First Look: SRAM GX - The 11-Speed Wide Range Drivetrain for the People

Apr 2, 2015
by Richard Cunningham  
Truvativ GX-P
We've seen this profile before, but never at this price. SRAM's GX component ensemble promises to put its most important technological improvements into the hands of riders who needed it most.


SRAM is on the move again, and this time it's in a direction that is sure to please many mountain bikers who have wanted to give its wide-range eleven speed drivetrain a go, but have been rebuffed by its lofty cost. Their new GX drivetrain is priced below the Chicago-based component maker's X1 one-by-eleven system, and it is cross-compatible with all of its eleven-speed mountain bike offerings. One-by GX drivetrain ensembles start at an impressive $564 USD at retail stores, which is not inexpensive, but is still mighty attractive when one considers that just the X-Dome cassette from an XX1 group runs about $285 USD. The best news should be for new bike buyers. Typically, only the higher priced versions of the most popular bikes had SRAM one-by drivetrains, forcing less moneyed customers to settle for a two-by-ten system that's bolted on an identical chassis. We expect to see fewer two-by cranksets, and much cross-pollination of GX with upper level SRAM components by OEM brands in 2016.

GX is targeted at OEM bike makers and as such, comes in a plethora of options, including a one-piece crank with a 94mm bolt circle, as well a two-piece GXP-style crankset that should adapt to direct-mount chain rings. However, the shockers are the (gasp) two-by-eleven and two-by-ten versions with (cough, cough) dedicated front derailleurs. GX shift levers are Matchmaker compatible, and a Grip Shift option is also offered for both one and two-by systems. Only the upper echelon GX parts will appear at the retail level, which makes sense, as they would be an upgrade over a less desirable mid-priced offering. GX is a 2016 product, and while SRAM did not give us an exact date for its release to retailers, when they debut a new product as early as this, we expect to be riding it at 2016 bike launches near July and to see it in shops in early autumn. Scroll down for all the images, specs and complete pricing.





The One-Two Punch

A handy chart, supplied by SRAM, suggests that GX is clearly aimed at dethroning Shimano's rule over the mid-priced enthusiast mountain bike market. Shimano has staunchly held that the perfect mountain bike drivetrain has closely spaced gearing, with about a 13-percent change in leverage between gears. SRAM, however, blew that notion to pieces with XX1, which has jumps between gears at or in excess of 15 percent.

Banking upon overwhelming satisfaction among a wide cross-section of riders, SRAM claims that its GX ensembles dominate Shimano's equivalent Deore and SLX drivetrains by offering wider overall gearing ranges, which translates to lower climbing gears and taller speed gears for SRAM customers. SRAM's one-by chart claims that its GX one-by-eleven has a 425-percent change, while the delta of Shimano's comparable eleven-speed group is 382 percent. All that gearing spiel is sure to launch philosophical discussions about gears and steers, but SRAM's glove is already on the ground, so let's have a look and see what the fuss is about.
Truvativ GX-P
Truvativ GX-P
SRAM's graphic compares the percentage of change from the lowest to the highest gear ratios.


Truvativ GX-P
SRAM's new GX 1000 Crankset has the XX1, 94-millimeter bolt circle and can be configured as a one or two-by setup.

Cranksets

SRAM offers two aluminum cranksets within the boundaries of GX: The GX 1400 is the boss, with SRAM's 7000-series alloy, "Open Core AL" hollow-forged arms and two-piece GXP-style spider. The 6000-series alloy, GX 1000 crank is the workhorse one-by-eleven option, with a one-piece drive-side arm and a 94-millimeter bolt circle. Both the 1400 and the 1000 cranks are offered with 30, 32, 34, 36 and 38-tooth X-Sync chain rings in the one-by option, and while it is not specifically advertised, the two-piece 1400 crankset should be cross-compatible with SRAM's direct-mount X-Sync rings for customers who want lower gearing.

Both the 1400 and the 1000 cranks are also sold in two-chain ring configurations as well. The two-by-eleven option features a 36/24 chain ring and a bash ring option. The lower-priced 1000 crank is also sold in a two-by-ten configuration, with both 38/24 and 36/22 ring options.


GX One-By Cranksets:

• GX 1400 option (Open Core Technology aluminum)
• GX 1000 option (6000-series aluminum)
• CNC-machined 7075, two-tone anodized X-Sync™
chain ring (30, 32, 34, 36, 38 )
• Bottom bracket configurations: PressFit 30, BB30, GXP, and PressFit GXP
• Both 24mm and 30mm BB axles supported
• Chain ring guard option
• Crank lengths: 175, 170mm
• Colors: black, red
• Boost 148™ compatible
• Weights: 680g (GX-1400, GXP, 175mm, 32t); 720g (GX-1000, GXP, 175mm, 32t)


GX Two-By Cranksets:

• GX 1400 option (Open Core Technology aluminum)
• GX 1000 option (6000 series aluminum)
• X-GLIDE™ 2 x 11 shifting technology
• Chain ring option: 36/24
• Bottom bracket configurations: PressFit 30, BB30, GXP, and PressFit GXP
• Both 24mm and 30mm BB axles supported
• Guard option available
• Crank lengths: 175, 170mm
• Colors: black, red
• Boost™ 148 compatible
• Weights: 727g (GX-1400, GXP, 175mm); 774g (GX-1000, GXP, 175mm)
Truvativ GX-P
GX 1400 with X-Sync chain ring.

Truvativ GX-P
GX 1000 with X-Sync chain ring.

Truvativ GX-P
GX 1000 crankset in the two-by configuration.


Truvativ GX-P
The new GX X-Horizon rear derailleur has all the goodies: a type 2.1 roller clutch for chain control, offset, oversized jockey pulleys to follow the wide-range cassette, and SRAM's Cage-Lock button that releases chain tension for quick wheel changes.


Derailleurs

SRAM makes three GX rear derailleurs: The GX-Horizon mid-cage rear derailleur, which is dedicated exclusively for one-by-eleven drivetrains; and two more conventional slant-parallelogram long-gage rear derailleur designs for its two-by eleven and two-by-ten drivetrains.

The GX Horizon has some improvements, but it is basically the same platform as SRAM's X1 rear derailleur, with its pronounced offset pulley cage and sturdy body - which is a good thing, because the X1 derailleur has been an excellent performer. Compare the GX with the current X1 below:
GX X-Horizon Rear Derailleur:

• X-Horizon™ design reduces shift force and chain slap
• 12-tooth X-Sync™ pulley wheels
• Large upper cage-pulley offset automatically adjusts chain gap
• Sealed cartridge bearings
• Aluminum cage
• Colors: Black, Red
• Optimized for one-by drivetrain with a 10 x 42 cassette
• Weight: 265g


Truvativ GX-P
The 2016 GX X-Horizon rear derailleur...
Truvativ GX-P
...Compared with the 2015 X1 version of SRAM's X-Horizon rear derailleur.



GX two-by drivetrains require a different rear derailleur. The GX 2 x 11 rear derailleur has a less pronounced offset at the upper pulley, which is paired with a more conventional slanted parallelogram. The two strategies are necessary to accurately track the angle of the cassette while compensating for two different sized chain rings. Nothing new here, because the long-cage GX 2 x 11 design has been ironed out over two decades, and now, armed with a Type 2.1 roller clutch, it is configured for eleven-speed drivetrains.


GX 2 x 11 Rear Derailleur:

• X-Actuation™
• Long cage design offers the widest available gearing range using a 10 x 42 cassette
• TYPE 3 technologies: Roller Bearing Clutch™ and CageLock™
• Focused chassis design for all conditions and usage
• 10 x 42 cassette compatible
• Colors: black, red
• Weight: 289g (long cage), 286g (medium cage)
Truvativ GX-P
2016 GX 2 x 11 rear derailleur.

Truvativ GX-P
Can you spot the differences in the GX front derailleur's eleven-speed cage above....
Truvativ GX-P
...And the GX ten-speed cage in this photo? SRAM offers both in top-pull, bottom-pull and direct-mount options.

SRAM has played catch-up with Shimano with its front shifting since its inception as a drivetrain maker, but it may be on its way to closing that gap. The fact that it offers two different cage configurations for its eleven and ten-speed front changers is evidence that SRAM is serious about capturing a sizeable share of those remaining customers who love and want a left shifter on their handlebar. Reportedly, the eleven-speed front derailleur has been shaped to function at the exaggerated chain angles created by SRAM's 10 x 42 cassette, combined with the additional vectors caused by rear suspension. Upon inspection, there are significant differences in the cages of the eleven and ten-speed GX front derailleurs. SRAM offers both in clamp and direct mounts, and with top and bottom cable routing.



Truvativ GX-P
The GX downshift paddle is aluminum for a consistent feel, and the pods are designed to use either Discreet clamps or the integrated Matchmaker system shown here.


Shifting

SRAM offers both trigger shifters and Grip Shift at the GX level, which may fuel a groundswell among mountain bikers just entering the sport who have not experienced twist shifting yet - more surprising things have happened. GX triggers feature an aluminum thumb paddle for a professional feel and action, and are interchangeable with SRAM's upper level X1 and XX1 derailleurs, although the GX models lack some of the adjustability. As expected, the pods are Matchmaker compatible.

Truvativ GX-P
Truvativ GX-P

GX X-Actuation Shifters

• SRAM 1x™ X-Actuation™
• Multi-position mounting
• MatchMaker compatible
• Aluminum pull lever
• Discrete Clamp
• Colors: black, red
• Weight: 122g
GX Grip Shifters

• SRAM 1x™ X-Actuation™
• Metal indexing keeps shifting crisp and precise
• Three rows of ball bearings provide low friction
• Grip Shift shifter and grip interlock to handlebar with forged-aluminum clamps
• Colors: black, red
• Weight: 144g

Truvativ GX-P
SRAM didn't cheap out on the GX Grip Shift, opting to retain the metal indexing and smooth, ball bearing operation of its high-end original.



Truvativ GX-P
The prohibitive cost of SRAM's X-Dome Cassette made it nearly impossible for them to bring one-by-eleven to the masses, and the Full Pin cassette is the key to GX - a galaxy of rivets joining eleven steel cogs.


Brand New Cassette

Looking more like a secret component stolen from an enemy submarine, SRAM's Full Pin Cassette is literally a stack of steel sprockets that are riveted together with 123 steel pins. Considering that proper shifting cannot tolerate even the slightest deviation in tracking, the precision required to assemble this beast boggles the mind. SRAM's 1180 "Mini Cluster" cassette formed the basis of this feat, with the seven middle cogs riveted together and attached to an aluminum 42, and to a trio of sprockets machined from one piece of steel on the small end. The Full Pin design allows for the use of inexpensive stampings to form the individual cogs. The 394g GX Full Pin cassette fits XD hub drivers



SRAM GX MSRP
The GX ten-speed rear derailleur looks very familiar.





Visit the feature gallery for high resolution and additional images.



MENTIONS: @SramMedia


323 Comments

  • + 338
 Sram dont think because you brought me roses I forgot about your betrayal with that boost whore. Seriously though this is awesome, boost still sucks.
  • + 131
 Sram is very... shifty.
  • + 177
 shifty shades of grey
  • - 99
flag foggeloggliod (Apr 2, 2015 at 7:34) (Below Threshold)
 Have you even tried the boost? There ya go again complaining about products that you only read about. Why bag on new products? Its mountain biking, we evolve.but seriously, the boost 148 giving you the stiffness of a 27.5 on a 29 inch wheel is a advantage.
  • + 48
 Maybe Banshee is the only smart bike company out there that made a 150mm x 12mm axle spacing on the Prime ( a 29er) years ago.
  • + 7
 Stiffness...Why not use straight pull wheels then?
  • + 38
 or 32 spokes
  • - 24
flag foggeloggliod (Apr 2, 2015 at 7:55) (Below Threshold)
 Why not just ride it, then start bitching?
  • + 155
 im running 36 spoke rims and its stiffer than my dick watching fest series
  • + 17
 Ii havent tried it in fact i think is probably very good. I just dont think a bit more stifness is enough to accept the fact that the price of it means new drivetrain, wheels frame and fork. Mtb evolves and it should but we should pay such price when the innovation means we are going faster and further. Dropper posts? yeah. 1 by 11? hell yeah. well designed 29ers, carbon dh frames, or even 27.5 wheels and a lot of shit i cant think of right now. All those things allowed us to go further, and faster. Are you gonna go faster with some more stiffnes? Absolutely not! Dont believe me? Go ride a bike with a sid and then one with an RS1 the Latter is way more stiff but that does not mean you are going faster. I saw mike pointing out in his review and that was my exact feeling when I got mine.
  • + 19
 Fercho25, my thoughts exactly. Push the boundaries! more gears, bigger diameter bars that weight less. Don't give me something in between old and older and tell me its better cuz its new. I still ride 20mm and don't see a need for anything in-between that and 9mm. I still ride a 135mm rear and don't see a need for anything in between that and 150mm.
  • + 7
 @justincarpenter I'm dying
  • + 35
 There goes my last excuse to stick with Shimano
  • + 8
 boost 148 is a design that trek came up with. I think Sram is just suppler of the hubs for it. I may be wrong though but that was the impression i got from all the announcements of it a while back. On a side note this is the most tempted i have ever been to run a sram drivechain.
  • + 1
 i have a trek remedy 29 with 148 and sram roam wheels with 24 spokes. actually pretty stiff but a bit scared of the 24 spokes so I got some nobl carbon hoops and industry 9 hubs to put on it. thing rails, don't hate it until you try it. definitely the fastest trail bike Ive ever had.
  • + 13
 Well it's about damn time. I may even forgive you for that BOOST atrocity (BOOST = Bunch Of Obvious Sales Tactics). Probably not though.
  • + 4
 Hey RC, are you ABSOLUTELY sure you weren't supposed to post this YESTERDAY. I mean, as long as we've been waiting for this I find it almost hard to believe that it's NOT an April Fools joke!
  • + 0
 @fercho25: everybody thinks that Boost is just a way to make stiffer wheels, but this is only part of the story. With the chainline moved out, frame designers have more room to create much better bikes: more clearance at the chainring means shorter chain stays, better pivots, or more room for the tire. You say you're all for better frame design and improvement, so this is exactly what Boost is all about - make better bikes!
  • + 2
 PLMedia, we love you! Sincerely, MTB industry
  • + 7
 Looks like SRAM is the new leader. I never thought I'd see the day when SRAM would overtake Shimano. And who knew it would happen with the creation of a 1x11?
  • + 3
 Now, how long will it last till we all switch to bikes with gearboxes like those from Pinion ?

pinion.eu/en
  • + 28
 I thought they'd wait until Shimano came out a competitive 1x system before releasing a more affordable option. Even SRAM is done waiting on Shimano.
  • - 1
 @Boardlife69 It must be because they know Shimano has something competitive to offer, or soon.
  • + 2
 Also, just imagine the pressure on all the bike companies to find ways to compete with YT Industries! We're going to see a lot of bikes coming with SRAM GX !!!
  • + 3
 Check out this Nicolai Helius AC Pinion 27.5 Full Suspension bike with Pinion Gearbox. Sorry, couldn't find anything on PB for some reason. Maybe Pinkbike wants to do a review of this bike?

A) forums.mtbr.com/nicolai/nicolai-2014-product-range-871883.html
B) www.nicolai-usa.com/store/p20/HELIUS_AC.html
  • + 12
 Non of my kit is up to date really. Most of it is 2011/12 and mid range at that and you know what? I still have fun and that's all it's about
  • - 8
flag democody (Apr 2, 2015 at 13:47) (Below Threshold)
 I don't think people are complaining about the benefits of boost 148, i'm sure they're great. What is stupid is that there's already a 150mm standard, it doesn't take much to have another mm on each side to keep people sane. Most frames don't even have tight enough tolerances that their dropouts would measure exactly 148mm without a hub in it! My guess would be that you could put a 150mm hub in a boost 148 with little if any effort, I'm not saying anyone should do this since you would loose any warranty you had, but instead just to point out how stupid 2mm is when we are talking about a 150mm total.
  • + 8
 142 = 135mm inner width
150 = 150mm inner width
Boost 148 = 141mm inner width

finally got it?
  • + 8
 Boost and GX are all aimed at bringing e-bikes to the masses. Boost allows for more space for hub based motors on the rear and the chain line to go with. The Gx gives you the wider range so when your battery dies your not totally F-ed pedaling a dead e-bike around. 27.5+ is the same thing too "Not-so-Fat" E-Bikes are coming next year. Mark my words.
  • + 2
 holy shit so true
  • + 1
 Hub motors don't need any more space because: 1. As technology improves, they are only getting smaller, like most electronics; 2. A relatively larger hub motor will have a greater diameter, but generally not greater width (so you don't need a longer axle and wider dropouts). I have an e-assist cargo bike I use in the city with a rear wheel built of mid-range parts and a Bionx hub motor. I have loaded the rear with close to 500 pounds and ridden over potholes and washboard with no protest from or damage to the "cheap" wheel. It's so strong because the spokes are about 2/3 the length of regular 26" wheel spokes making them inherently stronger than longer spokes of similar diameter, plus with shorter spokes, the angles are more favorable for providing lateral stiffness.

I've said it before (in reference to other new "standards") and I'll say it again: Boost is just another industry scheme to drain more cash out of our pockets. After all, if they just needed a wider rear axle to fit hub motors, why not convince the OEMs to go with 150?
  • + 1
 Because 150 doesn't push the flanges wider, it just makes a symmetrically dished wheel. Also, frames designed around 150 don't have the recessed slots that allow you to put the wheel in, then put the thru axle in. That's why they went to 157, to add the 3.5 mm slots.
  • + 1
 Aha.... Shimano XT 1 x11. That was pretty quick
  • + 86
 Holy crap, this is huge news- like the entire drivetrain market just got blown up news. Since that cassette is still running a 10T on the smallest ring, it needs an XD driver to run it (not that I actually care, the XD driver is much more reliable than a standard freehub, and most hub makers don't charge extra). Given that it can run 2x11, they've just covered the entire market in one swoop. I would expect to see this as OEM on a hell of a lot of bikes in the coming year or two.

Shimano, ol' buddy, you're kinda on the ropes here. What do you have coming?
  • + 49
 Seriously. I like Shimano shifter ergonomics, shifting performance and reliability. But Sram is offering a much better 1x solution. Shimano needs to swallow their pride and make an SLX price level 10-42 one-by. They clearly have the engineering skill to do that.
  • + 10
 Yeah I'm pretty much all Shimano but SRAM just gained some massive points in my book. It's shimano's turn to play a card like this now.
  • + 6
 the card i'll be playing is sram cassette with shimano derailleur and shifter
  • + 5
 Shimano better get their shit together before my wolftooth cog wears out...
  • + 2
 Sea otter is in two weeks, which means a year since the debute of the XTR m9000 group set. I wouldn't be surprised if shimano released an slx or xt 11 speed group set there.
  • + 2
 Sea otter should definitely be interesting. I'm stoked this is my first year I get to go
  • + 1
 I wonder if Santa Cruz will announce any new bikes at Sea Otter? New TallBoy LT?
  • + 60
 I must say shimano shifting is by far superior in my opinion, but yet again they have been beaten to the next big thing by Sram...
  • + 33
 It's rather sad they came up with the clutch that made all this possible, and now they just won't make a proper 1x drivetrain..
  • + 19
 Best solution: XTR M9000 shifter and derailleur on a Sram cassette. Their XX1 cassette is the best cassette out there IMO in terms of durability, weight and gear range. Spendy though :/
  • + 15
 Shimano is pushing DI2 pretty hard and from what I have seen its pretty awesome. To bad its does not integrate into allot of bikes just yet and will be Stupied expensive.
  • + 7
 Yea I mean look Shimano is not dumb... clearly... they make really high quality stuff. Perhaps they are fully aware that XX1 ect exists but choose to offer something different for the sake of reaching a different market. Why build XX1 when SRAM already makes it? Di2 is impressive and certain folks will buy that and others will not. Not sure which direction I will head when it's time, for now on a 30tx11x36 and I am fairly content. I see the appeal of both SRAM and Shimano's approach.
  • + 13
 My XX1 cassette lasted 9 months which is the worst cassette life I have seen in recent years. Then they wanted $600 to replace it plus a new front ring and chain. I managed to get one for $300 on a black friday sale and now I'm running 3 chains and changing them every month to try to maximize the life of the cassette. I clean and maintain my chain every ride. I like the 1X system and it ran well for the time it ran but I'm looking for options for the next drive-train that won't have me explaining to my wife why my cassette costs as much as my kid's dirt jumper bike and requires changing more than annually.
  • + 7
 I feel the opposite, I much prefer Sram shifting over shimano, I like the easy set up too with the more forgiving cable pull ratio.
  • + 2
 @greg1 , it's the 42T that wears the fastest. Replacing your chain often will certainly help, but what I do in the "off" season is use a smaller front ring and avoid using the 42T all together. Then switch to your larger ring and use the 42T as needed in the regular season.
  • + 4
 @greg1: Doesn't the price of 3 chains a month add up to more than just replacing a cassette when it's worn out?

I've been on my XX1 for a year with no visible signs of wear, riding usually 3 times a week. More when I can.
  • + 3
 394g for a derailleur?? Must be a Typo. Current X1 11speed is 257g. Maybe made with lead?
  • + 8
 I think that comes down to what you are used to. Shimano has a firmer, higher effort shift but feels more "positive" to me. I rode a bike around with xx1 and I was thoroughly impressed I have to admit. I can say, however, that my Shimano drivetrains last a long, long time and once set up shifting the way I like- stay that way. Durability appears to be far superior to Sram in my personal experience. I am very tempted by the 1x11 systems but like my Shimano...
  • + 5
 greg1, what you are saying is exactly what I'm afraid of. I have a 1x9 with 11-40T homebrew. I'm prefectly happy with that, and a new 9 speed cassette not even $100. Not interested in how many gears, just like a lovely wide range. $600 and poor lifespan, for me it's not worth it.
  • + 2
 The M9000 has a lever feel that's as easy or easier than XX1. The upshift (trigger) has a really solid resistance to overcome then a loud CLICK as it shifts, where the XX1 is just a quick click and it's done. Sram upshifts are so easy that I'd find if I ride with my thumb on the paddle anticipating an upshift, sometimes i'd hit some chatter and my thumb would activate the lever twice really fast without my wanting to. Not a big deal, just kind of annoying.
  • + 2
 Di2 is nice but it has two rather big issues:

1. Get the ratio right and you don't need more than one ring and an 11-speed cassette, but for some reason Shimano is still clinging on to the dual ring concept. More shifting, more weight, more expensive, more complicated, more prone to shifting issues and mechanical failures... That's a lot of cons, when the only pro is a slightly wider (but mostly useless) ratio. Very few people will miss the in-between gearings and ability to push 50km/h+ top speeds on their MTB.
11-speed out back with a Di2 shifter + NW single ring and Shimano would have a winner!

2. Too expensive as a concept. SRAM's approach is scalable and easily implemented into cheaper solutions. It can be applied to everything from their cutting edge XX1 group to this new and (relatively) inexpensive GX group. One might ask why it took so long, but I think we all know the answer to that question ($$$). Di2 on the other hand is much more complicated and expensive to produce. Too many compromises on the shifting electronics = everything goes down the drain, and you would be better off with a cheaper traditional shifting system.
  • + 3
 How many xx1 users will get this much cheaper Cassette when theirs wears out? Show of hands please? I got Xx1 pre x01 but am close to having to replace My gears. I'm rarely racing, so the weight penalty is liveable and the price is oh so nice.
  • + 2
 IDK, it depends on what kind of deal I might find on an XX1 or XO1 cassette. They are pretty light...
  • - 16
flag maxhajdu23 (Apr 2, 2015 at 9:14) (Below Threshold)
 Plus in reality most of the people I know that run a one by eleven don't ever use the top rings, 1x11 is just a flashy new thing that's been made cool to run even though they have no benefits "look I can make it up the hill slower and easier than you" and the sram stuff runs like crap a 1x10 from shimano is all you really need it's cheaper and a hell of a lot more reliable
  • + 1
 when you stick to 2 rings in front, wouldnt it be possible to use a much smaller and lighter cassette? What is killing it - the big gap when shifting in front? cure: electric shifting front and back at the same time.
  • + 2
 greg1...start checking the German sites and get an XX1 cassette when you find a deal too good to pass up. A guy I ride with just scored a cassette for $205 all in. That being said, I ride 3x per week and my XX1 cassette is going on 18 months and still going strong. Same chain too. A few weeks ago, I was having some noise issues that I was thinking were going to be chain/cassette related but the mechanic said they were fine and the problem turned out to be the bearings in my I9 rear hub (again).
  • + 5
 Cassette is unsprung weight, so even if you're not a weight weenie, it makes sense to get the lightest you can afford.
  • + 3
 the nice thing is that you can get the cheap ass cassette from the GX and then spend a little more on the shifters, and the RD and then eventually when you get enough money, put it into the Cassette and get a better one, so it gives you a base to start with, then splurg gradually on parts later on. this is great. because i wanted an X1 drivetain with XO1 shifters, but the cassette was really killing me, now i'll be able to bum it out with this guy for a while and then X1 it up later.
  • + 0
 @maxlombardy seems like its just your problem hahaha. i've ridden XO1 and XX1 on various bikes on various trails, you should just not hover over the paddles so much haha.
  • + 1
 Agreed. Plus that usually puts you in a good place to start looking at getting the second bike on 11 speed. that's certainly how it's working for me now with 10 speed.
  • + 3
 Ha, I've actually done it too. Not really a big deal though. All told, if shimano were to announce an XT priced 11 speed setup before this hits the streets, that's what I'll run, just with an 1195 or 1199 cassette.
  • - 7
flag Axxe (Apr 2, 2015 at 11:26) (Below Threshold)
 SRAM hub design is not the next big thing. It is the next stupid thing. Shimano can deliver superior shifting and more than enough usable range on a bike with total price less than SRAM cassette.
  • + 1
 I thought that was wierd too, and especially when the 2x11 derailleur is 286g. Since it's designed to work with the same 11-42 cassette why not just get the 2x11 derailleur run one ring and save over 100gs. Unless of course the listed 394 is a typo
  • + 2
 It is. all the stuff is already up on SRAM's website. 1x11 is 20g lighter. than 2x11, from memory.
  • + 2
 Lots of interesting comments here that seem spot on. I'm really curious where we'll be in 5 years. If Shimano doesn't step things up, once 1x11 costs what 1x10 currently does Sram while completely own the market. For price's sake I really hope Shimano offers some real competition (though I don't see how unless a full SLX Di2 drivetrain is less than a low endish 1x11).
  • + 2
 I think di2 will stay with xtr for a while but there is definitely hope for a 11 speed xt driveterran soon. Possibly 11 speed slx in a year or so.
  • + 1
 I agree, @Vans4life14. It's unlikely that they'll bring di2 down at the same time they upgrade XT to 11, but manufacturing efficiency alone would suggest we should see 11 speed XT fairly soon, & heck, Maybe Saint. Heck, I won't be surprised if we see Di2 Saint spy shots sometime this summer at a WC.
  • + 2
 I just can't see saint going 11 speed unless they did what Sram is doing using 11 speed chain and cassette spacing but on a 7 speed cassette.
  • + 0
 There isn't any technical reason saint can't go 11 speed the same way xt will
  • + 3
 Not a technical reason, no. But no practical reason to have 11 gears on a DH oriented build.
  • + 2
 True, but if that was their main focus, saint wouldn't be 10 or even 9 speed then, it'd be an 8 or 7 speed, specialty group, with a burly chain. They'll bring 11 speed to saint because it's new, & because they want to keep all their top end components on the same speed for synergistic reasons. For instance, most of the internals of a 10 speed XTR shifter are exactly the same as a Saint. now that XTR is 11, that means they can't share anymore, which means cost per component goes up. If they bring saint up to 11 speed spacing (exactly like SRAM did with X01 DH) then they can benefit from those synergies again. Heck, first version of a Di2 Saint shifter is almost certain to just be an XTR with a different paint job.
  • + 1
 I just don't see saint going di2. I mean It makes sense for the main group of people who would buy brand new xtr parts but saint? Can't imagine that would sell that great. But I do think they will do what Sram is doing with XO1 dh and use 11 speed components with a 7 speed casstee block.
  • + 1
 Yeah, I can see the target audience for XTR wanting to pay more for Di2 while DH riders not so much. So like XTR they'll probably keep a mechanical saint group at a lower cost (since the Saint Di3 derailleur and shifter are almost the same as XTR the engineering to do that isn't too involved).
  • + 35
 Dammit, shimano missed the boat again...
  • + 11
 Yeah. They're gonna lose
  • + 21
 its okay, they have their fishing business to keep afloat
  • + 16
 They should do reel well with that.
  • + 6
 they also dominate the road side of biking. and a lot of bikes below $1000 use shimano. plus their brakes are still imo the best
  • - 7
flag peanutbuter (Apr 3, 2015 at 7:07) (Below Threshold)
 hope and sram are the best brakes
  • + 3
 Maybe with the Guides but Shimano still have a better proven history of reliability.
  • + 29
 This needed to happen. This brings 1x11 to the masses. We'll see basic spec'd bikes for around $3k with a decent 1x11 drivetrain. Thank you!
  • + 27
 For those of us with XX1, X01, or X1, a $144 MSRP cassette sounds really freaking awesome.
  • + 1
 Oddly enough, there's two "full pin" cassettes. wonder why they aren't covering that: www.sram.com/sram/mountain/component/cassettes
  • + 3
 I've actually been blowing through chains like a mad man trying to stay on top of the cassette wear. This is an AWESOME option. Very happy.
  • + 1
 tehehehe I'm all tickled.
  • + 3
 One with steel 42t, one with alu. The latter is only 10g heavier than x1 cassette, I wonder what the price point will be. Also I hope these cheaper cassettes are not oem only...
  • + 1
 Although the price of the cassette is far more reasonable than X1, it's still not exactly cheap is it
  • + 1
 MSRP ain't exactly retail, either, however.
  • + 1
 That's true, but you can't ever buy Sram products at anywhere near the discount you get with Shimano
  • + 1
 I can't argue. though do understand that seems to a uniquely European/GB phenomenon: Shimano/SRAM is price competitive in US, online or brick & mortar. Just means I import via CR or other stores.
  • + 20
 As much as the thought of a reasonable price 10-42 cassette excites me, I have been burned too many times by SRAM to use their stuff again. Multiple broken (new) shifters that have gone back for warranty, seized jockey wheels, mechs that have fallen apart. Lets not even mention avid brakes.

It's not all bad, some of the stuff works, but the build quality compared to Shimano is poor.

New bike has Shimano with a saint shifter, slx mech, rad cage and one up cog. Never again will I stray. I'll give you my Shimano groupset when you pry it from my cold dead hands.
  • + 3
 They seem to be good with rockshox but i know what you mean. look at the recalls they've had with their road disc brake gruppos and zipp wheels. Shimano takes their time to properly test and design products. i don't think id ever buy the first batch of anything new from sram. don't want to be a guinea pig
  • + 1
 In my riding group Sram has a terrible reputation and gets made fun of all the time. That's not to say they don't have some good products but they are nowhere near Shimano reliability.
  • + 21
 I'll need a 630% gear range right around the same time a need an adult diaper and eat my meals through a straw.
  • - 5
flag b1k35c13nt15t (Apr 2, 2015 at 8:34) (Below Threshold)
 My sentiments exactly. The 10T is only necessary because of the 42T. Just grow some muscles and lose some mass if a 36T isn't enough.
  • + 5
 36t Isn't enough for fat bikes and some 29ers.
  • + 2
 Yep. In some rough snow conditions I've really wanted a lower ratio. Otherwise a 11-36 cassette is fine for local trails around here. Other regions though, I completely understand the need for wide gear ranges. Extended steep climbs kinda changes What people need on their bikes.
  • + 2
 Yeah I mean 36t is doo able but the way some people set up their bikes like me it gets old quick. I have a 35 pound am bike with coil shocks that I ridea as my trail bike but I race dh with it so I have a 34t chainring and a 9 speed 34t cassette. It's possible but it gets real old after a day of climbing.
  • + 18
 Yes! Thank you sram
  • + 8
 If shimano embraced 1x10 it would really hit SRAM where it hurts.
  • + 2
 whats wrong with a wide ratio 10 speed praxis or expander and 16t
  • - 4
flag Callum-H (Apr 3, 2015 at 0:06) (Below Threshold)
 Wide ratio ten speed is now redundant.
  • + 1
 no there not I don't want to change my freehub and buy all of this I would be much happier with a wide ratio ten speed
  • - 1
 Me too. You can now but a ready made 10spees wife range. I sincerely how SRAM doesn't do that well with this and people just go 10x1
  • + 1
 Callum-H, soon but not yet. Buying a 1x11 from scratch (not counting front chainring and crank) is about 300 while you can get XT level replacements for 50 - 100 less, mostly because you can get that stuff well under MSRP at the moment (and even cheaper as 10 speed is fazed out). Luckily cranks and NW chainrings are all cross compatible.
  • + 1
 The theory of Wide Ration 10spd is redundant, in practice it is still cheaper, but it has been around for that much longer you can only expect the price of 1X11 to come down as well.
  • + 17
 Still rocking 1x9. Always have, always will.
  • + 4
 holla!
  • + 1
 Same here...thinking to get a transition patrol 2 this late spring but the idea of going around with a reeeaaally expensive drivetrain like that (x1 with x0 2.1 type 11sp derailleur) makes me think of going camping and wearing jewelery.. And it gets even worse when I think about my last seasons where I was smashing drivetrains like crazy in crashes! I definitely can't afford to replace a 230$ derailleur every time I crash bad... I'm thinking of taking the bike, selling the drivetrain asap and stiking with my old friend sram x7 9sp.. I can get new derailleur for 50€ (70$)
  • + 9
 Xx1, then x01, then x1, now xg. Every year, they've reached down one tier. So now we'll have a complete mid-market 1x11 drive train. What do you want to bet that all those trail bikes currently spec'd with SLX or X9 2x10 drivetrains will come with xg 1x11 next year, like mid - level SC Bantam or 5010, or comparable Konas, Treks, etc.

That's the sweet spot in the market for the enthusiast - great bikes, but not as fragile and expensive as carbon. Built up with this sort of drive train and slx-level brakes and decent suspension. Bikes you can ride for years without needing to trade up on components. All in the $2.5-3.5k range depending on suspension complexity and whether they have a dropper.

I know the superbikes get all the attention (and hate), but that mid - market niche is giving us bikes that blow away the high end from even just 5-10 years ago. Good stuff.
  • + 2
 Agreed, great to see the trickle down of 1x technology.

But carbon is fragile? Light is fragile. Carbon can be thick or thin. Those thick walled carbon DH frames are anything but fragile.
  • + 13
 Looks promising for those who are optimists
  • + 3
 too right , I remember buying my XX1!! aaah nostalgia isn't what it used to be
  • + 4
 Optimists find everything promising though...
  • + 13
 ok shimano your move
  • + 11
 I'll stick with my ghetto inexpensive 1x10 32*11-42 and 26" without boost whatever, thank you. But good job Sram!
  • + 8
 Here's the breakdown, weight-weenie-wise:

XX1: retail $1449
Cluster: 260g
RD: 220g
Shifter: 91g
Crank (GXP 175mm, 32-tooth ring): 645g
Chain: 252g
TOTAL: 1468g (3.24 pounds)


GX: retail $564
*Cluster: 325g
RD: 265g
Shifter: 122g
*Crank (GXP 175mm, 32-tooth ring): 680g
Chain: 258g
TOTAL:1650g (3.64 pounds)

Difference: 182g (0.4 pounds), $885!
So...$4.86 per gram for the weight savings.
Granted, "retail" isn't reality for most and there are other options such as different cranks.


*Add 69g for a GX cluster with the steel 42-tooth cog (versus Al).
*Add 40g for the lesser GX-1000 crank.
  • + 7
 I'm a stalwart SRAM fan, so I was pretty disappointed when they stumbled in the road hydraulic brake market and were overtaken by Shimano. But what SRAM is doing in mountain right now is far more significant - they aren't just dominating an experimental brake option, they're dominating the entirety of the mountain drivetrain market, OEM and aftermarket, price point by price point. Whether or not Shimano's right about two-by being the best solution for the average rider, they're obviously having a hard time convincing him, and if they don't change their tune soon they might well be overrun. I'd love to see statistics on how many bikes in the XX1/X01 price bracket are specced with XTR - these days, we only hear people talk about Shimano drivetrains in terms of converting them to one-by.
  • + 0
 Isnt 2/10 with a 11-36 cassette enough for everyone? Why should anyone on this planet need more gear ratio than 3/10 ???
Sounds like real bullshit To me. But still... 1by is a very nice thing...
Shimano isnt stupid... But maybe they lost a huge part of the market To SRAM's 1/11
  • + 1
 I think the 2x solution is mostly for brand managers who want to spec a 2x, especially on low end builds. Now SRAM has a solution for that market that gets people that buy those bikes on XD drivers, & a narrow-wide chainring away from the 1x solution that they really want people to ride.
  • + 8
 I just spent years and lots of $ moving from 3 x 10 to eventually getting rid of a front derailleur FFS! whats next 26" wheels
  • + 9
 26''+ *
  • + 3
 @sewer-rat, it may be hard to understand, but just because this has been released, doesn't mean you *have* to buy it. You can keep running your 1x10 system for as long as you want!
  • + 0
 @joeofloath after spending shite loads to get to xx1 I honestly don't think I will thanks
  • + 5
 Goodbye Shimano. Has been nice knowing you. If the new Sram brakes end up being reliable that will be the final nail in the coffin. Had considered XTR for my new build but with a new cheap rear derailleur for the one I will inevitably break, it is really a no brainer.
  • + 2
 I was a die hard xt brake fan after years on crappy avid brakes. Just switched to guides and sold my soul to sram today after this announcement. X1 replacement parts would have killed the bank account.
  • + 9
 Not to worry, XT 11 speed is around the corner.
  • + 18
 ... and as many nay-sayers may think Shimano is "off the back" because SRAM is always first to market, they fail to realize that Shimano has been making bicycle components since 1921 and their approach has always been to watch what the market does while they continue to engineer and refine, not releasing a product until it reaches their high quality standards and rigorous test cycles.

The new XT will surely be all you could ever want and more in a mtb drive train, and still continues to utilize a 9/10sp freehub body, not a proprietary one.

By the way, didn't SRAM's marketing campaign tell people that "all you need is one..." and now they are crawling out of the pigeon hole they put themselves into a few years ago with a new FD and 2X drive train?

Always down for seeing the prices shift to allow more people to become involved in this incredible sport, but all things aside, it's just like anything in life - you use Canon or Nikon, Honda or VW, Ford or Dodge... the list goes on, and we all have our followings; after all, that's what makes the industry turn round and round.
  • + 6
 The FD is pretty much for the OEM market because some product managers continue to insist on speccing 2x drivetrains. XT 11 speed will have the same range as the current XTR, which is less than GX/X1/X01/XX1 (11-40 vs 10-42). Also, the "standard" free hub body needs to die. It's a holdout from the roadie world that suffers from lower reliability in poor conditions and makes maintenance a pain. The XD driver is fundamentally a better way of doing a free hub on mtbs, this news means it will become much more widely adopted as an OEM standard, which is awesome. As much as I do prefer shimano's shifting feel, unless they come up with a good damn reason for me to stay I'm on SRAM from here on out.
  • - 3
 Agreed, except fot the ford thing. Yuk, wouldn't let my dog drive a ford
  • + 1
 Totally.
  • + 4
 @tsheep How is XD a fundamentally better/more reliable freehub? Genuinely curious. Never really thought standard hubs were that hard to service but I haven't worked on an XD hub.
  • + 1
 The way XD cassettes engage the driver, there's far less opportunity for the splines to get chewed like on alloy drivers. other than that, I can't comment, as I haven't owned one... until this fall.
  • + 0
 @bkm303
So the first big thing is that the XD only has one big, beefy spline, and that interfaces with the Al big cog, which means it doesn't get chewed up like a standard hub and you can actually remove the cassette without needing to resort to a hammer (sigh, personal experience speaking).

The second big thing is that because the cassette only mounts on the inboard end, it puts less stress on the free hub bearings compared to a standard free hub which mounts all along he spline and puts more leverage on the bearings when you're in the small cogs. This does mean that the cassette takes the stress instead, but as a single piece chunk o'steel (or riveted chunk of steel in the case of the new GX one), it can take it a lot better than a precision bearing. I'm running some industry 9 torch hubs on my bikes, the XD and standard hubs use the same bearings but the XD ones seem to last quite a lot longer before needing service despite being used in the same conditions.

The third big thing is that an XD cassette seems to shed mud a heck of a lot better than a standard cassette. I think it comes down to the hollow cavity in the middle, but I'm not sure. Anways, the drivetrain gums up a lot less than a normal freehub, which is a big bonus in wet areas.

A fourth very minor thing is that the XD driver is a bit lighter than a standard hub, but if that matters you've gone full-on weight weenie.
  • + 2
 "A fourth very minor thing is that the XD driver is a bit lighter than a standard hub, but if that matters you've gone full-on weight weenie."

Kinda, but weight in this location matters more than you might think: we're talking about unsprung weight here, which has a greater impact on how the the bike rides than in other places. Since the 1195 & 1999 cassettes are under $300 a lot places right now, I'll probably pick one of those up, while going with the GX derailleur.
  • + 2
 Of course there are arguments for both sides... I was merely defending the point that just because someone is first to market with a new idea does not mean it is always best executed... case and point, road hydraulic from both companies... which one had the weak links?

I don't spend much time on this board, but for some reason finally felt inclined to post something. Sure I'm biased, but everyone is when it comes to their gear choices... that's the beauty of it all, we have our opinions and love certain features in different products. I spent some time working for the big blue and embraced the competition as it only drives development of my brand following. Can't we all just get along?

Bickering aside about what design is better than another, we could talk about these things all day... I'm gonna go on a lunch ride and clear my head. ;-)
  • + 0
 Nonsense @tsheep. The XD cassette only connects to the driver on the 42T area, and way too much torque goes through a small area, they need special attention to remove the cassette in many cases. Think about when other manufacturers are making these hubs in China from alloy the potential pain and suffering this could cause for the end user or bike shop mechanics. The 9/10 speed freehub is perfectly fine except when idiot manufacturers make them from alloy, then they get easily chewed up, simply adding 20 grams to the wheel and making them out of steel or ti they are reliable for years.
  • + 1
 @ZMC888 No, the bearing area on the splines of the XD driver is much bigger than the bearing area from any single cog on a traditional free hub, hence the stresses are lower and there is little to no material deformation. That's not nonsense, it's a pretty basic mechanical design principle and a more efficient use of space. As far as removing the cassette, sure- if you forget to grease the threads it's a bitch to get off. But if you read the manual that comes with the cassette, they tell you to grease the threads. If you have any experience wrenching on a bike, you'd realize that you should probably grease the threads. Compare that to a traditional free hub where regardless of how perfectly the instructions were followed, you can still chew up the hub and make it impossible to remove without a hammer.
  • + 1
 XD is better for numerous reasons. And on that note, I think a 10-40t 10-speed cassette would be sweet. More range than 11-42 without the crazy derailleur issues (goatlink is all that is needed, not special cage).
  • + 1
 @tsheep, you'll never need a hammer if the freehub is made from steel, you are mis-associating good design with poor material choice. Even if XD is better we have to PAY SRAM to use their design. That means more expensive bikes for everyone, and that sucks if the old design was perfectly good.
  • + 5
 This is gna be great, especially for beginners(ezr&reliable) such as middle school aged riders!
I must have fixed at least 3 of their chain drops/sucks during a middle school race last weekend
  • + 4
 I'm still not sure 1x is the best. I know it's the new "look", but a close ratio cassette with 2 rings can give a racer an advantage by having a more optimal raio at any time. With the electric shifting you could have all the shifting on one side. I know I'll get neg props, but if you have an open mind give it some thought.
  • + 2
 But for people who aren't racers . . . ?
  • + 3
 How many seconds do you lose in a race putting your chain back on? I'll take sub-optimal(not that I've found the ratios to be too wide, at all) ratios over a dropped chain anytime a clock is involved.
  • + 2
 Fair point. I use a bionicon C.Drive. It works well with 2 rings and is pretty cheep chain retention. I also think that more than one system is great for all bikers. I would not want either to fade away.
  • + 1
 Yeah. Nico Lau's setup at the EWS looked spot on. Double chainring, Di2, one shifter:

www.pinkbike.com/news/cube-stereo-nico-lau-crankworx-rotorua.html
  • + 8
 GX sounds like a Honda Civic sub-model
  • + 4
 It's actually the natural gas version
  • + 2
 A question: you've got yourself a 1x10 bike in need of new gears. Got 2 options:
- Leonardy 10-speed 9-38 cassette with KMC X10 chain, a 30t ring and an XD driver body;
- Sram XG group without the crankset,only a ring, plus the XD driver body.
Which one would you get? Smile
  • + 1
 Canfield stopped selling Capreo hubs for a reason. Chainwrap on a 9t is too iffy. If I remember rightly, SRAM even tried a 9t on XX1 in the prototype stage, & found it to not work well, even with x-horizon shifting.
  • + 1
 Meaning? Not good shifting, doesn't last long, or what?
  • + 1
 I believe it wore too quickly, & would skip more easily, & more often.
  • + 2
 Sram is gawking about percent change, just saying if ALL you are looking at is having the most percent change possible Shimano does still make a 3X11 now that will be some percent change, and the same crank is 1, 2 and 3 ring compatible.
  • + 3
 Cross compatible with all 11 speed offerings has me smiling. I got my bike used with XO1 drivetrain. Been saving for the day I have to replace something. This option won't completely break the bank.
  • + 2
 yup. My main criteria for moving to a drivetrain is that a busted derailleur won't keep me off the bike saving for a new one. $115 bucks for a replacement der finally puts this in the price range of "run down to the shop & grab a new one" if you bash a der to bits, at least for me. Now if they'd make an answer for multirelease....
  • + 2
 I don't really get the 2x11. It seems like SRAM re-invented the wheel on that one, with no benefit to the end user (i.e. us). That is, we still get a basic 2x11 drivetrain, but it is one we can't hack as easily. Sure, there is a wider gear range, but even when I get the low gears I want (and, I need them LOW because I suck wind so bad), I still can't usually spin out my top gears. And XT shifts so much better than XO. SRAM's front derailleurs are horrendous to adjust, I'll say that much, and even on my bikes with SRAM drivetrains, I switched out the front mech for a Shimano one.

TEMPLE
  • + 4
 There are some people out there who just refuse to drop the front derailleur. We have enough difficulty convincing people to go to a double from a triple who've been cycling forever.
  • + 2
 Right, so why not just give them a conventional 2x10 or 3x10 that they can change as they like rather than a proprietary all-SRAM 2x11 drivetrain that (I think) even requires a new hub body? Nothing to do about it if a bike comes new with the SRAM drivetrain, but I sure won't be getting a new SRAM 2x11 drivetrain when I build my next bike.

Let me change my opening remark from "I don't really get the 2x11" to "I understand the 2x11 but I don't like it."
  • + 2
 Sram still offers convenational 2x10 if I'm not mistaken. Honestly I don't understand why you need the 11th cog unless your running a 1x. I think 22-36 is as low as any one needs. The reason why Sram wants to make a 2x11 is probably just to hype up there 11 speed mtb driveterran. Theres really no need for it if you think about it. I think it would be impossible to climb up something steep enough to really need a 24-42 granny gear unless you just really want to crawl and I mean absolutely crawl up a hill.
  • + 2
 Damn Sram is really making a big stride forward again! This is going to hurt Shitmano hard! It's great to see that the costs have been brought right down making the 1x11 drivetrains more affordable. Keep up the great work guys tup
  • + 2
 I think Shimano should come out with there own 11-40 10 speed cassette and a modified xt derailleur to work with it. Then make an actual narrow wide chaining. Just make it all compatabile with their existing 10 speed shifters. Come on shimano your brakes are king but your loosing in the driveterran game.
  • + 2
 My 1x9 SRAM drivetrain (Shimano cassette) is cheap and bombproof. I won't be changing to 10 or 11 speed drivetrains until these prices drop to something less than completely absurd. My 9 speed cassette is 12x36, with a 30 tooth up front, and I can climb anything with that ratio. Everything about the system is affordable and works perfectly and reliably.
  • + 1
 As usually, a top remark gets ignored... everybody being blinded by the 1 or 2 by 10 or 11 battle...
  • + 4
 That "handy chart" just doesn't make any sense to me. Plus it is comparing Sram 2x11 while the picture above and below it is of Sram 1x11. WTF?
  • + 1
 Ugh, maybe ill have to jump on the 1x11 bandwagon. My 1x10 setup wore insainely fast and went back to 2x with no issues. My biggest gripe with 1x11 was cost, so this fixes that. Im glad everything is cross compatible, as im thinking xo1 cranks, x01 shifter and gx everything else..
  • + 3
 I doubt you'll find the durability you're looking for with a budget SRAM drivetrain... just sayin'.
  • + 1
 Haven't had any issues with x7/x9 in the past, in fact its easier to setup than shimano and more forgiving with bad adjustments. just hate the ergo and lever feel. Just saying.
  • + 1
 ".. including a one-piece crank with a 94mm bolt-circle.." And everybody who has ever worked at a shop just laughed hard. This is incorrect terminology. SRAM never has and never will make a one-piece crank. For those who aren't familiar, it's the S-shaped noodle of a crank, made of steel, which came on your 1986 Schwinn BMX Wink
  • + 1
 Hahaha! I think a dry noodle was stronger than those 1-pc cranks. Nothing like snaking your cranks and bearings through the BB. I bent numerous of them before I got a high end BMX, a Hoffman Pro-Series Dirty1Thirty with Primo Powerbites. Thanks for the spark that sent me down memory lane. Smile Reminds me of bikes built like tanks, bars cut so narrow grips were on the bends, and super thick chains because sprocket grinds were in. Brings me back.
  • + 2
 Shimano reminds me a bit of Honda with its street motorcycles: You just know they can give you what you (and lots of other people) want--and could probably do it better than anyone else--but just won't.
  • + 5
 Uh, another April Fools joke?
  • + 1
 I was thinking about it, it´s posible.... have to wait
  • + 9
 Haha, psyche. That'll be 300 bucks for a new cassette. Thank you come again.
  • + 1
 This is still steep price. I'm glad to hear Initial buying price is at this rate, but servicing is what bothers me most.
Have you ever had issues with rear deraiuler on one by 11?
New deraiuler every hit, thanks, but no thanks.
  • + 5
 Shut up and take my money. Shimano... Where you at?
  • + 3
 Nice to see that the 42t cog on cassette is now made from steel. I have X01 groupset and chain started to skip on that large aluminium cog after 9 months...
  • + 1
 To all the people worried about Shimano, OneUp, Wolftooth, and the plethora of extended range sprocket manufacturers, do NOT worry! There are plenty of consumers in the market and if there are still people riding 26", 150x12 & 20x110 axle standards, and aluminum frames, there are enough of us to keep the market full of choices and variance. You add in brand loyalty and everything will be fine. I am in the process of building a bike up that in today's standards is highly outdated, I even have the OneUp sprocket, cog, and cage to go on a 10spd Saint and I am not bummed out right now. It was logical at the time and I found great deals on my parts. To me XX1 was WAY overpriced and not worth the benefit. This is a good move by Sram to follow Shimano's tactic of trickling down technology to the masses and will most likely push Shimano to do the same, which I would rather buy. Give us the goods at a reasonable working stiffs budget.
The only true issue I see in the market currently is the tire market regarding 26" and lack of new treads being offered in 26". Even the new hub standards are eh, negligible as there is room for it all, buy what you want to run. And there is always the used market.
I just can't wait for 12 speed! (sarcasm)
  • + 1
 I love this.... Cause no one has talked about hubs.

In reference to the drive side hub shell bearing, 24 - 42 is way too much torque for smaller hub shell bearings (6802). Some of them were blowing up with 1 x 11 in certain ratios (26 or in some cases 28 - 42). One Up even warns on their website not to run one of their cogs with a granny ring can.oneupcomponents.com/pages/compatibility (scroll to bottom).

Hope your running a rear hub with a beefy ass bearings if you're doing 2 x 11.... Then there goes any weight savings. I wouldn't be surprised if 6902's (which are much bigger) start blowing up in a 24 - 42 set up.
  • + 1
 If you're buying this group, weight savings are not your primary motivation. Otherwise, I'm interested to see how right you are.
  • + 1
 I don't understand why there is torque load issues on hubs when I never hear of this happening to people running a 3x with 22-36 as their granny gear. Is it because of some of the torque being distributed to the cranks because of the small chainring?
  • + 1
 Never mind my last comment I see what your saying. 24-42 is a hell of a lot lower than 22-36
  • - 2
 Further to this, why does Sram seem so committed to push the industry towards making bikes slower? So more people will access mountain biking?

Let's check a few points here.

People are so excited because 2 x 11 will be a great and popular OEM spec. Boost 148 was created to allow for new tire designs such as 27.5+. One of the features of 27.5+ is that the tire is wider but the same tire diameter as a current 29er.

From those 3 statements, 27.5+ is basically a slow ass 29er, which I will climb extremely slowly on my 2 x 11 GX drivetrain because I will have the lowest climbing gear of all time.

I feel like I would fall asleep climbing this bike. In terms of exercise, I don't know what would make my heart rate lower... Climbing a 2 x 11 27.5+ GX equipped bike, or climbing a E-MTB bike.....

Maybe more people will be able access mountain biking. But after they climb this bike 4 times they will be bored as f*ck..... And then go to the shop and buy a real DT... Oh wait.... I see now......
  • + 1
 Well boat 148 was originally only a trek thing on 29er remedies SRAM just decided to make hubs for it and also realized that it would also help 27.5 + bikes.

One could also argue that 27.5 + is a faster fat bike not a slower mountain bike it's perception.

I do agree that there is no need for 2x11 other than manufacturers only having to design one cassette for 2X and 1x. But 24 or 22 - 36 is plenty for any bike.

Don't get me wrong about 148 and 27.5 + I'm not a huge fan of them especially 27.5 + but if boost 148 does have a legitimate advantage in stiffness then thats called progression of the sport. Yeah it sucks because everyones bikes are suddenly outdated but that's probably how people felt when disc brakes came out. Plus 148 is only on certain bikes. I'm pretty sure all 27.5 and 26 inch wheeled bikes are going to stick with 142 or 150 for a while.
  • + 1
 Not really a problem, been running a-homebrew 39t cassette with 22t chainring for one full season in all mountain style and nothing broke.
  • + 2
 £249 for Shifter, Rear Mech and Cassette! Come next year, with CRC prices, i'll get that, a raceface narrow wide, second hand crankset and KMC 11 speed chain! For about £350, got full 1x11 set up!

BARGAIN
  • + 5
 Is it too late to return my month old 2x10 XT groupset?
  • + 2
 A 394 gram rear mech? Thst's only a couple of ounces under a pound. My X9 long cage weighs 215 grams. Bolting on the x-horizon would be like putting 2 rear mechs on the back.... Heavy.
  • + 2
 265g, PB failed pretty hard on the specs here, this isn't the only wrong one: www.sram.com/sram/mountain/products/sram-gx-1x11-x-horizon-rear-derailleur
  • + 2
 That's nice. I'm really curious about complete bikes specced with this. I wonder how low 1x drivetrains will reach in terms of complete build prices in the next 2 years.
  • + 1
 this is awesome as i might be able to afford it Smile however, i thought the whole point of having a 11 spd cassette was to ditch the front derailleur, although i spose they have to cater for everyone's potential needs
  • + 1
 They finally realized that everyone was simply converting to a ghetto 1x10 for $200 instead of forking out $1K or more for the cadillac version. I was curious when the pricing was going to become reasonable.
  • + 3
 please be released soon before i order a Zee groupset, as i'd love to go 1x11.
  • + 3
 Shit, just wait til it comes out and get Zee anyway. It'll be hella cheap haha.
  • + 0
 They haven't even pushed saint to 11, we're at least a year away from 11 speed ZEE. XT is a possibility.
  • + 0
 it's all about 7 speed saint and zee now.
  • + 5
 singlespeed
  • + 1
 How can the GX (1400) crank weight 120g less than the X1 crank if they use the same arms, same chainring size, and same BB? SRAM's own site has the GX at 680 g and the X1 at 800 g.
  • + 1
 PB also thinks a derailleur weighs exactly the same as a cassette, & almost twice as much as SRAM says it does. Rush to press, methinks(though they've certainly had enough time to fix it by now.)
  • + 0
 The seemingly rushed approach is why I will wait for Shimano to "catch up" when they are most likely doing the correct amount of testing and revising at the Numeric level before releasing it at Alpha. Not saying the Sram GX is a bad product and will fail but recently in more than one industry rushed products are being released and the issues translate to the consumer. It is only the weight numbers that don't match up but if those little details aren't being double checked is there more to be worried about...
  • + 1
 Reading comprehension: you fail at it.
  • + 1
 I was referring to the OPs finding regarding weights on Sram's website, not your comment on PB. If you compare the 1400 X1 to GX and do the same with the 1000 models the GX comes in lighter. Not very often does a cheaper lower tier group come in lighter. Where is the 100g+ in the X1 coming from? Family design and same materials. Maybe they were weighed in different configurations? It was just my opinion which we all have and nobody cares about.
Posting a constructive comment that isn't disrespectful: you fail at it. Wink
  • + 1
 First: If you're replying to someone, that's what @ + their name is for, @KottonGin . If you simply post a statement inline below another one, they're going to assume that you're replying to them, especially when you reuse words that were in the previous comment. Because that's what logical people do.

Second: new versions of things are lighter than the old version all the time. Just because something's a lower spec doesn't mean they won't make it lighter, if it doesn't cost them any more to do so. Maybe they figured out the X1 crank was overbuilt in some places, maybe they switched to a new process that keeps the same strength with less material, maybe it's not as strong, so it's lighter? They're not going to fill hollow arms with lead just to make it heavier than the next higher spec(because lead costs money.)

Third, I'm so very, very sorry that you feel "disrespected" by my reply to your thinly veiled "Yay, Shimano, Boo SRAM!" comment. Truly, my heart is bleeding that you would think ill of me. I may have to find a school marm to whack my fingers with a ruler from the shame of it.
  • + 2
 @groghunter Your first and second points are good ones, the second especially. Made me realize I may have put too much mustard on the hotdog regarding the weight fluctuations. Your third point, I'm glad is as sarcastic as I attempted to be with my winky face and fell short. Honestly I was not offended and was just trying to parry the comprehension comment sarcastically. Is any of this fun if nobody pokes back? These comments don't impact the way the pedals turn and tires grip the trail. It's all just food for thought and opinion on a public forum anyways. [Insert played out opinions are like...joke here] No love loss and good luck finding a teacher to smack you with a yardstick haha.
  • + 2
 get the GX1 shifter and derailleur, then get the Microshift 11-42 cassette to fit it on your old wheel and you are set to go! no need for stinking XD driver
  • + 2
 Well, it looks that such set is heavier than front mech and shifter altogether, providing similar gear range. We are back to the square one
  • + 1
 Or buy one of the more expensive cassettes, with the cheaper derailleur. that's what I'm gonna do. 1199 cassettes are showing up online for less than $300 now.
  • + 3
 Perhaps all those after market 11/40 clusters. have something to do with this.
  • + 2
 What difference is Type 2.1 clutch against Type 2? Does anybody know? I notice that April stocks of XX1 rear mechs also say Type 2.1.
  • + 4
 Google is your friend, but it's an incremental improvement. works the same, but more reliable, performs slightly better.
  • + 0
 I wonder why and how.
  • + 5
 GOO-GOL, you lazy lima bean.
  • + 1
 I like the steel hopefully-non-folding cassette and the 2x option. Can't wait to see how/if a hub will handle 22 tooth up front and 42 in back grinding up the steepest terrain! Braaap! Srwarranty.
  • + 3
 I'm glad they released this on April 2nd or I would've thought this was an April fools joke. Good job SRAM!
  • + 0
 Funny how SRAMs tune changed. they went from basically saying 1x11 is all you will need, now they too are offering a 2x11 setup. Shimano is not sleeping people, and SRAM just proved it. people forget that when xx1 first came, the big hype was that there was a chain ring that didn't need a guide. Since they can't sell that anymore, they gonna throw up a chart with some numbers that means absolutely nothing to the majority of riders.
  • + 4
 Way to model the drivetrain "for the masses" on a carbon Santa Cruz. Smile
  • + 1
 After people saying throw out your front mech, we have all the range need, the front mech has returned? I don't get it, talk about a u-turn!
  • + 1
 Funny the the Shimano 1x11 system isn't mentioned in the graph, especially because it uses a 10 spd cassette body. Curious. Very Curious
  • + 1
 A $150 cassette still doesn't seem cheap to me. I don't blame Sram though, Shimano need to bring something to the table to compete on the 1x market.
  • + 3
 Now. Just need to wear out my 9 speed xt cassette...
  • + 1
 finally, still on my origonal XX1 set from 2013 except front ring is a wolf tooth the Sram Xsync rings back the wore out faster than Jenifer Lopezs husbands!
  • + 1
 So happy that both manufacturers are now supporting 2*11.
600% gear range is what is needed for real mountain biking by which I mean bicycling in the mountains.
  • + 1
 im a shimano fan but this just hits them where it hurts. if the guide brakes are up to snuff, then sram might have pulled a hat trick here.
  • - 2
 It does not hurt. Because SRAM free hub design is stupid and will never be mass adopted.
  • + 1
 Is it just me or does the 42t have no shift ramps or shaped teeth? I'm sure SRAM knows what they're doing, but it still strikes me as odd…
  • + 2
 Hmmm...still don't need a 10 tooth cog or want to have to get a new wheel build/hub with xd driver.
  • + 1
 XT 11 speed cassette to the rescue!
  • + 1
 I dunno about that cassette but everything else looks good. What is this front derailleur they are showing? Are these new? Never heard of one
  • + 3
 Still needs that dang driver...
  • + 2
 QBP says it'll get to the warehouse by 08/03/2015, so it should be here by the fall, not 2016
  • + 1
 it it just me, or did they forget to mention the release of a wide range 10 speed cassette (10-42 or 11-42). that's what the masses are clamoring for...
  • + 3
 I think ill wait for the 1x12 that will be out in 6 months.........
  • + 1
 oh with cranks too, thought it was mech cassette shifter and chain, perhaps i should read a bit more ha ha
  • + 1
 Hopefully the new chainring is rotatable so we get more than 850mi out of a ring.
  • - 1
 And here I am trying to make my 9 speed into a 7 because why do you need all those cogs when you could just be a human being and drop a gear when its hard or one up when its easy?
  • + 1
 I love the trickle down effect for our bike tech!! This actually happened a bit quicker than I thought.
  • + 2
 Is the grip shift a good option?? I had one on my Grifter when I was 8
  • + 0
 @rmaurer who cares about inner width? It's the wider spoke flange that makes the wheel stronger/stiffer, and boost 148 has a wider flange than the 150 hubs.
  • + 1
 In one fell swoop, blows a massive eff-off hole in Shimano's MTB market share.
  • + 1
 I want to buy a bike, but I can't wait a whole year...but I want a bike and this drivetrain
  • + 1
 BIkes with GX on them should be available in June.
  • + 1
 2015? Or 2016? I'm in australia, so shit takes longer to get here sometimes
  • + 1
 If Shimano would just release a wide range 10 speed system. Thats all where asking for!
  • + 1
 Sorry for the newby question, but does the 11 speed cassette work on any normal shimano/sram 11 speed compatible hub body?
  • + 1
 no, XD driver only. Shimano XTR (11-40) will work on a standard freehub.
  • + 0
 2x11 seems kind of silly. Seems like you would need a 33" wheel to ever need a 24T front and 42T back set up. Although maybe 33's will be the next big thing.
  • + 1
 The GX cassette is actually already available on 2015 OEM bikes, including my new Norco.
  • + 2
 C'mon Shimano, your turn.
  • + 2
 Anybody else here perfectly happy with 10sd 11-36?
  • + 0
 I have so many problems with my x1 set, I'll be surprised if this works well or is very durable. But optimism is high for cheap replacement parts
  • + 2
 Cranks-wise, it's all about Race Face. You guys up north should be proud!
  • + 2
 So we're still using derailleurs, eh?
  • + 1
 How come it says 11 steel cogs on the caption, but an aluminum 42 on the description?
  • + 2
 and wrong weight for the cassette
  • + 1
 read 1x11 derailleur - wrong weight. Copied from cassette.
  • + 1
 Looks like a mistake in the caption, unfortunately. I would rather have the little weight penalty and better durability.
  • + 1
 Also, there's two cassette, not just one, one has an aluminum 42, the other steel.
  • + 1
 Best news from this would be a non carbon affordable direct mount crankset....
  • + 5
 raceface turbine!
  • + 1
 GX One-By Cranksets Boost 148™ compatible. WAT??
  • + 1
 Fuk Shimano. Get off your ass!
  • - 2
 They are comparing it to the 10speed Deore and SLX but obviously forget that shimano will be changing those lines to 11speed soon. And then what? Shimano will still be on topWink
  • + 1
 WOnder how squishy the gx cranks will be?
  • + 0
 I will just wait for the CV drivetrains to be released, till then, I will motor along on my 1X1s
  • + 2
 Finally
  • - 3
 Only SRAM has forced anyone to "settle" for a 2x10 system. Why anyone buys into the idea we have to get our entire range of gears from the cassette is beyond me. I run a 3x8 Alivio group on my 29r trail commuter. It has 11 cogs and chainrings while a 1x11 has 12 but I have a wider total range of gears.

Shimano made great points explaining why they went 11-40 at their 2015 tech seminars. They reasoned few people will ever use the 10t on the trail so why re-engineer a hub for it? They went to a max 40t because they include 2x11 and 3x11 options that both have wider over all range because its more efficient getting that range from a multi-ring crank.

SRAM says of its 7 speed DH cassette the shifting is more stable and you get across the useable gear range faster. Who doesn't want that? Combine that with Shimanos' recommendation to find the middle chain ring size you will use most of the time and add one or 2 close spaced chain rings and we have a more robust system that is quieter, more efficient and more durable. Since most 1x11 bikes have lower priced models with front derailleurs the idea frame designers are freed up by 1x11 is a myth. Weight reduction isn't as great as suggested a 2x10 and 1x11 have the same number of cogs and rings.

Then there is the myth that a 2x or 3x crank doesn't hold the chain on as well. In most cases it is excessively worn chain, rings, improperly adjusted front derailleurs and improper gear choice that cause dropped chains on 2x and 3x systems. Of course consumers don't want to accept that and the bike industry is only too happy to offer up a silver bullet in the form of 1x11... only that doesn't work either based on the daily releases of yet another way to hold the chain on 1x10/11 systems.
  • + 2
 "Since most 1x11 bikes have lower priced models with front derailleurs the idea frame designers are freed up by 1x11 is a myth"

Until now. GX means that you can get away with building only 1x frames and still have a kind-of budget version.
  • + 0
 A 1x can be built off any drivetrain since bike companies can sub in any brand crank they want. 11 speed will still be too expensive for many of the entry level models of a line up so FDRs will still need to be accomodated. Also since Shimano included 2x and 3x cranks with the new XTR and XTR Di2 few builders even on their most expensive bikes are going to make their frames incompatible with an FDR. Most won't want to get crossed of the list of someone who is going to spend a few grand on a drivetrain because they limit his drivetrain choice to a 1x set up. 1x11 has likely had its hey day as the only option for the highend now that both SRAM and Shimano are offering 2x and 3x11. I also think its only a matter of time before cassettes with fewer cogs break out of DH and into enduro after which it will gain acceptance by the market again by those of us who are tired of finiky 10 speed and 11 speed systems.
  • + 1
 It LOOKS cheap (in a bad way).

Also, no ramps on the 42T cog?
  • + 1
 The cluster on the bike has ramps on the 42 cog, but not the one by itself. Sram's website resolution isn't clear enough to tell. Also, there is a 69g weight penalty to get the steel 42 cog vs the aluminum one. Worth it for many.
  • + 0
 They should start making an off-road internal gearing hub! you know less maintenance, cleaner look
  • + 1
 Shimano looser, SRAM winner !
  • + 1
 shimano are to slow, at everything,
  • + 1
 Yay, it's Boost 148 compatible!!!
  • + 0
 Great job Sram!Now we need a 10-44 cassete for use larger chainrings.
  • + 0
 I ride a ss ht w/ 26" wheels…JOIN ME!!!
  • + 1
 finally!!!
  • + 1
 Cool beans!
  • - 1
 USD$564? No thanks, still very expensive... I'm still with a mix of Shimano parts...
  • - 1
 Oh SRAM, if only you'd gone to 150x12, 100x20 ditched the front derailleur and long cage RD.
  • + 0
 1x10 here, RF narrow/wide & XT. SUPER HAPPY. 600? No thanks.
  • + 0
 One word Singlespeed Nuf said
  • - 1
 £500+ drive chain for the common man? how is £115 for a cassette cheap? the bike industry is such a piss taker.
  • - 1
 Boost recovery mode, sorry Sram you still suck! Your rear mech's and shifters are f'n garbage too, are you kidding me?
  • - 1
 Premiers budget drivetrain... puts it on a $4000 frame.

f*cking logic.
  • - 1
 as long it is not a zee shadow+ it make no scene to buy
  • - 1
 i think sram will kill shimano in the future...
  • + 1
 Do you have any idea how much bigger Shimano is and what their real business is? SRAM would be showing up with a knife for an inter-continental missile fight. not that I'm much of a fan of my 2014 XT 10 speed... just pointing out the relative size of these two companies wouldn't work out well for SRAM.
  • - 1
 I am assuming the cassette is 11-42?
  • + 2
 Counting it looks like the smallest cog is 10t. So will this need a xd hub as well?
  • + 2
 yes, but if that's your sticking point, new XTR cassettes should work with this(& by extension, whenever 11 speed XT shows up, those will too.)
  • + 1
 Read the article
  • + 1
 I did. When I posted that the article was in complete. That section just ended mid sentence before it said it needed the driver.
  • + 1
 Opps my bad then!
  • - 1
 SRAM hub design was a mistake and time will prove it.
  • - 3
 Bye bye Shimano!!,
  • + 2
 And every company that was selling a big chainring, and the competition that drives real innovation and low prices. This blows. Shimano will be fine, but the real competition from little companies is dead.
  • + 2
 Yea. Just like that damn Henry Ford destroyed the buggy whip industry!
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