SRAM Talks Tech: Inside the RockShox Reverb - Interbike 2016

Sep 24, 2016
by Richard Cunningham  
Interbike 2016


RockShox Reverb tech
Cut-away versions of RockShox's Reverb Dropper post are used to explain its various oil pathways and moving parts


SRAM goes beyond simply displaying its components at Interbike. Throughout each day, SRAM and RockShox tech experts demonstrate how to disassemble and service everything from bottom brackets, hubs and suspension items, to the Reverb dropper seatpost. I stopped by to discuss two RockShox Reverb questions that had been on my mind with Simon Stewart - a RockShox expert and one of the best guides I have ridden with. My first question was about how air could occasionally work its way into the oil column of early Reverbs and cause them to act like suspension seatposts. My second question was to address the possibility of RockShox being able to offer an adjustable-travel Reverb in the future, to address riders whose saddle heights prevent them from using longer-stroke posts.
RockShox Reverb tech
RockShox expert Simon Stewart.

RockShox Reverb tech
Three version of the Reverb's internal floating piston: The original aluminum one with its white glide rings (far left), the plastic O-ring piston (center), and the new molded-plastic piston with pressure-actuated seals.


The "suspension post" issue turned out to be a simple one. Reverb internals use a floating piston to separate the air-spring chamber at the top of the post from the oil column below it. The oil column is metered to change the height of the post, and also must support the rider, who is often banging on the post with his or her full weight. Because oil can't be compressed, it acts like a solid shaft, supporting the rider when the control valve is closed. The problem arises when air slips past the floating piston into the oil column. Even a small amount of air will cause the post to act like a spring. Simon explained that air could leak past the piston when side-loads or internal pressure overwhelmed the O-ring seals, or caused contact and wear between metal parts.

RockShox Reverb tech
The heart of the latest Reverb dropper is this blue-colored floating piston that eliminates the O-ring seals of earlier versions altogether. The air-spring chamber is the area to the right of the piston between the inner and outer tubes.


The first floating piston was machined from aluminum and had O-rings on its outer and inner surfaces to maintain a seal. Bushings in the form of white plastic "glide rings" on either side of the O-ring seals were used to separate the metal bits and to give the post a seamless feel. Stewart said that bending forces on the post could sometime cause the metal floating piston to contact the aluminum inner shaft and wear grooves that could allow air to pass the seals. RockShox engineers then developed version two - a plastic floating piston, which could not abrade the shaft, but still used O-rings as primary seals.

According to Simon, version two fixed 99.999-percent of the problem, but in rare cases, side loads on the longer-stroke 150 and 170 millimeter posts could still coax air past the O-ring seals. Version three - which is installed on current Reverb posts - eliminates the O-rings completely. The entire piston is molded from a seal material, and it is engineered to expand against the shafts when it is pressurized. The pressure-actuated seal is not affected by bending or lateral loading and it also compensates for wear - all of which has reportedly solved the issue completely. The new piston is also included in RockShox Reverb rebuild kits, so customers who send their posts in for service will automatically receive the upgrade.
RockShox Reverb tech
Pressure spreads the sliding surfaces at each end of the new piston, creating a tight seal.



Adjustable-Stroke Reverb?

Why the need for an adjustable stroke feature for dropper posts? Two reasons: with seat tube angles evolving steeper, riders are positioned significantly higher above the bike, and at the same time, steeper angles move the saddle nearer to where the rider must hover to control the bike on descents. In most cases, those effects require a longer-stroke dropper post to get the seat low enough to clear the rider. Unfortunately for some riders, frames with tall seat tubes create a situation where the saddle height with a 150 or 170-millimeter dropper post is just a little too tall for pedaling, even when the post is slid all the way down in the frame. In such cases, the option is to choose a post with 30 to 50 millimeters less stroke - which often places the saddle uncomfortably high in the fully dropped position. The advantage of being able to adjust your dropper posts's stroke in five or ten millimeter increments is that you would be able to maximize the amount of drop you need, rather than be forced to accept a 20 to 30-millimeter reduction in travel, downsizing to the next available post.

RockShox Reverb tech
It could be done, but... The blue aluminum piston in the center of the photo is the poppet valve body. The post tops out against an O-ring cushion on its left edge, which illustrates how little room is available to add a travel spacer of any significant thickness.


Simon told me that RockShox was aware that customers were asking for an adjustable Reverb, but he was not in a position to comment about whether or not the engineers were working on a solution. So, I asked if there was a simple fix, like an aftermarket spacer that customers could install under the post's top-out cushion to reduce the travel in five millimeter increments - sort of like small headset spacers. He said that, while that spacing the post would be possible, it would also be impractical. The Reverb mechanism tops out at full extension against the lower side of the poppet-valve body, which is located deep inside the guts of the post. Besides the fact that accessing the poppet valve requires a complete disassembly of the post, the cramped space between the poppet valve body and the tube surrounding it leaves little room for a spacer. If the top-out spacer failed, it might destroy the inside of the mechanism. So, the short version is that, barring a redesign of the Reverb's internals, we won't be seeing a travel-adjustable version soon.


MENTIONS: @SramMedia




140 Comments

  • 84 3
 When will there be a 300 mm version available?

Pinkbike, we need you to be asking the real questions.
  • 36 2
 so when is SRAM gonan ditch the stupid UNergonomic hydraulic remote ? Im sure it wont take a genius to do that.....
  • 3 0
 You mean a 50-300 mm adjustable stoke on an infinitely adjustable dropper post?
  • 15 1
 When will there be one with tuneable low speed compression and high speed rebound?
  • 19 3
 When the monster T come back for a full on downduro e-bike with a belt drivetrain,metric shock, boost and with plus tires, only then is going to be the perfect moment for the 300mm reverb, so, not so long really
  • 7 0
 I want a charger damper in it.
  • 2 0
 need a dropper on your scooter?
  • 4 0
 Yes, sod the short arses, what about lanky sods like me who want more travel!
  • 1 1
 My ideal dropper post needs handlebar mounted adjustable travel, both high and low speed compression and rebound, progresivity, and a coloured sanction. Too much to ask?
  • 1 0
 @drfunsocks: in short, yes
  • 48 9
 There's almost no way it can be worse than before. But I do need to say "almost" since it is SRAM. There newest way to rebuild reverbs are a joke. I just got mine back and it's tough to push down, slow to return and makes a bunch of noise. I sent it back and they said that's just how they work with their "new improved seals". They say it's suppose to last more than a season now. I'm sure it will last longer now since I'm going to have to just replace it with a fox transfer post.
  • 15 3
 Just get Giant seat post. Sure their remote is good but you never ever have to worry about it going out. If it does its warrenty. Not maintnence.
  • 6 4
 Also way cheaper than a fox and kind of the same thing
  • 2 1
 Have you bled the remote line and adjusted the barrel on the remote for speed?
  • 5 3
 @p0g0: yup it's been bleed twice in a week now and the remote is as fast as it goes. The new seals they put in drag causing a lot of noise and slows it way down.
  • 5 0
 @Ecarlson: I have the new version and mine snaps back up and no drag or noise. Sounds like a defect?
  • 5 0
 You may try checking your air pressure; 250 psi, if its off it makes it tough to push down.
That said I just installed a new internal Fox Transfer post on my hardtail today.
Its f ucking awesome!
  • 6 5
 Why in some peoples mind there's only two brands for suspension and dropper posts? (RockShox and Fox). It's not like the Transfer has been the most reliable dropper post, it's new (you know what happens with a new product, even to experienced brands) and from what I have read they haven't had more or less issues than dropper posts from others brands.
  • 2 1
 @islandtees: I don't have the new version of the post. I just had them rebuild it and they put what they called there newest fix for the posts. A couple guys in the shop felt it when I brought it back and they thought there was something wrong with it also. Sram just sent it back saying that it will last longer now but that's how it will feel.
  • 7 0
 @Ecarlson: its worth checking to make sure your seat post clamp isnt too tight as funny as that sounds. Mine had the same issues and the problem was from it being just a bit too tight.
  • 2 0
 "teething problems" ?? no. teething problems are by nature not poor design
  • 2 0
 This is kind of funny to me because my 2012 reverb is one of the very few sram products I owned that never crapped on me. I just wish it would come back up faster (it's fully opened) but I can live with that.
  • 2 0
 @jmsxtreem: true story.
  • 2 0
 Exactly what I did. Was sick or rebuilding the reverb every 3 months. Snagged me a Fox transfer and love it.
  • 1 1
 Fall line 9.8 bud!
  • 43 9
 Reverbs, and many other dropper posts, fail because they are cleverly over engineered. It has air seals, oil seals, a floating piston between the chambers and a hydraulic lever. Its not a damn suspension component. Good engineering and design would produce a seatpost that appears simple in spite of all the hard work needed to develop it.
  • 13 4
 What?
  • 10 2
 Could not agree more
  • 14 1
 Will be interesting to see the e*13 post. No hydraulics, no air. Just a spring and mechanics
  • 31 7
 "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
Mikhail Kalashnikov.
He designed what is probably the most successful product of the 20th century even though it's purpose is horrific.
  • 29 6
 @conkers:Keep the conversation to Seatposts, Boris.
  • 4 0
 @conkers: Perfect illustration of a simplistic, utilitarian, solution to and often overly complex engineering problem.
  • 2 10
flag unrooted (Sep 24, 2016 at 18:35) (Below Threshold)
 @BadgerBacker: which problem? People you don't agree with?
  • 3 0
 @unrooted: Thanks PC Bro troll. It clearly says an engineering problem.
  • 3 2
 Hate to say it, but there is one post that is the exact opposite: Crank Brothers highline. Works like an office chair - which is quite ingenious if you think about it...
  • 8 0
 Gravity dropper figured this out 10+ years ago
  • 3 0
 @conkers yeah and he's famed for regretting it ever since.
  • 1 1
 It's called a Fox D.O.S.S.... bullet proof.
  • 2 1
 @TyranT21: It's funny how many are designed to be more than that. Spring is really all you need
  • 18 0
 "teething problems"...?

If I bring one of my company's products to market whilst it still exhibits "teething problems", I would be looking to replace myself as company director.
  • 11 0
 Funny, I seem to remember Pinkbike saying the Reverb was the best post out there for years... Had to find out for myself that it wasn't.
  • 1 0
 @skelldify: Its one of the worste. Just came out first and actually looked presentable and so bike companies specd it on every damn bike
  • 2 0
 @skelldify: It came out at a time when the competition was the Gravity Dropper and the Speedball/Joplin. Many are too vain to use the Gravity Dropper (and the joke's on them all) whilst the Joplin made the Reverb look like a Swiss Watch. But that was almost a decade ago, things change, except Gravity Droppers, which still work just like they always did and always will.
  • 2 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: mostly I agree with you. But a decade ago?? Come on! I remember will reading rave reviews of the reverb a year ago.
  • 16 1
 My Doss Dropper keeps on going. I have not done a thing to it. Not even added air after 3 years. Its got a funky lever, it is clunky and rattles a little. The stanchion is not Kashima coated but it always works. It always works...Thanks Fox!!!
  • 1 0
 yup, doss on my ht same experience. reverb on fs: acts like suspension post, creaky seat clamp, performance oscillations on different temperatures, completely frozen below +5 C, needs bleed few times a year...
  • 15 0
 After two reverbs, I decided to never ever in the million years to have one. What do I have? An ugly but Uber reliable Gravity Dropper Turbo LP. It is as reliable as it is ugly and I am living it!
  • 1 0
 I went KS, can do a strip and full rebuild in about 20 mins. The thing never needs bleeding. Why you'd chose such a complicated system with so many potential failure points is beyond me.

Oh, at that fugly lever / button thing
  • 1 0
 Funny though, because you'll hear tons of people swear that Reverbs are great, or complaining about incessant reliability issues with KS LEV posts. Those mixed reviews seem to apply to basically every post on the market, so it made choosing my dropper feel a lot like a lottery :s

I couldn't do internal routing, so was happy to find a discounted Thomson Elite on Chain Reaction and, fingers crossed, it's been flawless for a couple of months. The only grumble is the 2x compatible remote which really doesn't offer as comfortable a position as a shifter-style lever, or as much leverage
  • 12 0
 When can we get these new Pistons? My wife's reverb needs rebuilt after 2 months of riding because air keeps getting past that seal.
  • 5 0
 If it's a new post just send it to Sram. They replaced my 1.5 yo reverb for a new 2017 version within the week.
  • 1 0
 @ColinD: Yep! That's what it was with my post. Got my 2017-model in April. Works without any issue from that day on.
  • 10 0
 My office seat has infinite adjust that's been reliable for years. Haven't had to rebuild it once (lol)
  • 2 0
 I think your office chair's mechanism is also really heavy, like upwards of a kilogram. I think if dropper posts were that heavy they would be foolproof too ;-)
  • 15 0
 My office chair needs a rebuild after I rode it up and down the stairs for a season.
  • 13 4
 I have been coming across this articles before any one comments to often. I think I have a problem.
  • 7 1
 I drank the kool aid when they released the 170 and said the saggy post was a thing of the past. Mine drooped almost immediately. Now they revise it again?!

Reminds me of the Robin Williams skit...you cross this line you die. OK you cross this line you die. OK, you cross this line I hide you can't find me....or something to that effect.

Hey SRAM, you couldn't envision side loads or you just never bothered to test before using your customers as a test bed? Fortunately my 9.8 200 is in the mail en route to me. Bye bye SRAM
  • 6 0
 That 99.9999 number is total BS. I have a 3 months old latest model, and it too moves up and down. I'm apparently not alone, judging by comments here and elsewhere. B1, blue seals, blah, blah.
  • 6 0
 Simon says, the new blue piston will solve 99.999% of the problems with the Reverb!!!!!! Good to here that, when can I get the blue piston upgrade?
  • 1 0
 Yeah X2. And is it fully backwards compatible?
  • 6 1
 I know someone who has a B1 (2016/2017) version and it's already developed the same problems as the old one! Its only 3 months old. This is his 3rd reverb to fail 2xA2 and 1xB1 so is now looking at the fox transfer.
  • 3 0
 Same here, was a warranty replacement for a failed 2015 version. Had the new one 3 months and it did the springy thing after 2 weeks! Sent it back and got no.2 which worked fine for two rides but now is very slow and noisy going up and down. Thought it might be the old seat clamp being too tight but no, it does it loose too. Spoke to SRAM who said that's what they're like now! Strangely a good remote bleed will sort it for a ride or two, never had any air come out so I have no idea why that trick works! Will be looking for an alternative when it dies, probably Fox as the UK service centre is just down the road.
  • 3 0
 Same for me, got my 2014 reverb replaced under warranty just some months ago because it completely stuck (also got the "sagging mode" of 2-8mm right before). Have to say that until then it worked fine. Was super happy to get the new one with the blue sealing, had it like 4 months now and it does the sagging mode already again, complete bullshit! Im weighting 65 kg and I'm not hard with parts and paid 100% attention on not lifting the bike at the saddle...
  • 7 2
 Have a new reverb 170mm post. It has worked flawlessly. Feels better than my old one.
  • 1 0
 RS warranted my 2015 Reverb and sent me a brand new one. I've got about 500 miles on it. Flawless...so far
  • 1 0
 @bmfeascoaster: Meanwhile, I have rebuilt my 150mm stealth 3 times in 8 months. Lucky you!
  • 8 5
 I am always amazed at the smack talk on PB I have been using Reverbs for 4 years with zero problems. All the guys I ride with use them and only one has had to have his rebuilt and he breaks everything.
  • 5 3
 Five years, and my Reverb is fine.
  • 5 1
 Well, mine has been rebuilt 5 times in 2 years. The first 3 were under warranty, but the next 2 weren't, and now my post is squishy again. And most people I know with the Reverb have had the dreaded squish at least once. Funny thing is, I don't consider myself hard on gear for the most part. Most things I own last and last. I don't think the tolerances are very good on the Reverbs and there are a lot of duds out there. It's the least reliable thing I've ever owned in biking.
  • 3 0
 I think they tend to design products that require tight tolerances and don't do a good job getting them right the first or 4th time. So it is a numbers game, you got lucky. No one comes on the Internet to praise design, but many people who have problems will complain. seems like they should do the rebuild on the posts for free on the older designs that were flawed.
  • 3 1
 Down votes for stating a fact... You'd think you all would be happy for me.
  • 2 0
 My friend had an idea for his hardtail, a dropper seat with built in compliance for travel, think of the first 50mm as being the suspension of the seatpost, like a thud buster seatpost... Only better. Has anyone made something like this yet?
  • 4 0
 Yeah, buy a reverb
  • 3 1
 I thought this article was going to cover the fact the new design has not fixed the sagging problem. When are Rock Shox going to fix the issues with the new design? Mine failed with three weeks despite being careful to avoid lifting the bike by the saddle.
  • 2 0
 My Reverb b1 was replaced under warranty after 2 weeks due to it becoming 'squishy.' My warranty replacement is now 2 months old and is starting to feel the same. Looks like I'll be selling my next replacement to buy a transfer....
  • 5 0
 Not sure what kind of engineers they've got but I'd be embarrassed about this article if I were them.
  • 1 0
 The post was actually designed by work experience trainees from the local zoo
  • 2 1
 My rebuilt 2015 (purchased in 2016) started to pogo after 3 months. Sent out in and this one lasted 7 months.

Can i send this in for one with updated internals or what? It's just a run of the mill, out dated 125mm version so i don't buy that crap about it only being a problem on longer travel posts.
  • 3 2
 I'm sure they're amazing posts but as a counter point I've run my fox doss for nearly three years with no service, just the occasional new cable and outer. Good as new, really is literally the same as when it was new, worth no service. Love that, hope the transfer is as good
  • 1 0
 Just got the newer B1 version of the Reverb, but it seems to have an issue with the remote. After being used for a few mins (i.e. test ride around the block), a leak develops on the remote (from the actuator itself, not the hose connection). If I then do a bleed it feels super solid, but after being ridden & used for a few mins it will leak again. Any ideas?
  • 1 0
 Did you shorten the hose yourself?
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: I did trim I myself, yeah. It doesn't seem to be leaking from the hose/remote interface though. What were you thinking?
  • 1 0
 @rhysjenz: my guess it's leaking where the hose goes into the actuator. You might consider recutting and replacing the barb. That'll be cheaper than a new actuator.
  • 3 1
 My 2017 150mm reverb starting dropping after about 12 hours of use. Now, three months later, it falls a couple inches. Improvement my springy seat post butt. I'd really suggest people stay away from this post.
  • 2 1
 Still feeling the reverberations? Least SRAM are making the effort to resolve.. Droppers are still in their infancy still ..yes still, reliability will come through ingenuity or larger diameter frames to seat larger diameter seatpost's. Wise up
  • 2 0
 Or you could buy a Gravity Dropper and never worry about it again.
  • 1 0
 I had a first generation Reverb that lasted a season and a half and had a Stealth installed on my 2015 Troy when I bought it. The Stealth has been warrantied three times in less than two seasons. I have to say though, SRAM is really good about replacing them quickly through my LBS. As long as they keep replacing it, I can't get too pissed.
  • 3 0
 I own a 2017 reverb, and trust me, it's not any better, I have owned about 3 months, and have had to get it bled about once a month, or else it won't work
  • 2 0
 Rocking the fixed seat post since forever = 100% of the time riding compared to 100% of the time whining, bleeding and messing around with a dropper post not being able to ride.
  • 1 0
 My brand new 2017 170mm dropped that came on my Hightower started doing the "suspension bob" after about two weeks of riding. My LBS took the part number and are supposed to be shipping me a new one, but that was a few weeks ago and I still haven't seen one yet. Starting to annoy me riding it the way it is, hopefully the new one comes soon. This article claims you can't get air into the oil side with the new design, I think that's completely false from my experience with this thing.
  • 1 0
 I have one of the new B1 series 170mm reverbs and I can say that the new IFP has not solved the problem. It is sitting in my garage right now with about an inch of "suspension" in my seatpost. Also, who decided that the little metal barb holding the hose to the remote was a good idea? one good crash and it snaps right off every time leading to new barbs, new hose, and a bleed.
  • 5 4
 After having WAY too many issues I would never own one again. I'm not sure anybody in their right mind would purchase one aftermarket. I feel sorry for the buyers of completes who are stuck with them.
  • 7 2
 Complicated, hydraulic, overpriced...
Got a thomson covert for 100$ less, works flawlessly, build quyality is amazing.
  • 5 1
 Well....Im in my right mind and I have too after market ones that I bought. One is 4 years old now, has been on three bikes and still works flawlessly.
Of course I dont need to sit here defending them as only people on Pinkbike seem to have issues with them.
You enjoy the constant cable tension fettling of another brand Wink
  • 1 0
 @gnralized: you can get a reverb for $250...not exactly overpriced and doubt you can get a thomson for $150.
  • 1 0
 @Renovatio: sure you can get a gen 1 reverb (2014) not stealth 100mm for 250 bucks.
Try to find a gen 2 (2016 B1) under 450 bucks while fox transfer + remote is 330 and you can find a thomson covert for 400.
  • 3 0
 My KS Lev works fine after two years. My X-Fusion does too, though it has quirks. Why do I want a Sram?
  • 1 0
 Interesting! i'll try this out when i service mine. Whats the size of the o-ring you use?
  • 1 0
 Good stuff in there. Suggests that to reduce the possibility of creating a vacuum, Reverb owners should run their speed settings full fast and avoid slamming their posts down super hard and fast when they retract them.
  • 3 0
 Teething problems?!? Most babies have gotten a job by the time rockshox has come this far. Buy a fox or a thomson.
  • 1 0
 Doesn't the enduro collar do the same thing as limiting the travel? Or are you talking about limiting extension, not compression.
  • 3 1
 I think the problem is tall guys put their old posts on their wife's bike and the post is too long!
  • 3 0
 Limiting extension. I know I have sold quite a few small frame bikes with 125mm posts that are dropped to the collar and extend to far for the customer sitting on it to have a proper pedal stroke. A spacer inside the post would solve the issue of having to order a new 450+ dollar post and switching it out.
  • 4 0
 @unrooted: I wouldn't consider it a problem if my post was to long for my wife.
  • 1 1
 @Tonyster2: phrasing
  • 3 2
 Fun stuff. Hasn't kept my new reverb from failing after a weeks. But in contrast to LEV where the repair took months, SRAM replaced it within days. Thanks for that!
  • 3 4
 Aren't teething problems supposed to be solved before a product goes to market? Is this why their cassettes are so expensive? Is there a shipping container somewhere with 10,000 warrantied posts awaiting transformation into beer cans? It's a good thing brand loyalty/faith is so effective for reducing diversity.
  • 1 1
 3yrs later my Reverb is still going strong. It's yet to be opened up. Just flushed the hydraulic fluid out of the line once. My only real complaint is the remote is not very ergonomic.
  • 3 1
 Until rockshox figures out how to compete with the 9point8 Fall line, they will remain irrelevant.
  • 3 1
 Been using reverb for 4 years.
Had to service once and bleed (easy 10 min job) 2-3 times.

No issues. Brilliant bit of kit
  • 1 0
 What size of the 90A durometer in replace of the Ucup?

Big thanks
  • 2 0
 With all the rs seatposts for sale on here I'm thinking they are junk or why would so many people wanna ditch them
  • 1 1
 Received my 3rd warranty Reverb Stealth in July. Is there a way to tell if it's the new version by looking at exterior? Noticed it feels slower than my last one even after bleeding.
  • 3 1
 Great job figuring out that you needed an oil seal rather than an o ring to seal the oil.
  • 1 0
 Anyone like the concept of droppers but still waiting until dropper posts succeed the reliability of politicians before they drop £200 on one?
  • 1 0
 Reverb is not made for people with hands growing from their arse and with no knowledge about the product. You can screw it up if you don't know what ya doing.
  • 1 0
 @richardcunningham do you know when the reverbs with the blue piston became available?
  • 1 0
 They are in production now.
  • 2 1
 @RichardCunningham: I mean, have they been in production for a while? or just coming out?
  • 1 0
 @railin: Simon told me that the new pistons were installed in Reverbs beginning around December last year, but that there still may be a number of the stage-two piston Reverbs in circulation.
  • 5 2
 My advice: Fox Transfer
  • 3 3
 I've got a stealth model that came on my 2015 bike so I'm guessing its the "version two" but it still sag's about 25mm when I sit on it.
  • 2 2
 All I care about is whether this version still has that annoying play in it that mine and every other reverb I've ever felt seems to have....
  • 3 1
 @RichardCunningham, seriously, 'weather'....?
  • 1 0
 Looks cool and has all the fancy whistles but how reliable is it. My last Reverb I wanted to throw out.
  • 2 5
 I feel like I could design a decent dropper seat post if I put my mind to it. A big company should just be plowing cheap, and perfect ones out with all their knowledge, and expertise. Oh well.
  • 1 1
 that guys eyes stare right through you
  • 1 1
 It was awful nice of Legolas to give us the lowdown on the Reverb.
  • 1 1
 POS
  • 3 5
 and its broken
  • 2 4
 Lasted about as long as I suspected
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