park.
  • 3 1
 @MrLynch: you poor thing it must be a tough life....
  • 2 0
 @Mattysville: forget the bottle mount. We need a mini kegerator for DH bikes. Like a 1-2 beer kegerator & maybe a smoke pack holder & lighter. XD.
  • 1 0
 @MikeGruhler: there is a better photo of the downtube on Vital
  • 1 0
 I talked to a norco employee and he said: "maybe people want a bottle cage mount for long days at the park..."
I don't think it's the range but that's up for debate, at least until they release it
  • 1 0
 @Mattysville: it's a good call. Even if you don't use it for water it could be used for tools / tube.
  • 1 0
 @MikeGruhler: looks like it could be a return to a pull shock design to me, but I could equally be wrong!
  • 1 0
 @landscapeben: it's the same as an antidote darmatter as the article says. It's similar to a Devinci but it's an horst link (wheel is not connected to the swing arm).
  • 1 0
 @Mattysville: I bought a collapsible rubber cup on amazon for $3. I just fill at the tap in whistler then fork it up and put it in my pocket. I'm so smrt
  • 100 18
 Tall white socks? Unforgivable.
  • 50 9
 agreed 100%..
  • 222 0
 You can make the rules when you start riding the prototypes
  • 26 11
 Any white socks when not playing tennis, squash or cricket is unforgivable. Also black socks make a good place to wipe grease and dirt off fingers for grubby mountain bikers.
  • 26 0
 Look out! It’s the fashion police!
  • 15 5
 The higher the socks, the downer the foo
  • 7 1
 In the next 18-24 months, everyone will be wearing white socks! Just like how everyone is now wearing pants instead of shorts.
  • 7 1
 Only acceptable with burkendorks
  • 9 6
 @charmingbob: to this day, I don't understand why pants don't dominate the MTB scene
  • 17 3
 @Arierep: too hot.
  • 2 2
 @Arierep: The tide is shifting I'm seeing a lot more people wearing Fox and TLD pants. I don't think I'll switch mainly because I can't stomach the cost of them.
  • 9 2
 @Arierep: Someone show me a pant I can climb in and ill buy it.
  • 8 1
 Only people I see here ride in pants are kids that see the pros wear them in videos. Maybe there will be a couple on the mountain on shuttle days, but otherwise it's Shortsville here.
  • 13 6
 I wear white socks on my roadie in full lycra. That should shut this whole thing down.

@Arierep: It is a cool day today here, only about 90F (32C) outside. I'll be riding about 30 miles (50k) and 3000' (1000m). That's just a Thursday evening ride.

I'm not a fan of pants.
  • 7 0
 @phastlikedatnascar: lol! Idk if a lot of people on this site will understand your reference. #foosgonewild
  • 7 6
 Better than these little lady socks every one seems to wear these days so dudes can show off thier ankles.
  • 1 0
 @snowintrees: If I had that a** I'd probably wear them.. but at status quo, I might get arrested...
  • 7 1
 @noplacelikeloam: fox flex air. It got a elastic waistband and basically feel like cosy around the house sweatpants while wearing.

I started wearing pants because the pros wear them. Because, Fanboy/poser. And I have ended up wearing them all the time, unless it's really warm. The main benefit, apart from making you feel like a pro, is when you are finished riding, and take them off with all the mud and dust that elswhise would have ended up inside the house.
  • 2 0
 @noplacelikeloam: Decathlon NH500 Slim pants. Cheap, fresh, comfortable and lasted me a year of heavy duty use.

I like pants because they keep you and your pads clean and generally do a much better job protecting you on natural trails, specially with overgrown
  • 2 0
 @santacruz-ing: for real let the man rock the tall white tubes
  • 2 0
 @noplacelikeloam: Ride NF out of Vancouver Canada, you are welcome!

www.ridenf.com
  • 2 0
 It's 2020.. People be wearing high white socks with cropped pants and black shoes and it's considered "trendy..."

But I agree and think it's hideous... Black socks or no socks for me.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: Brave of you to claim you're a roadie in the PB comments lmao
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: I wear pants on rides like these. Not because it is "better" than shorts or anything. In fact, even the Fox Flex Air can seem like a burden in weather like this. But yeah, pants and long sleeves for me.

I'm really allergic to poison oak and it's only gotten worse over the years. It's everywhere where I live and it's possible to get it during the colder months, too.

Pants, long sleeves, and gloves are the only way to be certain that I'm not covered in the stuff for entirety of the year. The pants are expensive, but you can find knock-offs or non-cycling stuff cheaper. getting breathable and sun-protecting long sleeves is easy too if you look through fishing and hiking gear off season.
  • 1 0
 @whisper06: $$$$$$$$ Nice though!
  • 1 0
 @bengtleon: Discontinued by the looks of it
  • 1 0
 @charmingbob: you easily get your money's worth though. I bought some Kevlar Defend Pants for $130cad beginning of last year and wear them every single ride, whether is 30c+ in Utah (because they're so well vented) or middle of British winter, (stick some thermals underneath).
  • 3 0
 @JSTootell: I am impressed. I don't think I have ever seen a post with a U.S flag and metric conversion when talking measurements before.
  • 3 0
 @stumphumper92: Trying to earn my Silver Star ribbon in bravery.

@happycatbasket: I get that. Some people need/want that protection. For you, it's available.

@themouse77: I'm smart enough to recognize the superior system. Dumb enough to work in a career where we don't use it.
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: 1995 called...
  • 1 0
 @bigburd: I like to show off my ankles and get the Mennonite girls all excited.
  • 1 0
 @noplacelikeloam: fox flexair, I wear them in summer on trail rides no problem
  • 40 0
 I’m a rigid believer in flexy stays.
  • 10 0
 TMI
  • 12 2
 Looks to be the same as the Antidote Darkmatter

antidotebikes.com/product/darkmatter/?v=7516fd43adaa

If you look closely at the seatstays of the Darkmatter, imagine if the cap for the pivot hardware was black. From a blurry, blown up phone camera it would be easy to miss:

ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb13894900/p5pb13894900.jpg

TL;DR: it could have a pivot that you can't see because potato quality
  • 5 0
 I too think there is a pivot there.... similar to Rocky's Slayer.
  • 4 0
 there were about 4-5 of those that day. i honestly didnt notice or forgot to check any differences between the protos. but i saw the whole bike and it basically looked like the current nomad front triangle but more straight(er) and a wilson back end with and idler on the top main pivot
  • 3 0
 @juicebanger: Given what people said about Darkmatter it was probably the best bike you could get 4 years ago (I don't know exactly when it was launched).
  • 4 5
 This is all a marketing ploy to softly release a product and create a bit of a buzz. I guess job well done!! Don’t you think the leg is too perfectly placed in the photo? Or that no one noticed somebody get on their belly in the parking lot to take the photo?
  • 2 0
 Also similar to the original zerode dh and lahar dh bikes
  • 3 0
 @vid1998: the dark matter launched in 2016 and if you compare the geo to today’s standards, Antidote was ahead of their time. The geo is exactly aligning with today’s standards.

The pic above is a spitting image of the linkage of the dark matter sitting in my living room. If you also check out propain frame design Antidote launched that same design 1 year prior with the Antidote Lifeline (26 in DH).

There has been a lot of subtle influences that stem from Antidote.
  • 3 0
 @jaydawg69: I agree. There's a hidden Horst Link back there. The suspension layout looks actually really similar to the Devinci Wilson's one.
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: Not Horstlink, but singlepivot with chainstay actuating the rocker link. I think the misterious pivot is on the chainstay, hard to see at the 1st time, but there is big blurred dark part of the chainstay in front of the rear axle.
There is no way, such rectangular tubes would be used to flex the structure for such a long distance required by rocker link.
  • 1 0
 @fluider: yes, there's no way such a boxy structure flexes and whitstands the forces a DH bike is subjected to. As you mentioned, there is a change on the fibers layout on the chainstay, next to the dropout. It's a blind pivot, a la Norco.

By "Horst Link" I was referring to this chainstay positioned pivot, not to the whole suspension layout. The whole suspension system is very reminiscent of the one you find on the Devinci Wilson, or the one Sunn used on their DH bikes some time ago, as I stated above.
  • 2 0
 Vital's tech and rumors thread has some updated spy shots from Whistler; once again potato quality and inconclusive
  • 3 0
 @vid1998: I'd still take a Darkmatter in this day and keep it for the next 5-10 years
  • 2 0
 @Happypanda1337: Propain Rage and 'Pro10' suspension predates Antidote by at least 1 year.
  • 10 1
 single high pivot, no flex stays but an additional link hidden in the bb area. The visible silver horizontal and vertical part are two parts.
why: if you think of the curve the pivot linking to the chainstays would make if its a single lower link, this would allow for only a few cm motion to the back of the bike --> 200mm travel? nope...
  • 3 2
 It has to have flex stays since the swingarm needs to deform to accomodate the link around the BB. Otherwise you'd need a pivot by the rear axle. Nobody said the BB mounted rocker and the swingarm are single piece. The swingarm appears to be. And the main pivot, the BB and the rocker-swingarm pivot below the BB make 3 pivots with the fourth missing.
  • 4 1
 @flowgeek has it. There will be a short little link pulling the rocker that drives the shock. I've made a trail bike like this without the high pivot.
  • 3 1
 @Primoz: nope no flex needed if there is an extra pull-link... (hard to explain in words, sorry - a simple drawing would be much easier...)
  • 1 0
 I get what you mean, and I think you're right.
  • 6 0
 Surely they’d have closed the rear triangle if they were using a short link?
My moneys on a flex design.
  • 3 0
 @ProperPushIrons: That's what I was just about to say.

Yeah, I get the point made now. It would be a classical swingarm design with two short links driving the shock, which, kinematically, checks all the boxes. It's in the vein of the Alchemy bikes, or, better yet, someone mentioned Corsair Marque below.

The catch is with such long chainstays and seatstays with no bracing between them, the structure is gonna flex like crazy. Why complicate your life with a flexy construction and then complicate it again by using two links which will just wobble around and do mostly nothing, when you can use a single rocker link and be done with it?

Don't think of it as that the flex is needed for this to work. Flex was used intentionally to make it work.
  • 2 1
 @ProperPushIrons: indeed, closing the rear triangle would make sense if there is no flex needed - i just don't see how you would get dh-worthy 200mm travel with only flex stays and a single lower link roating around the bb...
  • 1 0
 @flowgeek: With proper link positioning (for example by having the relaxed state mid travel and bend the structure going to 0 or max travel from that point) and with proper carbon layup (making it flexy/elastic in that mode, but not others).

You'd be surprised how flexy structures can be. Take a look at an airplane wing flexure test (where they break it). Even more, aerodynamics of such flexible structures must be analysed (with CFD) in their deformed state to provide accurate results, in their 'designed' shape the aerodynamics is quite different.
  • 1 0
 FWIW, the "DH vs Enduro vs Slopestyle?" Pinkbike video shows the new Norco DH at 4:07. Pausing and looking at the frames (boy would I love a frame by frame option from YT) shows an edge, indicating a pivot near the rear axle, on the carbon part. A pivot that looks like the bottom link ('chainstay'...) is the one the axle mounts to, which would make this bike a true (high pivot) horst link.

Where's that hat?
  • 10 1
 Saw that bike in the park (whistler) and it looks really good, rode the chair with the rider and I asked many questions with no success.. it as bottle mount inserts. He told me that a similar high pivot trail bike is also in the works...
  • 1 0
 who was it?
  • 11 0
 Cool, always good to see what Norco is doing
  • 6 0
 Looks like this bike will also come with a set of legs.
Cutting edge really, means I can use the pair I have for the climbs, and switch over to my 'NLEG' TM (Norco Leg Extension Gain) for the downhills.

I can only assume this is done via a Zipper like many other great products hitting the market.
  • 1 0
 @Waldon83: i'm guessing it's the zipper tires you're talking about?
  • 1 0
 @Bikerdude137: If you're talking about the incredible, mind boggling, outer space traveling, all the woman getting, Zip on tyres....then yes I am !
  • 10 0
 What are the chances that this is a pre-production frame, and those are to adjust/fine-tune the wheel path and linkage?
  • 5 0
 Come to think of it, thats probably what that is.
  • 7 2
 hardly need a spy shot, this guy has been chilling in the lift line all season and not making any attempt to hide the bike. i was too confused by the watter bottle cage mount to notice the stays though!
  • 5 0
 I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that's the range with a dual crown, or at least if it is the dh bike then the range will be nearly identical
  • 1 0
 The Range, given some pictures of a prototype looking very Norco-like, is a high pivot horst link design and, apart from the idler, very similar to the sight. Nothing like this one.
  • 1 0
 @Primoz: answering the real questions ????????
  • 2 2
 @Primoz: that thing on vital is not a range. I know that 100%.



I won't say what it is though
  • 3 4
 I've seen the new Range and actually have ridden it for a couple of minutes. I think the release date will be sometime in the fall. The above photo is not the new Range.
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: But it is a Norco?
  • 2 0
 @Primoz: sure is. But you'll understand the confusion when they release the models. Norco = Smart.
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: Someone on Vital commented that it's an enduro race bike. Does that mean a new model and the fact that the Range, if staying, is becoming a park/FR/jib/hardhitter bike?
  • 1 0
 @Primoz: photo posted above is the DH model. One on Vital appears to be the Shore model (650b/180mm travel). I'm sure there will be a 170/180 29er as well but not sure.
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: Yeah, didn't mean this here is an enduro bike, I meant the Al bike on Vital, no worries.
  • 1 0
 It would be kind of strange if they threw the current design of the Aurum out of the window, since they completely redesigned it not even 2 years ago.
  • 2 0
 @PaulBoettig: this would hardly be throwing it out the window. It's an iteration of what they did then.


Keep in mind they had been working on that aurum since like 2016 or 17.
  • 16 9
 #GRIZTOUR
  • 12 8
 Why did people down vote this?? Griz is the man!!!!!
  • 2 4
 @jomacba: Beard envy!
  • 2 3
 @bojackbikeman: Your probably right...
  • 3 0
 See also: GT RTS, Sunn Radical, Antidote Darkmatter. Although the latter two used seatstay pivots and none of them had concentric BB pivots.
  • 2 0
 wilson?...
  • 2 0
 @jomacba: Duh. Of course. Forgot about that. Concentric at both the BB and rear axle. Bikes are fun.
  • 5 0
 @jmc361: bikes ARE fun Smile
  • 7 1
 New shore?
  • 3 1
 Looks like it!
  • 4 0
 Man that spy shot is so frustrating, I’m sure they’re minions but I can’t be sure.
  • 2 0
 looks like an assegai at the front and a DHR II at the rear
  • 1 0
 Hey @norco, here are some assumptions (and a bit of wishful thinking). Which ones are wrong?

The Aurum (not HSP, now available in aluminum only) is aging and could (should) be replaced in your line up.

The Aurum HSP is expensive to manufacture and some of its shapes can’t be made in aluminum.

You’ve been convinced by the team and customer/industry feedback that high pivot + idler pulley design out performs the horst link, and you see that people want to buy this design.

You are seeing other brands coming up with trail/enduro bikes with such designs and you are now ready to get onboard.

Enduro bikes are getting closer and closer to dh bikes in terms of geo, strength, weight and performance.

More and more riders who can’t justify and/or afford two bikes are choosing a trail/enduro bike over a dh bike.

So, you come up with a hsp bike which:

- can be done in aluminum or carbon;

- is cheaper to manufacture in carbon than the Aurum HSP (rear trianlge);

- geometry/suspension set up can be adjusted so the bike can be built has a full-on DH (200mm) or big enduro (170-180mm).

- is lighter than the Aurum HSP.

What do you think?
  • 1 0
 Sorry, you're wrong, there's no flex pivots. It rotates around the top pivot on the seat tube and then that linkage at the bottom allows the lower pivot on the rear triangle move in an arc back and up and drive the shock. It's pretty nicely done.
  • 3 0
 Didn’t blenki say they had a completely new bike he’d be riding after fort bill?
  • 3 0
 noone just makes prototypes out of carbon....it looked mullet ready and definitely running 29ers since i ride one myself
  • 8 7
 Can’t exactly do flex stays out of aluminum
  • 3 0
 @jj12jj: my marin mount vision has got flexy stays and thay are alloy, had it two years of jump and light dh abuse and supprisingley still not cracked or snapped, it's the isotrac frame.
  • 2 0
 @theberminator: neat! I would love to know how they manage fatigue
  • 2 0
 The Giant Stance has alloy flex stays and they're known for snapping lol
  • 1 0
 @jj12jj: Scott does Wink Granted, it's the Scale frame with 100/120 rear travel. But still.

And I too was flabbergasted when I saw that. Carbon front, flex rear in Al.
  • 1 0
 @jj12jj: You can though? What makes you think you couldn't?
  • 1 0
 @jj12jj: Salsa Spearfish Aluminium also had flexstays. (2012)
  • 1 0
 @jj12jj: when I brought the frame used from paligap it was a used enduro race frame so has also been abused by someone who is a sponsored rider, I didn't even realise it had flex stays until I got it out the box as it was a cheap bargain on ebay and I snapped it up without reading the advert, I did think at first what have I brought this won't last 5 mins, two years of a 90kg rider using it for everything iv got to say its probably the best frame iv had, it's now on its second shock and the bearings are still OK.
  • 5 0
 Probably an E bike
  • 4 0
 The handy under-trailer-hitch cam.
  • 2 0
 Lower link driven, shock placement similar to nomad, but no counter-rotating upper link. Maybe a VPP-like design with less moving parts and a circumvents parents?
  • 2 0
 I believe the VPP patent is expired now anyway.
  • 3 0
 THATS NOTHING.... Wait until the new model gets debuted that is going to be the talk of the town.
  • 2 0
 To be fair, I've seen the Aurum on the internet lots, and always think, "meh"; but I saw one in person, and it was the freaking best.
  • 1 1
 Same with the Pivot Firebird.
  • 4 0
 New Shore?
  • 1 0
 Nope shore will be high pivot but has a rocker link driving a vertical shock. More standard for what we are used to from norco's suspension layouts
  • 1 0
 That large triangular link driving the shock looks pretty interesting. Or shall we say it makes for pretty interesting looks?
  • 2 0
 This is going to piss off so many people who believe engineered flex is a hoax!

#engineeredflexgate
  • 3 0
 I bet they have never used a coil spring in their life.
  • 1 0
 Looks like the same design used on the Corsair Marque over a decade ago. Very effective and great design. What once was old is new again.
  • 1 0
 Talk about being too early. 1x drivetrains would help them out immensely.

What happened to the brand?
  • 1 0
 @Primoz: the company still exists but not distributed many places. They have some nice looking stuff but not as progressive as they used to be. They are the same company as Atomlab now.
  • 2 2
 Sorry Norco the Aurum hi pivot is ugly. This new frame is a vast improvement in looks. In fact it gets me excited! So glad to see a Canadian bike company create world class mountain bikes.
  • 5 1
 They dont care if you find it ugly. They simply wanted to make a fast bike.
  • 3 1
 Looks extremely similar to the Forbidden Druid! Shock placement is now identical on this new Norco. New Range perhaps!
  • 1 0
 Minimal chain wrap could make it extra sensitive to drivetrain wear. (Same with the Kavenz VHP16, Deviate Highlander, Forbidden Druid without the lower guide, etc.)
  • 2 0
 Could the dropouts be using sliders?
  • 10 0
 Switch infinity axle
  • 1 0
 I mean it's not totally improbable, especially for a single high pivot system, which needs an idler anyways. I think I've seen a picture of a prototype GT downhill frame that did have suspended axle dropouts on top of just a regular four bar rear wheel suspension system.
  • 2 0
 @benmoosmann: I think cannondale had an old prototype similar, it had a main shock driven by the swing arm and two smaller short travel shocks parallel to the seat stays that were driven by a pivoting axle of sorts.
  • 3 0
 Looks like a Lahar
  • 1 0
 I think there's a pivot and in addition it seems that the dropout can move to avoid the braking blockage.
  • 1 0
 My app bike have similar seat stay; I doubt it will be flex seat stay, more likely 2 pivots
  • 2 0
 You still need a chain for downhill? Big Grin
  • 2 0
 180mm front and rear Norco Shore.
  • 1 1
 This is the new range, under wraps officially until spring 2021 according to dealer supplies. We haven't even been given geo numbers to go on yet.
  • 3 3
 I like the design with shock being even more at the bottom of the frame for the better stability. Let's see!
  • 1 0
 Absolutely! keep the center of gravity low while allowing a bottle cage! Santa Cruz!
  • 1 0
 How about that sweet NF kit !
  • 5 4
 Yep, that's the NEW Range!
  • 4 2
 Nope. Not by the looks of it. Also, dual crown fork.
  • 3 0
 Yeah I think it might be, why would a DH bike have a bottle cage mount? They might just be testing a dual crown fork on it
  • 2 0
 @PetrolHead209: gear mounting? It has become increasingly popular to mount tools to your bike, even through separate bottle bosses.

Also the supposed range proto is made out of aluminium, looks nothing like this one, looks much lighter, but is also a high pivot with an idler. This is a DH bike.
  • 1 1
 @Primoz: the "range proto" could be the other long travel bike that is new for 2021 that will be alloy only, but this is definitely the new range. 2021 dealer catalog shows the builds of the '21 range and the frame is identical to this.
  • 1 0
 @Bryceridesbikes: wait, the carbon thingie in the pics up here being the Range and the aluminium bike being the... well, supposed Shore? Hah... That would be fun, this one looks much more burly, maybe too burly for enduro compared to the 'Shore'.

Will there be aluminium versions of the Range too?
  • 1 1
 @Primoz: 2021 sourcebooks show an unchanged aurum hsp and alloy aurum. A completely new range that is what you see in this picture. A shore is coming but positioned as a freeride/park bike. Range is a race bike and will be carbon only, shore will be alloy only. Shore is high pivot Horst link with vertical shock. Little details like the bottle cage provision and step seat angle give away that its an over forked Enduro bike. Not to mention the frame has no stop bumpers like Norco dh frames normally have
  • 2 0
 @Bryceridesbikes: You're playing the right game to get laid off, talking about bike embargoes like that!
or... are you?
  • 1 0
 @spaceofades: Now who said there was any embargo on this spy bike that doesn't seem to exist?? I could be just making guesses like any one else just making a fake claim to have seen all the details ????
  • 2 0
 Looks like a GT RTS
  • 1 0
 Or Sunn Radical
  • 2 1
 Flex stays + long travel rear end seems like formula for disaster.
  • 2 0
 I love DH bikes!
  • 1 0
 He’s obviously flexing his stays for the camera... =P
  • 1 0
 Going the way of Polygon.
  • 1 0
 Ethirteen tyres in the photoshoot, Maxxis on the hill.
  • 2 0
 Forbidden Druid
  • 1 1
 It’s a Norco Wilson... nothing more...

No flex stay needed for this change.
  • 1 0
 Looks like the m29 gwins on with a higher pivot
  • 1 0
 Looks sorta like an old school Sunn Radical+.
  • 1 0
 A Better Looking Norco Long Travel Bike
  • 1 0
 Reminds me of the Demo 8, minus some superfluous rear end pieces
  • 1 0
 Anyone else notice the huge seat tube? What kind of shape is that??
  • 1 0
 Possible floating rear brake with this setup
  • 1 0
 Is that a 200mm travel fork?
  • 1 0
 New range? Guessing 170 rear.
  • 1 1
 Is that water bottle mounts above the shock? Missing the key point here.
  • 1 1
 What’s the difference between flex stays vs. just a solid rear triangle?
  • 3 1
 A solid rear triangle is a single pivot and drives the shock either directly (Orange) or through a linkage (think Alchemy and some old Commencals, ~2010 Metas). With flex stays you effectively make a 4-bar layout (usually a Horst link or a faux-bar, because the rear pivot rotates very little, enabling you this), but then you throw away the rear pivot.

Because you only have one link driving the shock instead of two, the distances between pivots change and something has to flex in order for the suspension to cycle through the travel. With only two sides of a big triangle (seat stays and chainstays) the actual flex around the rear axle needs to be relatively small to go through the suspension motion.

This has been applied a lot in XC bikes, where the travels are small and the rotation angles similarly small as well. That and the fact that you get rid of a pivot point lowers the weight significantly. Case in point, multiple Cannondale Scalpel models have had flex stays, the latest Spec Epic has them (coming from _THE_ FSR company), Canyon has had them on the Lux, Scott has it on their Spark models (in aluminium as well!).

Kinematics wise, it's something in between and can't be modelled classically, you need to perform a flexural analysis to see how the brake carrier and rear axle actually move (and rotate) through the travel to actually determine the kinematics. But with the usual place of application (XC bikes), it's not that much of a concern apparently. And you can just strengthen the chainstays and make the seatstays flex the most, call it a day and say it's a singlepivot Smile
  • 1 0
 @Primoz: solid rear triangle doesn’t only mean single pivot - Santa Cruz, Any DW link bike, they have the solid rear triangles no flex stays and are not single pivot.
  • 1 0
 @aushred: True. Bit confusing for TBH.
  • 1 0
 @aushred: the point was trying not to overcomplicate things too much. If I extend your logic for example, a split pivot is a solid rear triangle then (even though it's just a line). And all seatstays on all horst link bikes are flex stays because they have 3 points defining them but more or less just two triangle sides connecting them, enabling flex.

Hell, everything flexes, everything is a flex stay!

Of course all dual short link bikes have a solid rear triangle, but it is suspended from two separate links and "floats" in space compared to the front triangle. The two options I was describing are both connected directly to the main frame and rotate around a single defined pivot point. That's their similarity with a difference down the line (driving the shock and all). With a dual short link, kinematics wise, there is no similarity to a swingarm (with or without driving links) or a flex stay.


If it's confusing it just shows that things might not be as simple as throwing around some pivots.
  • 1 0
 Braaappppp stays
  • 2 2
 Seriously? I just bought the old one!!
  • 3 0
 Me too but I’m not crying I love the bike I got! If this comes out and it’s even better I may think about a quick flip after this light season but otherwise I’m happy keeping the 2020.
  • 3 0
 @Mattysville: it is a great bike definitely
It's sooo fast! I won't be switching but it's kind of annoying lol
  • 2 0
 @Bikerdude137: nothing wrong with a previous gen bike. Doesn't mean you're missing out. I'm still riding my 2015 Scott gambler 710. I could afford a new one but I love this thing!
  • 2 0
 @ThunderChunk: yeah but the old gambler is waaaay cooler than the new one
  • 2 0
 @Bikerdude137: I was actually thinking of buying an aurum next season. I love the design
  • 1 0
 Maxxis prototype tyres!
  • 1 0
 Wilson
  • 1 1
 The 'meat of it' being the bosch electric motor Wink
  • 1 1
 Phil Swift must have sold Norco on those flex stays
  • 1 3
 @norco: You guys need to focus on the front triangle design. The seat post mast is too chunky in comparison with the top tube and downtube.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Nomad!
  • 1 0
 white sox
  • 1 0
 GT RTS reincarnated.
  • 1 1
 Everyone wants to be like Kavenz!!
  • 1 0
 Maybe new range?????
  • 1 1
 Yes, should be a spring 2021 launch
  • 1 0
 lahar rebourn
  • 5 6
 Full review and press release tomorrow
  • 7 0
 i am not paid or anything by anyone so i doubt it....would have been nice though ehyy pinkbike ??
  • 1 1
 27.5 please!!!!
  • 2 0
 Not a VPP
  • 2 5
 horrible!
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