SR Suntour Auron Fork - Review

Apr 30, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  


SR Suntour have been making the push to gain recognition as a viable option in the increasingly competitive high end suspension fork market, and last season announced their entrance into the all-mountain category with the Auron. With 150 or 160mm of air-sprung travel, 34mm stanchions, externally adjustable high and low speed compression, and a 15mm thru-axle, on paper Auron looks intriguing, especially considering the $700 USD asking price, which is several hundred dollars less than other suspension manufacturer's top tier offerings. After our initial test ride last fall, we took the Auron to the trails of the Pacific Northwest for a long term test to see if it had what it takes to compete with the current kings of the suspension world.



SR Suntour Auron Specs

• Intended use: all-mountain
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Travel: 150 or 160mm (ships in 160mm setting)
• Air sprung, cartridge damping
• Adjustments: high and low speed compression, rebound, air pressure
• 34mm stanchion tubes
• Hollow aluminum crown, magnesium lowers
• Tapered steerer tube only
• 15mm Q LOC 2 thru axle
• Weight (RC2): 2040 grams
• MSRP: $700 USD (RC2)



Construction

The Auron's lowers are constructed from magnesium, and the 34mm 7000 series aluminum stanchions are bonded to a hollow aluminum crown. The fork is only available with a tapered steerer tube and is equipped with a 15mm thru-axle that uses SR Suntour's Q LOC 2 system. The arch of the fork shares a similar shape with Suntour's Rux downhill fork – it's fairly thin vertically, but has more horizontal width than other forks on the market. There's plenty of room to run up to a 2.5” tire, and the back of the arch is smooth, free from any lattice work that can pack up with mud on sloppy rides. Disc brake calipers are mounted onto a post mount that will accept 160mm rotors without the need for an adaptor.

Suntour Auron 2014
  The Auron's lowers have plenty of room for wide tires, and the back side of the arch is free of any mud collecting crevices.

Damping / External Controls

The Auron has an air spring with a coil negative spring on the left side of the fork, and a sealed cartridge damper is located in the right side. Suntour chose to go with a sealed cartridge due to the ease of service – a cartridge swap can be done in a matter of minutes, providing that a shop has a replacement in stock. The possibility of contamination from mud and grit working its way past the fork's seals is also less of an issue, since the oil is all contained in one sealed unit.

Suntour Auron 2014
  Air pressure plus low and high speed compression are adjusted on the top of the fork, and the rebound knob is located at the bottom of the right leg.

The fork's air pressure is adjusted via a Shrader valve found under an aluminum cap on the left side of the fork, while high and low speed compression can be adjusted by turning the two knobs on the top right side. There are 14 clicks of high speed and 10 click of rebound adjustment. Rebound adjustment takes place at the bottom of the right leg by turning a red anodized knob. There's also an elastomer volume spacer found underneath the air cap that can be trimmed down to decrease the amount of ramp up at the end of the fork's travel.

SR Suntour Auron QLoc2
  SR Suntour's Q LOC 2 system uses an expanding collet design - the red portion on the axle expands once the axle is slid through the hub and dropouts, and then the QR lever is used to secure everything into place.

Q LOC 2

The Auron uses SR Suntour's patented thru-axle quick release system called the Q LOC 2. Instead of threading into one side of the drop outs, the axle has a portion that expands once it's through the dropout, and then the quick release lever is closed to secure the wheel. Wheel removal is as simple as opening the QR lever, pushing in and turning the nut on the thru axle, and then sliding the axle out. It does take a few practice runs to get the hang of the system, but once you figure out the concept it's a quick and easy method of securing the front wheel.



Ride Report

Our test fork spent time on two different 160mm full-suspension rigs, each originally specc'd with a different suspension manufacturer's 160mm fork. On the trail, the Auron has a very uniform, consistent feel through the initial 3/4 of the its stroke, followed by a strong ramp up as it nears the end of its travel. There's not the beginning stroke suppleness that's the hallmark of a coil sprung fork, a trait that several air forks currently on the market have been able to come extremely close to replicating. SR Suntour does use a coil negative spring on the air side of the fork to help increase the fork's initial sensitivity, but it still wasn't quite as supple over the small bumps as we would have liked. After a few rides we decided to trim the elastomer spacer down a bit since we weren't using the full amount of travel, even of off larger drops. Trimming the spacer is a quick process, but it's a measure twice, cut once type of affair, and it seemed like a fairly rudimentary way to adjust the air chamber volume - some type of reusable plastic spacer system would make more sense. Trimming the elastomer did the trick though, giving the fork a less harsh ramp up and increasing the amount of useable travel.

Although we weren't floored by the fork's initial suppleness, its performance was consistent, and there wasn't any odd behavior even when it was pushed hard through sections of jagged rocks or wheel grabbing, root filled holes. Even after the elastomer spacer was trimmed down, the Auron did a good job of managing hard impacts, and there were no teeth-rattling, harsh bottom outs on those occasions when we landed further and flatter than planned. Although the Auron does have a wide range of compression settings, we seemed to fall at the far end of the adjustment spectrum, and ended up running the high speed compression all the way open, with only a few clicks of low speed. Heavier riders may find the compression settings to be more useable, but it would be nice to see the amount of damping in the full open position reduced to expand the range. As far as chassis stiffness goes, the Auron falls in the realm of what you'd expect from a fork with 34mm stanchions, although it did feel slightly less laterally stiff than the RockShox Pike whose place it took on our test sleds. Still, riders making the jump to this fork from one with 32mm stanchions will no doubt notice (and appreciate) the added stiffness.


Issues

The first bike we tried to install the Auron on had a set of wheels laced up with Shimano XT center lock hubs. After getting the fork and brake all set, we put on the front wheel and gave it a spin, or at least tried to – the center lock lockring contacted the lower part of the fork leg, a design oversight that meant the Auron wouldn't work with center lock hubs. We spoke to Suntour about this and they said that fewer than 50 forks had this issue, and that the design had been corrected for the current production run.

The other issue we ran into occurred on demanding sections of trail where the fork was cycling quickly through nearly all of its travel. In these instances the rebound stroke noise became very pronounced, emitting a sound reminiscent of a fat kid trying to suck the last bits of a milkshake through a straw. It's not something that affects the fork's performance, but it's loud enough to be distracting, and was even more noticeable thanks to how quiet modern bikes have become.


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesOn paper the Auron looks quite promising, with a reasonable weight and price, plus features usually reserved for higher end offerings, but on the trail the fork didn't quite end up being the diamond in the rough we'd hoped it would be. It's a capable fork, but the number of viable options in the suspension fork market continues to grow, and it takes more than middle-of-the-road performance to really stand out from the crowd. Further refinement, such as a more usable compression range and a quieter rebound stroke would help the Auron earn higher marks, and move it closer to the head of this year's class of all-mountain forks. That being said, Suntour is now offering custom fork tuning at their Madison, Wisconsin, facility for customers seeking a different tune than the stock configuration. Although there is a fee for this service (pricing will vary depending on what changes are requested), it is good to see Suntour offering aftermarket options to their customers that should help raise the Auron's performance up a notch. - Mike Kazimer


www.srsuntour-cycling.com


103 Comments

  • + 45
 There have been some changes to this fork from the version that the user had in this review. After some more R&D from our field Werx riders we have made the following changes.

Cartridge: The compression spring was modified to emit a more usable range of compression adjustment. This has allowed for better tuning in the middle of the settings as opposed to the extremes.

Negative coil spring: This has been replaced with a longer and more sensitive assembly giving the fork that small bump compliance for small chatter type surfaces.

Thanks for all the great comments!

Cheers
  • + 16
 Wow, nice to see you guys make quick improvements from rider input....speaks volumes. Keep up the good work!
  • + 4
 I agree. How can I know that the fork is the updated one? Tnx Wink
  • + 20
 It seems that the sound emitted is the same as the sound on my 55RC3 due to the open bath system. No effect on the working indeed
  • + 8
 Yup, I love all open bath Marzocchi forks, they maybe are a bit louder than fox/rs/manitou etc but they sure are very plush and really strong forks.
I guess Italians got it right, I'm either gonna stick to Marzocchi products or go for Fox with it's expensive services. (it's only expensive when you compare the two, Marzocchi I can service myself, simple yet effective Italian design)
  • + 2
 I believe the service cost can lowered with this link
service.foxracingshox.com/consumers
This has helped me a lot.
Haven´t found anything like this on Marzocchi.
  • + 8
 weird that the auron is claimed to be not supple. I find my Durolux to be very supple for an air fork. Keep in mind that Suntour somehow has no patent on oil lubricated lowers therefore there is only grease in the lowers of a stock fork. To add suppleness just add a few ccs of engine oil to each lower leg.
  • + 2
 Formula 35 forks are Italian made, the lightest in their class, and extremely stiff
  • + 4
 Is it correct that SR Suntour has no rights for oil lubricated while other manufactures using that method for a long time?
who's protected by the patent?
  • - 1
 they seem extremely similar to my rockshox reckons .......
  • + 1
 888's also have that rebound noise but it pairs well with the rebound noise from my roco air.
  • + 8
 The noise comes from air being pushed through the oil inside the cartridge. This is difficult to eliminate with closed type cartridge design. For Durolux and Rux we have pressurized the cartridge to help reduce noise which has worked very well. Cheers.
  • - 1
 Suntour did have oil lubrification in their cartridge( which is apparentely user friendly) but they decide to keep it simple on the piston of the cartridge, that's why they use grease, it's more reliable and user friendly
  • + 1
 Yep but you get much more long term suppleness from the fork if you add the right oil
  • + 2
 Grease is not a good lubricant for a fork, as it generally finds a nice quiet spot inside the fork where its out of the way and not being bothered by any moving parts, then sits there quietly doing nothing. Oil is good as it tends to splash about getting in all the nooks and crannies and generally keeping everything lubricated.
  • + 1
 grease the seals and pack a decent amount of it between the two seals then add engine oil
  • + 9
 I love it when this happens ! .... If we took the decals off the fork and handed it to a few armchair experts, nobody would know which stable it came from !
  • + 6
 Dear SR Suntour, you have an incredibly loyal and wide fanbase in the Philippines and Asia Pacific. WHY OH WHY aren't these available yet? Auron has been out for a year and yet lots of people who want to get AM forks for their 650b bikes can't get Aurons even if they wanted to. Lots of opportunity cost right there guys... just sayin.
  • + 6
 Thanks for the support. Forks are shipping to distributors around the world. If you would like you can email our office in Taiwan to find out more information on who is selling this product. orders@srsuntour.com.tw

Cheers
  • + 1
 NICE! Will email them about it. We have a local distributor here but most of the 650b forks are Epicons. Not enough for some of the rougher terrain. Thanks for the tip.
  • + 6
 Great to see an honest review on a budget fork, nice to also see the comparison to the pike!! I would seriously consider this if i were to upgrade on a budget opposed to buying second hand. I actually quite like the look of it also
  • + 5
 This fork is about 30% cheaper than the Pike, which is not a small difference, but also I wouldn't call a $700 product cheap. And as fork being the most important part in the bike excluding the frameset I would ever go to save some money and buy a better quality fork that will perform better and probably will lasts longer.
  • + 3
 thats fair enough, like i said if your on a budget it will work and be appealing. Me I ride a new pike and being honest after riding it for 5-6 months I think its better than my old Talas but not a patch on the BOS devile I had previous
  • + 10
 I wonder if we will see this OEM. If so, then new bikes could be more than $300 less, plus it would flood the used market with dirt cheap Aurons, which is good for us poors.
  • + 5
 There is interest from manufacturers to spec this as OEM as well as our more affordable Aion in the future. It is based off the Auron but has a slightly heavier chassis and cost $500.00 instead of the Auron's asking price of $700.00.

Cheers.
  • + 1
 Is the Aion available in the US? This is the first I've heard of it, and I can't find much online. I'd be all over that for a budget LTHT build!
  • + 5
 I have a Auron on my Trance 27.5 and absolutely love it. Yes it makes some noise when going through rough root sections but then again, so does my Monarch Plus. Doesn't bother me at all. I really do like Suntour's products like, not to mention easy and fast to service.
  • + 5
 Glad you like it. Just about everyone that gives us a try would agree. Cheers.
  • + 3
 We'll see what will come out of this WERX program. Maybe with the help of Remy Absalon - the enduro rider - some progress are going to be made. From what I know, the WERX program is based in French Alps with the ex #1 guy from Marzocchi in France. 2012 Olympic champion and back to back world champ Julie Bresset uses Suntour fork.
  • + 6
 What is this "All-Mountain" you speak of?
  • + 13
 It's like Enduro , only slower and was cool 2 years ago Wink
  • + 7
 enduro without the tape....
  • + 2
 xc. with a cooler name. bit like enduro. good fun too Smile
  • + 5
 Question: what's the sound of a non-fat kid sucking the last bits of a milkshake through a straw?
  • + 12
 A visit to your local McDonald's should give you a good idea I reckon.
  • - 2
 Ha ha yeah !! ... Any American McDonalds should do it !
  • + 12
 Fedz you realize you just said American Mcdonalds have the non-fat kids right?
  • + 1
 Oh shit your right !! ...oops, that'll teach me not to read it properly ! :0)
  • - 1
 Fedz- America isn't the fastest country in the world either! Mexico is!
  • + 1
 Fastest or fattest... You choose !
  • + 2
 We are just terrible with reading, aren't we.
  • - 1
 @ jlevandoski- Stop watching TV and regurgitating the BS you're told. How could an impoverished nation be fatter than self-important, self-entitled Americans?

-An American
  • + 1
 Hahaha self-entitled? You realize that is a completely redundant statement?
They could be fatter if they don't exercise. I assume you are better then all these other Americans you are talking about? Where do get your information from if not from the TV? The newspaper?
  • + 1
 @XCMark- You realize that this was all a joke after @fedz accidentally misread a statement. And first of all, there are studies and information that show Mexico is now the most obese nation on the planet. Just because you're going to consider it BS doesn't mean that there are things to disprove.
  • + 2
 When McDonalds is all you can afford to eat because corrupt politicians have destroyed your economy and globalize your country's natural resources, naturally you will become obese even if you are starving at the same time. On the plus side, there's more hot Latina ass floatin around!
  • + 2
 i am on my third epicon, each was a diff. generation. shaun and nick have been very helpful over the years not only to my personal forks but also my customers...consistancy is why i pick these forks today. here in NC lots of roots and structure trail riding...heading out right now.
  • + 1
 I spent about a year on the epicon, and I had similar experiences with it. Not overwhelmingly great, but decent for the msrp and amazing deals can eventually be had on the buy/sell. However, in both the epicon and durolux, I found that the compression is definitely not as controlled as mission control or even OB RC2 from fox and can lead to some *very* sketchy moments during high-commitment maneuvers. At lower speeds it tends to be fine and feel more consistent. Also...elastomer volume reducer? Sounds pretty old school, even for a cheap 650b fork...
  • + 1
 Well, the Pike uses old school plastic, so I'm not sure it makes a great deal of difference really. Plus, elastomers are easier to cut down than a harder plastic spacer would be.
Is there any reason the end user couldn't just ditch the spacers and use oil on top of the piston instead? Or do Suntour recommend against doing that for some reason?
  • + 1
 suntour actually recommend using oil to increase progressiveness on their durolux, and the RC2 damper looks pretty similar here. would have to DL a manual to be sure , but i would guess it's the same across the suntour forks
  • + 4
 Yeah, Nick from Suntour actually tells heavier riders to add oil into the air chamber (he replies to people on MTBR forums all the time, check the customer loyalty thread).

I recently got an Epicon TR and I've loved it so far, and been blown away by the service. Emailed Suntour with a question... 7 minute response time, with real technical advice from an actual person. For most companies that first email is just an automated reply, then you don't hear from them for a day or more.
  • + 2
 We use a spacer assembly on our Rux that is quite nice. The elastomer isn't quite as ideal but does what is intended. Yes oil can be added but it will need to be changed regularly as it get's contaminated. We have new elastomer's available if someone where to cut the original too short and need to go back. Cheers.
  • + 1
 SR-S US HQ is just a few miles from me. When I was in the market for a fork, everything I was looking at on their site was either out of stock, not being sold in my region or had been discontinued. I asked the people at SR-S on the phone when they would have their sales site up so consumers would know exactly what they could get in their region and if it's available, I was told "soon"(no date given), that was almost five months ago.

I don't like that I have to make a phone call to SR-S to make orders when I could place orders through a website in a fraction of the time. The details section of particular items have been stripped for some reason, just a few months ago. The SR-S site used to have very detailed information regarding components on the right side of each components page, now you get very little information on components.

It completely blew my mind that I could have bought an Epicon off Ebay for slightly less than what SR-S quoted, though the quote meant nothing as "there was no Epicons available in my area". When I asked about when an Epicon would be available, I was asked if I wanted to put money down to reserve one when they became available. So I asked for a date as to when I could expect an Epicon, I was told it could take any were from 3 weeks to 6 weeks. I now own a Marvel Pro and a 100mm travel Circus Expert.

Would of loved to have an Epicon, but was not willing to wait and did not want an Ebay fork that could not enter the SR-S Customer Program.
  • + 1
 XCMark.

Thanks for your interest our product. Our distribution network is through your local bicycle retailer or direct from us for all of our premium level forks. To our knowledge, prices are fixed for these high performance level forks and are sold at MAP. We are always happy to field emails and or phone calls (855-205-BIKE) be it dealers or consumers. Currently we do not and have not planned for a consumer direct website to make purchases.

Our global website just got a nice overhaul and is still under some development on both the front and back end. As with forks and life, it is in a constant evolution.

We have our most popular forks ready for sale in Axon, Auron Rux and Epicon series with the arrival of some newer models latter this summer.

Thanks again for checking us out,
  • + 1
 Is it pretty common to have the high speed compression near the open end of the range for a lot of forks? I'm on an x-fusion metric and landings have been harsh, but I've been at >50% closed on the high speed. I added more air and opened it up more...where is the balance between air and high speed compression? The low speed has been relatively easy to dial in. Thanks!
  • + 3
 "emitting a sound reminiscent of a fat kid trying to suck the last bits of a milkshake through a straw"

bahahahahahahahaha...... yes, that would be distracting.
  • + 1
 Hello, I have one question. If I bought Auron RC2 2014 these days (new supply). Does have this AURON RC2 these adjustments?

Cartridge: The compression spring was modified to emit a more usable range of compression adjustment. This has allowed for better tuning in the middle of the settings as opposed to the extremes.

Negative coil spring: This has been replaced with a longer and more sensitive assembly giving the fork that small bump compliance for small chatter type surfaces

Thank You very much!
Best Regards
  • + 1
 Hello, I have Auron RC2. Weight about 95 kilograms. 80 PSI. Yellow elastomer is completely out of air chamber.
I have problem with range of travel. When is bike in mounting stand, I can measure about 140 mm instead of 160 mm. If I pull down lower legs, I can measure whole 160 mm.
Where is problem? Is negative coil spring too tough?
Thanks
  • + 1
 just bought a durolux for my new bike and the qsp internals are so easy to work on i now want a rux for my dh bike would be great if they where to build a dh shock to match the forks
  • + 2
 Maybe 1 1/8 steerer fork? Please?
It's hard to find good fork for my "old" Commencal Meta 55 2011, which have straight headtube.
  • + 3
 We still sell the Durolux RC/RC2 with a striaght 1.125" steering tube. It's a proven fork and has many of the features that the Auron has but with a 20mm thru axle.

Cheers
  • + 2
 I hate when I get to that point of my milkshake! ...had one from rubys diner yesterday!
  • + 2
 The pike uses an elastermer like volume adjuster, although you stack them rather than have to cut
  • + 3
 hurray for slightly negative reviews on PinkBike!
  • + 2
 Didn't sr suntor make forks for Marazzochi?
  • + 1
 Any chance the Aion or Auron is offered for 26" wheels and a 1-1/8 inch steerer? (Old school, I know..)
  • - 1
 I would have thought Suntour would have learned more from manufacturing forks for other people?
But like that you guys were able to modify spacers to tune air spring, Wake up Suntour!!
  • + 1
 I used to have an 2011 Epicon on my HT. I like the "kid sucking last bits of a shake with a straw" sound.
  • + 1
 Due in stock in the UK soon, contact for prices..we can ship international as well..
  • + 1
 Suntour is kicking ass and doing better then ever. Keep up the great work guys.
  • + 2
 Awesome forks!
  • + 1
 so, no auron for 26ers he??
  • + 1
 The Auron spent several years in development as a 27.5 fork specifically and was just released in a 29.

The Durolux has proven to be a pretty good fork for all things 26" in this travel category.

Cheers.
  • + 0
 LOL, the fork is cheaper then a hubset. But I still think this fork is a good choice for this value.
  • - 1
 Sucking rebound noises are to be expected on an open bath design, but on a seald cart?? Very strange. Kinda missing the point of a sealed unit i reckon.
  • + 5
 Sealed cartridges require less maintenance over an open system as they are not exposed to contamination. Our cartridges have a 200-250 hour service life for oil before it needs to be changed. If for some reason you needed a replacement for warranty or had a spare, you can drop the new one in in under 5 minutes and get out on the trail.

We have been producing cartridges for our forks for over 10+ years. We see the advantage as others manufacturers are too.

Cheers.
  • + 2
 Perhaps true on paper. I have found the reality to be that cartridge forks generally need more frequent love due to the much smaller volume of oil doing the damping duties therefor breaking down faster. They are indeed less exposed to outside contamination, slightly, due to one extra set of seals between the oil and dirt. However as a large amount of the contamination found inside a fork is often not mud, but infact worn ali from inside the damper, all a sealed cart does in that respect is keep the contaminants inside better. Also the cartridge is not really the main thing at risk when running dirty oil in a fork. its the bushings. Most sealed cart forks are much worse in this department, due to very little oil circulationg near the bushings and often only a dust seal on the stanchion rather than the obligatory dust seal and hydraulic seal found on all open bath forks.

It is not really any quicker changing a sealed cart than an open one, just less oily. Changing the oil on an open bath fork really is a 5 minute job and is easy to do regularily. Changing the oil on a sealed cart quite often requires special tooling and is always far more time consuming. So as this is the only real maintenance either will require, your speed of service point is just not true surely?

The main (only?) advantage of a sealed cart fork is that the oil can be kept totally free of air, which should lead to more consistant damping performance at the expense of shorter service intervals. However the loud sucking noises coming from your fork would suggest that your cartridge does not do the one important thing it should do, so essentially has all the disadvantages of both systems.

Sorry if this is coming across as if I hate your fork. This is not the case, but if you are going to sell a fork based on advantages that do not exist then I do feel inclined to question that....
  • + 3
 Opinions are what they are. Cartridges are not going away anytime soon as more and more manufactures are heading in this direction. We realize that we haven't perfected this technology even after all the time we have been using it, but we sure are trying. We like to think that we are bringing a very reliable, tune-able and fun to ride product to the market that just about anyone can afford and service. You do make some valid points but not all are true to what we have brought to the table especially with the contamination issue in the lower casting and bushing wear. This is one of the things that make our forks platform so easy to service and maintain, With a cartridge based system the lower can be cleaned and lubricated in less than 10 minutes and feel just as good as new keeping the glide rings from wearing and having a longer life. Thanks for the comments.
  • + 2
 Oh no. I do not think sealed carts are going anywhere either. Tbh I genuinely think they are the better system performance wise, mainly due to the oil not being contaminated with air. I just don't see how the sealed cart in any way reduces the maintenance required, or makes it any quicker. Turn the fork upside down, let it drain and pull the lowers off, clean and re-lube and put them back together. Its the same for a sealed cartridge or open bath. The only difference being that the sealed cart fork will still be full of old damping oil at this point, while the open bath will have had all new oil by virtue of its design.

It just seems odd to sell the sealed cart on its ease of maintenance. By all means sell it as a performance upgrade (once you have sorted the air inside the cartridge issue that I assume you have, based on reading the above review), just don't try to tell people it is easier to maintain when its not true. I understand that your main customer base are probably a little scared of a high maintenance fork as they are essentially an entry level product, but perhaps that would be a good reason to make the fork open bath, rather than make it a sealed cart then try and convince people that this is somehow easier to look after. If you want low maintenance there really is nothing better than high oil volume. If you want high oil volume, there really is nothing better than open bath. If you want consistant damping, there really is nothing better than a sealed cart with no air/oil mixing.
  • + 0
 One way to improve this fork is by not calling it suntour
  • + 1
 its Just like DUROLUX
  • + 1
 Yup, only lighter and different styling ques.
  • + 1
 Yeah, kinda weird that this review is more lukewarm than the Durolux review. But I guess that was a couple years ago.
  • + 4
 There are a lot of great forks at the moment especially at the upper end of the market so it's not unreasonable to have high expectations and review something without sugar coating it. We are pretty confident in this fork, especially after the modifications that have been made. All of our Werx riders and people that have purchased them are stoked on the Auron! Cheers
  • + 1
 Love that Chris King!
  • + 1
 Yup. Chris King make some very nice parts. There located just down the road from us.
  • + 0
 They're....Sorry. I feel like an arse even typing that...:P neg prop awaySmile
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