Staff Rides: Mike Kazimer's Transition Spur

Nov 3, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  
Transition Spur Kazimer


STAFF RIDES

Mike Kazimer's Transition Spur



Despite the fact that I spend a good chunk of each year riding and reviewing longer travel enduro bikes, I still have a soft spot for short-travel machines. Maybe it has to do with the fact that my formative years were spent as an aspiring XC racer on the East Coast – I still haven’t lost my lust for long rides, especially ones that contain plenty of technical, awkward trails.

That’s where the Transition Spur comes in. Earlier this year I decided to build up a fresh whippersnapper for myself, something that was light, fast, and above all, fun. I didn’t have any set goals in mind for the build, but the final result turned out better than 14-year-old me could have ever imagined.

Spur Details

• Intended use: mountain biking
• Travel: 120mm rear / 120mm fork
• Wheel size: 29"
• Frame construction: carbon fiber
• 66° head angle, 435mm chainstays
• Weight: 26.5 lb / 12 kg (size L without pedals)
transitionbikes.com


Transition Spur Kazimer

Frame

The Transition Spur has 120mm of travel that's paired with thoroughly modern geometry numbers. The 480mm reach for a size large is a good match for my 5’11” height, and the 435mm chainstays keep things quick in the corners. I tend to prefer longer chainstays on enduro bikes, but for a bike like this it’s nice to have a little extra zippiness for tighter, slower speed trails.

When it comes to frame details, the ability to carry a full size water bottle inside the front triangle is a must for me, especially on a bike that’ll be used for lots of all-day adventures. The Spur also has mounts on the underside of the downtube, but I haven’t made use of those at all – playing giardia roulette isn’t my idea of a good time.

A Syncros IS accessory mount is attached to the two bolts on the underside of the top tube, and it’s loaded up with a 26” tube. Why 26”? It’s lighter, and it takes up a lot less space. Plus, it’ll stretch enough to work in an emergency, just in case I’m not able to fix a flat with tire plugs.

The Spur’s cable routing is internal, except for the brake line, which runs entirely on the outside of the frame. Henry Quinney and Matt Beer may not agree with me, but I’m a big fan of this design. It makes it much easier to swap out brakes without needing to remove the line from the brake lever. I typically end up testing at least a couple different sets of brakes a year, so the easier it is for me to install and remove them the better.


Transition Spur Kazimer
A 120mm Fox 34 GRIP2.
Transition Spur Kazimer
The pint-sized SIDLux packs a punch - I've been impressed with this tiny shock's ability to handle long, rough descents without acting up.

Suspension

Suspension from two different companies? Oh, the humanity. I’ve never been too fussed about mixing brands – I care more about performance than labels, and in this case a RockShox SIDLuxe and a Fox 34 Grip2 take care of the Spur’s 120mm of travel.

I ran the 34 in its stock 140mm configuration for a handful of rides until the 120mm air spring showed up, but in this case more travel and a slacker head angle didn’t create the ride I was looking for. The 120 / 120mmm setup feels much more balanced, and realistically the Spur isn’t the bike to try and turn into a mini-enduro bike – there are other bikes that are better suited for that type of project.

My fork settings for my 160lb weight are as follows. Air pressure: 87 psi. SC: 5, LSC: 12, LSR: 8, and HSR: 5 (all clicks from closed). In the SidLuxe shock I’m running 160psi which results in 27% sag.

I took off most of the stickers from the 34, since the orange Fox logo was clashing with the other colors I had going on. That’s the same reason the red sag indicator o-ring on the SID isn’t there anymore. I’ll replace it with a black one eventually, or at least that’s what I keep telling myself.


Transition Spur Kazimer
DT Swiss 350 hubs are laced to Roval carbon rims.
Transition Spur Kazimer
Specialized Ground Control tires in a 2.35" width front and rear.

Tires / Wheels

Roval’s Control Carbon wheels weigh in at 1473 grams, which is a very reasonable weight considering what they’re able to withstand. They have a nice ride feel too, one that strikes a good balance between comfort and stiffness.

As for tires, I’ve mainly been using Specialized’s updated Ground Control tires, the tan-walled Soil Searching Grid T7 version for that little extra bit of ‘90s flair. They're reasonably light at 880 grams, with a tread pattern and compound that works well in most conditions. As I wrote in my review, “they offer a great balance of traction vs. rolling speed, with a level of handling predictability that's not always present in this type of tire.”

Now that the fall rains have arrived with a vengeance, I’ll likely put a Specialized Butcher or something similar on the front to gain a little more traction in the mud and slop.


Transition Spur Kazimer
Little bikes need to stop too - SRAM"s Code brakes help keep things under control.


Brakes

I like taking little bikes where they might not necessarily belong, and good brakes make that much easier to accomplish. SRAM’s G2 or Level brakes are a much more common sight on downcountry and trail bikes, but given that the Codes are only 40 grams or so heavier per wheel, it was easy to decide which model to go with. I’ll pick more power and a better lever feel over saving a few grams any day. I’m running metallic pads, since they work much, much better than the organic ones in the wet.

I’ve been very happy with SRAM’s new HS2 rotors – the revised shape and extra thickness makes a noticeable difference compared to the previous version.

Transition Spur Kazimer
No batteries for me - SRAM's X01 Eagle 12-speed drivetrain is controlled the old-fashioned way.
Transition Spur Kazimer
Cane Creek's eeWing titanium cranks in a rainbow finish as a nod to the '90s purple and blue anodizing craze.


Drivetrain

At one point this bike had a SRAM AXS wireless drivetrain on it, but I’ve since gone back to a tried-and-true cable actuated drivetrain. The electronic stuff works well, it’s just that I don’t want to need to worry if my battery is charged before heading out for a ride. I know, it’s not that big of a deal, except that I have enough trouble keeping my phone charged – the last thing I need is more USB cables and chargers to keep track of. I’ve also found that the AXS derailleurs are noisier than their analog counterparts – the clutch doesn’t seems as strong, and they have more chainslap noise as a result.

Why SRAM and not Shimano? In this case there isn’t any particular reason - I’d consider myself relatively drivetrain agnostic these days, since I’m able to get along just fine with options from either of the big S-brands. Although that rainbow cassette and chain does go nicely with those colorful titanium Cane Creek eeWing cranks...

Transition Spur Kazimer
Shimano XTR pedals.
Transition Spur Kazimer
Specialized Power Pro Mimic saddle. No chamois necessary.


Contact Points

When it comes to grips, ODI's Elite Flow lock-ons are some of my favorites. They're nice and thin, with just enough texture to provide traction on rainy days or for use without gloves, and a soft rubber compound for extra comfort.

Speaking of comfort, Specialized's Power Pro Mimic saddle does the trick for me. Its short length keeps it from getting in the way on the descents, and there's padding in all the right place to prevent any discomfort or numbness. That saddle is mounted to a 170mm Fox Transfer dropper post. I tried out a 200mm post for a handful of rides, but that ended up feeling like too much drop for this particular bike – I have plenty of room to move around on the descents with the 170mm post.

Shimano XTR SPD pedals are the final contact point. If someone asked me, I'd actually recommend the XT version over the XTR, since they work just as well, cost less, and in my experience have better long term durability. The dust seal on this particular set of pedals has a tendency to slide away from the pedal body, but other than that they're still spinning smoothly. I've rebuilt and adjusted them a couple of times over the last few seasons, a simple procedure that only takes a few minutes.

I'm running a 40mm Truvativ Descendant stem and a 40mm rise Enve M7 carbon handlebar. A high-rise bar may not be the most typical setup for a downcountry-ish bike, but I chose it because it allowed me to have a similar position to what I'm used to on trail and enduro bikes. My days of being hunched over and stretched out are long gone, and with the 40mm rise it's even easier to imagine that I'm on an overgrown dirt jumper.


Transition Spur Kazimer

How's It Ride?

So far the Spur has met and exceeded all of my expectations. It's the bike I grab when I want to knock out a bunch of fast miles, or to explore little-used trails that require a bunch of climbing to access. It may not be the absolute lightest or stiffest bike in this category, but its level of all-round capability consistently puts a smile on my face. It's been an excellent palate cleanser, a bike I can hop on and instantly feel quick, thanks in part to the faster rolling tires and the fact that it weighs nearly 10 pounds less than a burly enduro bike.

Call it a downcountry bike, a short-travel trail bike, or an aggressive XC bike, at the end of the day this Spur is all about having a good time, no matter which way the trail points.








380 Comments

  • 387 4
 Intended use: mountain biking

Accurate
  • 41 1
 got to clarify just in case @notoutsideceo jumps into the comments talking about gravel bikes
  • 56 0
 Is that like upduro or some-mountain?
  • 20 1
 @SATN-XC: whether he will or not, I think it will be a spur of the moment decision.
  • 16 3
 Do brands pay for their bikes to be ridden by Pinkbike correspondents and editors? Would be worth disclosing that if so - otherwise it reads like Mike chose this bike above all bikes in the land...
  • 137 0
 @shredddr, nope, brands don't pay for their bikes to be ridden by tech editors. The presenters (Christina Chappetta and Tom Bradshaw) are sponsored, and you'll see the 'sponsored' tag on articles about their bikes and equipment.

So yes, I chose this bike above all the bikes in the land. Although I'm also lucky enough to have multiple bikes to test out every year.
  • 30 0
 @mikekazimer: Did you choose SRAM brakes over all brakes in the land ?
  • 89 6
 @schlayer, I did. I prefer the modulation and consistency over Shimano's offerings. Although I've been really impressed by the Hayes Dominions - I'd happily run those on my personal bike.
  • 91 9
 @SATN-XC: Thanks boys. But just to be clear, I ride the eGravel Lefty Topstone in the mountains! Check my profile of a recent ride I did here in Boulder!

Be safe be well,
Incognito Robin
  • 16 1
 @notoutsideceo: You, sir, are a genius
  • 60 1
 @mikekazimer: We're just glad to see any content in narrative form, as the flood of outsourced videos on PB was creating some concern on my part that Outside had sacked the actual writers. Those of us who grab our PB time when we're supposed to be working need words, not video.
  • 17 8
 @mikekazimer: Ah, modulation - that thing people keep telling me about. I keep trying brakes those people rave about offering lots of modulation - only to find that at >220#, modulation is sort of a higher order need only to become relevant after power has been taken care of. Which is why even on my trail bike (140/134, 66 degree HTA) I prefer my old Shimano Zees over anything SRAM or TRP I've tried so far. Bonus - no need to worry about DOT fluid in my garage...
  • 9 1
 @mikekazimer: curious if you've tried magura and what you think about them. I finding them to be my favorites hands down
  • 3 0
 @g-42: absolutely love trp dhr evos for all the same reasons
  • 3 0
 @meSSican: I’m right there with you. I’ve been running Magura for 4 years and I’m very happy with them.

But TBF I haven’t run codes, Hayes dominion, TRP, hope, or formula cura 4 - which have all gotten plenty of praise too.
  • 5 0
 @g-42: At a similar weight I find the Zee’s to be very good. Only after trying the Hayes Dominion brakes have I found something far better! Cheers
  • 3 0
 @meSSican: maguras are sooo good but servicing them sucks
  • 8 0
 @codypup: >>THIS

I’m glad I’m not the only one. I’ve been turning to the podcast for opinion and editorial views. The RC podcasts are just so good.

Every once and a while PB drops some interesting articles/ opinion pieces (Seb’s recent article about long vs short travel comes to mind, especially in the context of Spur as go-to staff ride…)

I have been turning to a certain other PNW mountain biking site for actual articles about mountain biking.
[The site that just hired Mike Ferrentino.]
PB is my go to for bike reviews and comments- but I do hope their talented team of writers can pump out a bit more narrative in the coming years.
  • 2 0
 @nowaybro: I've had pretty awesome luck with them. I also find them super easy to bleed. I did a youtube video on our channel on the bleeding process I use.. I can do a quick bleed with syringe and fluid on a new set. Mineral oil is nice to work with.
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: The better question is do they pay even close to retail for bikes and parts. I'm guessing they're just about comped.
Not that they shouldn't be. It's a perk of the job.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: what about magura, trickstuff?
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: ...and what is the stiffest bike in. this category according to your views?
  • 1 0
 @meSSican: Maguras are nice, very light, very powerful, thick rotors come stock, nice lever feel on the MT7 and MT Trail.
But the master cylinders and levers are fragile, a consequence of being so light. Hamfistedness when bleeding or installing can screw them up easily.
In an emergency you can swap in a Shimano lever and the brake is still quite good.
  • 2 3
 @mikekazimer: Yes this is a nice all round bike, but cost, or lack of it will have some influence on choosing a bike & given that you are advertising this bike, means that you got some deal on it?
May not be sponsored, but still the first step in being able to get that!
  • 6 0
 @mikekazimer: +1 on Dominions. Flawless...
  • 2 0
 @meSSican: have maguras on one bike and really enjoy them, recently put the hayes dominion a4 on another bike and they are just flat out better
  • 3 0
 @sbh071: +1,000

Dominion are the best brakes I've ever used. I have yet to meet someone who gives them a shot and still goes with something else
  • 2 0
 @Swangarten: I concur with you. Got these and think, they're the best upgrade I have ever made on my bike. I'm not going back to another brand for a while..
  • 4 1
 @aljoburr: This is dumb. He is a well known industry writer and could probably get any bike at employee cost, making it a non-issue.
  • 2 0
 NO Chamois... Ya Barbarian....

and also, now you need to mullet, over fork and angle set it. Smile
  • 1 0
 @codypup: no doubt!!!!
  • 123 3
 Pretty fancy bike for somebody who's just an assistant.
  • 2 51
flag extratalldirtrider (Nov 3, 2021 at 12:19) (Below Threshold)
 Uh, really?
  • 80 0
 At least he’s not a unpaid intern anymore. He’s really moving up in the company!
  • 62 0
 Removes the Red O-Ring on the shock for aesthetic purposes, yet adds a water cage with a red stripe that would match the aforementioned Red O-Ring...
  • 70 1
 Don't worry, I've got an all-black bottle cage waiting to get installed. That red will be gone soon.
  • 12 55
flag Jo-rides (Nov 3, 2021 at 14:17) (Below Threshold)
 @mikekazimer: There was a recent pole on climate change vs bikes, no offense, we all do it, but this color thing really is a cancer for the environment
  • 9 36
flag BenTheSwabian (Nov 3, 2021 at 17:38) (Below Threshold)
 Imagine saying you're concerned with aesthetics, but then also building up a bike with external brake routing.
  • 24 0
 @BenTheSwabian: call me a creep bit I actually prefer external, I’ve seen behind the curtain now and only think off dark times I’ve had running cables through frames whenever I see internal cable routing. Seeing external cable routing makes me feel instantly more chilled out and an all round nicer person even if it’s not even my bike.
  • 13 0
 @thenotoriousmic: ur a creep.
  • 6 0
 @mikekazimer: I'm running a Tubolito Tube for that purpose. Safes a ton of weight with no downside except: it's orange! Haha! Btw, great bike check!
  • 3 1
 Why not run a Fidlock bottle @mikekazimer ?
  • 2 0
 Great for the all black bottle cage - but then surely Mike will then fill it with a spnsor correct Pinkbike branded red logoed bottle?
If you described the Kashima, skinwall, and brown logo bike to me, I would have said hideous, but seeing the photos it really works on this bike.
  • 3 1
 @thenotoriousmic : I totally agree. It's so much more practical than internally routed cables. And it can even be done looking kinda neat. That being said, the way Transition routes the brake cable is just ugly. Completely ruins the clean aesthetics of their frames.
  • 5 1
 @thenotoriousmic: I much prefer internally routed as I don’t change brakes or hoses very often
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: but they’d match your silly Velcro shoes!
  • 35 3
 Pushes through the pack like a tough guy through the crowd at a Hatebreed show at the Wallingford American Legion hall. Smooth as the ice in the first quarter of a Hartford Wolfpack game. Almost as long a wheelbase as the blue trail system (not that kind of blue trail). I'm running out of 2000s Connecticut stuff. A top tube to seat stay silhouette as flat as the coastal plain (max elevation ~460 ft at Bear Mountain)
  • 28 2
 Ha, toss a ska reference in there and you've pretty much nailed my high school years. I spent so many evenings in VFW and American Legion halls, and at the El n Gee club. I left in 2000, so it was the Hartford Whalers all the way for me.
  • 5 0
 The greatest Hatebreed shows were at the CT Bike Exchange.
  • 6 0
 @mikekazimer:

Sgt. Scagnetti or Spring Heeled Jack?
  • 11 0
 @AckshunW, got to go with The Incognitos - Glastonbury represent.
  • 9 0
 Victory Records was on fire in the 90s!
  • 3 0
 As sweet as kate moss at Miller's pond. (not that Kate Moss)
  • 4 0
 @kylext: RIP CT’s. Some good skaters came through there.
  • 3 0
 And some bad skaters, like me! @analog7:
  • 3 0
 "Smooth as the ice in the first quarter of a Hartford Wolfpack game"

Is there a joke I'm missing here?
  • 2 0
 NO WAY OUT! @mikekazimer:
  • 3 0
 Prime Miller's Pond time in the late-2000s and Trumbull in full swing... Ah back when Millers was so fresh and so new.
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: Please tell me someone remembers Nigel 6
  • 2 0
 Ha, grew up in Hebron Ct.!
  • 4 0
 "The bike showed the confidence you'd need to order at Pepe's Pizza when it's at max capacity. And the swagger to handle the Case Mountain rock gardens like a full skank at the final BiG MiSTAKE show."
  • 25 0
 More of this please.
  • 16 0
 ..."The Spur isn’t the bike to try and turn into a mini-enduro bike – there are other bikes that are better suited for that type of project" ... Which ones for example? (asking for a dwnctry friend...)
  • 44 0
 Norco Optic. That’s a mini enduro bike.
  • 21 1
 Santa Cruz Tallboy
  • 8 5
 Coiled and over stroked and over forked Tallboy V4
  • 6 10
flag blackthorne (Nov 3, 2021 at 13:17) (Below Threshold)
 One would be a 2021 stumpjumper. I overforked mine to a 160mm rock shox zeb and now it’s a 28lb nimble beast. Could easily get it one down to sub 27 with fancier parts.
  • 3 1
 Gonna try it on my Forbidden Druid with a cascade link, shall report bank.
  • 13 3
 @stormracing: also known as a Santa Cruz Hightower Wink
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Isn’t the V4 the current version that won’t actually take a coil shock?
  • 6 2
 My choice would be a Ripley AF.
  • 1 0
 @Fullsend2-13: Hightower can’t fit coil and also doesn’t have chainstay adjustment which sucks for someone tall looking for good balance in a bike. That’s why I think that route on a Tallboy is better. At least for what I want in a bike
  • 2 0
 @FuzzyL: Tallboy V4 can fit Ohlins TTX22, Fox DHX2, DVO, And Cane Creek. That’s what I know so far.
EXT Storia does technically fit but it’ll rub under load. It’s diameter is larger and eats up the clearance
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: good to know! Strange that the Tallboy can but the Hightower can't.
  • 2 0
 @Randmhero87: “If ever there was a gravity riders’ XC bike, the Tallboy is it”
  • 2 0
 @Fullsend2-13: yeah it’s pretty strange that’s for sure but I won’t complain. Can turn the Tallboy into a pretty insanely capable short travel bike
  • 6 2
 Mini enduro? Trance x 29
  • 5 2
 Evil Following V3 w/ Push rear 140 front. I've got it, it's sweet.
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: That really is great to hear. Are we talking Tallboy Aluminium, or Carbon, (or even both)?
  • 5 1
 @Randmhero87: can confirm, the Tallboy is a beast with a 140mm fork and big tires.
  • 11 0
 Banshee Phantom
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: I can only confirm with Carbon
  • 16 1
 Banshee Spitfire
  • 6 1
 @joose:agreed. The Spitfire is f*cking awesome.
  • 4 8
flag americandentalassociation (Nov 3, 2021 at 16:41) (Below Threshold)
 SB115
  • 10 0
 @americandentalassociation: that’s like the least mini enduro “Downcountry” bike right now haha.
  • 1 0
 Vitus Escarpe. It even shares its frame (and weight) with an enduro bike...
  • 5 0
 Norco Optic would be your best choice.
  • 2 0
 @stormracing: I did all but the coil- Tallboy with Fox36 140mm and Cascade link. The frame handles these changes really well. There are plenty of folks out there running the coil- I think the frame has around 20% progression stock, and about 30% with the cascade link. I also did the long-stroke thing with a dpx2, but personally I preferred the feel of the cascade link. (More supportive mid-stroke and pop)
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: we will be looking for you on friday fails.
  • 4 0
 @FuzzyL: just let the ripely do the work for you
  • 4 0
 @jason475: @joose: The Banshee is definitely more of a mini enduro bike as it sits, IMHO. Not really a "downcountry" bike that you will turn into a mini enduro. Not at all in the same class as the Spur. Definitely an awesome bike though. I own both the Spur and the Spitfire and they compliment one another nicely for the riding I do.
  • 3 0
 @hardtailhowie: I actually found the AF version of the Ripley very forgiving for a 120mm travel frame. Ok, the one I tried was slightly over-forked with 140mm travel, bringing down the head angle to 65 degrees… felt confidence-inspiring enough for me.

I sure fail often enough so, but usually not on the big features, at 50 I find I only try those anymore when I’m very very sure I’ll make it, so don’t think I’ll feature in the Friday selection anytime soon.
  • 2 2
 Commencal meta tr 29
  • 2 0
 @MillerReid: seconding this. Found myself slogging a ‘19 Patrol around (mostly Galbraith) wondering “why am I doing this?” Replaced it with a Optic, put some proper rubber on, and never looked back. It’s a surprisingly capable short travel bike.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: from a guy who owns both rides I shall redact my recommendation…though I still have a sweet spot for the spitfire Smile
  • 17 1
 Whats the point of trail brakes anymore? People are just putting big brakes on ever style of bike
  • 16 1
 People are riding way faster than what was normal for a short travel bike years ago. I weigh 170lbs soaking wet and I immediately took off my G2 ultimate for Code RSC within the first week…
  • 25 0
 Probably one of the biggest weight to benefit ratios on a bike.
  • 5 1
 If you aren't worried about cost or weight, why not put bigger brakes on it?
  • 3 0
 at some point, your tires can't keep up with your brakes. if you are running fast rolling, low grip tires for speed, then you may not need burly brakes. of course, tires are easy to change, and brakes are not, so I prefer to err on the burly side.
  • 6 1
 Why not? Weight difference between 180 and a 200 is hardly anything but super noticeable at the lever. Doesn’t make sense to use little rotors.
  • 1 0
 totally agree! I really don't see a need for brakes like the G2s anymore. Unless your on a super light XC race bike, I don't see a reason to go with a brake that has less power than codes, especially since the weight difference between something like a G2 and a code is so small
  • 3 0
 I'd rather say that XC brakes have become obsolete. Trail brakes are on XC bikes now and big brakes on every other type of bike. Plus, Sram have shot themselves in the foot by making their micro-4-piston trail brake too heavy for XC and too weak for everything else.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: There’s still the dirt roadie XC market. Not all XC is World Cup style.
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: That market is being eaten alive by Gravel bikes.
  • 1 0
 I have zee's on my trail bike. What's the point of getting a "trail oriented" brake when you can have ultimate stoppage power with burlier breaks? The weight savings is insignificant enough to make a difference unless you are maybe on an XC bike and not bombing downhill
  • 11 1
 Interesting take on the AXS. I just installed the AXS GX, and I have been pretty impressed so far. I don't find it to be any noisier than any normal rear mech that I used up till now. . Its pretty impressive how smooth it shifts. Don't notice any more or less chain slap. As for the battery life, I have been riding a shit ton with it, and its a little above half charged. Super easy to install and set up also. I really thought I would be yanking it off and selling it, but I am pretty happy with it, and would go so far as to say its worth it. At least the GX kit. I think Sram nailed this one.
  • 7 0
 I kind of found the AXS to have less chain slap and the clutch stronger than the cabled version
  • 2 0
 @stormracing: same same. I ran X01 and XX1 AXS on my last two bikes, and X01 AXS on my current ride. Never had any major noise or chain slap issues. One theory I have is that the rear shock setup and suspension curve might have something to do with the chain slap they're getting.
  • 3 0
 @stormracing: I get more chain slap with AXS. I thought maybe I was crazy at first because I definitely noticed more but it seems pretty common thing.
  • 3 0
 @MillerReid: stiffer clutch may be the demise if that little motor so maybe sram reduced it's spring force
  • 1 0
 I’m in for more AXS chain slap… XX1 and GX same noise. Mechanical much quieter… just can’t find any mechanical for sale.
  • 2 0
 Same here. I put an AXS me derailleur n shifter on my Druid, and I was needing to fiddle about with tuning conventional gears before every ride. No longer! I think high pivot bikes might be more affected by chain growth and consequent derailleur performance. AXS seems to solve this issue.
  • 1 0
 @MillerReid: same here with my x01. Loud af but I’ll keep it until it dies, I like the programmable shifting options.
  • 9 0
 I just got a Spur and it's pretty sweet but I didn't realize that it can't accept an underbash. Pretty important in New England. I could do the Wolf Tooth thing or put a crank on with a 4x ring spider and get an old school bash ring.
  • 2 0
 Bash rings are good stuff. I like the wolf tooth solution, though I happen to still be running a crankset from about 2008, with a 104bcd bash ring
  • 3 0
 Wait…tell me more about this underbash guard from Wolf Tooth.
  • 2 0
 @JNKER: its called the CAMO on their website
  • 3 0
 I have the Wolf Tooth Camo on mine for CT riding... works a dream.
  • 17 4
 Expensive/10
  • 4 0
 Just look at those cranks
  • 5 4
 @pisgahgnar: they're an investment piece
  • 12 4
 If you don’t have industry connections one would have to be a Dentist to own this setup!

I will take an aluminum version with Shimano SLX!
  • 5 7
 and it'll work just the same
  • 9 1
 Paging Doctor Mike to exam room 3!
  • 11 1
 Yeah doctors aren't real dentists
  • 5 0
 @SATN-XC: it wont because of flexstays
  • 1 0
 @mironfs: Scott seems to make it work
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer - Can you drop a grip2 damper into the SC34? Did you intentionally choose the non-SC version for added stiffness?

- thanks for the thoughtful write-up. I just recently bought the same wheels and tires for a build myself, and was stoked to hear that you’re continuing to really like them. I’m going with the Epic Evo for my build- mostly because the Spur is unavailable for the foreseeable future.

I bet Transition is losing out on a LOT of potential customers due to lack of supply right now.
  • 4 0
 Commenting on your last point, I agree. I would buy a Spur essentially immediately if one was available.
  • 2 0
 @neologisticzand: Supply chain issues notwithstanding, I wonder if the popularity of the Spur caught Transition slightly off guard? Seems like basically every person who has ridden one has raved about it, and it I must admit it's high on my list for next bike considerations.. if it can be found in stock.
  • 4 0
 Weird, I just bought a Spur in late July because the Epic Evo was unobtainable, until summer of 2023 according to my local Spec dealer. I went to the Transition Outpost in B-Ham and got a large with AXS same day out the door.
I love the bike by the way. Went with gum wall minions front and rear and the goldish cassette/chain combo.
  • 6 0
 Hey Mike we’re a similar age and were racing in CT around the same time. You ever do Schrieber’s Farm? Greasy steep janky scary to MY 14 y.o. self.
  • 10 0
 I sure did. I did most of the CT races for a few years, plus some of the Route 66 stuff, and of course Mt. Snow. In my mind all of the courses were muddy, with lots of weird steeps and awkward climbs.
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer:

Right on! Yeah they did all start to blend together after a while. And yeah, ALWAYS muddy. Kind of wild so many were on private land not usually open to riding... Anyway, sweet bike.
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer: WRATH OF SUN VALLEY!!! I thought it was just me who remembered every race being a completely drenched nightmare of awkwardness. what town did you grow up in? between races and shows theres no way we didnt meet at some point back then
  • 4 0
 @heathhandsome: yes! That race was awesome. I grew up in Glastonbury, and raced on the Pig Iron / CVC team around ‘97 - ‘00.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: Ha, my brother and I laid out that “Wrath of Sun Valley” course. The downhill section dumping back down into into the field was wild, especially in the mud, which seemed to be everywhere back in those days. I also remember watching in awe as one of the McCormack brothers rode up the toughest climb on the course in the big ring.
  • 1 0
 @bde1024:

I might be mixing up my race courses —- was Sun Valley the one with the very ledgey, bouldery, slow speed, steep, brutal final descent??
  • 2 0
 @bde1024: I still remember that section so well to this day. And yeah the McCormack brothers have blown my mind many times.
  • 2 0
 @heathhandsome: I was at that race. The downhills were such sloppy messes and the v-brakes of the time were just not up to it. I'm from CT originally with a multi-year stint in RI in the 90's with a ton of MTB racing all over New England.
  • 2 0
 @AckshunW: Yup, the downhill dumped out into a grassy field. After the first few years of the race, without checking with me or my brother, some do-gooders eliminated a lot of the obstacles on that downhill, which actually increased speeds and made it much more dangerous. We ended up with a lot of people being taken out with fractured collarbones.
  • 4 0
 That's an awesome build.

I love my Spur, but the SID suspension is a nightmare. The fork had bushing play from the factory and still did after a 1 month wait for a warranty replacement. I rode it for a couple months, shipped it back, and now the stanchions are damaged from riding with sloppy bushings. It's still covered under warranty, but after 4 weeks of waiting, I'm told I won't have a replacement for at least two months. The shock weeps a ton of air can fluid around the dust wiper, and by the time it's due for an air can service, you have to add fluid every 10 hours to keep it from going completely dry. Rockshox no longer warranties the shocks for that issue, though. Apparently they've just decided it's "normal". It's a shame, because the fork and shock both rode incredibly well for how light and simple they are.

I'm glad to see Codes on a Spur as well; even with 200mm/180mm rotors, the G2 RSC brakes are weak. I have Code RSCs on my other bikes, and the difference in power is significant.
  • 10 7
 "it’s loaded up with a 26” tube. Why 26”? It’s lighter, and it takes up a lot less space. Plus, it’ll stretch enough to work in an emergency, just in case I’m not able to fix a flat with tire plugs."

serious question...why not just have a 29" tube and not stretch it? I cannot imagine the weight/space savings is noticeable. Is there something I'm missing?
  • 30 0
 Because we all have too many 26" tubes laying around from our previous bikes.
  • 7 0
 Your buddy with a 27.5 can use it too
  • 5 1
 Back-of-napkin math, but it's a difference of about 10" in tube length (~13% difference). It might not make much of a notable difference, but if the 26" tube will do the job, why not just take the lighter/smaller option?
  • 2 0
 My thought too. Even a 27.5 tube would be much closer to fitting the 29 wheels.
  • 10 1
 @SATN-XC, a folded up 29" tube takes up way more space on the frame. It's more of an aesthetic thing than anything else, at least for me.
  • 3 1
 @rustiegrizwold: I'm with you on that
  • 1 0
 There are almost 10 more linear inches of tube for a 29" tube vs a 26". When folded, that's probably another two layers thick. It's not an enormous difference, but it's noticeable when trying to keep this unobtrusive.
  • 14 5
 @DPGriffin: When is the last time you actually stretched a 26 tube onto a 29 wheel? "Does the job" is a stretch (pun semi-intended): it's a huge pain to get the tire back on with a tube jammed deep into the rim valley, and even bigger pain to do it without pinching the tube in the process. Not to mention that the tube being stretched so much makes it damn weak and thus will likely need a bunch of pressure to survive the trip out, which is a silly trade-off to make for "lighter/smaller", and an even sillier trade-off against "an aesthetic thing".

Better choice would be a proper sized Tubolito, and if the orange color ruins any kind "aesthetic thing" then maybe put it in a nice WolfTooth BRad pouch.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: thanks for sharing, I follow you on the visual impact. I don't ride with a spare tube on the bike so I'm not familiar with just how much space it takes up.
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: Why not a skinny 29er tube? A 26x2.3 tube is going to be stretched out pretty thin around a 29er wheel. But it might not take up any less space than a 29x2.0 (or narrower) tube, which will also be stretched a bit thin to fill the bigger tire but will not be a huge pain in the ass to install if/when needed.
  • 6 0
 @justinfoil, yep, that'd work too. In this case I just grabbed what I had laying around, and since I rarely get a flat that plugs can't fix it's stayed in place ever since I built up the bike.
  • 1 0
 I bring a Latex 29er tube or a thin 27.5 tube.
  • 4 0
 Or go the dentist route and use a Tubolito as a spare. Oh wait...the orange will clash. Wrap it in a kashima colored bag.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: get an Occam Designs Apex BOA storage container. I use one on my Top Fuel for a 29" tube and tire lever. Barely noticeable, and worth it to have the right size tube imo.
  • 3 0
 On the topic of Tubolito, what's the deal with them apparently having some issues? Some folks were buying them as "emergency tubes" only to pull them out after a year for an emergency and have the valve stems fall off or other irreparable issues.

I've gotten to the point where I get so few flats with tubeless that it might be worth carrying a Tubolito, but not if its going to make me walk out when I try to use it.
  • 1 2
 @justinfoil: clearly someone who’s never overinflated an inner tube and sent a river on it. It’s actually hilarious how much you can inflate an inner tube without it blowing. A 26 inch tube will easily work on a 29 inch wheel though carrying a spare tube is pretty pointless anyway because your just going to get a puncture anyway from all the shit stuck in your tyre you haven’t noticed because your tyres are caked in sealant.
  • 3 0
 I’ve long carried a 27.5 tube - as a weekly group-ride leader, it just makes sense to have a size that works for everyone on the ride. [It’s been a while since I’ve seen 26” wheels on a local group ride.] And yeah… less stretching.
  • 1 2
 @justinfoil: I keep a 700cx40 tube on my bike. More compact than a standard 29er tube, but the correct diameter for my bike.
  • 1 1
 @mikekazimer: totally agree,but for a 29 inch,a 27,5 tube is the best in that case. But it had a big downside maybe you never thought about. If you flat a tubeless tire and put a slim tube there,you have a ton of chances the tire would rotate over the rim&tube.
I worked has trail guide and used that trick tons of times in enduro&dh bikes,even myself. With a regular tube for your wheel size tire rotation could be a thing if the inside of the tire is full of tubeless liquid (very possible if you flat and repair it in the middle of a trail). It felt like the bike never slows down.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: my thoughts exactly
  • 4 0
 Sweet ride! Pretty much my choice of components,especially the wheels... light wheels make you feel invencible and are super addictive. Kind of like some drugs,at the same prices!
  • 4 0
 "Step 28: Your new addiction is now Carbon. Although healthier than Cocaine, it's more expensive"
  • 2 0
 A kashima DPS would be the only thing I’d put on if I was concerned about aesthetics. Maybe the red-accented XO1 shifter to go with the cage.

Lovely bike Mike, I’ve been looking at short travel bikes more for eastern MA riding as opposed to the current 160/160 rig + gravel bike as a do it all sled. Yours is a great inspiration. Maybe next year.
  • 2 0
 " Maybe the red-accented XO1 shifter to go with the cage." = next level OCD
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: you gotta check out the bike check threads on the PB forumS, especially the hardtail ones. I’m nothing compared to those guys’ attention to detail
  • 1 0
 @sjma: oh, I know. currently have tires from two different brands on my cross bike and it is KILLING ME...
  • 7 0
 What happened to Levy?
  • 36 1
 He was abducted by aliens.
  • 3 0
 He's probably gearing up for curling camp.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Then we should expect his return soon. Probably not any aliens in this Marvel Universe that are up for Downcountry Levy.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: All makes sense now.
  • 2 0
 He's meditating about the fact of having 4 pistons brakes on a 12kg downcountry bike.
  • 1 0
 He’s still coming down after drinking the leftover Monster from PB Academy
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: So he went home to visit with family? That's nice.
  • 4 0
 That's my kind of bike, and my kind of riding - long XCish rides with a tendency to take a shorter travel bike to where it has no business being, but still having a blast.
  • 6 1
 26.5 pounds. That is what I have been ranting about for 4 years and get slammed and jacked by groms with no clue. I'm done.
  • 1 0
 Wait! I'm interested... What's wrong with this number? 11.8kg seems to be about right for a modern L 120mm bike with a long wheelbase.
  • 3 0
 @HankHank: I think he's saying that's a good number
  • 4 0
 @HankHank:
when I say 33 pounds is heavy for a trail bike what happened to 26 pounds? I get lynched
  • 2 0
 @madmon: Gotcha. Happy to help provide a grom education service!
  • 4 1
 I love seeing custom Spur builds. I have one I built up on my own. Though mine comes in at 27.5lbs with pedals and a Fidlock 'bottle cage'. The Spur is truly one of the best bikes made in the past few years.
  • 3 0
 Agreed. It works awesome for 80% of the trails I ride . Such an efficient bike. Wants to go fast!
  • 2 1
 So good looking it's verging on curing my carboniphobia.
  • 2 0
 Question for you @mikekazimer Really wanting this bike next year and largely in part due to your reviews and testimony on forums matching my 80% of my riding terrain and style. Currently have a Hightower v2 which I have planned to upgrade to be lighter...but is the Spur similar enough of a climber and on muted trails that I would regret the descending capabilities of the HT? N+1 wont work for me right now haha
  • 2 0
 I'm running that wheel tire combo on my trail bike and just broke one of those Roval wheels almost in half. I'm 140lbs and have never broken a bike part (let alone carbon wheel) in my life. Bonus, shop guy tells me " they probably won't warranty it" without even looking at the wheel. Back to Light Bicycle rims I guess.
  • 8 3
 Why all the wierd names. It's a trail bike.
  • 13 3
 I don't know why distinctions bother people. There are "trail" bikes that people race enduros on (Ripmo, Hightower come to mind), there are "trail" bikes that you might race an XC race on (Spur, Epic EVO), then there are "trail" bikes you probably wouldn't do either on (Optic, Stumpy) if you had the option to ride something more suitable. There's very little overlap between the two extremes, neither are pure XC race bikes, nor pure enduro race bikes, so what's the problem with making at least one distinction within what you're calling the trail bike category? Seriously, who is this hurting?
  • 4 3
 @pb-kg: micro segmenting just confuses marketing and scares new consumers away so basically hurts everyone. The argument you made could be made in every segment for literally every model. "This dh pedals better so it's on the more xc end of dh" sounds ridiculous right? Trail bikes are in between xc and Enduro bikes. They weren't designed around racing either but good for riding on those long skinny dirt paths with rocks and features sometimes of varying pitches.
  • 5 0
 @pb-kg: According to google (which is always right btw) a "trail" is "a beaten path through rough country such as a forest or moor." that sounds like all the places we ride mountain bikes, therefore all mountain bikes are trail bikes. Solved. Your welcome
  • 5 1
 @makripper: New consumers look at price points far more than travel categories. If you're gonna drop 3k+ on a rig where these categories start to emerge, you're getting recommendations from someone. If I'm a noob and not asking for help, I'm sure as hell wondering what the difference between a Spur and a Hightower is. Categorizing is shorthand organization, and takes 5 seconds to learn.
  • 2 0
 @LS3VER33: How could I be so obtuse!
  • 3 0
 @LS3VER33: all mountain bikes are all-mountain bikes
  • 1 0
 @makripper: i would argue differentiating "trail" and "enduro" bikes are way closer to each other than "down country" and "trail."

Geo is really similar on a modern bike with a 150 fork and a 170 fork enduro. They both ride the same terrain too. Down country is a small niche, but it's a lot more unique in design than enduro bikes are.
  • 2 0
 @jcougs: argue all you want. "Down country" is an over forked xc bike or a trail bike lol
  • 1 0
 @makripper: If only there were a way to shorten "over-forked xc bike or a trail bike".
  • 2 2
 @makripper: yes because the spur was originally designed with 120 rear travel and a 100mm fork.

I guess they then take those forks off in the factory and over fork it to be down country.
  • 1 0
 @jcougs: yeah you totally missed the point lol
  • 4 2
 Nice! I love my Spur. I have a Pike 130mm and Deluxe on mine, I'd bet you'd prefer the Fox DPS or RS Deluxe over the SID. I'm also super-jelly over your cranks! I let reason prevent me from that purchase! Wink
  • 1 1
 Interesting. Didn't know you could run a 130 pike on the Spur.
  • 46 0
 @RogerMexico: You just kinda put it on and tighten the bolts like normal.
  • 2 0
 @toast2266: I understand how that works. I built a spur out earlier this year and wanted to put that same fork on but was told by the transition guys that they strongly recommended against anything other than a 120mm fork. I took that at face value.

But, it sounds like it worked for you.
  • 1 0
 @RogerMexico: You can but Transition doesn't recommend it as it will mess up GEO in their view... don't know if warranty will play

@davec113 DPS and RS Deluxe fit???
  • 5 0
 @RogerMexico: personally, I think 130mm Pike is exactly the move on a Spur.
  • 3 0
 @RogerMexico: I called Tranny and the person I spoke to said most of the folks there run a 130mm Pike. It's a minor difference vs a 120mm fork, works great and Pike is FAR better than SID.
  • 1 0
 @Runerider: Yes. I have a Deluxe on mine, pretty sure a DPS will fit too.
  • 1 0
 @davec113: awesome - good to know
  • 1 0
 @davec113 I just got a Spur and have only been out on it a handful of times but the couple times I rode it in rooty or rocky terrain with quick repeated hits I felt like the rear shock had me just skipping over the top. Have you felt like the Deluxe helps with this?

@mikekazimer any further recommendations on shock settings to help my SidLuxe rear shock not skip off the top of repeated bumps? TIA
  • 2 0
 @sledshed: Yeah, the Deluxe feels like a normal, modern shock. The SID suffers from horrible rebound damping, especially at higher pressures. I suspect Kaz is ok with it because he's lighter, but for me (200 lbs nekkid) either the rebound was too fast or made the bike feel dead. Compression is pretty uncontrolled too, but it doesn't ruin everything like the rebound does.
  • 1 0
 @davec113: would a super deluxe ultimate be complete overkill?
  • 1 0
 @sledshed: I doubt the res would fit
  • 2 1
 How's the edge padding on the Power Mimic? I just replaced a Power Arc because it has _zero_ edge padding and I bruised the crap out of my inner thighs after a day of downhilling and steering with my hips through the seat. The Arc fit me well for pedaling, but no way it can live long term on a trail bike: going on the (under-used) gravel/all-road/commuter.
  • 1 0
 The Mimic saddles are quite comfy for guys actually. I run a Phenom Mimic on my MTB and have been impressed with the comfort.
  • 2 0
 A note on this saddle. It's actually the Elaston/Mimic version and I also wear it without a Chamois. Frickin' amazing.
  • 2 0
 Glad to read your comment, same issue here. Great for pedaling but the lack of edge padding is rough. I've had a couple rides on a WTB Deva and really liking it. It's just a touch longer than the Power but not much.
  • 1 0
 @ryan77777: Good to know. Riding an Ergon SM Enduro Comp for now (pretty good edge padding), but if it doesn't work out, WTB Pure (big edge "wings"!) was next on the list, and now the Deva is top of the list.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: BTW - If you don't need a narrow nose, the WTB Koda has noticeably more edge padding than the Deva. Good luck!
  • 2 1
 @GaryGets: Oh, you mean the almost THREE HUNDRED dollar one?
  • 1 0
 How capable would you say this bike is @mikekazimer ?

I live in Denmark and think it would be perfect for the trails here. But Im also in love with trails In Squamish and want to visit the place again in the near future. Would the spur be able to ride a trail like Pleasure trail or would I limit myself a lot by bringing a bike like this?
  • 4 0
 You could definitely ride Pleasure Trail on a Spur. I'd chose some more aggressive tires, but otherwise it's fully capable of riding that style of trail. I wouldn't recommend it for massive hucks or smashing laps in the bike park, but if you're a relatively smooth rider it can handle plenty of steep and rowdy terrain.
  • 4 0
 @Lassemj You've probably already heard of the Revel Ranger but take a look at that too. Have freinds who use it as their only bike on the North Shore, but it would probably do well for the trails in Denmark (done a bit of riding there myself).
  • 4 0
 The only critique is about the rear shock. It's either all or northing when comes to kashima bro.
  • 1 0
 I think you should add a ready to ride weight too, would be interesting to compare the stripped down no fat without pedals comparison weight with an actual riding weight including the tools and spares we all ride with these days.
  • 2 0
 What's up with the wheels: "Roval’s Control Carbon wheels weigh in at 1473 grams" - This weight seems very low for a wheels build around DT 350 hubs. On Specialized site, they claim also optimistic 1610 grams.
  • 4 0
 It's true, that's what my set weighed with tape and valves installed out of the box.
  • 1 0
 I've been thinking about getting the Spur as my next bike but I can't decide between M and L because at 5'9 I'm right in the middle of the size range. I ride an S3 Enduro (465) which feels spot on for me but the choice of 455 or 480 doesn't feel great so also looking at the Specialized Epic Evo.
  • 2 0
 I have both of those bikes in S4 and large. They fit about identically. If the S3 feels good to you, I’d go with a medium spur.
  • 1 0
 Many PB editors (like the one in this article) mention that it would be odd to compare fork and shock from different brands but really, is there even anyone who actually thinks so? If one has a bike with same brand front and rear suspension and then replaces the fork with one from a different brand, would this person then feel any urge to replace the rear shock too even if it performs perfectly fine?
  • 2 0
 But bike weight doesn't matter., why doent it weigh 35lbs? The truth bike weight does matter the industry is trying to convince you otherwise so they can build cheap heavy shit with fewer warranty returns
  • 1 0
 Mike, if you’re still out there, I’m dying to know why you went with less drop for your dropper?
I’m building a new Tallboy and I always thought every millimeter was pure gold.. I bought a 200mm dropper for my bike which puts me over 3” lower than my old Tallboy. As an ex MX racer, I’m always looking for a DH position that can emulate an MX bike.

Eric
  • 6 2
 That Mimic seat looks like it's has cellulite. Is that the foam?
  • 9 0
 Seat shaming has no place here.
  • 1 1
 Yes. That's the Elaston Foam or Cover that gives that "mottled" look. Apparently the Mimic core helps with flex and movement (similar to SQLab's flexy wings) and the Elaston is like a really firm memory foam.
  • 2 0
 Sweet bike! we have color matched Fox stickers, perfect for that exact bike in stock, both Step Cast and Standard lowers. Would complete that build perfectly. vcgraphix.com
  • 2 0
 How can us mere mortals with no industry connections get these new HS2 rotors? I was thinking of Codes for my new DC bike - maybe your choice will seal the deal Smile
  • 2 0
 They’re in stock at some shops already, at least here in Bellingham. I’d imagine availability will increase as more ship out.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Thanks! Ride safe sir!
  • 2 1
 Why 26"? Because that was the wheel standard the last time I used tubes, so I still had some old ones lying around. I don't expect to actually need it, so the fact that it's perished and won't even work is irrelevant.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer 'My days of being hunched over and stretched out are long gone' I back this sentiment so hard!
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer I am curious about the choice to go with shorter dropper post, do you find yourself seated with it down often enough or is there a different motivation there?
  • 4 0
 It was more due to the fact that I didn’t need it all the way down to have enough clearance while descending.
  • 1 0
 on my spur seat can get in pretty awkward position between my heels when you fully smash it down (its that low) not bad but you need to get used to it
  • 2 0
 The seat is tilted down quite far. Does that help with seat comfort or other reasons? I guess it makes sense if you are only using it when going up steep climbs.
  • 1 0
 It's great for wheelies and keeps the nose of the seat out of the way. If you don't have a cutout, it's the way.
  • 1 0
 I am always curious what retired pro bike racers/reviewers prefer to ride when they are no longer sponsored or buy there own gear. This is really cool, thanks for honesty your rig looks like a rocket ship!
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer, I'm a kid in CT looking to get into a little XC racing. Anything you remember from those days that you wish someone had told you?
  • 1 0
 Great bike and article. Since you can only ride one bike at a time, the importance and truth of reliability, balance and versatility is highlighted in this. Chapeau. More please.
  • 1 0
 Anyone want to trade their LARGE Spur frame for my MEDIUM Spur frame? It's in 9/10 condition and I'd be willing to throw in a little cash for the swap. (Black Powder coat color). Drop me a message.

I'm serious.
  • 3 0
 Oooft, she’s a fine vessel!
  • 2 0
 Such a nice bike, would love to have this short travel giddyup machine in my quiver.
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous. I would want something with 30mm more travel, but damn this thing looks amazing. Also, self-confessed tan-wall lover right here too.
  • 1 0
 Really nice ride! Speaking of XTR vs XT pedals I‘d opt for XTR. I have both, XTR are just smoother: spinning and dis-/engagement. Dust seal slip is annoying though…
  • 1 0
 I feel like after about a year of riding and both are broke in they feel about the same though. At first XTR feel smoother though.
  • 1 0
 @MillerReid: New XTR feels like used XT? Perfect!
  • 2 0
 tried a 26" tube in a 29er before and it didn't even remotely work. Luckily someone was able to give me a 29 tube.
  • 1 0
 When I got first 29er (2008?) I could only buy 26" tubes. They were a pain but worked- you need to pump them up before fitting. My spare now is a lightweight 27.5 because 26" is a pain but 29" won't fit in the little triangle between top tube and seat tube brace Smile
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer as a french speaker I'd like to know what "giardia roulette" stands for 'cause Im afraid Im might've missed a nice analogy. Thanks !
  • 6 0
 Giardia: an intestinal parasite common in the outdoors
Roulette: a game of chance (with poor odds); a risk
  • 2 0
 In other words, The position of the water bottle risks spraying potentially infected water on the mouth piece.
  • 1 0
 Wait a minute! Specialized tires, Specialized seat and Carbon Roval rims? Guess cranks weren't the only thing on the Kenevo that broke.
  • 3 0
 Transition has the nicest (BCXC) trail bike imo
  • 5 2
 They only made like 10 of these. Never seen one in the wild.
  • 4 2
 Downvoted by two people that got broh deals on this bike, because it’s never been available to the general public.
  • 5 2
 I thought weight didnt matter..
  • 2 0
 Its a 27lb 120mm bike with xc tires. Only way to ride that is to not care about weight.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer. It would be cool to see any other bikes you have in your collection that you have kept around. Old, eclectic, sentimental or just got can’t part with.
  • 2 0
 Those cranks do not pass the 90’s anodized purple/blue test. They are more like 20’s oil slick
  • 2 0
 I like the 26 inch tube idea. How many times have you pumped one up in a 29 inch tire? Any issues? thanks
  • 2 0
 plenty of times, but you need to pump up before fitting in tyre - so I carry a 27.5" spare for 29
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer what length crank arms you running? I found the stock 175mm doable riding in the East Coast but had to be precise in certain situations.
  • 1 0
 I'm running 175mm cranks on this bike. I'm with you - it's very doable, but a little extra care is needed to avoid pedal strikes.
  • 2 0
 I'm confused. No price tag for me to buy it?
  • 5 7
 Regarding mixed suspension, I think a balanced feel is the most important thing. I can see how a 34/SID Luxe combo could work, but the 36/SD DH I have on my Optic feels wonky. The SD has a firmer mid than the 36 and I can't the fork to stay up in its travel without packing it full of spacers, which brings on some undesirable traits. Pike on the way, because I know that combo works.
  • 8 0
 Oh Christ
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: The 36 was developed as an ~160 enduro fork, the current iteration of the Pike as a ~140 trail fork. Running both at 140, you don't think there are feel differences, or what?
  • 6 0
 @pb-kg: no I am just saying your analysis is about as useful as a glass hammer.
  • 4 0
 @usedbikestuff: rec for good analogy.
  • 3 1
 If you're fork is packing down your rebound is probably way too slow.
  • 2 0
 Why would you even swap out the Pike for a 36 in the first place?
  • 2 0
 @CFR94: Not necessarily true. Different air piston and damper designs can bias a fork to feel more supportive and sit up higher in it's travel. I've had multiple forks from both manufacturers in the past and found RS to generally feel more supportive, although not quite as plush as Fox.
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian: All my other suspension is Fox. I think Norco dialed the RS tune on the Optic and the Pike is a better match, with its smaller volume and it’s ability to ride higher in its travel without feeling harsh. I ran the DPX and 36 on that bike for a year, but always preferred the feel of the RS that I demoed the bike with. My two other rigs are fully Fox… 38, 36, DHX2, DPX2. Would not want a Pike on the other bike with the 36.
  • 2 0
 @BenTheSwabian: Oh damn, all that and I read your question wrong. The bike came with the 36/DPX. Went that direction because it was available, and as I mentioned, I have a good amount of time/experience on Fox.
  • 1 0
 @pb-kg: One ought to be able to balance any air combo, unless one is very light- or heavyweight.

I'm 79kg and have been riding two identical 2019 36G2, no spacers, Luftkappe, 160 and 140mm. Neither lack support, but the 140 is plusher off the top, even with an extra two psi in spring. But neither are as plush as Mezzer Pro awaiting service, with its soft, sweet midstroke ramp.

I regret selling a recent Pike Select+ after only fifty hours, because it felt comparable to 36, and I forgot to remove spacers.

Trail here is dry chunk, so I run near max sag with enough LSCD to avoid high-speed low-stroke rebounds, and set shock a touch firmer to maintain front wheel weight in fast flat sweepers.

Cool story, right?
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: Yeah, I agree. I’ll admit I’m not too invested in figuring it out, since I know the Pike is going to do what I want it to, and that it’s a straight up local trade to get one. I wound up using a Runt on my old Lyrik to fix its shitty mid stroke, but I have everything working well on my other bikes without needing to deal with stuff like that any more.
  • 1 0
 @pb-kg: I won't have another fork without a dual-chamber spring
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: Fair play. I hear that Luftkappe is great.
  • 1 0
 @pb-kg: it's a Band-Aid smartly developed for a bestseller fork with an inferior spring that makes it slightly less inferior. After a year on Mezzer I'm not recommending LK unless you're already stuck with a bestseller fork. I'll try any dual spring design including DVO before considering Fox/RS again. An elitist problem which helps me not eat dirt
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer
When you move on to your next project bike I'd happily store that Spur in my garage for you.
  • 2 0
 Nice ride Mike! Definitely looks like it rips…
  • 1 0
 Very cool bike. I assume you've got something else around the 170mm mark to compliment it?
  • 2 1
 Good old fashion mountain biking.. A bike that can go up and down a mountain, no cables attached.
  • 5 4
 How are we supposed to take you seriously as a reviewer if you say a sidluxe rear shock impresses you?
  • 1 0
 90s flair FTW. The rainbow cranks and chain combo is a seriously nice touch @mikekazimer
  • 1 0
 The term "drivetrain agnostic" just got bookmarked in my brain for future conversations.
  • 1 0
 You can buy water bottles with a cap now which covers the nozzle, but i guess its only decreasing the odds!
  • 1 0
 Mike, you should have removed the bottle holder for the pics just for fun...
  • 1 1
 Lady saddle is the biggest hack in the game! Love the mimic and can usually find cheap deals online (although probably increasingly less after this)
  • 1 0
 So ready for an aluminum version of this. Less price, less waste, takes dings better....depending on. Maybe one day!
  • 1 0
 Weighs more than a Stumpjumper. Has less travel and a XC shock. Bro's definitely aren't the smartest.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer I'm usually not gear envious, but those cranks are niiiiiiice.
  • 1 1
 Rest of the world : can’t find parts so frame ups are not impossible .
Mike : I decided to build a spur ….Smile
Someone is wrong and it’s not Mike .
  • 1 0
 Ridiculous! I love the hard-tail lines of this bike as well as all of the other small but critical details; WoA!
  • 2 0
 nice build.
  • 1 0
 Do a “pinkers ride” series now
  • 1 1
 I have a Spur for that series!
  • 5 6
 Not a fan of tan-walled tires, but like the Transition lines. It's a clean design, and looks light (I didn't check the weight).
  • 13 2
 Ok
  • 3 2
 Right? Such a gorgeous frame. A shame that it's got an externally routed brake cable. Kinda ruins the looks imo.
  • 2 2
 @BenTheSwabian: I think lots of folks prefer function over fashion...
  • 2 0
 What a beauty
  • 3 1
 Look like a spark
  • 3 1
 I'd say it looks like an Optic - if it had the suspension system of a Spark.
  • 2 2
 The Spur is a great bike indeed and I have 1 for sale on here in case anyone is looking for an XL.
  • 1 0
 How does it compare with a tallboy?
  • 1 0
 Love the Spur even though I've never ridden one.
  • 2 2
 Which is a really weird thing to say, don't you think? Essentially it means you love your personal idea of the Spur - despite not knowing if that is accurate to reality. Sounds awfully irrational to me.
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian: no, quite normal unless you over think it.
  • 1 0
 Keep rolling speed up and put an eliminator T7T9 on it
  • 1 0
 just curious how small of a tube I can get away with? Subway here I come!
  • 2 1
 its just a fancy pants smuggler
  • 1 1
 Ok Spur v Spot Ryve? @mikekazimer? Currently on a well built Smuggler… looking for a better climber.
  • 1 0
 Next up, Levy’s over forked super enduro rig.
  • 1 0
 Complete disaster, the tyre logos don't line up.
  • 1 0
 fresh whippersnapper…..hmmmmm
  • 1 0
 There is 120mm shaft for fox34 2022 fork?
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Great article! What length cranks did run? -Shanta
  • 1 0
 Good day for a Hush Hush lap, eh @mikekazimer ?
  • 1 0
 Always. The roots are probably just the right amount of shiny after all the rain.
  • 1 0
 They had me at "Staff Rides Mike Kazimer"
  • 1 0
 minimal but strategic use of bike bling i approve this bike
  • 1 0
 who would choose sram brakes?
  • 1 0
 GET NEW DECALS WTF YOU WORK FOR PB
  • 2 3
 Perfect bike. Nobody cares how many clicks of suspension adjustment your running. Amirite?
  • 3 0
 If you wieght about 170 you are likely to be fairly interested in this detail.
  • 1 0
 Youareright
  • 2 2
 I didnt know they made a women's specific model?
  • 1 1
 Best bike check in a minute. Great frame and a solid setup.
  • 1 0
 No AXS, Kaz?
  • 1 0
 nvm, meself didn't finish the article
  • 2 5
 Heck of a compliment when a rider that tests so many bikes, chooses this one. Glad I own one as well! PS. Hot tip, Manitou Mara rear shock ftp! Their R7 front fork is also fantastic in this application.
  • 2 2
 Does the bike have a bmx background?
  • 1 0
 Looks like a ripper
  • 1 1
 so many wires, so little time! #AXS
  • 1 0
 RIGGGGG
  • 1 0
 Up Park bike?
  • 1 0
 looks like a session
  • 4 6
 Why the 35mm bar? I think they're uncomfortable.
  • 3 1
 Enveous?
  • 3 5
 why do you ride a womans saddle?
  • 4 1
 Because it’s a good saddle.
  • 1 0
 I have a bunch of guys friends riding it. If it's designed for women and they approve, it's gotta be even better for dudes is my logic.
  • 5 0
 Truth is, 9/10 most women's saddles are more comfortable because they are wider. "Men's" saddles were designed for 160lbs XC whippets with no body fat who wear size 34 pants.
  • 3 0
 My chode is very interested in this saddle...
  • 2 0
 yeah i was like damn lemme see what kinda sweet saddle this is and come to find out it is designed for vaginal comfort
  • 2 2
 Just get an Ergon
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: Not sure I agree, you can get Men's and Women's saddles in the same widths...
  • 1 0
 @GaryGets: For a long time you couldn't. Specialized was one of the few brands making wider saddles for men, but even there they had the 160+ sizes reserved for women. That's changed in the last couple of years, but you can still find saddle brands who only market their wider saddles to women, or worse, as "recreational" saddles.

BTW a 148mm side isn't really "wide" despite what that brand wants you to believe.
  • 11 14
 I can't stomach Specialized tires on a Transition...sorry.
  • 4 2
 So it's come to that, eh? That bikes only deserve certain tires?

The saddle is Specialized, too. Guess Mike can't be comfortable nor choose the tires he prefers.
  • 1 2
 I can't stomach *insert random private company* on a *insert random private company* for reasons.
  • 6 9
 3k plus for a frame with single pivot suspension.. No sir.
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