First Ride - SRAM Debuts DH Specific 7 Speed Drivetrain

Mar 4, 2014
by Mike Levy  

FIRST RIDE - Queenstown, New Zealand
SRAM X01 DH





Racers have been asking for a production downhill specific group with less gears for a long time, and 2014 will be the year that those requests are answered. SRAM's new X01 DH offering combines both existing and brand new components to create a drivetrain that has been designed specifically for the needs of downhillers. Available this coming April, the X01 DH group includes a crankset, modified shifter and derailleur, and an entirely new 10 - 24 tooth spread, 7 speed X-DOME cassette. You'll also need an XD driver body and 11 speed chain because the group uses the same 11 speed spacing as XX1 and X01. Don't want to spring for a complete drivetrain? SRAM will also be offering a 10 speed version of their new X01 DH derailleur that will work with any 10 speed cassette and SRAM shifter.

We flew to Queenstown, New Zealand, to spend a few days on the new X01 DH group and to learn the ins and outs of its design.




X01 DH Explained




SRAM X01DH group
  SRAM's new X01 DH group has been designed for use on downhill bikes, and it features a radical 7 speed X-DOME cassette and revised derailleur.


The new downhill specific group uses the same technology as SRAM's XX1 and X01 drivetrains, which shouldn't come as a surprise given that both of those groups can trace their roots back a decade or so to what was originally a prototype derailleur intended for downhill use. It's only now, many years later, that SRAM is revisiting those intentions. Why now? ''What we looked at was how we could make a drivetrain work better on a downhill bike, and if we're completely honest with ourselves, current downhill bike drivetrains don't really work that great,'' Chris Hilton, SRAM External Drivetrain Product Manager, told Pinkbike. ''They work acceptably, and they do shift, but there's a lot of things that cause them to shift funky. The axle is moving upwards and backwards far more that on other types of bikes, and every single downhill bike is different in this regard, all while powerful riders are putting out huge watts while sprinting and pushing buttons, hoping that it changes gears. That's not exactly a recipe for success.'' SRAM clearly believes that they can come up with something better than what's currently out there, and that is exactly what they set out to do, despite the marketplace for a downhill specific group clearly being much smaller than a drivetrain that would be put to use on a trail bike.




We have to pick our path. Are we going to go down, get cheaper, and make a bunch of X7 stuff? At some point, yes, we'll have to try and continue to reduce the price of our one-by groups. But are we going to try to take our one-by technology and use it in other places where it's useful? Yeah, we are, and that's what we're doing today. X01 DH uses all of the same technology that is found in XX1.
- Chris Hilton, External Drivetrain Product Manager
The investment put into X01 DH, while not small by any means, was benefited by what SRAM calls their ''core technology', much of what makes XX1 and X01 tick, already being proven to function well. That includes their Type 2 clutch derailleurs, X-Sync chain ring tooth design, and both the XD driver body and X-Dome cassette that can be found on the new downhill group. Hilton told us that it is only the success of those two groups and the core technology in them that has allowed their engineers to pursue a production downhill component range. ''We developed our core technology, and we have to decide what we're going to do with that technology,'' he explained. ''Of course we could go cheaper. We could make X7 one-by and all these things, and that is one path to take. A reasonably successful path to take commercially. Or we could take the philosophy of the one-by drivetrain and instead of going down with it, we could go across into other categories.''
















SRAM X01DH group
  The 7 speed cassette sports an integrated spoke guard, and it mounts on a standard XD driver body.


X-DOME Goes 7-Speed

SRAM's X-DOME cassette is arguably the crown jewel of both the XX1 and X01 component groups, with its extensively machined away steel construction and aluminum large cog / backplate making for an extremely light finished product. The very same manufacturing methods have been used to create the 7 speed X01 DH MINI BLOCK cassette, with SRAM saying that the finished product weighs just 136 grams. That's a touch lighter than SRAM's top tier eleven speed RED cassette, and thirty three grams less than Shimano's Dura-Ace offering, although having four less cogs despite sporting a similar top and bottom ends obviously works in the MINI BLOCK's favour. Weight isn't the real story here, though, with the relatively large jumps between those seven cogs, yet featuring the same spacing as their 11 speed blocks, counting for much more than a handful of grams being shed. How so? SRAM says that they have data showing that racers are double shifting - grabbing two gears per shift - over fifty percent of the time when running a standard road bike cassette, something that points towards said cassettes having far too closely spaced gearing jumps. ''They were designed for guys wearing lycra who are trying to maintain an optimum and very specific cadence to keep their speed up and be more efficient,'' says Hilton. ''That's not the same needs of a downhill racer, or even of a dirt jumper, who need to accelerate and decelerate quickly.''

These road cassettes are being used for their top and bottom end ranges, not the small jumps in between, as large cogs simply aren't required if you're riding a downhill bike as it was intended. The obvious answer was to create a cassette that offered not just the overall range that would makes sense but, more importantly, much more useful jumps between each cog that wouldn't require a racer to double or triple shift. It's that double and triple shifting under extreme loads, especially common during a race run, that can cause both broken chains and poor shifting. There's another factor here, Hilton says, with the fractions of seconds that are lost while slightly easing up on power during those double shifts adding up over a race time, a factor that he told us is trimmed down by turning two shifts into one. No, that's clearly not going to be a super important point to a casual rider or sport-class racer, but consider that the sharp end of a World Cup downhill field is often on the same second and you can begin to see where he is coming from. SRAM tested and settled on a 10 - 12 - 14 - 16 - 18 - 21 - 24 spread, as well as an integrated spoke guard that attaches in the same manner as the large 42 tooth cog on their XX1 and X01 cassettes. The $303 USD cassette is also compatible with the same XD driver bodies that their 11 speed cassettes require.





















You're putting the drivetrain in a really extreme environment. Just look at the tracks that are being ridden, how fast they're going, and how much the bikes are changing, and we're trying to build a drivetrain to work well there. Up until now we've just been piecing drivetrain parts together. They work; they function. But can they be better? Yeah, they can be better.
- Chris Hilton, External Drivetrain Product Manager


SRAM X01DH group
  A shorter cage and modified low-limit stop geometry are some of the differences between the X01 DH derailleur and a standard unit.


7 Speed Specific X01 DH Derailleur

It became obvious that SRAM was working on a downhill specific drivetrain when we first spotted a prototype derailleur and what looked to be a compact X-DOME cassette on the back of Aaron Gwin's Specialized Demo 8 Carbon race bike during last season's Fort William World Cup race. Besides a shorter cage, the clutch equipped derailleur appeared to resemble a production unit, and we speculated at the time that it could be the predecessor to either the yet to be released at the time X01 derailleur or a more gravity orientated setup. As it turns out, the sighting was the first public showing of what to expect of the X01 DH derailleur pictured here.

So, what exactly is different between the XX1 or X01 derailleurs and the new X01 DH model? The most obvious difference is the shorter cage, with its downhill intentions meaning that it doesn't have to deal with the added chain length that a larger 10 - 42 tooth spread cassette requires. SRAM will offer the $277 USD X01 DH model in two cage lengths, a short and a medium, that will cover the chain growth figures of every downhill bike on the market. Many bikes will be able to use the short cage model, but bikes with more a more rearward axle path than usual, such as Canfields, should be fitted with the longer of the two options.


Less obvious are some changes that are hidden out of sight, including a longer low-limit screw, a differently shaped low-limit screw stop, as well as a different rearward stop that better match it to the compact 10 - 24 tooth cassette. Given that SRAM's top tier XX1 single ring group can trace its roots back to the development of a downhill specific derailleur ten years ago (pictured above), it isn't much much of a stretch to see the that technology applied to a modern component group for the same intention. ''The idea of a one-by, downhill specific derailleur ten years ago was deemed to be unnecessary.'' Hilton told Pinkbike. ''That early prototype sat around collecting dust on an old specialized Demo with an eight-speed cassette because there was no application for it. But, times were changing, and we saw people starting to ride one-by-ten.'' As the success of their XX1 and X01 groups began to prove that it isn't just out and out racers that wanted to use the group, SRAM began to consider other applications that saw the technology come full circle back to its original intentions.



SRAM X01DH
  There is a new 7 speed shifter to go with cassette and derailleur.


7 Speed Specific Shifter

Shifting the chain across the seven cogs of the MINI BLOCK cassette could actually be done with a current 11 speed shifter due to it using the same cable pull ratio and the cogs featuring the same spacing, but that solution wouldn't be ideal given the four extra clicks on one end of the spectrum. Instead, SRAM modified their latest fourth generation shifter with a revised stamped steel ratchet wheel with four less teeth, a relatively simple way to go about it. The shifter sports the same ergonomics as found on SRAM's other offerings, with an adjustable thumb lever, two-position mounting, and is also Matchmaker compatible. Cable changes are accomplished in the same manner as in the past, with a removable aluminum cover hiding the revised internals and cable port. The shifter will retail for $143 USD when it becomes available in April.



SRAM X01DH group
  X01 DH has its fair share of carbon as well, with a set of carbon fiber crank arms available in three different lengths.


Carbon Arms and X-Sync Chain Rings

Many readers are likely familiar with the carbon fiber X0 DH crankset, and it is that very setup that you'll find carried over to the new X01 DH group. That means that they'll still be available in 165, 170, and 175mm lengths, all with the same aluminum pedal insert and sub-800 gram weight including the bottom bracket. What has changed, though, is the inclusion of SRAM's X-Sync chain rings that we've begun to see both downhillers and freeriders use in competition, with and without a chain guide. The rings will be available in 30, 32, 34, and 36 tooth sizes to fit the drive side crank's 94mm BCD. GXP compatible setups will retail for $315 USD, while BB30 version will go for $347 USD.



10 Speed Option

The majority of downhillers out there are running ten speed setups on their bikes, and SRAM knows full well that many of them won't be keen on purchasing an entirely new drivetrain, or at least a derailleur, X-DOME cassette, and the required shifter in order to use the latest 7 speed setup. A much less expensive option, although one that won't work with the trick 7 speed cassette, is the new 10 speed X01 DH derailleur. It features the same construction as the 7 speed model, sans the reworked limit screw and screw stop changes. The biggest difference between the two, though, is the cam that the shift cable wraps around that provides the correct amount of leverage to make it 10 speed specific. This means that the 10 speed X01 DH derailleur isn't compatible with both the 7 speed and 11 speed shifters, but will work with both 10 speed trigger and Grip Shift options.

While it retails for the same $277 USD price, the 10 speed version can be bolted onto any bike that uses a 10 speed cassette and shifter, which is the large majority of machines out there.


SRAM X01DH group






FIRST RIDE - Queenstown, New Zealand
RIDING SRAM'S X01 DH





Our introduction to the new X01 DH group was split between time on two bikes, a Devinci Wilson Carbon and an Intense 951, and the three days of ride time included two in Queenstown's Skyline Bike Park and a helicopter assisted shuttle to the top of a local peak. We can't reiterate enough that those three days shouldn't be taken in any way as time enough for us to come up with a thorough review, so think of this as more of an introduction with first ride impressions included than a true in-depth evaluation of how SRAM's new downhill specific group functions. With that disclaimer out of the way, lets talk about our first impressions of X01 DH.

SRAM
SRAM

SRAM's big storyline with X01 DH isn't specifically that it's 7 speed, but that the jumps between gears have been designed to be more useable and functional for downhillers. That approach, with a 10 - 12 - 14 - 16 - 18 - 21 - 24 spread on the cassette, is certainly noticeable when in action, but it isn't quite as cut and dry as you might think. Some of our initial time on the group was spent riding trails that we'd label as being either quite steep or very smooth and fast, meaning that it was more a matter of choosing a gear at the top of the run and dropping in than actually slowing up and then accelerating out of corners. Having said that, it was still quite obvious that the 7 speed setup provided a completely different type of performance than what you'd find from an 11 speed road cassette. No amount of back pedalling over rough terrain, even when shifting like we forgot how to control the thumb on our right hand, was able to really upset the system. No skipping. No strange behaviour from the chain. Nothing. The setup was also as quiet as we've come to expect from a clutch equipped drivetrain, although the bike's Truvativ X0 chain guide also certainly helped matters in this regard. Shifter feel is very SRAM-like, as you might assume given that the 7spd X01 DH trigger is a modified version of what the company already offers, and this means that you can expect positive and tactile action at the handlebar.

It was when we left the bike park and ventured onto more varied terrain that the merits of X01 DH became much more noticeable. After a short but incredibly scenic helicopter shuttle to the top of what could be the most beautiful location that we've ever ridden a bike, we dropped into a trail system that included pretty much any and every sort of terrain imaginable. It was here, on trails that saw us go from doing high speeds to being hard on the brakes for a corner, where X01 DH's gearing was most noticeable. The result? Less shifting, with a single stab of the thumb paddle seeing us shifting to an easier gear faster than we've become accustomed to with a standard cassette. This is down to the larger than standard jumps between each cog, and it is something that won't just be a benefit to racers when having to drop anchor for a corner and then accelerate out of it, but also for those dreaded moments when a corner is blown and he needs to get back on the power to make up lost time.

The market for a 7 speed downhill specific group is much, much smaller than components intended for any other mountain biking discipline, but that certainly doesn't mean that a group designed for exactly those intentions shouldn't be offered. In fact, given that downhilling is arguably the one style of riding that puts the most demands on components, it makes sense for a group to be designed specifically for it. Do the current drivetrains being used on downhill bikes work? Of course they do, although a more specialized approach to problem looks like it could very well offer some real advantages, especially in a race setting.


www.sram.com
Action photos by Adrian Marcoux

Must Read This Week

335 Comments

  • + 229
 Oh my god, they listened! Pinkbike might explode!
  • + 39
 I'll stick to my trusted 9spd DH setup I've been running since '08! Still works like a charm.
  • + 48
 Until it breaks and you can't find any spares
  • + 122
 Your move, Shimano.
  • + 130
 how do shimano need to make a move, the new saint can be set up as a 7 spd... this is sram's response not the other way around!!
  • - 26
flag wolly96 (Mar 4, 2014 at 7:18) (Below Threshold)
 i hope these newly fangled, shifters dont explode. must have gone through 3 x9s and 1 XO. just go to change down gears and BOOM !! the shifters internals ripped themselves apart
  • + 5
 @sup3rc0w not true, you can still get 7-speed parts
  • + 40
 Micro cassettes aren't a new thing, its just that now you get to pay twice the price for a pre-assembled one. Along with all the other SRAM-specific crap like the chain and wheelset. I'd be excited about this if it didn't require a complete and very expensive drivetrain and wheelset overhaul.
  • + 7
 i want it
  • + 2
 Just as I bought saint!
  • + 17
 Then make the saint 7spd lukachadwick.
  • + 7
 The new saint can be set up as 7 speed. That's how minaar runs his bike, all you need to do is take the last 3 biggest cogs off your cassette and then put spacers on and then readjust your derailure
  • + 3
 About time. I guess pushing 11 gears was more important than something racers want. All we need now is a couple years of trickle so we can get it for £50.
  • + 23
 it's alright lukachadwick you made the right choice.
  • + 2
 Lol x9s last a week a whistler so poopy.
  • + 4
 I have an '09 Saint der. that's been bopping off rocks for 4 seasons and it still shifts when I want, only when I want.
  • + 67
 As alaamanza said, Saint has been 7 speed capable using spacers for a year or more. The cassette is designed so you can take the top 3 cogs off and run a wide spaced 7 speed cassette, and the derailleur has long limit screws to compensate and can be run either close or wide ratio mode. Shimano has had what people have been asking for, yet almost nobody got the memo. No need for a new driver either. Here's a photo of mine... www.pinkbike.com/photo/9464180
One modification I will be making this year is to file out the stops on the 11t cog so it slides over the freehub so I can run spacers either side of the cassette, to center it more on the freehub body for better chainline and no chance of jamming the chain on either side of the cassette.
  • + 1
 I neg'd you by accident Kramster, nice setup
  • + 27
 Specialized did this on the S-Works Demo and most of the goons on here thought it was stupid. Now all of a sudden it's great.
  • + 8
 I run the same setup as Kramer. No need to dish hundreds of hard earned cash for this. Just adapt your current setup !

www.pinkbike.com/photo/8481380
  • + 4
 I am still a fan of 10 speed on a close ratio cassette. I can see the attraction of 7 speed dh bikes but I like it when the difference between gears isn't as noticeable when pedaling in a fast section. It leaves more room for error if you shift up or down too much or little. And the saint shifter is amazing!
  • + 3
 Nice one xetal. You running a 12t small cog? I might just drop the 11 and add a spacer, but I don't know if I'll miss the low end gear. I'm running a 37t Chromag ring (they make odd sizes) which is the absolute max I can get in a 36T chainguide to get the most clearance I can with the fastest top end I can. Maybe it would be ok with 12t, and it would be much easier to just drop the 11t than file out the stops on it to let it slide over the freehub body.
  • - 4
flag katmai (Mar 4, 2014 at 9:07) (Below Threshold)
 This also means that a Chris King XD driver should finally be close to release. Syndicate runs CK hubs and SRAM drivetrains.
  • + 2
 Saint 7spd isn't hard, if you own the simplest tools you can make one, did mine last year after realizing I never used the top 3. This cassette is gonna cost you into the 300 range.. just buy a $70 cassette and cut it up. www.pinkbike.com/photo/10255259
  • + 21
 I think that what a lot of people responding to the initial comment above are missing is that in previous drivetrain configurations used for DH--whether it's Shimano or SRAM--the riders and the mechanics were having to ADAPT their stock stuff to get it to a 7 speed set-up; and that even then the gear ratios had them double and triple shifting and occasionally blowing up chains as a result. What this drive train does is take that ham-fisted approach out of the equation. Instead of having to adapt, the drivetrain is now exactly what those racers, riders, and mechanics have been creating when they adapted their 10 speed rigs to 7 speed. Is it cheaper? Nope. Is it more efficient? Definitely. What wins races? Cheap, or efficient? But then, what's this groupset designed for?
  • + 6
 I get that, and I have to say I really like the looks of this group. Especially the 10t. If in the market for a new drivetrain then this is a viable option. However it is not earth shattering imo. I mean you make ADAPTing a cassette sound like such a chore, you literally just remove cogs and slide spacer's onto the freehub. As far as double shifting goes? Shimano's shifter does it for you, and it works very well. No exploding chains I promise.
  • + 4
 kramster that is correct. Dropping the 11T cog was the fast route. I rarely miss it.
  • + 21
 Shimano 11-36 with top 3 removed is 11-13-15-17-19-21-24 compared to 10 - 12 - 14 - 16 - 18 - 21 - 24. I wouldn't really say one is better than the other. The reasons you describe is precisely why I run mine like this rather than using a road cassette.

And if by ADAPT, you mean dial in a limit screw and put a spacer instead of the top spider, I guess it's adapted. But I think you should include removing your freehub to replace it with one that not everyone makes (such as King which I use) in your definition of ADAPT.

Don't get me wrong, this stuff looks nice. And 10t will allow for smaller rings for more clearance. But to say it's revolutionary is selling Shimano's existing solution short. You could've had 95% of what this offers a year ago, like some of us here have been doing.
  • + 8
 Katmai, syndicate are on fox/shimano now, keep up..
  • + 11
 why would they make it 11s spacing, a huge appeal of 7s drive trains is thicker, more durable, and stronger chains and cogs!?!?!?!?
  • + 4
 The main thing I got from this article is that SRAM have knowingly selling us sub standard kit for years and passing it off as ' as good as it gets " , when in reality it was ' oh well that will do ' , f*ck you SRAM thanks for the years of deception
  • + 3
 @bigburd .... it reminds me of commercials we have here in the states for Domino's Pizza, where they say "we know our pizza was shi**y before so we changed it, please believe us"
  • + 1
 Isn't the XO1 10s derailleur simply an XO Type 2? I don't understand, I must have missed something. Either way I'm sticking to my 9s Saint, I can upgrade some things but I don't see the point of upgrading something with minimal effect on my performance before it breaks, save that cash for wheels or tires!
  • + 5
 nah, finnrambo, it uses that same movement that the XX1 and X01 use.
  • + 14
 Who will be the first aftermarket company will make a much less expensive, preferably steel, 11-25 cassette with the same spacing that doesn't require you to buy an XD driver? Please??? That way you would only have to buy the rear derailleur and shifter, and could use whatever hub you want.
  • + 4
 ^^ Hopefully who ever does it , does it soon !
  • + 1
 kramster and DARKSTAR63, I hear what you're saying, but when you consider what this group is designed for--racing at the highest level--adapting is one less thing that the mechanics in the pits want to do; it's one less thing that can go wrong.
  • + 2
 @finnrambo, while I agree with your Saint sentiment it is entirely different from X0, this is the parallelogram derailleur design.
  • + 13
 @Matt1234567890

Please try and understand the physics behind what you are saying. Narrower chains are stronger than wider chains, where the pin and plate remain the same dimensions, as has been done in the transition from 8-11sp (not sure about 7). Imagine taking the chain you have now, and using the same side plates but making the pins an inch long to make a 1in wide chain. It will absolutely be weaker. Shimano claims their 10sp chains to be stronger. Physics says yes, and so does my personal experience of never breaking one, but having broken many wider ones over the years.

If you are asking for thicker plates and wider cogs, you are asking for a lot of extra weight. If you also want thicker pins, you are asking for the chain pitch to get larger which means you won't get a 10t, or likely even an 11t to work effectively. Are you sure that's what you want? I sure don't.

The remaining piece of the puzzle in my eyes is to reduce the dish on the wheel and take up that extra space with extra width in the hub for a stronger wheel.

@Protour, why not just use Shimano's solution discussed above? If you're already on Shimano, you don't need to buy anything other than a spacer. And you get double down shifting that SRAM is sorely lacking.
  • + 3
 @meagerdude Im not debating your point, I agree this is a nice setup. But honestly what's going wrong with a spaced out cassette? The only thing you said that I really felt the need to comment on is the double shifts, because Shimano not only addressed that but made it so you can shift 1 or 2.
  • + 1
 im sorry, but this is lame, expensive, and not really that much of a discovery, if it came in cheap great, otherwise, use a cheap second hand 7 or 8 speed shifter!!!!
  • + 4
 Asking for it to be cheap is a bit over the top and is never gonna happen , but I do agree that the price is retarded as fuck , if it was 30 percent cheaper it would still be a shit ton of cash but not just fantasy for most of us.
  • + 6
 Looks like a half job. cassette should be narrower with its own specific hub body to allow wider apart hub flanges for a stronger wheel. the chainring at front is smaller but the chaindevice isn't so no extra clearance is achieved... also there is 9t hubs already like the canfield so should be a 9t rather than the 10t getting there but no reason to change from my 11-28t 9 speed with a zee mech atm..
  • + 3
 here is the solution. buy x9 clutch rear derrailler and 10 speed cassette adjust limit screws or buy longer screws if necessary. take 3 cogs off and put in spacers. save thousands.
  • + 7
 Seeing as you need to change the hub, one which would allow a wheel with less dish would have been nice, all that space on the inside of the cogs is a bit of a waste.
  • + 4
 Why do i need an X01 DH 10-spd if they make the XO DH 10-spd?
  • + 4
 anybody remember this gem?! NEVER FORGET! shimano capreo system - goes down to 9tooth cog: www.pinkbike.com/u/mikelevy/blog/DT-Swiss-7-Speed-Downhill-Hub-First-Look.html
  • + 1
 ^ For extra hashtag points?
  • + 2
 One of the few times I agree with Protour (his cassette comment above)
  • + 4
 Well i wanted 6 speed not 7!
  • + 1
 www.specialized.com/gb/gb/bikes/mountain/demo/sworks-demo-8#specs

whens specialized going to sell this hub with the shimano capreo 7 speed 9t-20t cassette ?
  • - 1
 Great, yet another standard to spend more money. Stick with one think for god sake.
  • + 1
 talto bishrub
  • + 1
 thank god i didn't think id ever get a DH 7 speed rear derailleur
why would you need more than 7 for a DH bike anyway?
  • + 4
 you know anyone can still buy a sunrace 7 speed cassette and chain, jsut adjust the limit screw on your derailler.
  • + 0
 Ok sign me up, finally someone with brains goes with a real DH solution for a drivetrain instead of using road gearing.
  • - 2
 i like all 9 gears on my high-range cassette. i often ride to and from the trails and also ride back up often. unless you are on strictly lift served trails or are happy as can be pushing your bike all the way back up the hill, why take off those extra gears? that add an extra like 50grams or something like that, and my short cage x9 works fine and i get no ghost shifts until i move into the last 2 cogs, which i never do. im content with my 9 speed. and for those who want to use a 7 speed setup, i guess they will just have to decide whether its worth it to buy a whole new drivetrain over the option of just modifying your current drivetrain.
  • + 2
 Taking off the top three cogs from a shimano cassette and shortening your chain takes off more than 200g of unsprung mass (if memory serves it was closer to 250g). If you need to pedal uphill it's worth it. If you don't, it's a considerable saving. Plus you get to run a shorter and tighter chain that won't fly around as much.
  • + 9
 Tells us a "Simple Drivetrain is the Best Drivetrain." Then brings in tons of Sram-Market'esque terms, introduces tons of new technology and products that have been uniquely integrated into this confined system that requires you, the consumer, to switch into a more complicated + expensive endeavor.

"It is better and more accepted because of its' simplicity."
Lol. 7-Spd automatically must mean it's simple right? Just gotta flush/swap out all of your previous drive-train, which a few moments ago, according to them more gears and more complexity was better. Big Grin
  • + 2
 How true mike, how true!
  • + 3
 At least when this fails it wont send you into a corner with no means to stop thus causing you the have to slide out and in the process shear the your knee into pieces.. I will stick with whatever alternative your competitor puts out even if it costs more, it will be better I guarantee. Sincerely yours, non Sram user Wink
  • + 3
 as long as they require xd driver hub bodies, im out.
  • + 3
 Am i alone when i think that pinkbike is SRAM bias?
  • + 2
 I don't know about that Hammm, they go easy on Fox as well which isn't under the SRAM umbrella. Just like every bike site they're gentle on products because they need to keep the site online, that and a lot of these product faults won't be noticed by the majority of riders. I believe the majority of riders like CTD, I don't like it but I'm just another pinkbike commenter, the majority of weekend warriors aren't pinkbike commenters if I'm correct. Either that or I'm completely wrong and my comment was as useless as a "Bicycle Owners Guide" manual.
  • + 2
 Yeh i certainly get where your coming from but i you look at the red bull rampage bike checks every single one was under the sram banner. When was the art time you saw this kind of write up for a shimano product. Don't get me wrong i like sram… i one of my bikes has full sram. But i just want a bit of shimano loving now and then
  • + 6
 Shimano just need to organise a heli lift for the journos Smile
  • + 4
 I had the same shit with 2011-12 xo. Went through 3 pairs on warranty and they put xtr on in the end and been sweet since. Neg prop all you like MFs, it's the truth!
  • + 1
 (That was to wolly96 btw)
  • + 4
 I guess when someone pays for you to fly out to their demo, hands you a brand new bike, tells you to go for a spin and has some chilled beers waiting for you at the end whilst they give you everything you need to write your article, its really hard to turn round and call their product "An extremely expensive, higher faff solution to an already solved problem" - Anonymous, 2014.
  • + 2
 They listened to 1 of our claims!
How long for the wheel manufactures to use this extra room created to stiffen the rear wheel by moving the spokes to the outter direction of the hub?
  • - 3
 That's because that's a stupid idea vicentecar Also, wheels shouldn't be too stiff and needs to have some give in them for traction.
  • + 4
 Moving the drive side spokes outward will make the wheel stronger , but not much stiffer. Viewed from behind the wheel for example, the spokes have a less steep angle going towards the rim. It is actually a great idea. The closer to the center line of the wheel the spokes are the more vertical that side of the wheel is, less stable.
  • + 2
 I commented earlier that removing the top 3 cogs from the shimano cassette and the appropriate amount of chain, will save over 200g. I thought I'd confirm that, so here it is on the scale... www.pinkbike.com/photo/10682371
  • + 1
 it also will be far easier to adjust and will require less adjustment becasue of the x actuation
  • + 3
 I run older 9 speed saint (shifter and mech) grind the pins out from the cass(deore or cheaper), remove 1st 2nd and 4th then fit as a six speed, using a Hope single speed hub, I have all the gears I need.
  • + 55
 It's only 7 gears, why do you really need the XD driver? Why not make it with the standard freehub?
It's only 7 gears, why did you really need the 11 speed spacing and an expensive 11 speed chain?
WTF is the big advantage of the $277 10 speed DH rear der over an X9 with a clutch that costs half that?
PinkBike why you no answer these obvious questions???
  • + 41
 Because those kind of questions don't get your advertising space paid for.
  • + 9
 Gives you the 10 tooth cog vs 11 tooth without XD driver. With this being race specific it makes sense.
  • + 5
 XD driver is required when you go to a 10t cog as it is too small to fit on standard freehub. Feel free to kit up a standard freehub with 7 11 speed cogs from a road cassette and use the derailleur and shifter mentioned in the review.
  • + 8
 @corvus1 - as mentioned above, you need the XD driver to get that small 10 tooth cog that will in turn allow for a taller high gear, wider range, and the option of running a smaller chain ring for my ground clearance but not going too low with your gearing. We ride a lot of different 11spd bikes, including longterm'ers that have seen loads of miles, and have had no issue with the 11spd spacing.

You can always run a relatively standard 7spd modified setup (as racers have been doing for years) with current components, or the new 10spd X01 DH derailleur with any SRAM 10spd system.
  • - 5
flag ReformedRoadie (Mar 4, 2014 at 7:47) (Below Threshold)
 No, it doesn't. An option for a 7 spd that fits on a standard freehub, that makes sense.
Are there a lot of people using their XX1 trail wheels on their DH bike? No. The X-Drive is required for the 10-42 11 spd. cassette...makes no sense here.

If they made a wide ratio (11-40) 10 spd 1070 level cassette, to go with that RD, that would also make sense.
  • + 10
 You need the xd1 driver for the 10t cog.

Keeping the spacing 11spd let's you use already existing x-sync chain rings and chains which greatly reduces r&d time and costs.

Pricing is identical to x0 derailleurs that are already on the market.

Why are you bitching? if x9 is your price range then stick to it. This is top of the line machinery that has been asked for for years. Companies monitor these boards and actually listen to feedback/requests.
  • + 13
 Twenty Two years ago when 8 speed cassettes were a new expensive thing only available to DuraAce/XTR level groups, TNT (an aftermarket brand specializing in titanium components for those not around at the time) offered thread-on 10T and 11T cogs that REPLACED the HG lockring of shimano cassettes. You respaced your axle to shift the hub shell leftwards a bit (and then re-dished the wheel), threaded on the cog and poof... 7 speed cassettes now had 8 gears. The cost to convert your bike was the one titanium cog, and a new shifter. That's it. 7 and 8 speed chains were identical, and the cog to cog spacing was so ridiculously close that it basically didn't matter, especially if you optimized the cable tension for when you were in the center cog (not either end), then as you shifted the most you'd ever be out of alignment is like half a millimeter (well within the float range of the upper pulley of shimano derailleurs).

There's no reason a manufacturer today couldn't simply offer a replacement shorter freehub body that still uses the standard shimano body spline pattern in a shorter length with a cassette that had a thread-on cog instead of a lockring, and you wouldn't need to adjust your wheel dish after the freehub body swap, and you could still have smaller (than 11T) final position cog sizes.
  • + 1
 @reformedroadie. the only change to your current wheel set would be locating an xd1 driver and swapping it out. Thats a relatively easy change to make and doesn't require "people to use their xx1 trail wheels on their dh bike."

Sorry for reposting info above in my previous post. Was posting it from my phone and apparently a few people beat me to it.
  • + 5
 Tim - point is, there is a lot of expense here for little gain over existing drive trains. What are the gains? A 10 cog? Weight? Ground clearance between a 36t and 34t chainring? It is a DH bike.

What Sram is doing is creating a market for companies like a Wolfstooth, or OneUp to make backward compatible solutions that solve the same problems cost effectively.

The wheel remark had nothing to do with XC wheels and everything to do with forcing another group of riders to have to swap out freehubs...which may or may not be possible with there current wheels.

And finally, it has nothing to do with "price range". Because you can afford a $277 RD, doesn't mean you should.
  • + 4
 There's really not that much expense over existing x0 derailleurs and shifters, aside form the cassette. If you're in the market for x0 then you have discerning tastes and are well aware that quality doesn't come cheaply. Gains? Gearing designed for DH purposes, wider gear spacing to eliminate double shifts, x-sync chain rings, etc.. did you even read the article or watch the video? That would answer most of your questions. It was pretty thorough.

If swapping out your freehub isn't an option, they didn't limit you to the 7 speed setup, there's a 10 speed version that is compatible with every bike out there and will allow you to run a cheaper 1070 cassette if you want. They're not forcing you into anything, they are giving you the options that have been requested by racers forever. Stop your bitching?

Wolftooth/Oneup are irrelevant here as it is a limited range DH group we're talking about, and not a wide range trail group.
  • - 1
 Do you work for Sram?
Gearing for DH? Buy a road cassette.
You say I am bitching, but your responses are weak at best...
  • + 8
 I've been on SRAM Red Cassettes for years and this new set up changed everything. You obviously don't neeeed it but it's superior to a road cassette 10 or 11 speed for DH like a Boxxer is to a Pike. If you can get your hands on one you won't ever go back Trust me.
  • + 13
 Reformed Roadie, not to be rude man, but you are acting like an idiot. This is progression. If you don't want it, don't buy it. I don't think that anyone is begging you to drop coin on an XD driver and this gruppo. This is intended to be a top of the line DH component group. 11sp spacing on a 7 cogcassette gives you extremely smooth shifting and the 10T cog gives you a gear to use when really putting power down at high speed, without mandating the use of a large chainring which would effect ground clearance.

No one is dragging you folks from your kludged together drivetrains, the argument of "well I can glue/weld/screw/tape another cog onto my saint cassette and it works" is meaningless. This is a polished, refined, and high functioning grouppo that does what people want out of the box. Doubtful that it works? Ask Stevie Smith.

The technology moves forward. This is another step. Embrace innovation even if it doesn't directly appeal to you. If haters like some of you folks ran the world we would all be foot paddling around in flintstones mobiles watching black and white tube televisions and riding the penny-farthing.
  • + 0
 @timkoerber If this is a top-of-the-line componentry, why is it made of effin' plastic? Why is XO1 shifter resembling X9 shifter almost 1-1 (except for lever angle setting)? This is not the quality level of XO we all used to know, for sure. And using a 10T makes a point in terms of making it possible to run smaller chainring, but why the heck are they using x-sync when they are also using a chain retention system? This is really a minor improvement at cost of major buck.
  • + 11
 This is a group aimed at racers and posers primarily, because real folks who chairlift/downhill on weekends don't run top end kit... they run stuff that is easily/cheaply replaced. They might buy a bike with top end stuff, but once they have to start buying replacement components they go cheaper/more durable. If Shimano made a clutch type Alivio mega-9 derailleur, that'd be all most weekend warriors would ever need. Someday SRAM might trickle down the tech to lower levels but don't try and argue this is anything but unobtanium for most people at this stage.
  • + 2
 Wow this turned in to quite the battle. Legit questions I posted above. I'm no luddite cheapskate (I already have XX1 on an XC bike) but I really was curious what SRAM's rationale was here.
Q1 - OK I get it. you need the XD to go 10t. and avoid a slightly larger chainring which helps ground clearance. There is a reason. It is legit. However, I don't think it's a huge concern for me. A 36t isn't that much more huge than a 34t.
Q2 - still no great answer here, but perhaps the shifting is slightly better. It's certainly not cause of the NW chainring. 10 speed chains work fine on those if you run 1x10.
Q3 - didn't get an answer there. There might be a slight advantage somewhere - perhaps the parallelogram - but not tremendous.
Fin - Thanks to those who responded. There are improvements. For me the gear spacing is the biggest advantage over a road cassette, but overall the entire system isn't a huge leap worth the investment. It will be to some. Time to go ride what ever ya got, and get whatever ya want.
  • - 1
 I agree with reformed roadie, lots of cost for small benefit. Slight improvements, but If it were a polished and refined DH gruppo it wouldn't have that humongous gap between the cassette and the spokes we see in the 3rd picture down. Hopefully an aftermarket company will make a much less expensive, preferably steel, 11-25 cassette with the same spacing, that way you would only have to buy the rear derailleur.
  • + 3
 Q1: powerdome uses the XD driver, so they're able to use existing machining to make it happen. Saves steps, saves money for both them and the consumer.
Q2: Back when The Syndicate was using SRAM, they were using 10 speed before anyone else in DH; they found that the ten speed chains were 15% stronger vs the 9 speed chains, and less likely to break under racing strains. This is because the chains are narrower, so there's less leverage on the pins that hold the chain together.
Q3: the rear mech is the same as the XX1 and X01 mech, so when the chain does slap, the rear mech only moves vertically; a clutch X9 (or X0) will move vertically and laterally, leading to ghost shifts--not what you want when you're on the gas coming out of a boulder strewn corner and trying to get back up to speed.

Last, as I explained below, over the long run, using a powerdome and 2 chains will be cheaper than using a standard cassette and sram's lowest cost chain (PC-1051); the powerdome and 11x1 chain combo is supposed to last 3-4 times longer than a standard PG-1071 (X9) cassette and PC-1051. One Powerdome cassette and 2 chains will run you $410 retail. Over the same amount of time, you'd use 3 x PG1071s for $300 ($100 ea) and 6 x PC1071s for another $210 ($35 ea). So you'd actually save $90 in the long run. That is if the cassette/chain durability is what SRAM says it is when it's out in the real world vs the test lab.
  • + 3
 SLX had a 9 speed 11-28 cassette before they shifted the group to ten speeds. It was if memory serves, 228 grams with the lockring and all steel cogs. It should have been a best seller for DH bikes and probably would have had shimano not changed SLX to a ten speed group.
  • + 1
 I use that slx 11t - 28t 9speed with the new zee close ratio mech and a x9 9 speed shifter. works perfect no ghost shifting no dropping chain of large cog etc etc etc... I also like the 28t for when having to pedal to back to the uplift.
  • + 1
 There has been talk of a dishless da-bomb hub with a stubby freehub to fit a reduced shimano cassette. Finaly can we begin to use those 150 hubs potential for stronger dishless wheels.
  • + 3
 I had actually not considered the little known detail that shimano dyna sys is the same ratio as the previous sram esp/1:1 used on their 8-9 speed shifters and derailleurs, when posting about the cassette. Still while shimano made probably millions of them, they are now OOP.
  • + 5
 To everyone griping about the gap between the cassette and the spokes, yes, SRAM could make the cassette end right there and then someone else or SRAM could make a hub with really wide flange spacing that would result in a VERY strong wheel.

Do you have ANY IDEA how much griping you people would do if they did that??? OH another new standard! OH another driver body! Oh my wallet! Oh I love 8 speed crappy shifting cassettes from back in the 90's.

There just isn't any winning with the pinkbike crowd, that must be clear to any part supplier. Unless you make the DVO emerald which all of you fanboys have jumped on without anyone trying it that hasn't been paid to. It is always a good laugh on here.
  • - 2
 www.pinkbike.com/news/DT-Swiss-7-Speed-Downhill-Hub-First-Look-sea-otter-2011.html

think this is what we really want to see... but its based on shimano capreo 9t not sram.. no one uses the xd driver for dh so it is already a new standard..

canfieldbrothers.com/components/9-tooth-rear-hub

is already here as a 9 or 10 speed..

you obviously haven't a clue trying to rip off dvo, they are the dogs go and try them, as good as an avalanche cartridge upgrade if you even know what that is...
  • + 1
 www.specialized.com/gb/gb/bikes/mountain/demo/sworks-demo-8#specs

forgot specialized already have and sell their 7 speed shimano capreo 9t-20t rear hub cassette that runs on standard mech and shifter... win win win
  • + 1
 the closer the different cogs are to each other the smoother the shifting will be. there are other reasons but thats the simplest one.
  • + 1
 Slight error in the article I'm not sure has been picked up:

"You'll also need an XD driver body and 11 speed chain because the group uses the same 11 speed spacing as XX1 and X01. "

There is no difference between a 10 or 11 speed chain/ cassette in terms of spacing. 11 speed campag is a different story but an XX1 chain/ KMC-X10 SL/ Dura Ace 10 or 11 speed chain for example are interchangeable and work great on XX1. Stuff is more compatible than they make out!
  • + 1
 " the powerdome and 11x1 chain combo is supposed to last 3-4 times longer than a standard PG-1071 (X9) cassette"

SRAM don't have a great history for making long lasting cassettes (especially here in UK mud). I would consider that they have brought XX1 cassette life up to par rather than far exceeded the competition which is how that statement could be interpreted. I'm happy with my XX1 but my gosh were SRAM cassettes and chains shonky in the past!!! Smile
  • + 2
 Meh ! cheap Road mech and cassette been working just fine for me. Pass
  • + 58
 Finally! Now I can spend my money again. Wife will be happy! Smile
  • + 12
 Why on earth does this not include a new rear hub with wider spacing between spoke flanges? They're essentially requiring a hub upgrade by making it compatible only with the xD driver. Reducing the dish of the rear wheel would have provided practical benefits.
  • + 6
 I was thinking the same thing.. In that top-down pic, if you ignore the pie plate there's an enormous gap between the largest cog and the hub flange.
  • + 4
 Thats next years " big idea " , imagine how much they would charge for the XXX01xx1 ( or what ever it's called ) super hub !
  • + 4
 downhil, I am surprised that you have as few props as you do. When I first saw this article, I thought 'Wider flange spacing for a stronger wheel'.

The vast majority of people wanting to run this cassette will need a new driver anyway. SRAM should have gone the whole hog and done shifter, cassette AND hub (incl. freehub body).
  • + 3
 whats the point of 11 speed spacing if your not going to change the hub flange? might as well just keep running the rigged 9sp versions we were or find some old xt 8sp. total waste with out the improved hub width to complete the idea
  • + 12
 new solution

get a 9 spd slx cassette (11-34) and a 9 spd saint system
add one longer bolt to the rear mech to limit the upper end movement
remove the carrier for the largest 3 sprockets and replace with bb spacers, then set up mech as per usual

Congrats, you now have a 11-23 6spd "downhill specific" gear setup that will cost you less than 100gbp these days including mech and cassette even better it is compatible with any wheelset!!!!
  • + 5
 Well thats essentially what a lot of racers have done for years. Often using road casettes and custom spoke guards.
  • + 4
 I did a similar thing with a zee and a X9 shifter. But the Sram XO1 7spd is easier to mount for a bike manufacturer, because they only have to open the pack and mount the system. So we'll see that on complete bike, with avid brakes and RS suspensions, because with the whole package it's cheaper.
  • + 1
 i also used a zee 10sp der so i could run a clutch on a 9sp setup. but why remove the largest three sprockets? i guess there is some weight advantage but not worth the versitility you lose.
  • + 1
 same reason as sram state here, gives you the same useful range as a road cassette but you dont need to be hitting the shifter as many times to get the gear you want, road cassettes work but it means you often have to be hitting the downshift twice at a time, this eliminates that and allows you to get acess to useful gears faster.as faul says it is possible with other gear setups than saint but that is what i have have done on my dh bike (m810 saint not the new 10 spd m820 group) so i know that works i cant personally vouch for any other systems
  • + 12
 1. New DT Swiss wheelset? Nice!
2. It is good to see the evolution here, but 245 euro for rear derailleur and 269 euro for cassette is out of my range.
  • + 9
 It's the most expensive, yet cheapest quality, drivetrain ever.

They derailleur is probably somewhat expensive to make, but a slightly heavier, more durable 7 speed 11-24 steel cassette could be made for less than $50, and you wouldn't have to buy their expensive hub. A 7 speed shifter for $143 pays for a lot of flashy red advertisements, but could also be made for much less. But I won't hold my breath, they will probably keep this high end since their isn't huge demand.

Without a doubt, the most exciting thing about this article was this:

"Chris Hilton, External Drivetrain Product Manager"

This presumably means they have an Internal Drivetrain Product Manager and are hopefully finally making progress towards getting rid of the stupid, archaic, rear derailleur that is the weak spot on every bicycle that has one.
  • + 1
 Amen brother
  • + 1
 It seems like the price of the cassette is just a big f*ck you to us,
basically they're saying "now it's 7spd so you can't buy a road cassette, your only option is this overexpensive pile of 7 rings that will have worn out in 2 months".
  • + 4
 @protour, I like your theory about "external drivetrain product manager". I hope some day derrailleurs will be old fashionned things.
  • + 1
 www.effigear.com/#!copie-de-accueil/c1jv8

Nicolai has a protype DH-Frame with the gearbox weighing in at 16.5kg race ready, soon to be in production...
  • + 2
 UCI Rule 1.3.006: The bicycle is a vehicle with two wheels of equal diameter. The front wheel shall be steerable; the
rear wheel shall be driven through a system comprising pedals and a CHAIN.
So Nicolai wouldn't be allowed to use the belt drive on his bike, so he gets almost 0.5kg extra. 17kg That is quite heavy for a "competitive" bike.
  • + 1
 That is why there is Zerode Smile )
  • + 10
 This is beautiful. The whole groupo is magnifically designed and the integrated spoke guard/cassette looks killer. I didn't think I'd say this anytime soon, but I might be going back to Sram.
  • + 11
 "Racers have been asking for a production downhill specific group with 7 gears for a long time."

All the way back since the 80ies Smile
  • + 7
 Everybody sounds like a bunch of Bickering girls. Sram is just trying to push the boundaries by producing a dedicated 7 speed so you don't have to MacGyver one together. If you don't like it don't buy it and shut up. I personally have the xo1 drivetrain and love it.
  • + 6
 That 10-Speed X-Horizon combined with a Narrow-Wide chainring and the 42-Tooth oneupcomponents ring in the back will provide all the advantages of XX/XO1 setup (except the 10 Sp. cog) without the super expensive rear casette, and it uses existing 10-Sp. shifter. I'd say this is a huge positive!

May subconsciously not be as careful with my rear derailleur in the coming rides.....
  • + 5
 This product certainly looks good, but as is the case with most new products, the real question is whether it is practical and for who might it be practical. If you are a serious racer this new 7 speed drive train looks awesome. But for the recreational rider like myself, that makes up a huge part of the market? Probably not. Not when you can right now pick up something like a Zee derailleur AND shifter for under $150.
  • + 5
 ''Of course we could go cheaper. We could make X7 one-by and all these things, and that is one path to take. A reasonably successful path to take commercially. Or we could take the philosophy of the one-by drivetrain and instead of going down with it, we could go across into other categories.''

All this quote shows me is a big middle finger to everyone who can't afford a $1,000 component group. Eff you too, SRAM.
  • + 0
 Yeap
  • + 4
 Respect where its due, they don't make the best drivetrains, but they work their way around the patents to put out something fairly decent and are investing R+D into NEW ideas. They are pushing progress more than Shimano has in a long time!
  • + 8
 I want the machined proto. Looks sweet
  • + 4
 "bikes with more a more rearward axle path than usual, such as Canfields, should be fitted with the longer of the two options".

Even though our Jedi has 2.5" of rearward travel through it's axle path, the bike has virtually ZERO chaingrowth due to the upper idler. This means you can run a shortcage derailleur and a tighter chain than normal.
  • + 6
 A 7 spd GEARBOX, fantastic. What I've always wanted.... Oh! sorry, I misread. It's just a 7spd casette on a 11spd body.
  • + 1
 lol think Nicolai wouldn't be happy as that's their prototype race bike

www.flickr.com/photos/96532427@N05/10350166965
  • + 3
 Now all we need is campy to enter the mtb segment so everybody will have their own dedicated hubs, dedicated spokes, dedicated everything and a million new standards. If you wanted a bigger range just go 11-27(2Cool with a bigger chainring. It's not like it wa impossible. And overpriced dh components that are gonna be smashed to pieces? That seems like a good idea right?
  • + 3
 I really don't get the need for the 10t cog other than forcing you to buy a new rear hub body/hub/wheel.... Ok it gives you one less tooth so in theory a higher top speed before you top out and cant pedal any faster or it gives you the same current top speed as an 11t setup by dropping a tooth off the front chain ring. This sounds all fine and dandy until you realize most chain guides with plastic skid plates are designed to be used with 32-36t chain ring so swapping your current 34t ring for a 32t your not going to gain any additional ground clearance as that is determined by the skid plate which is designed for the maximum chain ring size of 36... Now another point because of the nature of the narrow wide nature of the chain ring you cant actually just drop down a single tooth to keep the same max gear as the chain ring needs to keep an equal number of teeth so doing so will actully leave you with a lower top speed. So basically the only advantage is a very slightly higher top speed that i really don't care much for maybe for the best of the best they'll notice the difference but i sure as hell wont. Not to be completely negative 7speeds a good idea so is the thick thin teeth on the chain rings and it sure is pretty. Will i buy it nope I'm perfectly with my current X0 10speed
  • + 4
 Except now you don't need a chain guide and can run a 30-32 tooth front ring and not have to double shift out of the gate and every corner.
  • + 2
 ill accept the no chain guide argument when i start seeing dh bikes being raced without one, even there demo bikes are running chain guides. My issue isnt with 7 speed nature and 2teeth steps those i reckon are positives i just see the 10t pointless for most people
  • + 1
 A point that some folks are missing is that a chainguide is not actually needed here. Look on a lot of pro's bikes running this gruppo, many aren't using chainguides. This increases the benefit of running a smaller ring, drops weight from the bike, and reduces drag (a lot).

You are right though, there are no odd tooth combinations for wide/narrow chainrings, so you have to make two tooth jumps.
  • + 2
 Neverlost , care to share some links to DH bikes being ridden at the WC with no chain guide ?
  • + 2
 here is the bikes from the SA world champs everyone is using a chain guide even the blackbox riders which are using the protoype version of this system

www.pinkbike.com/news/World-Champs-2013-Rider-Profiles.html

even mitch ropelato who is running the trail version of XX1 drivetrain on his 29r is still using a chain guide

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10033422
  • + 0
 Using sheldon brown's (RIP) gear calculator (sheldonbrown.com/gears/index.html) you can see that going 10t with a 34 offers greater gear inches than an 11t with a 36 and the difference between 10-32 and 11-36 isn't a massive loss.

However, I personally think this is an utter rip off by sram as they're just bodging their existing xo1 tech for DH. The rear mech didn't need tweaking but the cassette did, and that's where they've let themselves down, especially at this price point. If you want to charge us $300 for a bloody cassette at least make one that looks like it hasn't been adapted by some first year uni student with a CAD machine. Change the specific driver you made (make it shorter) and get rid of that spacing at the back of the cassette so it'll sit closer to the spokes. You can then widen the hub flanges and make the wheel stronger which is another crucial thing in DH.

It's not like people are going to scream any more at the cost of a new hub after they've dropped their cash on a new mech, shifter, cassette, chain and freehub already. You could always offer a freehub and adapter/spacer for those that don't want to change their hubs.
  • + 1
 if memory serves, check out zink and Lyles bikes from Rampage, I dont think that either of those guys are running guides. At the world cup level I think most of them ran guides last year even with this gruppo as both insurance and as a way to hide the fact that they were riding an XX1 style drivetrain. We'll see this year I guess now that the cat is out of the bag.
  • + 3
 I think SRAM missed out on this one. Why not take advantage of the extra space and produce a new rear hub? Make a custom driver for it so they now have 11sp and 7sp specific drivers to force you in to buying their rear hubs. Increase the spacing on the rear hub flanges to use up all that wasted space they have behind the largest cog on their new "revolutionary" 7sp design. This way you get your wider spaced 7sp gearing, better rear wheel dish, and a somewhat more justified need for a new rear hub. People who don't want to shell out for the new rear hub could still use the narrow 7sp cassette and space the inside to fill out their 10sp driver if they don't want the benefit of the wider spaced hub flanges.
  • + 3
 It's great to have an integrated package, but it's strange that there's no real mention of the lead Specialized took in creating 6/7 speed DH drive trains, especially since SRAM's WC racers include Specialized athletes. Plus, you can buy a Demo with a micro cassette drive.

www.pinkbike.com/news/DT-Swiss-7-Speed-Downhill-Hub-First-Look-sea-otter-2011.html

Maybe SRAM didn't like that they used a Shimano cassette to set it up.
  • + 0
 maybe shimano is working on one with the capreo hubdriver... That's a proper setup designed from scratch that shouldn't cost a fortune..
  • + 3
 The past year I remember lots of whiners asking for this exact product. As I'm writing this, there are 293 comments. Im going to guess that about 30% of them are whining rants.
How do you please these people? haha
  • + 3
 the short answer is.... you dont. the average pinkbike "product pro" wont be happy with anything any company puts out. bunch of chimpanzees. scream for innovation then shame it when it gets here.
  • + 2
 At first galnce I thought, yes someone has finally come out with a 7 speed dh groupset, just what everyone has been asking for. Then I noticed that it uses a nice thin 11 speed chain. Why the fuck would you bother designing a 7 speed groupset and then take away one of the key advantages of a low gear groupset, being a stronger chain. Also, the fact that you have to use an XD freehub body to use a 10 tooth low gear seems abit pointless to me when you could just go for a slightly bigger front chainring for a fraction of the price. The 10 tooth cog makes sense for enduro and xc so that you can have the massive gear range with a single ring up front, for DH its just pointless.
  • + 0
 Exactly, this is insane. They've brought a 7 speed cassette with a proprietary driver to market, no wider chain and not increased the spacing of the cassette, so you don't solve the (Admittedly small) issue of clogging in muddy courses?

The mind boggles as effectively the same thing could be accomplished on a 10spd set up with the integrated dork disk taking up the space of the largest cog.

Radge.
  • + 2
 Infact the the chain is actually now thinner. The old 10 speed chains are thicker than the 11 speed
  • + 1
 True! Besides, a wider space between cogs would allow also less funky shifting in wet conditions, as the bigger distance derailleur travels through each cog would make the shifting less vulnerable!
  • + 3
 The XX1 chain is stronger than the 10 speed chain, it will last a lot longer as well due to the hard chrome finish. Ask anyone riding XX1 whether their chain has any issues. You might be surprised. The cassette has been ridden in lots of muddy conditions by pro's in racing and it has worked great. It drains just like an XX1 cassette. Folks just don't want to believe I guess.
  • + 3
 I'm not saying it doesn't work; infact it works incredibly well. It provides a practical, massive range of gears in an incredibly tight and well made package in a trail setup.

The same technology does not however necessarily transfer very well to a DH specific, 7 speed drivetrain. There's nothing wrong with the mud clearing of XX1, it could just be better if you adapted it for a 7 speed spacing. You would also get away with far more pronounced teeth on a 7 speed cassette. Just look at an old 5 speed freewheel!

And it may very well be true that the XX1 chain is stronger than a run of the mill 10spd chain; it's an incredibly high end product. My point is that an even wider than 10 speed chain, ie, a 7/8 speed width chain will of course be stronger. To suggest wider links and chunkier pins wouldn't be stronger is facile.

As for the proprietary driver, I think there's little that can be said in it's favour in this situation. It works incredibly well for 11spd xx1, but it's implementation is pretty pointless in this instance. You needed the 10t for the wide range of a trail bike, but one could get away with a 2t bigger front ring in a DH setup.

XX1 is a marvel of engineering and leaps ahead of anything else; I just feel its re-appropriation into a DH groupset a little contentious.
  • + 2
 That mech looks pimp. that's the only good thing I will say about this.

Seven speed, what's the point if you just leave a gap? Wasted space. Might as well leave sprockets on to catch the chain even if you don't use them.

Ten tooth cog, weaker and wears out quicker. What's the point if you don't have a smaller chain guide? Half a job.

Narrow chain might have a higher tensile strength but they wear out quicker and are more likely to snap if you hit a rock.

We need Hope to release their version of a Dh hub and cassette. Wider hub flanges is the only reason to drop gears. This new sram stuff is great for tarts. Real people need a backward compatible hope hub with wide flanges. Do it Hope. ANd, go!
  • + 1
 A 12x150 hope hub with the Pro 2 Trials 48 pickup freehub [which fits 6 or 7 10spd cassette rings] and widened flanges to take up the spare width - then you could run any standard cassette with the larger rings removed and any derailleur, chain and chainring setup you wished, only needing to modify a limiter screw in some instances.... HOPE - are you listening!?!?!

Build it up to a Mavic, DT or Easton non-drilled bed UST rim ready to go tubeless without the fuss and you'd have the perfect downhill wheel IMO!
  • + 1
 I second everything you mention, but with a Spank Spike rim... the best real world rim you can get!
  • + 3
 Now I have to invent a new standard of hubs that is wider and use the space of the spoke guard. For wheel lateral stiffness. I'll sell it with a handle to re-use the hub guard into a beautiful piza cutter.
  • + 2
 10 speeds? Not enough. 12? Still not there? 18? Not yet. 21? Nope 24? Not there yet. 27? Still not doing it. 30? We've had enough.

7, 9, 10, 11? All acceptable.

I just love that more and more gears were added to drivetrains, only for a lot of riders to seem to settle down with much fewer gears.
  • + 2
 750 bucks for a cassette a derailleur and a shifter.!!!!!!!!!
We are talking down hill bikes. Gear box is the only way to go.
I will laugh my ass off at every sucker that shells out close to a grand to "improve" their bike with a seven speed sram set up.
DH bikes =Gear box people. wake up!
  • + 5
 8 speed cassette = $40
8 speed chain = $15
saint 8/9 speed derailleur = $90

Zero problems. Dirt cheap.
  • + 1
 True that!
  • + 2
 The biggest problem I find with this is you're out $780 USD for just the cassette, derailleur, and shifter, then you still need the specific SRAM chain and cranks. Don't get me wrong I'm happy to see something DH specific and this system looks beautiful but I built my entire DH rig for about what this drive train would cost... I think I'll stick with my cheap stuff that doesn't cost more than my rent to replace if it gets knocked off on a rock.
  • + 0
 Don't forget your new rear wheel/hub/freehub body!
  • + 4
 So, with the reduces cogs- does the hub flange spacing increase to build a stronger wheel? Fewer speeds in the same amount of space doesn't make any sense.
  • + 1
 was thinking that myself, drive side spokes are laced differently to the brake side to allow room for the cog. Would the extra free space from the missing 3 gears allow the wheel to be built more balanced/stronger. Maybe they haven't developed the 7spd rear wheel fully yet..
  • + 2
 I think they were trying to minimize the concentration of public (read Pinkbike user) outrage at introducing yet another rear hub standard for this drivetrain!

Additionally (and more realistically), utilizing existing technology will allow them to push it out faster to the masses as the XD driver body is becoming widely available as a swap-out for many hubs. Perhaps they will work with a hub manufacturer on specific spacing but would likely not go anywhere past the proto/team race scene for a while.
  • + 1
 And whats wrong with shimano? I just got a zee rd and saint shifter for my all mtn hardtail and it shifts flawlessly, with an 11-36 cassette.. the saint shifter is so smooth and i can triple and quadrouple shift in one quick motion.. sure sram has a solid feel but shimano wins.. now for dh why not run a similar 10sp setup? Only benefit to this xo1 dh i can see is the smaller rd.. but its negligable compared to zee or saint
  • + 5
 Mang. Xd driver? Chris King, I hope you are seeing the new trend.
  • + 1
 now we just need a new standard of hub flange width and free hub width for all the axel sizes out there in order to take advantage of a skinnier cassette.... I really think this 7sp with gear spacing of an 11sp or 10sp would be fine is a step in the right direction. but i think the major reason behind a cassette like this would be to make the hub flange width wider with out actually making the hub and esentialy the bike wider
  • + 2
 I've been running 6 speed on my downhill bike for forever. 11-19. works perfectly, just took my top 3 off of a 11-23 cassette.
9 speed spacing too
www.pinkbike.com/photo/10001104
  • + 2
 Why not a 11-20 5 speed, by taking the top 4 off a mtb cassette? Is there a need for such close ratios?
  • + 2
 idk man i just took the top 3 off and left it at that
  • + 1
 Since this product is for high end DH use - I think that a 7speed specific xd driver/hub would be a very good idea. If you could move the spokes on the drive side out a few more MM - that would make a massively stronger wheel. I know it is less interchangeable - but lets get real - if you are spending this kind of money on a drive train, you can afford a new wheel - and it would be a good deal stronger - maybe even symmetrically dished if you moved the flange out instead of just throwing on spacers...
  • + 1
 totally agree bobby, I think that they probably didnt do it just since communities like this one would absolutely crap their pants if you told them they needed a new rear wheel. Look at all the bellyaching above when all they asked you to replace was your driver to accommodate the new drivetrain...
  • + 3
 My horde of 7-speed cassettes are about to be worth a fortune! Next, I'll cash in on my stash of quill stems and bar ends...
  • + 1
 I've already been running a 7spd on my dh bike for a while... Don't waste your money if you are good with a grinder and can adjust a reach mech! I converted a 9spd cassette to a 7 by cutting off the top two cogs. Then I used a 10spd carbon xo shortcage and shifter, adjusted the limit screws a bit an presto!
  • + 1
 I was asking for less gears so we could go back to thicker chains and sprockets so they last more then a few months. Taking a few cogs of a 11spd cassete is nothing new. The chains are still to thin and the sprockets are still way to close together. I would be more then happy if you just re-relesed your old 8spd but with a clutch derailleur.
  • + 3
 about FUCKING time!!!!! a step in the right direction now we just need it to trickle down to the more affordable groups an then a shimano shadow version please
  • + 1
 I really feel like it would have been way more beneficial to make a 7speed drivetrain, compatible with 10spd freehub bodies, and uses the standard 7speed chains, but also offer a higher end chain option. Wider chains do last much longer than today's 10-11spd offerings and cost waaayyy less. And guess what? they shift just fine.
  • + 4
 sick now I can spend way too much money for slight gains in weight, clearence, and shifting quality
  • + 1
 XO1 DH, WOW!....What's next? a XX01 - 3 speed or maybe a XXX1 Single Speed. I may get bashed for being sarcastic but that's cool cause I'm doing the same.
Those cat's are Really going "Enduro" on your wallets..... just thought I'd jump in on the enduro jive before it fades.
  • + 1
 177 comments so far, not one person mentioned the the biggest advantage to this system. Clearance!!!!!! Running a 10 tooth in the rear means you can run a 30-34 tooth chainring. Today we have lower and lower BB's, more clearance is something a lot of us can use. As someone who has broken plenty of chain guides, I see this system giving me more confidence in the chunky chunk. Right now my chain guide is a 36-40 version. I would love to use one that was designed for a 32 tooth.
  • + 2
 This is what happens when marketing leads product development. A guy in a basement could do better ... oh wait he did: www.peterverdone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Six_Speed_MTB
  • + 1
 I really love what he did! Makes me regret selling my single speed rear hub, that was very similar to the rear hub he used.
  • + 1
 I have always thought that running road cassetes on downhill bycicles is stupid, and the existence of this product confirms this opinion. Just like they say, there is no need for close ratios on downhill. You don't need the bigger cogs of a mtb cassette either, but no one is forcing you to use them, you can just use the 7 smaller ones. Which, minus the weight difference, is exactly the same as running this 7-speed setup. The real advantage of running a 7-speed cassette though, is that a wider hub can be used, helping to center the rim and equal spoke tension. Like Specialized is doing on their Demo bikes. However, this cassete is meant for a regular hub and just leaves the space where the cogs used to be unused. I'm still waiting for the real 7-speed downhill standard cassette and hubs.
  • + 1
 shit just do the same shit w/ less techy drama and give it to us for 300 F^ckin $$ total... fug carbon on my DH deraileur. Gimme smashable alloy and steel with stiff springs. fug insane machined cogset....just make it 7 plates and a low gear spoke guard.... leave my shifter the f^ck alone.....
  • + 2
 FYI, you can already run an 11spd derailleur/shifter with a 10spd cassette, just set the limit screw to prevent the derailleur from going over the 11th missing cog. (spacing is the same)
  • + 0
 No. How is it you think the spacing can be the same when 11 sprockets are fitted into the same overall space as 10?
  • + 2
 Exactly , but this would boggle the minds of the techy nerds that don't know how to tweek on their rigs So therefor it is wrong because the manufacture didn't print it on the back of the box
  • + 3
 The same space is used on the cassette (although I believe on an 11spd cassette, you gain a fraction of a mm if not a mm on the 10t cog side, and it was a problem on the "old" IBIS Mojos, with the chain grinding the chainstay), but the 42t cog is offset from the rest of the cassette using room made by the dish of the spokes.

Try it and see for yourself ...
  • + 2
 @djpearce The 10t sits where the lockring used to and the 42t is dished to sit closer to the spokes. Go to your local shop and take a close look at the cassette.
  • + 5
 If that's the case (and it would make sense) I stand corrected and humbly apologize. I will take a look!
  • + 1
 No, it's not fitted into the same space. It is dished to effectively hang off the back of the 10. The chain width and spacing is the same as 10sp.
  • + 5
 Less is more...money that is!
  • + 3
 Think about how much faster you'll go when you aren't being weighed down by dollar bills!
  • + 4
 I think this is completely badasss! but it pisses me off with srams damn 300 dollar cassettes.
  • + 2
 rapit2theredline, see my comment a couple comments before yours.
  • - 1
 why are you defending the product so eagerly? I see from your profile many comments towards others as well. Its the comments for a reason and that's just my opinion on it. And even still 300 dollars for a cassette is insane. you don't even pedal a DH that much anyways.
  • + 1
 rapit what do you think was going to happen? SRAM was going to swoop in with a new technology that they just finished sinking lots of R&D money into and has proven works great by winning world champs with it, and then sell it for the same price as a junky 8 speed cassette that people are raving about in these comments?

Come on man. When was the last time a new corvette cost the same as a 1980s vette. Griping about the cost of new top of the line parts is foolish. The consumer drives the price. You may just not be the target market.
  • + 1
 The remark stating that a Canfield would need the longer cage option to handle the chain growth of it's rearward axle path is incorrect...The Jedi uses an idler pulley to handle this growth so there is virtually no movement of the derailleur cage during suspension movement.
  • + 4
 Finally! Sram, take my money, and also release the charger boxxer soon please
  • + 2
 Wow, SRAM reinvented the "enduro specific" joke with the good old "DH specific" one.

I see massively neg proped guy have already tried this dangerous game... Good, we'll have fun.
  • + 5
 I need this in my life! Never thought they'd do it though....
  • + 5
 A new product that isn't Enduro specific!? Finally!
  • + 0
 why do you still need an 11 speed and XD driver? whu didn't they make the drivetrain cheaper and make it, oh i dunno, normall driver sized and for a 7 speed chain? even if they used 10 speed spacing i'm sure they could get their nice dome stuff going bown enough.
  • + 2
 I'm actually going to buy this; cassette, derailleur and shifter. I was thinking of trying to make a custom cassette similar to this but now SRAM has done the work for me!
  • + 0
 When I saw that the title had "specific" in it I thought it was going to say Enduro specific and then I just started thinking "really SRAM! You're joining the enduro-specific marketing crap!" Fortunately it turned out to be something else.
  • + 0
 Want to use one of the components, you say? oh, i am sorry, you`ll need to buy a whole group AND a new driver body! Stupid if you ask me. But not if you ask SRAM! more money in their pocket!! f**k that, since i don`t race i don`t need 11speed 7 speed heck nor 2 speed, singel speed for me is the bomb and still will be!
  • + 0
 What a lot of readers are missing, is that this cassette w/ an 11 x 1 chain is supposed to last 3-4 times as long as a normal cassette and chain combo. Sure, this means you'll be spending a lot up front, but spending LESS in the long run. If SRAM's claims of durability are accurate, that is.

Bear with me and do the math: If you change your chains regularly, you typically get 2-3 chains out of a single cassette. Since none of us are really that anal, call it two chains. So you'd spend $300 on the new DH cassette and another $120 on 2 11x1 chains for a grand total of $420. If the powerdome stuff is really is 3-4 times more durable than a standard cassette and chain, over that same time frame, you'd be buying 3 x PG1070 cassettes at $100 per and 6 PC-1051 chains at $35 each for a grand total of $510. Using that math, you'd save $90 by running a single powerdome cassette and two chains vs the amount of regular cassettes and chains you'd use in the same amount of time.
  • + 3
 There are plenty of reports out there of premature wear on XX1 and X01 cassettes and chainrings. 3-4 times more durable is a complete crock.

Just because Sram says that their 11spd chain the strongest ever doesn't mean that they can't make an even stronger chain if it is wider. Slightly wider cog spacing could increase life dramatically because you could use wider cogs which increases the contact area between the chain and cog. I give Sram credit for coming up with this but they could have done better by keeping the standard freehub body, increasing the cog spacing (while increasing the cog thickness and chain width), and making a rear hub with wider, symmetric flange spacing.
  • + 2
 "Supposed" is the keyword. It does not. XT cassettes with Zee shifter - and take three cogs off if you so desire - there are nice hubs with a narrow freehub just for that. Much cheaper, stronger, more protected derailleur, and actually shifts very nice.
  • + 1
 The xx-1 cassette is straight junk , they made it cheap for a reason , anyone that really has used one for more than 4 months knows what I'm talking about It may as well been made outta aluminum it wore down so fast The cassette is the most expensive and worst part the xox-1-0 group
  • + 0
 needing an XD driver compatible hub for a 7spd system is unnecessary, other than forcing you to spend more money. shifting smoothness is overrated on a dh bike (even in general). i shift once, maybe max. twice in a race run. and the narrow/wide chainring is again, unnecessary, as everyone runs a chainguide. as long as you are sticking the big three (e.13, MRP, Gamut), chain security is an nonissue.

i run 10 spd road cassette with a short cage clutch derailleur. i use limit screws to lock out my biggest gear. problem solved.

this is an answer that already has a solution. i will pass.
  • + 3
 Shimano is a few steps behind lately..... Time for them to joint the One by And dh revolution
  • + 1
 my shimano 1x10, 36tx36t setup gets me up any technical climb I need it to, and I'm pretty sure shimano have been solely holding up the dh drivetrain market for a few years now... and will continue to do so if the hilarious pricetag above has anything to do with it.
  • + 2
 How can they be behind? Saint has been pissing over the Sram stuff for almost a decade. Wink
Till now, Sram didn't have anything as serious as the Saint line. The new XO1 Dh is what they needed for quite some time, indeed. But too many people are already crying about the XD-driver compatibility and the other specific stuff.
And what about the 10-speed version? Would it get it's own cassette with a 10t cog, or is it an open opportunity to ride whatever cassette you want? Smile
  • + 2
 How is this behind? Take a 10sp saint or zee setup, don't use the big rings on a wide-range cassette, and you have everything you get here, except the pricetag and a miniscule difference in chainring diameter.
  • + 1
 Hey, I couldn't see if this got covered but could i use this rear der on my S-works demo instead of the XO type 1? Ive been looking for a type 2 to put on it and now all of a sudden this pop's up, convenient?
  • + 4
 Hahaha 'Integrated Pie Plate'!
  • + 0
 the more and more sram unveils there new BS, the more and more I become a fan to Shimano. 7 speed specific, this and that and all these others shenanigans, so that when it breaks or your looking for fix it in a few years time its discontinued and your kicking yourself in the ass for not buying 10 speed and locking out 3 gears.
  • + 3
 Already have 7 speed. Just remove the two largest cogs from a cassette and replace with spacers
  • + 1
 You can get a short cage x9 derailer and a SRAM 11 - 26 cog set for about $150.00. Why would I want to spend more than twice that for basically the same thing ( minus 2 gears)
  • + 0
 Sram used to be less expensive than Shimano and now they are even more expensive, how do they expect to get customers to pay more for a simpler product than what they usually put out (but still more complicated than shimano) and especially when the products have a bad reputation of not having good durability? Way to go SRAM, you could have used those efforts to make and X9 version of the X01 that is less expensive and then more people would buy your crap! lol
  • + 3
 Everyone watch the vid, it explains the reasons for most of the decisions rather well.
  • + 0
 What good is a specific 7sp system if it uses the same spacing as 11sp? How about having all the space in the freewheel body in use, and building some tolerances in the system just to keep it rolling longer problem free, since these things DO whack against all kinds of obstacles and they DO get grimy and bent. I would just tear of the lower speed sprockets and make some kind of a limitter in the switch before burning all that cash.
  • + 0
 After having watched the SRAM tech video on this its pretty clear SRAM are far ahead of the game! The X-sync chainrings and jockeys and X-horizon technology is going to be game-changing combined with clutch derailleurs and increased actuation on the shifting to reduce the age old issue of cable stretch/worn shifters...
For years I stuck with my old 8spd XT mech and had removed the top [mounting] pivot, as I found the knocking noise from my derailleur was from the top jockey wheel hitting the cassette and not the mech hitting my frame as most people believe,and removing this pivot's movement stopped the knocking.
Its fantastic to see SRAM make a groupset meet the needs of riders so precisely! Shimano have a lot of catching up to do!
  • + 1
 Well for a while I thought I'd finally give Sram a chance as I generally like the way it shifts, but it just breaks way too easily. Then I spotted the price and I think I'll stick with my Saint!
  • + 3
 What a fucking marketing bullshit.
  • - 1
 are you kidding? you must be stupid to think all of this is marketing bullshit. Marketing has something to do with it, but this is genuine mountain bike innovation. don't slag it off.
  • + 3
 About the 7speed: Don't like it. Lot of wasted space. They should have used a different hub with wider offsets to increase wheel stiffness or reduce hub width at all...
  • + 1
 That would take heaviers spokes , but yes, wasted space!!!
  • + 2
 Kijan has a point, why is that spoke guard in there? It could be thinner instead and have a wider hub... Downhill needs stiffer wheels more than spoke guards.
  • + 2
 Bullshit? I feel ya. My 11-13-15-17-19-21-24 7sp. Shimano Zee has 28, 32, and 36t bailout gears in addition. Never any transmission problems, either. 10t and reduced weight is the only motivation behind this raceday only setup. If SRAM wanted to introduce ANOTHER freehub body design and widen flange distance, they could have had another reason to point it out and say "That's why". I'd be happy to run this as soon as I get paid to race for SRAM GIVES this to me.
  • + 1
 *...SRAM and I"M GIVEN....* argh.... Was just looking at my bike and just realized its a 11-13-15-17-19-21-23 with a 26-30-34 option. I (of course) now remember pondering the ratios when I pulled the trigger on the shimmy swap.
  • + 2
 Ohhhh yay, another derailleur!!!!! It'd be nice if racers would start demanding a gearbox setup.
  • + 1
 I'll reserve my opinions on whether or not this is worth the money etc. But that is definitely the sexiest cassette I've ever seen. Beautiful milling on the back.
  • + 1
 There are hubs with shorter freehub bodies. To use 7 cogs out of 10sp - with wider flanges. Take last three off 11-36 cassette. A better, cheaper, stronger solution.
  • + 1
 Seven speed great .just had a new XO fitted to my sons DH bike this is the 3rd one on the bike less than a year old and yep the cable still only lasted 40 min .
  • + 1
 Halfassed. Want an automatic hubgearbox that slides in and out of the hub for servicing and adjusting shift points. with 3 -5 wide gears.
  • + 2
 I always thinked that the good thing of having 7 speeds was a stronger chain...
  • + 1
 Everybody is talking about drive trains and rear derailleurs, but has anybody noticed the DT Swiss FR Gravity wheels? They look strong and wide, yammy!
  • + 1
 Looks like FR600s on 27.5 version. Finally switched to Stans FLOW EX/ 26 wheels...fridgen stiff, lighter, and just as wide!
  • + 1
 The gravity rim from DT Swiss is a new development, 27.5mm wide, measured inside, wiiiide I would say!
  • + 1
 I bought a Shimano 7 SIS in 1998. Today is 2014 and it still works very well. The new group is throwing money away. So bad move Sram.
  • + 2
 Nice work but expensive, there is a cheaper solution, dapilten.com/en/bike-parts/22-10-to-7-spacer.html
  • + 3
 What a fucking heap of shit
  • + 0
 Hahhahahah not enduro, not 29er not fat bike, not 27.5, not super cx? they want mooooreeeee money! The went back in time and their own products and charge more $....they got me once with the hammerpoopoo...so they loose me.
  • + 2
 For how many years are you going to keep milking this shit. DI2 GEARBOX please
  • + 3
 $280 for something brakeable as deraileur?
  • + 2
 'Our new jet black finish provides a high level of corrosion resistance and it just looks awesome' love it SRAM
  • + 2
 Ok, it's here.Time to start bitching about SOMETHING............aaaaaand, GO!!
  • + 3
 i can now retire my xo 9 sp for my kids bike. ameen
  • + 2
 230€ for a derailleur that it can be smashed by a rock, for me no thanks... i stay on my sram x9
  • + 1
 I thought hope was doing a free hub body that is a casset with a 9 tooth ! that's what I'm interested in. 11T= to slow on a 32t/34t chainring
  • + 1
 always ran 8 speed on all my bikes, fu*k the hype do what you like people, it will probably be cool to do what you're doing one day anyway
  • + 1
 "X this, X-that, X-everything. X-actuation, X-aggeration?"
Glad this product has been brought to market, but jesus, how many times did that guy say X in the video?
  • + 6
 It's an X-rated video.
  • + 2
 THANK YOU!!!!! A MTB company that actually listens to its market and customer$. Hey FOX pay attention to this!!!!!!!!
  • + 2
 FINALLY!! ...but, why oh why does it have to be SRAM? Come on, Shimano...get off your ass.
  • + 2
 Just buy Saint for like a third the money and pull off the top three cogs. Spacers and done.
  • + 1
 This is amazing news. 7 gears sounds like the magic number that every DH 'er has always wanted. After seeing this all I can say is: I want, I want, I want Drool
  • + 2
 i would love to run that blocky proto, that thing would last years trouble free!
  • + 1
 they look like very beautiful design. 7 speed is right for DH so that with less gears it comes more quickly from one extreme to the other...
  • + 1
 looks cool, some awesome tech here. But the price,ouch!!,lets face it,unless your riding for a living,or got deep pockets,most folks will set their sights a little lower.
  • + 2
 can't just drop 2 cogs from an 11-34 block & keep the sramano zee 9/10spd shifter/mech?
  • + 1
 7 speed but needs 11 speed chain and xd compatible hub? also the cranks seem to be the same shitty x0 dh ... get lost sram!
  • + 1
 That is bloody fantastic! A true genre-specific product, that cassette looks unbelievably sexy. Kudos SRAM!
  • + 1
 I thought a lot of Downhill peeps used the Shimano 7 speed road cassette. Is this that much better?
  • + 1
 watch it only work on 650b bikes or something stupid ha just kidding. Im actually really stoked on this!
  • + 1
 Wonder if they're going to make anything compatible with Shimano direct mount.
  • + 2
 Oh, it ALL comes back, around doesn't it?
  • + 1
 i think dh riders will want gears on their bike, just not as many. so fewer, not less.
  • + 2
 Oh yah ..so glad I held out on ordering my drivetrain. Can't frickin wait.
  • + 1
 7-speed is the hot new thing? i thought i saw it all. i cant wait for 26in wheels to be cool again
  • - 2
 My 9 speed x7 short derailleur works so perfect... why say you dont have an specific dh group if you have x7 x9 and x0 rear derailleur made for DH? That cluch system is nice but will make suspention harder and srew tunning rear shock
  • + 2
 lm waiting for the 15 speed....
  • + 3
 Good game Shimano.
  • + 2
 Cool another mech version and ploy to make even more money.
  • + 1
 I have no interest in a 7 spd drivetrain, but I would love a set of those cranks.
  • + 2
 Not a very bright idea to release it right before the riding season.
  • + 2
 When my bike is already built up.
  • + 2
 Any way to use this with a downtube/road shifter?
  • + 1
 entwickeln das deutsche ? o.O
  • + 1
 SRAM? Where is our wide range (11-42 or 11-40) 10 speed?
  • - 1
 That's what I'm saying I'm not down with the XX-0-1 setup , NARROW WIDE , Clutch rear mech. Bang done ....
Wide range.............................10/speed Please
  • + 2
 oneupcomponents.com 42 tooth rear cog. Just installed it and works like a charm!
  • + 0
 Mine is on the way , can't wait
  • + 1
 Shimano are 10.000 years back now ! Well done SRAM Smile
  • + 1
 This not new I had 7 speed 40 years ago.
  • + 1
 I want the intense 951 PUH LEASE
  • + 1
 yes... why do we need 10sp in DH bike???
  • + 2
 still way behind shimano
  • + 1
 But still so f*cking expensive :/
  • + 1
 Does it require 135mm rear spacing like Specialized is using?
  • + 1
 No, but it is compatible with a 135 rear end. It's compatible with any hub that has XD driver compatibility--and that is a long and growing list.
  • + 1
 about time they came up with this!!!
  • + 1
 Typo: "with more a more rearward"
  • + 1
 very useful but ultra expensive
  • + 2
 One word, awesome!
  • + 2
 about time.
  • + 1
 NO DOUBT! per long discussion at SRAM in 2000. about specificity of DH/DS drivetrain vs XC mtb.....huge watt output of riders, smashing of their stuff. .. need for stiffer springs... Low gear limits that work to prevent massive deraileur into rear wheel explosions..... Jeeeezus!!!! what tooo SRAM so freakin loong!.... sorry....i'm frothing...

wait.. how about smashable, for $70 retail....now this... ugh
  • + 1
 we need someone to bring Waki's ideas to life, they make much more sense
  • + 1
 The number of times someone said "...X..." in that video....
  • + 1
 I don't care how many gears as long as my gear cable stops snapping
  • + 1
 Looks very good
  • + 1
 So many haters
  • + 1
 I like zee
  • + 0
 Needs twisty shifts...
  • - 1
 7speed 10-42T, Enduro weight weenies will want in on this!
  • - 2
 Great. So I've just gone and changed to 11 speed, and now your telling me I only need 7 gears?
  • + 0
 You have 4 speeds to climb and 7 for downhill purpose. So if you have a 11 speeds drivetrain, you can climb.
  • + 10
 @faul - When I climb with a mountain bike my feet are planted firmly on the ground and I'm complaining about not having a chairlift or shuttle.
  • - 3
 Can I use this for Enduro?
  • + 0
 no its for DH... its not enduro specific...
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