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HQ Tour: Inside SRAM's Drivetrain Development Facility

Apr 5, 2023
by Ralf Hauser  



Enter SRAM's German headquarters and you enter a bit of bike history. From SRAM's first Grip Shift iterations to its latest electronic Pod unit, there have been significant advances in technology since the company's early days. With the introduction of their latest Eagle drivetrain group, we were allowed to not only take a peek into their front offices but got rare access to their test lab.

SRAM's facility in Schweinfurt, Germany, was once a manufacturing center for internal gear hubs under the name of Sachs. The facility's focus shifted when SRAM acquired the brand, and today it's the main development facility for almost the entire drivetrain range. Chains are developed in a close relationship with their own factory in Portugal, and crank development mostly happens in San Luis Obispo, California. Some team members have been with SRAM for 35-40 years, having previously worked at Sachs.

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Image Ralf Hauser

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Strolling Through the Halls

While the facility is no longer a major manufacturing center, it is still a hub of activity and innovation that is constantly growing and being altered in its structure.


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Cafeteria following the showroom.
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SRAM Technical University

The factory building also houses the SRAM Technical University (STU), which hosts workshops for dealers and mechanics, and SRAM Technical Service (STS) to provide service and warranty to products (including RockShox and other brands under the SRAM umbrella) that are sent in or are dropped off. In Germany, STS can be directly connected to the rider if they want to handle communication or even drop off a product on their own.

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SRAM Technical Service
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Also under the same roof is a small warehouse that handles European warranty claims and stores spare parts and equipment. Shipments to dealers or bike companies are handled from warehouses or distributors around the globe.

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Image Ralf Hauser


The engineering department, located next to the warehouse section, is off-limits to most people, as the team is typically working on projects that are two to three years ahead of the current state of the industry. Multiple types of engineers, like quality engineers, industrial design engineers, or test engineers work together on different projects.

Inside, the seating arrangement allows for a flexible concept where groups can move together to work as a team. Also, depending on the project, it sometimes makes more sense to mix people from different departments or to create groups of one specific department.

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No access beyond this point. The engineering department is off-limits to visitors.

Inside the engineering technician area, prototypes from the prototype machine department are assembled and put on bikes to be secretly tested in the real world. Development requires more than test lab machines - a lot of testing still happens while riding test bikes outdoors.

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Still plenty of room to expand.
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Again, no access to the engineering technician area.

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Some patents that were introduced under SRAM and Sachs.
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This golden 'Mona Lisa' of internal gear hubs represents the 25 millionth Torpedo hub that was manufactured at Sachs in Schweinfurt.
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The prototype department is dedicated to developing and testing new ideas, and run by machining experts, with the machining department having extended its capabilities through the use of advanced technology such as ERTD (Extended Reach Tooling and Drilling).

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From functional sample ....
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... to mass production.

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Some of the European race truck's drawers can be changed out to better cater to which type of race it's going to, say for example road or mountain bike.

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Next to the race truck, race bikes are being assembled.


Test Lab

The test lab at SRAM is one of eight around the world and is responsible for coordinating field testing and collecting data on various products. The team, currently made up of eleven people at Schweinfurt, custom builds most of their own test rigs and develops the software accordingly. Testing for durability and robustness is one factor for testing, strength and fatigue strength in particular - like cyclical loads on an e-bike for example - another. Some machines simulate real-world scenarios with changing load capabilities.


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Usually off limits, we got the tour that day.
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SRAM tests with loads taken from the field and also cycles from the field, but they also usually test beyond the real-world requirements to make sure that the end user runs into as few problems as possible. In order to be able to even build machines that simulate real-world conditions they have gathered (and are still gathering) huge amounts of data over the years and then broken them down to test for the range of data that they need.

SRAM has recently started testing with 3D high-speed image scanning via two Phantom cameras they can use outdoors to understand the workings of forces and impacts on the product, and to find better ways to correlate field testing to lab testing.

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This rig was designed specifically to test the quality of shifting more consistently than humans could, using high-speed video to analyze the function. With the new T-Type Eagle, they had to change the way they were testing, now looking much more at the quality of each shift and the workings of the shifting lanes, even under loads of an eMTB.

Image Ralf Hauser
Image Ralf Hauser

Around 4,500 samples per year are running through the machines, requiring a minimum of 250 meters of chain every month. Spread over the area, all types of components are tested in multiple ways, from derailleur to shifter.

One of the machines in the lab simulates shifting under load, allowing them to compare their products to competitors and previous generations. In addition to making sure the chain shifts smoothly in certain locations, they also work to prevent shifting in other areas. The team has gone through 900 cassettes for the latest drivetrain generation.

Image Ralf Hauser

Image Ralf Hauser
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A machine, dubbed 'Death Star', is used to push the limits of cassettes and goes way beyond standard ISO performance testing – which doesn't require much to pass as it only resembles a static safety test of a 150kg person standing on a bike – to gather valuable data on durability and other factors. Since it can generate so much power, it acts as a performance/durability testing device where it can wear out and break cassettes over time or allows them to simulate real-world (and far beyond) conditions and loads on the products, including steep hill climbs and strong e-bike wattage, in order to learn from the results to make improvements.

The Death Star's primary function is to find the limits of the cassette. To get to that point, it can take multiple chains to be replaced, as the chains are running dry in the machines to not make a huge mess, with the negative side effect of reducing their lifespan severely due to heat buildup. As a development tool, SRAM tests to failure a lot to see if they want to improve a product further.

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Out for destruction: The Death Star

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Since the chains are run without lubrication on purpose their life span is greatly reduced.
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Not just the work of the Death Star ...

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The crank test machine simulates about 10 years of use on cranks and bottom bracket, going well beyond the ISO requirement of 50,000 cycles.

The climate chambers allow them to test products in different conditions, including dry and wet phases. Different types of dust - collected from different riding areas around the globe - can be added to the machine to simulate different geographic areas and different types of wear.

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Image Ralf Hauser
Image Ralf Hauser

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Some of the testing is not overly realistic but engineers sometimes want to see if the system can handle a certain kind of abuse.

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Image Ralf Hauser

SRAM has also created testing procedures for impact scenarios for singular major impacts. The drop test machine subjects the product to worst-case scenarios.

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The 9kg weight can be dropped from different heights.

The bike swing came to life from playing around with new ways to abuse components in an easy and repeatable way. They usually also attach dots and high-speed motion cameras to the process so they can motion track the process. They can then calculate the energy of that impact along with friction and other factors.

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Derailleur vs. a block of steel.
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Over and over again ...

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Data acquisition: check.
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One of the engineers decided to build his own test bike. Lots of real world testing is still being conducted out on the trails.


Author Info:
ralf-hauser avatar

Member since May 10, 2010
68 articles

125 Comments
  • 267 9
 All this fancy equipment and out comes SX.
  • 9 53
flag Mac1987 (Apr 5, 2023 at 9:25) (Below Threshold)
 Proving it's not the equipment, but the person operating it.
  • 131 4
 all the people at SRAM should ride NX and SX for a year and see how it goes for them. Maybe they will dump some resources on that spec. Shimano killing it on the lower end.
  • 11 6
 @Mac1987: or the bar is set low for the entry level products, but then again even their high end stuff has had issues.
  • 37 3
 Yup… SX is absolute crap… NX not that much better…
Especially if you consider the performance or Deore vs XT or XTR
  • 17 1
 @jaydawg69: That is one considerable issue on SRAM components, performance gap is too large between lower and higher end components, that gap is much smaller on Shimano.
  • 2 0
 I'd expect some testing if they're going to sell these quantities at such prices. Unless I'm going to ride with a gearbox or singlespeed, there is going to be some derailleur on my mountainbike. To put all this stuff in perspective, how does Shimano test their stuff? I don't expect it would be far off.
  • 15 25
flag thenotoriousmic (Apr 5, 2023 at 11:24) (Below Threshold)
 @SchalkMarais: I think most of the people talking this nonsense hasn’t tried running deore 12 speed. It’s equally as shit as SX and if they had they’d know that. I have two full deore groupsets in my parts bin that just fell to bits in less than 6 months or broke from basically nothing of a crash due to the cheap soft materials. It’s not fit for purpose and if you ride often and at a decent standard or crash a lot it’s going in your parts bin as well. When it’s brand new the performance is acceptable at best and for what you’re getting it’s actually expensive £100+ for a 650 gram cassette that’s going to ruin your suspension performance. Pay the little bit extra (GX/XT) and get something that works. And please whatever you do don’t get the mech, it’s a complete waste of money. Cranks and cassettes fine if you’ve got an e bike but I’m not carrying that up a mountain. I’ll gladly pay the extra £35 not to do that.
  • 7 1
 @thenotoriousmic: I will disagree, as I have seen some pretty hard-charging dudes' deore group sets last for years.
  • 4 2
 @thenotoriousmic: nonsense, there are guys using deore for the past 10 years while sx can barely last a season
  • 5 3
 I don't think SX, NX, or Deore should be on high end MTB bikes. The lowest the high end bike companies should go is GX and SLX. Just my opinion.
  • 3 1
 @tacklingdummy: My opinion is that the definition of "high end" is vague too. If Deore now works as well as SLX did a few years ago, did "high end" become higher (as it is a relative term) or is it more defined in terms of accuracy, durability etc so that Deore could eventually join the "select league of high end bicycle components" too? What I learned about Shimano is that they introduce new technology in XTR first. What they learn from there, they use to apply it in XT and so it trickles down and improves. The do omit some costly but weight saving machining steps, may use cheaper materials here and there, use fewer seals etc. So some things may improve as you go down to the lower end components, others obviously become worse. But the spectrum of good and bad is not a one-dimensional one, it depends on what properties you value.
  • 2 12
flag thenotoriousmic (Apr 6, 2023 at 2:07) (Below Threshold)
 @stephenzkie: deore can barely last a season. Two full groupsets less than 6 months old in the parts bins. As expected nobody who’s talking this absolute nonsense has actually used this trash, it’s all hearsay or stories because if you had you’d know it’s not just XTR with different paint but cheese that’s not fit for purpose. Just standard pinkbikers talking utter shit about subjects they have no knowledge of as usual.
  • 1 3
 If you need something better then buy it. Why bash their lowest spec when they make much better parts? You get what you pay for.
  • 7 0
 @thenotoriousmic: "pinkbikers talking utter shit about subjects they have no knowledge of" you talking about yourself then? I mean I dont have to explain that I have used deore for 5 seasons before moving to xtr since the subject is longevity and mates been using his for the last 10 years. but if you think that plastic crap SX that's universally hated is better than deore then I guess there's no helping you
  • 2 0
 @txcx166: we need criticism and actual feedback to make companies fix their crap unless yall want them to keep releasing crap just because you are too afraid to speak out
  • 2 0
 @ThatOneGuyInTheComments: I've had 11speed slx on hardail for years, it had taken few rocks and branches, bent the cage pretty badly, straightened it and it still works. 12 speed deore on my newer fully got pulled in the spokes with the first branch it had met :/
  • 1 1
 @stephenzkie: SRAM isn’t sitting by their phones waiting for your call. You think it sucks, don’t buy it. Pretty simple.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I think older SLX is better than Deore. Lighter and better performance.

The way I look at it is, the price difference between Deore and SLX drivetrain is very small given a 3K to 5K rig. But the performance, weight, and quality is measurable. Bike companies should just put it on the entry level, high end bikes.
  • 1 1
 Totally correct statement regarding great fancy equipment and crappy products: PB: +219!

Logical conclusion regarding the end product being apparently more decided by people (amongst which designers) than said equipment: PB: -31!
  • 2 2
 @stephenzkie: that would be you with stories of some ‘friend’ who’s been using deore since the dawn of the dinosaurs. You couldn’t have provided a better example of standard pinkbiker bullshit. And I’m not talking about deore from ten years ago, I’m talking about the current 12 speed groupset which I have two fully broken groupsets in my parts bin, brakes included but please tell me more about your imaginary friends.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: did you actually miss the part where I just literally said I've used deore before but yeah keep saying its only hearsay.. I'd like you to suggest a better alternative in it's price range tho because I highly doubt you'd say the SX is better in the same price bracket
  • 1 0
 @txcx166: actually, there probably are people at SRAM whose entire job is to sit by the phone and take peoples complaints. Although the purpose is to document real issues actual customers experience with their products, not entertain anyone’s speculation as to why a product may or may not be good.
  • 2 3
 @stephenzkie: I’ve been very clear with what I’ve said. Which is deore 12 speed groupset is equally as shit as SX. Not like you’d know because you’ve only got your ‘friends’ experiences to go off and no actual first hand experience with the products you’re talking shit about. The old deore stuffs fine. I’ve got no complaints with a £30 10 speed rear derailleur and if you get the old deore brakes with the zee style levers they’re actually really good brakes. It’s the latest 12 speed groupsets that aren’t fit for purpose especially the rear derailleur which ironically I have a friend coming around in the morning with a brand new GX mech so that will be three deore 12 speed mechs that just fell to bits in my parts bin. This one twisted a full 180 degree when the chain slipped. The metal is so soft and cheap that I just twisted it back around with my hand and he could actually pedal his bike home. Imagine your mech doing a 180 because your chain slipped. Utter trash.
  • 1 1
 @thenotoriousmic: you really fail to take relativity when setting expectations, if go out buying a 200dollar drivetrain and expect it to perform like a drivetrain twice its price then I don't know how to answer to that, but for its price there's really nothing better than a deore but hey keep saying deores are shit because they can't perform as well as a gx if that makes you happy
  • 1 0
 @stephenzkie: I don’t expect it to work as well or last as well as much more expensive groupset but I do expect it to be fit for purpose which deore isn’t nor is SX. I’ve now got three deore 12 speed mechs and another deore shifter in my parts bin. It’s a false economy. It won’t last and it will cost you more money in the long run. It needs constant maintenance plus bending and straightening to keep running, it’s cheap and nasty and it doesn’t last. I’d be fine with it being a bit clunky and very heavy if it worked.
  • 61 2
 As a person who works in product development, I am always fascinated and extremely interested to see how others, especially in completely different industries outside of my focus, perform their work. Thanks to SRAM for a inside look.
  • 16 2
 Yes. As a former CNC machinist, familiar with HAAS mills, this is some damn fine porn. If I'd been working in an environment similar to this I might still be pulling a pay cheque.
  • 10 1
 @dlford: I doubt they even had to sweep up for the PB tour!
  • 44 2
 People will hate but that's a lot of time, money and engineering into bike component development.
  • 11 13
 I'm going to guess you ride singlespeed.
  • 40 1
 At my work visitors are usually not allowed into the engineering area either. Because I am there and people find my abrasive personality off putting.
  • 24 0
 That one engineer keeping it real with the steel full suspension bike on aluminum wheels, nice.
  • 3 0
 Pretty sure this is same said engineer showing all the work that's was put into the diy build. (google translate from German to English to read)

www.mtb-news.de/forum/t/voll-stahl-fully-i-got-99-problems-but-steel-aint-one.941175
  • 5 0
 *Builds rad custom steel bike* *mounts tire backwards* D'OH!
  • 1 0
 @shirk-007: woah that's cool, never thought I'd see the trails I learned to ride on shown on a random German engineer's forum post about his process of building custom steel full suspensions though haha
  • 3 2
 I just built a steel full sus Cotic with carbon wheels and carbon bars, do I get a pass
  • 4 1
 Although the DHR2 mounted backwards on the back wheel isn’t giving me more confidence. Maybe that’s part of the testing?

But overall- yes rad to see folks building their own frames meant for serious riding.
  • 1 0
 @McKai: extra climbing grip coz its an XC bike obviously :-)
  • 1 0
 @basic-ti-hardtail: For crazy tech climbing (think Akrigg or Braydon Bringhurst) backwards tire means better climbing traction, but worse braking traction and more rolling resistance. Dude seems like the type to experiment, it's probably on purpose.
  • 1 0
 @kcy4130: cool- thanks for the explanation!
I love watching Chris Akrigg do his thing - I’ll have to look up Braydon.
  • 26 7
 So many fancy test equipments. Why is my SRAM NX derailler on my Status having after 3 rides? Where as my low-end Shimano Deore never needed adjustments after many years?
  • 6 36
flag seraph (Apr 5, 2023 at 9:30) (Below Threshold)
 NX is supposed to act as an affordable way to get 12-speed wide range gearing onto a bike. I'd much rather see it on low-mid tier MTBs than the cheap Shimano shite that doesn't even have a clutch.
  • 12 6
 So many fancy text components. Why is your MS WORD literater on your Script having after 3 writes? Where as my low-end Open Office never needed adjustments after many years?
  • 25 2
 @seraph: The deore HAS a clutch.
  • 7 2
 It’s called cable stretch. Turn barrel adjuster on your shifter quarter of a turn. It’s just your new cable stretching.
  • 1 3
 Because housing/cables compress/stretch after first use and you probably never ride your Shimano bike because theres no way cable housing and cables can go "many years" without gunking up and needing replacement.
  • 6 1
 @mi-bike: high quality troll, well done
  • 2 1
 @seraph: just because something is affordable doesn't mean is has to be sh8, deore is a testament to that
  • 2 3
 @stephenzkie: deore is utter shit though and it’s expensive for what you’re paying for and how long it will last. I’ve got two full broken groupsets in my parts bin. I’d love for someone to identify the materials used because despite its appearance it’s not metal.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: please do give a better groupset better than deore in the same price range because I highly highly doubt you'd say SX
  • 1 0
 @addisonchen: some of it does, some of it doesn't. On the other hand, every SRAM 12-speed derailleur has a clutch.
  • 20 0
 Death Star, eh? Guess we know why there are no planetary gears being tested.
  • 5 0
 ...On Program!!! - 100% looks like the Andor Prison complex
  • 16 0
 Even the Sram employees run DT Swiss wheels
  • 4 0
 Those Zipp rims seem like a pretty clever idea actually, compared to all those hollow carbon rims.
  • 15 0
 Get this photographer a tripod and a level for christ sake
  • 17 0
 The factory looks so much steeper in these pics.
  • 1 0
 lmao
  • 14 1
 That lineup of old derailleurs is more like a lessons learned handbook of mistakes
  • 8 1
 I was amazed they had ones that weren't broken. Same goes for the Grip Shift Xray.
  • 11 0
 I was going to make a smart ass remark about "lab conditions" vs "real world conditions", but looks like they have to covered with their "test" dust....impressive
  • 15 4
 Unpopular opinion: Gripshift is actually pretty sick.
  • 4 1
 When rubbing it out.
  • 1 0
 Agreed. Used them for 30+ years logical way to do the gears
  • 2 2
 I was a big fan in the 90s when it came up, now, shortly after, I relized that loosen the grip on my dominant hand that much at speed is far from ideal.
  • 6 1
 Wow, this facility is cleaner then some medical labs I have worked at. However, with all those resources at their disposal, it would be nice if they would update the entry level SX & NX. Maybe the new Transmission tech will filter down.
  • 3 2
 Gotta make things break easy to make people buy more you know
  • 6 0
 It may just be me, but why doesn't Shimano let Sram use the double downshift, and Sram let's Shimano use the cage lock?

Both derailleurs would be better, and it'd make me happy...
  • 9 1
 Stools everywhere! bless their destroyed backs
  • 41 0
 I was kinda surprised that they weren't all just standing on the new derailleur.
  • 1 1
 @thustlewhumber: comment of the year.
  • 16 11
 Where do they test how efficiently Transmission can break chainstays? The armchair engineer/conspiracy theorists want to know.
  • 8 0
 They just asked Henry to stand on the side of a bike, test complete
  • 9 2
 Am I the only one not concerned about this? It shares the same chainstay interface as the rear axle (or rather, it is the rear axle interface). Are you really going to be driving as much load through your derailleur as you drive through the rear wheel?
  • 16 4
 @DaneL: So my comment was meant to be sarcastic. I think all those people claiming this thing will break your bike are absurd.
  • 3 1
 @pisgahgnar: Go stand on your chainstay. Im sure it will be fine.
  • 1 4
 @DaneL: Mostly it'll be okay unless you own a Trek, so I've heard.
  • 5 1
 Fanatik actually made a video testing this idea - eventually the Transmission was destroyed. Rear triangle was fine.
Here's the final video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3QzPxdN1e4

BTW - they ordered parts and repaired the Transmission good as new.
  • 1 2
 @BenLow2019: ok ok hear me out, how about replacing a 30 dollar hanger instead of risking a 600 dollar derailleur or rear triangle?

Even the replacement parts for the derailleur is way more expensive than a hanger
  • 2 1
 @stephenzkie: You didn't watch the video. It took AMAZING force to cause any damage. And when the damage was done the derailleur was repairable.
If the same tests had been conducted on a standard setup they would've trashed the derailleurs and the hangers multiple times - and without the ability to repair either the replacement of which would've easily exceeded the cost to repair the Transmission.

And the rear triangle was fine.
  • 3 0
 @stephenzkie: With the current hanger system, any strike to the cage that's sufficient to bend the hanger will bend/break the cage (so you're scrapping the derailleur anyways). The hanger really only saves you when you hit the body of the derailleur (but it can still result in the whole derailleur being pushed into your cassette or spokes, causing further damage). With SRAM's new system, they don't really make the cage more durable, but they at least make it replaceable. They do, however, make the body of the derailleur so strong that it's extremely unlikely that you'd ever break it. With the inclusion of their overload clutch, it's hard to see how this isn't a better solution overall. It also reduces tolerances and complexity, so it should be much easier to maintain consistent shifting after hundreds of miles without straightening/replacing hangers, adjusting b-tension, etc.

If most frame manufacturers adopt the UDH standard and SRAM eventually introduces some reasonably priced groupsets, I think this standard will take off. I just hope that Shimano doesn't try to make their own frame interface standard.
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: that too, if shimano ever releases their own direct mount I highly doubt they'd be wiiling to use the sram UDH standard, if that happens imagine wanting to switch drivetrain brands you'd also have to replace your frame to do so
  • 1 0
 @stephenzkie: if they don't use the UDH, Shimano can come up with another bolt in hanger type mount that at most you'll just need a new axle. I don't see any reason looking at my bike you'd need a new rear triangle/seat stay/chain stay unless Shimano comes up with something absurd, and then they'd be hurting only themselves at that point.
  • 1 0
 @FaahkEet: shimano doing their own thing has happened a lot in tha past tho notably the microspline, and their own direct mount chainrings so i would'nt be surprised if they made their own
  • 6 0
 That lab is looking German AF. You could eat off the floors. Love the jug of "test dust".
  • 11 5
 SRAM > Shimano. Come@ me.
  • 5 0
 Haha. Elixir, Juicy, Reverb, Guide.. Riding time lost and headaches from sram have definitely been greater than shimano.
  • 1 1
 They are completely different companies. Sram is really pushing it so they tend to release more stuff that is not really polished, but way more blingbling. Shimano is conservative uncle, they tried to make a revolution once and failed badly (khm khm dual control) so they make sure things are working now. They still get things wrong
like wandering bite point on some brakes or recent hanger patent that we most certainly absolutely need. I still prefer shimano for better value and smaller performance gap between their top and lower end, but I totaly get some people prefer the cutting edge you can only get with sram.
  • 2 0
 Can't disagree. SRAM is a privately held bike company. SRAM is founded in producing better bike components and that's it. Shimano is not a bike company. They are a publicly held manufacturing company that makes a bunch of bike stuff in addition to their other departments.
  • 2 0
 Dang, have worked in R&D for nearly 30 years a s never a lab that sexy or clean.
PA and clinical labs are spotless, but the R&D engineers labs.... Like a graveyard of tests, old tests and partly complete tests.
90% paperwork these days in the medical industry.
  • 1 1
 Something I’ve learned in the bike industry over the last 25yrs: Sram’s R&D is largely the customer.
  • 2 0
 I wonder what Shimano are conjuring up in their R&D labs, to rival the new AXS transmission?. Will we see prototype XTR M9200 on the XCO world cups this year?
  • 4 0
 why do germans love plastic so much
  • 3 0
 Buying Sachs was the smartest thing SRAM ever did. I only rode Sachs chains for a while.
  • 5 2
 Is this the futuristic technology behind the SRAM Level breaks?
  • 1 0
 Or guides, or elixirs, maybe reverb?
  • 2 1
 i don't get it, all this equipment, all these tests, and the brakes sucks this much? have they even tried other brands products?
  • 2 0
 It's really cool to see behind the scenes like this. Thanks SRAM and Pinkbike!
  • 4 4
 And how did they not realize before launch that the Eagle was going to pop the top pulley when the chain lost indexing with the NW teeth of the bottom pulley?
  • 2 0
 not enough testing booths i guess.
  • 7 5
 Sram trying to justify cost.
  • 3 2
 Is this where they invented headset cable routing? If so then Ralf needs to go back on a rampage Smile
  • 3 1
 even they don't use their own chains to test their cranks
  • 1 0
 LMAO
  • 1 0
 Somewhere in there is a white board with:
“wie ändern wir die standards und verdienen ein paar € mehr?”
  • 2 1
 From my experience their testing might pass the tests they set but it’s completely useless in the real world.
  • 1 0
 What was wrong with engineering SRAM products in northAmerica ? They are only ahead on the marketing department?
  • 1 0
 Was the camera man drunk? Why are all these photos slanted? Alt+double click the crop tool in Adone Camera Raw.
  • 2 0
 Sign on front door SCRAM.
  • 1 0
 I like the test bike. Flat pedals, cooked back tyre, innertube chain stay protection.
  • 1 0
 Are they still suing people for using narrow wide rings that they did not invent? Classy company :/
  • 4 2
 Needs more pictures.
  • 1 0
 needs less tilting in pictures... I was getting dizzy looking at them!!
  • 6 5
 Forgot to show the Chinese factory
  • 4 0
 I bet the place where they produce every crank spindle at 0.01mm tolerance at is even more areospacer
  • 5 0
 It’s a Taiwanese factory
  • 2 2
 Can we have a tour of SRAM’s transmission development facility?
  • 1 1
 Stop stop stop... Oh you cant you have SRAM brakes
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