Staff Rides: Henry Quinney's Transition Spire

Nov 18, 2022
by Henry Quinney  


STAFF RIDES

Henry Quinney's Transition Spire



Last year, at the 2021 summer field test we had some haywired and noisy e-bikes that I complained about, a very well-meaning GT, a Norco downhill bike with its enduro skates on, and a YT and We Are One that checked the boxes of direct-to-consumer and boutique respectively. However, it was a Transition Spire that, for me, won the day. It was the most well-rounded and high-performing enduro bike I'd ever ridden up until that point and it has become my go-to for just about everything.

Since then, I've ridden it on three continents and eight countries. After such high praise initially, I thought it was high time we checked back in and see if I'm still waxing lyrical about the wonders of an enduro bike with a head angle as low as 62.5-degrees, or if my enthusiasm had to start to relent and the love had turned sour.
Spire Details

• Intended use: mountain biking
• Travel: 170mm rear / 170mm fork
• Wheel size: 29"
• Frame construction: carbon fiber
• 63° head angle
• 480 mm reach and 446 mm stays in low
transitionbikes.com



Frame

Of the current bike setup, perhaps the only thing to stay the same is the frame and saddle. The paintwork of the bike is holding up reasonably well. It's not perfect but it is a very well-used bike at this point. Sadly, the culprit for most of the damage has been riding through gravel-strewn snow, but it's a mountain bike and these things happen.

So, is this still the BeSt bIkE EvEr?! Well, it's certainly my favourite. I think it's the most versatile enduro bike I've ridden, and that stretches across everything from seated climbs, scrambling for traction up wet tech, as well as being a very considered, confidence-inspiring and well-mannered descender. Everything about the geometry of this bike just makes you feel at home, and often takes the edge off intimidating features. And, let's be frank, that is what the monster 170 mm 29" wheeled enduro bike is for. I balk somewhat at bikes with that much travel that aren't confidence-inspiring in the extreme. In the trade-off on trail bikes, I understand that sometimes things might get a little skitter, but that shouldn't be a consideration when bikes in this category have this much travel, this much grip, and potentially weigh more than a downhill bike.

The geometry is comfortable for me, although I would be tempted at times to try it perhaps even a little bit shorter. At 183 cm I'm not wholly on the bandwagon for making bikes as long as possible. I'm starting to think that 480 or 485 mm is good for a large, but only if the weight distribution has been reigned in with long stays, such as the 446 mm rear end on the Spire.

This bike has taken a beating but is only really now showing signs of wear.

Although that rear-centre might seem extreme to some, I love the Spire's geometry because it's actually just so easy, and all the checks and balances are there. A high front lets your body move freely on steep terrain without being pulled forward. A steep seat tube and relatively short effective top tube means wrestling that long front centre through tight switchbacks becomes less about putting the front end in a choke hold, and more about lightly gesturing your intention through your shoulders. I actually run this bike in the high setting of the flip-chip. I felt that in low, which is a head angle of 62.5 degrees it didn't feel as if there was enough weight on the front through turns, and you could feel threaten to wash under braking load. I don't think 62.5 degrees is too slack, but rather in the larger picture of balance it was too slack for me and the way I ride.

Stability and balance are different things. Balance is a point where things are finely strung - stability is the ability to resist forces that might want to disrupt the balance. The Spire has both in buckets.

I love the Spire because it's a very well-made and well-thought-out extreme bike. If you listen to System of a Down, it might not be for you, but you can't deny how well-made it is. The Spire is Chop Suey, so well made, with so much care and thought that even its arresting aesthetic shouldn't put you off the functioning music and strong melodies. Even though the geometry sheet might raise eyebrows, it all adds up.

Water can collect at the base of the downtube underneath the shock bolt.

But, what's it been like to live with? Well, I changed the bearings after a year of riding as they began to develop play. The double-stacked bearings in the stay were the main culprit before they passed on the shimmy-and-rattle to the main pivot bearing. The bearings in the linkage were still running smooth, although I swapped them all the same.

A criticism of mine would be that the 5 mm interface on some of the alloy bolts is just a bit too soft. Another would be that water can pool around the lower shock bolt. But that's it. If I waved my magic wand I'd like to include some kind of storage compartment in the downtube. I would also like internal brake routing, however, I have managed to wrangle my rear brake inside the frame, although it ain't pretty.

So that's it then? The best bike ever? Well, for me, yeah - kinda. This is the best enduro bike I've ever ridden and it's my favourite bike I've ever had. That's not to say there aren't contenders in other categories, but for an enduro bike, and the things I ride and the way I like to ride them (read: badly) then yes - I love it still. Consider this bike check something like a retaking of vows after the review from last year.



The Ohlins fork works very well - although an in-house bolt-on Ohlins fender would be great.
The shock offers a great blend of support and tracking.

Suspension

Working with Pinkbike Racing this year, it quickly became apparent that the Ohlins suspension the team were using was very good, but also required a slightly different setup ethos than the Fox or RockShox setups the riders were coming off. To help my understanding I spent a few weeks in Morzine between races and just rode lap upon lap, got sunburnt, ate 7 soleros a day and slept in a luton van on a mattress with a peculiar large brown stain (apparently it was coffee but I don't know who drinks coffee in bed). I had two sponges - one labelled "ass" and the other "face" and a bucket. And that was that really.

During that time, I felt that I began to understand the quirks and personality of Ohlin's three-chamber system better. Essentially, in the fork there is a positive main chamber, a negative chamber and a ramp-up chamber. Now, the negative equalises from the main chamber pressure. You then pressurise the ramp-up chamber to fine-tune end stroke support. This system offers tunability, but also offers something of a paradox. To compress the chamber towards the end of the stroke, the main chamber has to reach a certain threshold of pressure equal to the ramp-up. That means that the harder you have the ramp-up chamber in comparison to the main, the later in the stroke it will come into play. So, to get appropriate midstroke support there is some finessing to do.

I still love the angular looks of the downtube and rocker.

Ride height is so important, especially on tracks like Fort William or Snowshoe where smoking a crankset is very easily done. That means that although bottom-out resistance is important, midstroke support is often the trump card. Ohlins recommend a ratio of 1:2 for the main chamber and ramp-up chamber pressures. However, I found that having the ramp-up at around 150 - 180% of the main chamber (depending on the track) with the main chamber pressure slightly higher to compensate, gave not only a superbly tracking fork but also huge benefits in support, ride height and confidence. Of course, my needs are very different to those of World Cup athletes, but this idea was something that we explored with Ben Cathro and Aimi Kenyon too and I think it had a positive effect.

For the RFX 38, I've never had a fork that is so happy to ride so deep into the stroke so often and offers so much composure on big hits. I remember watching Bruni's bike and always being surprised at how visually different his fork worked compared to his rivals. Well, maybe there is a different ethos here at play after all, and I've happened on a setup that trades off conserving head angle for more chassis stability. This isn't normally the way that I'd set up a fork, but then again, the Ohlins is a fork that I feel gives enough support to give me confidence when set up in this way.

I've personally never really been one that is convinced on the constant pursuit of small bump compliance as some kind of holy grail of setup of forks. In fact, for me, it's not really that important. I tend to run my forks harder than I perhaps should because of that and would rather put the emphasis on support and consistency than having something arbitrarily tracks over the odd pebble 3% better. However, the small bump on the Ohlins is very good, and a real positive trait that I've come to love.

A small moment from the year.

So, the RFX does feel different to most other forks on most of the other bikes - and it feels fantastic, I have to say. It's something similar to the shock. That said, the setup was far easier and less finicky than the fork. Contrary to my forks, I think that small bump tracking is a priority for me on the rear if only for the security and confidence it offers when trying to slow the bike down. For a large-shaft air shock, it's impressive to see it sagging under its own weight and, compared to the Super Deluxe on the bike previously, I would say it does offer a better all round level of traction, sensitivity and support on the Spire. The Super Deluxe was great, but I felt that to get the shaft speed where I wanted it I had to throttle out tracking over bumps slightly. It was still very good but perhaps didn't cover off all the bases quite as well. The final note would be that it's also relevant to the Spire - I can't say that the comparison would be replicated in the same way on a different bike. Horses for courses.



A 850 gram Hunt Trail Wide V2 on the front is matched with a burlier 31 mm width Hunt Enduro Wide V2 on the back
"Or else it gets the hose again!" I wash my bike a lot, and after a year or so with lots of riding, the front hub has begun to rumble slightly.

Tires / Wheels

I reviewed the Hunt Trail Wheels last winter and enjoyed the level of compliance they offered. Particularly how that felt through the hands. That said, I remarked at the time that I would like something a little laterally stiffer through the rear of the bike. Well, hey presto - we solved it. I began to run a heavier-duty, burlier and bigger axled Hunt Enduro Wide on the rear. The rim shares a similar profile but is a little wider, heavier and there are more spokes.

Largely though, they've been great. Both wheels worked out of dish over time, with the front migrating away from, and the rear towards, the drive side of the bike. Of course, that was easily remedied. After a year and-a-bit of abuse and washing, there is a steady rumble in the hubs, but consider that a fair timeline for a bearing swap.

Running the mixed wheels also has the added bonus of saving some weight, with the front wheel coming in a few hundred grams lighter than the Enduro Wide front.

I run the Continental Krypotal pairing on the bike, with a front and rear setup. I like them and feel at around 1200 g that they're about right for an enduro tire. That said, I would love to see a 1400ish-gram version available for downhill. I'm not saying it'd be for everyone but I think it would give another option.

The tires are both 2.4" and yes, they're very good. I think Conti has played a masterstroke by releasing a range covering all the bases in one fell swoop. Overnight they've gone from "Do you have a Sharpie I can borrow?" to non-Continental supported teams getting the itch of curiosity and asking how well the logos stay hidden behind paint-pen.



The Code RSC offers a lot of things that I want in a brake.
I run a 220 and 200 mm rotor pairing with metal pads.

Brakes

The SRAM Codes can sometimes come in for some slack for being underpowered - however, that isn't a complaint I'd level at then. Yes, of course they could be more powerful - what brake couldn't? - but I think any lack of power is easily remedied with a larger front rotor, and their HS2 rotors offer a more consistent feeling than ever. I did try going to TRP 2.3 mm thickness rotors and, although they cleared the caliper, I don't think the brakes liked them. I can't quite explain it, but I felt that it actually compromised the feel at the lever and inconsistency crept in. It felt like the lever throw wasn't enough to draw oil back into the master cylinder and give a positive and consistent feeling - it's something I haven't explored or understand fully, but I know that it was scary. It turns out SRAM engineers know far better than that smug man that makes oblique culture references on YouTube - who knew? That said, it doesn't necessarily make sense in regards to the quad seal in the caliper. Internet engineers, please tell me where I've gone wrong. Obi Wan, you're my only hope.

I like the Codes for their feel and adjustment. I like a brake that can be run close to the bar while also feeling positive. Plus, I want a brake and not a light switch. I particularly appreciate this modulation in the wet, or when the dirt is merely dust-on-crust and you're really pushing on the front as you mentally denture shop and prepare to have your teeth punched out by the ground. Having the most powerful breaks is good, but having useable power is the most important thing to me.




Drivetrain

How do you know somebody is a cycling journalist? Well, presumably they'll tell you without you even asking. Failing that, they'll almost always have Cane Creek eeWings cranks.

The cranks are, of course, beautiful. I do run the BB with only the lightest smearing of grease though as I felt they did accumulate grit and grime easily. I also run the silver 25-year anniversary Crankbrothers Mallet Es. It's funny, I'm lucky enough to see a lot of new tech and often don't get overexcited - however, there was just something about the silver Mallets that captured my imagination. I thought they looked just fantastic.

Say what you want about AXS, and I often have, but these things can take a beating.
"Yes, I review bikes for a living... Now watch me case this jump!"

After arguing with the Mikes about AXS at every turn, what is it doing on my bike? Well, I have a theory. I think that the robotic mech is simply too powerful for some bikes, and it twists the hanger slightly. I think that this is one of the reasons for the new interface that we're seeing on pros bikes. On some bikes, AXS works flawlessly, and I mean flawlessly, but on flimsy down country bikes held together by the odd 2mm diameter bolt, some bailing twine and a fair amount of hope, a lot of the time the shifting just isn't up to par. On enduro bikes such as this though, the shift is fantastic. Plus, the wireless functionality lets me run my brake line through its internal slot and compliments the clean look even more.

Realising I could run my brake inside the frame made me happy to an embarrassing extent.
AXS lets me be just a little bit sneaky with my brake hose.

The last piece is the KMC 12-speed bike chain, the Burgtec 32t chainring and the OneUp chain device. In 2022, you kind of just assume that everything works with everything, and it's a good reminder of how lucky we are that it almost always does. The chain sounds like an M2 Browning as it rattles over the chainring at even the slightest hint of moisture. If you use wet lube to try and negate this then the dirt also clings to the chain and, again, makes it sound like a spoon down a washboard. Another fun quirk is the long teeth of the chainring slightly protruding past the bash guard. Needless to say, they didn't last long. I don't like the word ecosystem when it comes to bikes. However, I do think there is something to be said for just running a complete setup. The SRAM chainring that came on the bike had slightly shorter teeth and stayed safely nestled under the protection of the bash. Plus, it was also silent.



THe OneUp seatpost is easy to adjust and has been reliable for me.
The Race Face Getta Grip grips have been great.


Contact Points

On the front of the bike, I run some mid-skinny Race Face grips. I like the shape and channelled texture. I don't always go for skinny grips, but these are absolutely on the money. I think there is a sweet spot for grip strength and grip diameter. Sometimes grip can feel very comfortable but it only takes a little bit of extra cushion to reduce how much force your fingers can pull with. The texture rides well in the wet and after being on multiple bikes for over a year I think they're holding up very well.

Shedding unnecessary weight - that's a true performance product.

The bars are OneUp's carbon bar. I just like the shape. The bar is paired to OneUp's 50mm stem length. I felt it just calmed down the front a little to have a longer stem, which is 10 mm longer than the stock one. Plus, I liked the slightly longer distance from the saddle when seated.

I also changed the 180mm OneUp post to the 210mm one, before shimming it down to 200mm. The saddle is the same stock one that came on the bike. I run a Garmin because I'm a nerd desperately seeking to find meaning in the world and staring at how many meters I've climbed, before having to explain what this even means as I talk about it to friends and family, is one way to do that.

For accessories, I sometimes cable tie a small pump to the Nukeproof Carbon bottle cage. The cage itself is a lesson in humility itself. When my last cage started dropping bottles while riding in Morzine, my friend and I went to a bike shop. The only options on the wall were versions of the same cage that was proving itself incapable of holding a bottle, $5 metal ones and this $40ish dollar carbon wonder. I deliberated, tempted by the sheer indulgence of that raw carbon, and I was eventually goaded by my friend to spend a not-inconsiderable amount on a cage as a treat. Needless to say, the tab at the top snapped off immediately on the first day. Funnily though, it still works and makes entry even easier and available from both sides.

My bars are 775mm width.



How's It Ride?

Absolutely-bloody-wonderful.


240 Comments

  • 379 2
 cant wait to see this bike on next weeks group ride!!
  • 352 1
 See you there. Just need to rebuild a wheel in the car park. Hope that's okay.
  • 73 1
 I'll be 5 minutes late
  • 72 1
 Can someone bring a spare tube that I will carry and probably never give back?
  • 71 1
 Leaving* now, be there in 15 minutes!

* installing my new hitch rack
  • 11 1
 @henryquinney: I hope that's after you ask your friend to bleed your brakes for you, in the car park...
  • 26 1
 *shows up complaining about the same “weird knocking sound” that they’ve been complaining about on the last 3 rides…

Unsubscribe
  • 29 0
 @locaroka: Got some new CushCore to install before we set off....that cool?
  • 5 3
 @henryquinney: actually spit my tea out reading this.
  • 15 1
 @henryquinney: Not enough love for that Chop Suey metaphor. You nailed it.
  • 4 1
 Guy showed up last night with a broken derailleur. (He broke it on the last ride and forgot to fix it.). "Hey is it cool if I borrow a bike?"
  • 3 0
 @henryquinney: RRP can take care of your bolt on fender needs .
  • 3 1
 @henryquinney: I may rock up too, I'll bring a picnic blanket, I like to be comfy when consuming energy gels.
  • 1 0
 Hey guys I see you're on your bikes about to roll hold on I have to take a dump (brings newspaper into forest)
  • 87 3
 Such a lonely looking bike
  • 14 24
flag barp (Nov 18, 2022 at 9:10) (Below Threshold)
 Well, he does hate group rides.
  • 40 2
 @barp: Yup you definitely spotted the joke!
  • 11 6
 @skiandmtbdirtbag: Actually I thought "lonely" was a typo for "lovely" and I made my own joke about it.
  • 52 0
 That is one of the rear brake routings of all time
  • 24 1
 That's the BS Brits and Aussies have had to deal with for the last 5 years. Let's just say I've been enjoying people complaining about headset routing. It's tough when the industry forces you to run janky shit eh?
  • 1 10
flag 50percentsure (Nov 18, 2022 at 10:53) (Below Threshold)
 Worst...or greatest. Either way yes. Still a lower typo to word ratio than Henry's article.
  • 7 2
 @50percentsure: in Henry ‘s case it’s no typo. It’s British English Smile
  • 7 2
 @EnduroManiac: hear me out on this… Bringlish
  • 23 1
 @EnduroManiac: otherwise known as:
English
  • 3 1
 @louiefriesen: Facepalm
  • 7 0
 @louiefriesen: England: English
Canadia: Canglish or Crench
USA: US-English
Ireland: Irish
Scotland: Scottish
Australia: Australian
Austria: Germaneese

There. Enough learnings for today.
  • 2 0
 @megatryn: pal, apparently you know nothing about Austria. Marille, mit Aprikose kannsch di glei schleichen!
  • 1 1
 @sorrymissjackson: Wooo(sh)! I am for reeeeaaal!
  • 24 1
 Internally routed rear brake hose!? What fresh hell is this? Do you hear that pounding at the Outside office door, @henryquinney? That's the comment section hordes coming to tear that brake hose straight through the carbon frame, waterboard you with a DOT 5.1 soaked rag, and then lash you by the ankles with that brake hose to the back of Levys Mini before parading you around Squamish like some modern day cowboys.
  • 25 0
 But don't ride it with your friends
  • 120 0
 Working on the perilous assumption that I indeed have any after that article.
  • 26 0
 @henryquinney: I related to that article so much that you're someone I would actually consider riding with.
  • 62 0
 @i-like-toytles: Ha - I think two people that don't like group rides actually work well. I think the basis for many great friendships is holding a dislike for the same things.
  • 27 0
 @henryquinney: Yep. I have one riding buddy. We don't stop pedaling. We don't talk unless it's necessary. We spend our alone time in our shops making sure our bikes are in tip-top shape for the trail. It's a beautiful anti-person relationship.
  • 2 0
 @henryquinney: You know how I know you're British?
  • 7 0
 @henryquinney: its cool I didn't wanna ride with ya anyway cuz I don't like waiting at the top of the climb AND the bottom of the descent.

In all seriousness, if I worked in the industry as a journo, I'd probly really value my solo ride time as well. Never the less, shit talkin with ur pals is a lot of fun! Backyard racing even more so. So, uh, see ya at the bottom, sucker.
  • 3 0
 @henryquinney: Henry get back on flats - stop faking it!
  • 1 0
 Lucky for us Henrys a lone wolf. All his love for the spire comes out in his writing instead of over an after ride beer with his mates.
  • 1 0
 @Speeder01: Comes with the assumption that Henry or anyone cares who is first. Lots of people do. I personally could not give a toss. You first? Good for you, I am here to enjoy myself, not to compete with randos or even my mates, first is not a part of my equation
  • 1 0
 @i-like-toytles: misanthropy is the best thropy
  • 21 0
 • Intended use: mountain biking
  • 7 0
 Yea I never made it past that intended use. What the hell kind of category is “mountain biking”? I looked it up, and now I’m even more confused..
  • 4 0
 I love that.
  • 18 1
 I find my spire to be a lively trail bike.
And a bomber big mountain sled.
And a comfortable all day climber.
Which is weird.
Sometimes I forget it’s 170 till I need it to be.
Than I’m glad it is.
  • 18 5
 These bikes have the thinnest and shittiest layer of paint on them. My patrol frame was shocking, then it cracked. Crazy for the amount of money that is charged for one of these carbon frames.
  • 24 1
 Raw alloy can't stop winning
  • 6 0
 @wburnes: yep, back on alloy now and will never look back. Also rip me for those downvotes, I think I hit a nerve Wink
  • 4 0
 @wburnes: I have just today completed the transition of all my bikes to aluminum and steel. No going back.
  • 1 0
 @Davebob: except for the alignment issue they had, which was eating shocks.
  • 3 0
 @wburnes: I don't understand people willing to spend big on carbon when manufacturers refuse to warranty rock strikes. The amount of carbon bikes with cracked downtubes is insane. Carbon is fine for the road and gravel set but it doesn't belong anywhere near a mountain bike imo.
  • 1 0
 @WestwardHo: I've been ring carbon mountainbikes for almost 25 years and never broke one. Broke 2 aluminum frames.
  • 1 0
 @WestwardHo: that should be "15" years not 25.
  • 12 0
 transition spire; yes

group rides on a transition spire; forget about it
  • 8 0
 I rented one from from the Transition HQ in Bellingham and was pretty blown away. For insanely capable it was SUCH a fun poppy bike. I unfortunately don't have the local terrain to justify it in Central Oregon. It would be awesome if TR released a 130/150 bike, an updated Smuggler if you will with the same DNA as the Spire.
  • 10 0
 It’s coming. 29er version of the current scout
  • 1 0
 @norcalbike: ohhhh very exciting! I've been waiting for that for awhile.
  • 1 1
 Get a Following or an Offering. Had a Following and you can have to a of fun on Phil’s/Mrazek but still enough for Wanoga.

Hell even can hit up Bach alright. Just get a Push 11/6 and it would be amazing.

Just got a V3 Wreckoning with a Push and it is an amazing bike.
  • 1 0
 @norcalbike: that thread is awesome! I’m gonna talk to my LBS about a preorder. I wonder what the HA will be is my only question.
  • 2 0
 @briceps: I’d guess like 64 or 64.5. Should be interesting to see.
  • 1 0
 I switched from a Spur to a Rascal last year because I wanted something just a hair burlier than the the 120/120 on the Spur. I do love my Rascal, a lot, but the idea of a new 130/140 Smuggler has my undivided attention for 2023.
  • 5 0
 I’m absolutely loving my Spire. I went from an XL Sentinel to a L Spire after a few conversations with the folks over at HQ and couldn’t be happier with my decision. At first I wasn’t sold, I felt as though my Sentinel with a Zeb could’ve done the trick but after riding some proper rowdy trails, you can do no wrong on this bike. The confidence it’s gives you is borderline spooky.
  • 1 0
 How tall are you if you don't mind me asking? I normally ride XLs at 6'3 but I'm thinking about a L spire with a 50mm stem instead.
  • 2 0
 @otbdb: I’m also 6’3 and don’t feel like the cockpit is crammed. 50mm stem is the call for sure. Most of the Transition employees are on Spires and all the ones I talked to did the same.
  • 6 1
 @otbdb: I did the opposite, at 6'3" I went from a large to an XL and love it so much. I'm way more comfortable and oddly much quicker in corners because I'm able to stay better centered in the bike.
  • 1 0
 @oceanforsurf: Man that's tempting. On a 510mm reach bike right now but feel like 490-500 would be a much sweeter spot.

@BiNARYBiKE: Well f*ck, there goes my assurance
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: On a Spire?
  • 1 0
 @otbdb: I’d default to advice from Transition. I did demo both and agree with @BiNARYBiKE on the cornering but far more advantages with the L for me and my riding style. And the trails up in Bham.
  • 2 0
 @schwaaa31: yes, on a spire.
  • 5 0
 This bike is a true enigma to me. I raced XC in the 90s on bikes that weighed mid 20s. I raced DH in the 00s on bikes that weighed in the 40s. On paper the Spire is a big unwieldy machine but somehow it just does not feel like that. It climbs, pops and charges. I've cleaned technical climbs I never have before, and it's as fast downhill as my old DH bikes. Probably faster if I were still capable. I did an uplift day recently at Bikepark Wales and pedalled back up for an 11th run at the end of the day. It shouldn't do that! Only issue I've had was tight uphill switchbacks where the length and slackness don't help. But I'm more concerned about getting back down quickly so I'm fine with that. Coming from a 2016 Patrol I love it. Big rides, family rides, uplift days, local rides. Big fan!
  • 5 0
 I've been loving Henry’s commentary & contrarian views since he arrived on PB staff and gotta say - whether he’s wrecking your view of group rides (not a fan) or regaling the Spire, co-hosting the PBR podcast w/ Cathro or bantering w/ The Mikes on the main PB Podcast - homeboy has a lot to say, says it in a way few in the US can muster, and has the funniest f*cking way to say it among PB staff.

Thanks @henryquinney. Two excellent if not totally encompassing articles in under a week… did you goto another mushroom party again or is this just a streak ?
  • 3 0
 Have you been on the Firebird? If so I would be curious to hear your thoughts on the Spire vs Firebird. They seem to be polar opposites in the 170mm category but reviewers says they are both precise and surprisingly nimble bikes. I've heard great things about both bikes and I am waiting to demo both and decide.
  • 7 0
 Sadly I have not ridden the Firebird. Beautiful bike though.
  • 2 0
 i have ridden the spire and the firebird (and the chilcotin a tiny bit).
I'm not a reviewer, and i'm not a pro. I find the bikes don't feel all that different in practice. They all pedal pretty great (a tad less good on the chicoltin unless you lock out). They all are great going down, jumping, etc. They all have a few little different things that aren't all that important. They all feel smaller than they really are and they're all really light for what you get. I'm honestly not sure which of the 3 is my favorite.
  • 3 0
 @henryquinney I had a lot of trouble with the shock hardware loosening up (every other ride) and eventually, transition gave me a whole new front triangle. The new frame rocks is perfect and makes me smile. The bike makes me a far better rider than I actually am.
Thiss the best bike I have ever owned by a long shot end the numbers don't feel nearly as radical as they would seem; this bike is spot on. The only gripe is that the long wheelbase can be a bit to handle in tight, climbing situations, but really not a lot to complain about. Also, transition customer service is killer, although I am a bellingham local Smile far better than dealing with Konas warranty dept...ugh.
  • 1 0
 What hardware specifically?
  • 2 0
 I went from carbon rims to those Hunt wheels and it was the best decision. They helped settle the bike down through rocks and made the suspension feel a bit softer off the top (re: less jarring). They're probably more maintenance in the long run, but in the year and a half I rode, them, I never had a single issue.

And they're half the price.
  • 1 0
 It’s really hard for me to justify more expensive wheels but it’s just being on the table
  • 3 0
 *with hunt being available

Autocorrect did a doozy on me. I guess I should read before submitting
  • 2 0
 Enjoyed the read. Was intrigued by your findings on the Ohlins suspension. I have a DSD Runt on my Fox fork and while DSD also recommend a 2:1 ratio for the secondary positive air spring I found the best balance around 1.7:1. Maybe I'm not crazy.

Did you try the MegNeg on the Super Deluxe? I have a bike with similar kinematics and found that the added midstroke support matched the supportive fork well.
  • 2 0
 Have a Runt in my Lyrik and also run a similar ratio in the two positive chambers.
  • 2 0
 It's possible with thicker rotors and new pads, there isn't enough clearance to achieve proper lever throw, until the pads wear enough to allow full range of movement. It should only be 0.15mm of wear, so isn't going to lose you a significant amount of pad life in the long run. Once you have lost that 0.15mm of pad material each side, theres no real way the caliper can tell the difference between a thicker rotor and a standard one.
  • 1 0
 Also @henryquinney - who's "that smug man that makes oblique culture references on YouTube"? I'm intrigued. He sounds interesting!
  • 1 0
 @steviestokes: Waki has a youtube channel now? I miss him round here, his comments were always interesting if nothing else
  • 2 0
 @gabriel-mission9: Oh no, wait - I was referring to myself.

Agree with your sentiments in regards to lever throw - however, when bleeding the system, the pads would still have to pump out to meet the 2.3 rotors, which I found strange. I'm operating on the assumption that if the quad seal's range is uninhibited then that would be enough for the lever? But yeah, quite odd.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: Ahh I see. Went straight over my head that one, haha Frown

Re: the rotor thing, that is super interesting that it felt different even though you had to pump the pads out to the rotor. As you say, this means there is plenty of room for the pads to retract etc.
I still maintain there's no way the calliper can tell the difference between .3mm of extra thickness on the rotor, and .3mm extra thickness on the pads (and wearing the pads that much doesn't change lever feel, so neither should a thicker rotor). Currently I can't explain why the lever feel would be different. Something else must have changed.

Could you describe in more detail how the lever feel changed? Sorry to press you, but I'm a massive geek and these things really interest me.
  • 3 0
 Why was I expecting Henry to have shimano head to toe on the bike? I'm also surprised he is not riding a nukeproof or something British.
  • 5 0
 Ha - Sram came on the bike and I just ended up leaving it on and upgrading bits at a time. That said, the matchmaker system is a small but not inconsiderate reason why I don't mix Sram/Shimano more often on my own bikes. One of the other is good, but with Sram brakes and Shimano drivetrian it can just look messy.
  • 6 0
 @henryquinney: I run Sram brakes with Shimano drivetrain using the problem solvers matchmaker adapter. Works great, looks clean
  • 35 1
 @p2rida: Ahh - you're clearly one of those proactive people that solve and not just comment upon problems. Regrettably, I am not.
  • 2 0
 @henryquinney: yeah, I would stick to one or the other, no mixing and matching. Well done on the build mate, it's beautiful!
  • 6 2
 @henryquinney: Here is the fix: Shimano drivetrain (Cassette, Chain, Chainring) with SRAM AXS derailleur and shifter. Works beautifully - all of the benefits of robot shifting cache and Hyperglide+ shifts under load, plus matchmaker for Code brakes.

I've done it on my enduro rig and it works flawlessly. I even had a bent hangar during a day at the park and I was able to use the AXS indexing to ensure that my most important cogs would continue working to finish out the day.
  • 3 4
 @henryquinney: SRAM cassette and Shimano for the rest! Shimano cassettes are a piece off crap compared to SRAM one´s,I hate the way shimano cassette gets all scratched and lost the black paint in the big sprokects.
I have a brake hack: ShiHope brakes,Shimano lever of your choice and Hope RX4 caliper,it would work with a regular E4 caliper but you need to swap the seals. Lovely brake feeling,light to the touch and close to bars with little death travel. 0 problems,it had been flawless for 3 months in my Enduro and almost 6 month in my dirt jump bike.
  • 5 0
 @KJP1230: Fix for what? His got a X01 groupset with a set of codes, ohlins front and back and a set of e wings. It’s as good as it gets. Anything he does to that thing would be a downgrade.
  • 3 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Shimano hyperglide+ shifting is no joke. My previous bike had Sram X01 Eagle, so I've had the chance to do a head-to-head. If I were forced (i.e. they were not compatible) to pick between Sram's fancy AXS system or Shimano's HG+, I would pick the shimano drivetrain.

Fortunately, I don't have to make that choice. You can have both. Smile
  • 1 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Digging deeper, I'd take issue with the "as good as it gets". Personally, I really like my Codes, but Trickstuff Maxima's are undoubtedly better. Similarly, Ohlins suspension looks really interesting - but compared to EXT? I've known a person who went from Push 11-6 to the EXT Storia and essentially said that it was a significant improvement.
  • 2 0
 @2pi: Didn't know about those ones - nice! Thank you
  • 1 0
 @p2rida: Welcome !
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: I was never able to really feel this magic that is supposedly the shimano hyperglide + shifting. It all felt the same to me as SRAM. Went to an AXS mix (Garburuk cassette, Shimano chain, AXS derailleur) so my shit is all over the place.
  • 4 2
 @KJP1230: hyperglide 2 is just shimano doing what it always does… Making a big song and dance about something they should have always have done… including shift ramps that go up and down the cassette, something sram cassettes have featured since the 1X era which I why you could shift down under power without kneeing your stem with srams 10,11 and 12 speed groupsets. Shimano only included it so their cassettes worked with ebike motors. It’s a lot closer to srams shifting now except they still use cheap stamped cassettes that are chewed up within a year while I’ve still got the same x01 cassettes from 2017 that’s only just worn through it’s coating. I’ve worn out a XT, SLX and GX cassette in the same time. But yeah about as good as it gets without going super high end bespoke. Haha
  • 4 8
flag skimtb1 (Nov 18, 2022 at 15:28) (Below Threshold)
 @henryquinney:

Friends don't let friends ride Sram brakes.
  • 2 1
 @KJP1230: exactly. Why no reviewer ever talks about this surprises me. Hell, you can min-max and pair it with a Deore cassette and an XT chain and have possibly the best shifting transmission ever for not ridiculous money.
  • 3 0
 @Ososmash: same i dont find the newest shimano to shift better even under load than the sram stuff.i also dont shift while smashing the pedals cuz that's neither needed or smart. I honestly like both just as much, they're both fine. I'd just get whatever is cheaper at a given time or keep whats on the bike. I mostly run an original XX1 and its also great. However, I personally don't see the appeal of AXS, heavier, batteries.
  • 1 0
 @p1nkbike: AXS is "fun". The shifts are nice and I personally like the shifter ergonomics. I broke my thumb over a decade ago and occasionally a normal shifter will make it ache.

But, it's just one more battery to charge
  • 1 0
 That's a nice looking bike. I have to admit I'm a little sad that the Knolly from the pictures in the group ride article isn't your bike because I love the colors on it. I think you convinced me that I need to try an Ohlins. I have one in my wish list alongside a fox 38, but I may as well go ahead and take the plunge and hope for the best. We'll see what Christmas brings.
  • 2 0
 I too used to watch videos of Finn and Bruni and wonder how their suspension could possibly be working so well. As the proud owner of an RXF38 (formerly also an RXF36 m2), I can say Ohlins has something special going on.
  • 1 0
 This bikes speaks to me, but I'm still not sure if it's too enduo for me. I don't spend a tonne of times on janky steeps (don't even really like that stuff) but I like speed, ride fairly rocky trails and appreciate being able to land jumps poorly. I also spend the summer riding black diamonds at Silverstar, but spend most of the season doing 500+ meter technical-ish climbs to get to my downs. Maybe something is lost in translation. Thoughts @henryquinney ?
  • 7 0
 Yeah, I mean, the Spire can do all of that but I wouldn't say it's a silver bullet to all of mountain biking. For instance, in Squamish, I would perhaps enjoy a bike with a little less travel. However, for most of my riding most of the time it's great. I think the slack front and long rear centre do give a bike that can be ridden fast whilst not feeling sketchy. I'm currently in Chile, and the trails are kind of similar to the ones you describe (massive climb, massive descent, rocky, fast but not that steep). It feels great out here - and a lot of it is just smashing rocky chunder at mac 10.
  • 3 0
 It all depends on your priorities! I am in a similar boat to you, and I built up a rather heavy, 170/170 enduro bike. My thought: its a confidence inspiring rocket ship anytime I'm descending, and more than capable for the odd park day. As for the climbs...well....I'm here for the extra exercise and additional calorie burn. More guilt-free parking lot beers! Smile
  • 1 0
 I love it. I do huge climbs every ride and no it's not a mountain goat but it's fine and descends so well. I had a chance to drop back to a shorter travel bike for a really good price and in the end I turned it down to stay with the spire.
  • 2 0
 It’s not that much of a weight penalty on the way up, the GX, carbon model, with WAO’s and full fat CushCore, one up tool/pump comes in at 33 lbs. that’s a DH capable, enduro fast, long travel bike. It’s much more playful than I imagined, more so than my Sentinel. For some reason when I’m out riding it, I feel like going further, and exploring more, looking for steeper, and junkier stuff to ride down. I am a fan of full, sphincter puckering steep jank, and this bike has made the difficult, easy. Mellower trails are, well, mellow, but any sort of side hit, no matter how off-camber, or flat the landing, hit it as hard as you like. It’s a good thing it’s a relatively comfy place to sit and spin, cause that’s what you’ll do, it does not inspire out of seat sprints, or make you want to attack any sort of climb, but it’ll get there, you’ll just be a bit more gassed from spinning the stubby cranks and 30T ring. The guys at Chainline in Kelowna are great, and really helpful, if you see me bumblefrigging around the woods, say hi, and take it for a pedal…..
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: My Ripmo AF is well over 33lbs. Probably is a bit more efficient of a pedaller, but I'm almost never out of the saddle so I'm feelin your vibe. Smoother tires do more for me than frame weight anyway. If you've ever done stone free in Kal, you know my situation! haha. I'll keep an eye out for yah!
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: the Spire is not your weapon for riding up stone free…..well, it would be a sit and spin your legs out affair for sure.
The Sentinel on the other hand, that would be a more appropriate choice. Longer, slacker, and more stable than your Ripmo on Fraidy cat and 36. I struggle frigged my way up there last spring, just after getting Covid, what a climb, and spicy decent, loved it.
I don’t seem to jive with most DW dual link bikes, but they feel may faster on the climbs for sure
  • 1 0
 Nice write-up. What you say there in the frame paragraph is EXACTLY the same for me with the Scout (changed to 65° HA) and its all-mountain intentions. It seems all companies are only talking about versatility, while Transition builds it in right from the get-go. They know their stuff !
  • 1 0
 I've ridden with a fam member who has a Spire - an absolute smasher. After we've ridden a trail worthy of dislodging my fillings, he's hardly noticed. Very capable and well-built machine.

Transition was my #2 recommendation after Norco, but they didn't have stock.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney did you find the bike quieter with internal routed rear brake line? Also, with AXS to your advantage, I wonder if you could remove external securement points for the brake line, cleaning it up further and hitting with touch-up paint? Has this been done before? Thanks
  • 1 0
 Ha - I'm not bold enough to commit to AXS forever... yet! I would say it's reasonably quiet, but not the quietest bike.

There was a time when I had a GX AXS mech with a floppy clutch and the play in the rear end and I was genuinely embarrassed to ride it with friends (lol) as they would hear it over their own bikes. Now though, it seems about right. The VHS rubber stay protector help too.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: Great solution when I move to AXS - will give it a whirl indeed. In the meantime I'll ensure frame well protected under brake line while external, or I'll be forced to keep that way to hide line rub.
Cheers!
  • 1 0
 Henry, you’ve got me looking for a spire to buy, despite the fact I very much do not need another bike!

Tires wise, assuming you’re running the enduro compound front and rear? I want to give them a go but not sure to mix a trail front with enduro rear for the weight saving?
  • 4 0
 Thanks Henny. Was planning on buying one. More "This is what I am riding" articles please.
  • 1 0
 I bought my Spire after reading the bike test, Love it, it's done Megavalanche, Ardrock, UK bike parks and general riding and smashed it all. My only gripe is the paint is a bit thin and the water/filth that collects under the rear shock bolt
  • 4 4
 Back end better than an Enduro? Wow, it must be something special, because the Enduro is something special.

I really wanted a Tranny back in the days of the TR250 but since then, not really. Should I change my mind now I know this is the current BBE?
  • 5 0
 I think the Enduro is perhaps more neutral and is just another flavour of good. I would that it squats less under braking, which may or may not be to your taste. However, I like that about the Spire and on steep trails it feels like it keeps my weight lower and behind the BB. It just feels deeper and plusher then the Enduro - which, again, may or may not be a good thing depending on the person and place.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: Funny, I never thought the rear of my Spire was more plush than my 2020 Enduro. Seemed to transmit more (alloy version however). More balanced, most definitely. I also wish they had a reach that was in the 490-495 range, so I've ended up with an XL at 6ft and either a 35 or 40 stem, depending what I'm doing with it. Ever try the low mode?
  • 2 0
 @ghill28: Interesting. I know that Matt found the original shock hard to get in the right place when he tested it during field test. He then tried an X2 and it improved. Different shocks and riding styles will of course play their part. I would say that I definitely don't drive the bike as Matt (shock horror) and am probably slightly more passive so need a little less mid-stroke. In fact, we often run similar pressures in our test bikes even though I'm several kilo's heavier - that could be one reason for it, or at least a start to understanding it.

I totally get it on the reach front. Would be kinda cool if single crown forks with 1 1/8 steers made a comeback so we could make the most out of the adjustment options of the 1.5 headtube.
  • 2 0
 @henryquinney: Agree. I looked at the reach adjustment headsets, which I think would get you 5mm or 6mm swing. But you'd also lose the internal bottom cup and change the HA/A2C. When you map it out, the axle would stay in the exact same place, reach would decrease and stack would increase.

Perhaps we need....another headtube standard?
  • 2 0
 I sold my Enduro frame (S4) after I got my Spire frame (XL) and switched over the parts. Spire climbs better and has more comfortable cockpit because of the steeper seat angle. Descending, it's at least on par with Enduro or maybe even slightly better. More fun in bike parks, though, because more poppy and jumps better. Both bikes with a Fox 38 with 180 mm travel and X2.
  • 1 0
 @roQer: Same here, but I had an S4 and an S5 Enduro at different points. Climbs better (except for being a ridiculously heavy frame) but the geo is better for seated climbing. Descending on it is miles better because of the longer rear end and slacker HA. Was always running 170mm forks though. After trying 3 or 4 different forks and shocks, have settled on 2023 RockShox coil rear and 170 Zeb with a Cascade link in the low mode. That setup doesn't want to slow down for anything. It's kind of nuts.
  • 1 0
 @ghill28:
I bought before looking then realized my mistake. Anyone want to buy a reach adjust headset for a Spire?
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney:
Hi Henry

Could U advise over stock rear shock

Does air shock smooth enough over square rocks & roots or it chatter?

Did U tried that with RS coil deluxe ?

I would really appreciate info on that
Cheers
Rafal
  • 4 0
 RF Getta Grip, not Half Nelson
  • 4 0
 So you are. Thanks. I'll amend that now.
  • 2 0
 Didn't read the article but is this a good bike? Will I be faster than all my buddies on all the group rides? And does it have external cable housing?
  • 4 0
 3 second penalty for a single use of "breaks" instead of "brakes".
  • 2 0
 "The SRAM Codes can sometimes come in for some slack for being underpowered - however, that isn't a complaint I'd LEVEL at them."

Nice. Like what you did there.
  • 1 0
 Hi Henry

Could U advise over stock rear shock

Does air shock smooth enough over square rocks & roots or it chatter?

Did U tried that with RS coil deluxe ?

I would really appreciate info on that
Cheers
Rafal
  • 1 0
 While I agree, internal brake routing or even the option of internal brake routing is my preference, shouldn’t you, Henry, a world-cup mechanic, be the target market for external brake routing???
  • 2 2
 I love my Sentinel too. I'm glad to see you bring up how soft the metal is in some of the rea pivot hardware. Stripping one of those out was basically the first thing I did after getting mine!
  • 1 0
 What hardware did you upgrade and what did you use?
  • 2 0
 Super interesting your take on the Ohlins setup...Ive found them to be hard to setup...would love a better guide from them.
  • 2 0
 @wolftwenty1 Same experience here. My shock was defective and sent back for a replacement. Both the new shock and the fork never felt that good to me and were sold. Glad it works for some people though.
  • 2 1
 @zerort: I find the TTX to have an almost 'over damped' feel and I can't seem to get the rebound slow enough. lol.
  • 1 0
 @wolftwenty1: I lightened the compression tune and slowed the rebound tune on my TTX and it is phenomenal now
Much better useable range on the clickers
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Even Dan Roberts review had the rebound slow as it goes and compression firm as possible which made me laugh as I landed on those settings before I read it. You sent it to them and had them change the tune?
  • 1 0
 @wolftwenty1: I had them do it when they put the shock together for me
Ended up with with C30 compression tune and R60 Rebound tune

I’m also on a shorter travel bike so that’s why the rebound tune is so slow. thats quite a slow rebound tune but I feel you need it when you have a shorter travel bike otherwise the HS rebound overcomes the LS and you just have a pogo shock
  • 2 0
 @wolftwenty1: yeesh. under-damped compression and over-damped rebound is a hell of a combo
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: what spring are you running?
  • 1 0
 @gabriel-mission9: 605 but because I’m 190 LB and on a very progressive bike
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Ah yeah, in that case an R60 makes total sense
  • 1 0
 Glad to see I'm not the only one with a noisy burgtec chainring, even with different chains, it was hella noisy as soon as dirt/mud got on the teeths
  • 1 0
 I had the same experience with the TRP 2.3 rotors with Code RSCs… something about it was odd and I went back to Galfer Rotors and it’s been a much better time with em!
  • 4 1
 Bike looks great, what kinda kickstand are you running?
  • 3 0
 Henry Quinney, the David Attenborough of mountain bikes.
  • 2 0
 Excellent wordsmanship and article. Some interesting points that have increased my awareness and inspired thought.
  • 1 0
 The best part on that rig is the titanium cranks. However it would be a big bummer if they changed the BB standard and turn them into a paper weight. lol.
  • 3 0
 That anvl saddle has to be the worst saddle I’ve ever sat on.
  • 3 0
 Unpopular opinion: this looks better than my Norco Truax.
  • 1 2
 Im surprised The normal Shimano brake fanboys are not in here having a melt down.

Modulation over "cool for 10 year olds doing skids" brakes.

as a heavier rider(210lbs) Brakes like Codes, TRP etc are always a better option for me, they remove much more speed more quickly, I have XT's on a new bike and heavy braking they keep locking up, theres no middle ground, lighter on the lever it doesnt slow me at all so....
  • 2 0
 Modern enduro bikes. Definitely the glory days of "one bike to do it all" versatility. Good article.
  • 2 0
 @henryquinney rides a Transition Spire? I had no idea. I wonder if he likes it?
  • 1 0
 No mention of how much it weighs? What tire pressure you're running? Geometry numbers besides head angle?
  • 6 0
 It all just varies so much. I'm actually on some test wheels currently and don't have the ones in the photos. It weighs around 15 kg - ish.

Tyre pressures, again, vary. Anything from 21 - 24 in the front and 24 - 27 in the rear.

I run it in the high setting - the full chart will be with Transition (I'll add this detail now). You may notice that I actually have the saddle neutral-to-rearward on the rails just to get a more balanced feeling and a few more mil of effective top tube.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: 33 lbs is very impressive for a Spire, even a carbon one. My co-worker's alloy Spire is 39 lbs with almost a stock build.
  • 1 0
 My medium carbon Spire GX build, with WAO’s, full fat CushCore EXO+ Tires, OneUp tool and pump, is 33lbs.
My old Alloy Sentinel with the same build, was 38.5 lbs
  • 1 0
 Yeah another point in favor of this bike its relatively light for a Transition and for a 170 bike.
Transition claims 3450 kg with Fox X2 shock in medium, giving us an approximate bare frame weight of 2950g.
This compares favorably with 2850g for a Ransom 910, and 2500g for a Ransom 900, or 3700g (!) for a non s-works Enduro frame.
  • 3 0
 @seraph: Just tossed mine on the scale. Large, carbon GX build, stock except for Assegais and Rimpact Pro V1 for both wheels (exo+ front, 120tpi DD rear), cascade link, edc tool and pump, 210mm OneUp post, ridewrap and an SQ labs saddle.

Weight is 36.7 lbs with pedals. 33 lbs is for sure impressive, sounds difficult to hit without compromising on ride quality or spending a ton.
  • 1 0
 @samsq: wasn’t difficult at all, that’s just what it is
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: maybe my bike is overbuilt then lol. Do you know what your bike's weight is to a tenth of a pound? Am trying to sus out where the weight difference is in the components.
  • 1 0
 @samsq: 33.02lbs
22 Carbon Spire, medium, GX build.
WAO Unions, full fat CushCore, DHF EXO up front, Dissector EXO rear

18 Sentinel, Alloy, same build, EXO+ tires, 37.8lbs

19 Knolly Fugitive ST, Fox X2, 36 Grip 2, I9 Hydras with Enduro 305, XT build, 35.6ls

20 Sight, A3, GX build, Yari, SD rear shock, WTB wheels, with EXO+ DHF/DHR. 36.64lbs

Realistically the weights aren’t that much of a big deal, I thought the Sentinel and Sight climbed better than any of them. Might be that I had more time on them to find my ideal setup.
The SA of the Spire makes the 460mm reach seem smaller than I thought. Usually I’m a bang on medium, for my taste anyway, and am willing to bet the Large would feel comfortable as well
  • 1 0
 Loved every bit of this read. Is there a reason one would route the brake in the same side entrance point? Just looks?
  • 1 0
 Aesthetics, I would never do it, because I love taking the brake entirely off the bike and putting it on my workbench to bleed.
  • 1 0
 Is this the field test bike? did Transition just let you keep it? (im assuming you paid industry pricing or something)
  • 2 0
 lol... it has AXS. I can't wait till ya post up your Slopestyle bike Smile
  • 2 0
 Needs handguards. I'm sure there's a set floating around the office....
  • 2 0
 So this is the Spire we have all been hearing about
  • 2 0
 Does the bike hate group rides too!?
  • 2 0
 Come on man! What type of valve caps are you rocking?
  • 2 0
 But how does it compare to the Transition Spur?
  • 1 0
 Haven’t ridden the Spire yet but the Spur is an awesome bike.
  • 1 0
 The Spur is a short travel downcountry bike. The Spire is a long travel enduro bike. My guess is that they ride very differently.
  • 2 1
 Linkage bolts are not fit for purpose. They’re unacceptably soft. Please address this Transition.
  • 1 0
 I'm impressed you are on the horrible stock saddle. Get an SQ Lab and never look back...
  • 1 0
 Why shim the seatpost for less travel? Didn't have the insertion depth or just don't like squatting up and down >200mm?
  • 2 0
 Insertion. For me at least, the large Spire carbon only has enough insertion to slam a 180 OneUp. I have 50mm of post showing, but the 210 is 60mm longer overall so I'd need to shim to 200.
  • 1 1
 Bearing change after one year on a Transition barely gets a second look from the PB comment section LOL. If that were a Yeti it would be “Ferrari maintenance”!
  • 1 0
 Unfortunately I misread sponges as spoons somehow. I was confused for a moment.
  • 1 0
 Great article. Love the thoughtful detail- hope Pinkbike does more articles like this.
  • 1 0
 I thought it had some kind of sweet gradient space pattern on the frame from the first picture. It doesn't. As you were.
  • 1 0
 You won't find a better looking bike if you ask me, Scout there as well.
  • 1 0
 Can you route the rear brake hose like that on a stumpjumper evo?
  • 2 0
 What a beauty
  • 1 1
 I'd take this over that 40lb Acoustic bike any day of the week. Great build.
  • 1 0
 "Spur Details"....pretty gnarly Spur Razz
  • 3 0
 Ha - I copied Kaz's template and botched it. Cheers
  • 1 0
 I think there is a typo in description, spur is @mikekazimer bike!
  • 1 0
 Love my RF ghetta grips so much i got a spare set..lol
  • 1 0
 They are my favorite grips ever too
  • 1 0
 Great read...looking forward to your next article.
  • 1 0
 when does it put the lotion on?
  • 1 0
 This is truly a bike we can all aspire to.
  • 1 0
 What are you running for your BB and Headset.
  • 1 1
 Most Brits colour code their cables and calipers, not Henry, he matches his frame colour to his garden rockery light, nice.
  • 1 0
 Henry, show us how you ride on it Smile
  • 1 0
 The Waffle Wagon. Tip of the hat to you laddie she’s a fine ride indeed.
  • 1 0
 Understand not the forum...but no Friday Fails?
  • 1 0
 Looks awesome!! The suspension seems to be real nice
  • 1 0
 Amazing… but where does he store his soapbox?
  • 1 0
 Can’t go wrong buying a tranny.
  • 1 0
 Some example how beauty is riding, next time some video?
  • 1 0
 HQ, no inserts with the Contis?
  • 1 0
 Natural, or synthetic sponges... and how did you label them?
  • 1 0
 Reference to Legendary moto journalist... Henny Ray Abrams.
  • 1 2
 The Bontrager stem is a bit random. Just trying a different length from the parts bin?
  • 3 0
 That's a OneUp stem.
  • 2 0
 Wat? It's a OneUp
  • 2 0
 @coffeepoop42069: in barp's defense it is really confusing because the "one" logo does contain three of the letters also found in the word "bontrager".
  • 1 0
 @i-like-toytles: Haha, to my eyes the "ONE" with dirt flecks on it actually said "LINE" which is a model of stem from Bontrager.
  • 2 0
 @barp: haha I can see that now. I used to have one of those.
  • 1 1
 My bars are 775mm, too! Any wider or narrower is just wrong, right, Henry?
  • 1 1
 SHOW-OFF!!! XD #WhoAskedForThis
  • 1 0
 Sick bike
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