Stan's New Asymmetric Carbon Flow and Baron Rims - Eurobike 2019

Sep 5, 2019
by Daniel Sapp  
Stan's Baron CB7 (left) and Flow CB7 asymmetric carbon rims were a collaboration with Ibis Cycles.


This week Stan's NoTubes introduced their Flow and Baron CB7 carbon wheels and we had a chance to give them a closer look at Eurobike.

The Flow and Baron CB7 rims are available either as a rim only or as complete wheelsets. The rims are asymmetric, which is new to Stan's range, but share their patented patented Bead Socket Technology (BST). CB7 rims were developed in collaboration with Ibis, who wanted the offset spoke drilling to help achieve more balanced spoke tension, an improvement which can result in a stronger wheel.

Developing the Asymmetric BST: The primary challenge created by the asymmetric profile occurred inside the rim, where mismatched angles created problems getting tubeless tires to seal consistently. The shape of a tubeless rim, when well-engineered, is designed to quickly initiate a seal, then guide the beads up and out of the rim's center well to lock into the rim flanges on either side. Off-center spoke holes tend to crowd one side of the rim and interfere with that action. It took a number of tweaks but ultimately, they brought the new rims up to a tubeless standard that Stan's were happy with. Engineers at Stan's say that it helped that Flow and Baron CB7 rims have generous inner-widths.

The Performance Bits: A final challenge of the CB7 rims was to ensure that they were reliable and provided ample control in corners. The differences in shape of the left and right sides of the rims also required extra attention during the impact testing stages of the CB7's development. The present versions are said to seal reliably in off-camber terrain and during hard cornering, while also withstanding equal impacts to both sides.


Rim Details

Flow CB7: The carbon version of the standard Stan's Flow rim, the 29mm inner width Flow CB7 has an added lay-up process that is said to significantly increase strength, while keeping weight to a respectable 420g for the 27.5" rim, and 455g for the 29" version. Flow CB7 rims are said to work best with 2.35" to 2.6" tires.

RiACT: The new rim's shape and layup are designed to absorb vibration, resist pinch flats, and withstand impacts, all while maintaining lateral stiffness for improved control. Stan's calls this Radial impact Absorbing Carbon Technology (RiACT).



Baron CB7: With a similar profile to the Flow CB7, the Baron CB7 is just a little wider - 35mm internal width, to be exact. The mechanical strength of the wider and slightly taller Baron profile resulted in the same weight as its smaller brother. Although it's wider than the Flow, it shares the same weight due to an increased air volume inside. The Baron also uses Stan's RiACT technology.



Wheelsets

Both rims are also available as wheelsets and are built in house at Stan's New York State facility. Wheels use Stan's newest "Neo" hubs, with the rear featuring Stan's latest "Durasync" 6-pawl triple bearing freehub that produces 10-degrees of engagement. Hub shells are CNC-machined from aluminum. and wheel builds use Secure Lock nipples and Sapim J-bend spokes. Both 27.5" and 29" options are available and claimed weights (pair) are 1674g for the Flow CB7, and 1761g for the Baron CB7. Baron CB7 rims and wheelsets are available now. Flow CB7 rims and wheelsets will be available in November.

All carbon rims have a seven-year warranty and lifetime crash replacement for the original owner.

Stan's says getting tubeless tires to air up easily on the inside of an asymmetric rim was a challenge.
The wider Baron's rim profile works out to almost the same weight as the narrower Flow.


Specifications

Flow CB7

Use: Trail
Rim Width: Internal 29mm, External 35mm
Rim Depth: 18.3 mm
Optimal Tire Sizes: 2.35” to 2.8”
Hubs: Neo, Durasync 10° engagement
Spokes: Sapim Force Black 2.0/1.7/1.8mm
Nipples: Sapim Secure Lock Alloy Black
Hole Count: 32-hole
Drilling Style: Asymmetrical
Rim Material: Carbon
Color: Black
Wheelset Weight: 1,674g (27.5”) / 1,761g (29”)
Rim Weight: 420g (27.5”) / 455g (29”)
Front Wheel Weight: 776g (27.5”) / 820g (29”)
Rear Wheel Weight: 898g (27.5”) / 941g (29”)
Max Rider Weight: 250 lbs (113 kg)
Max Spoke Tension: 105 KgF (1,030 N)
Wheelset MSRP: $1399 USD
Rim MSRP: $600 USD
Baron CB7

Use: Trail
Rim Width: Internal 35mm, External 41mm
Rim Depth: 18.3 mm
Optimal Tire Sizes: 2.5” to 3.2”
Hubs: Stan’s Neo, Durasync 10° engagement
Spokes: Sapim Force Black 2.0/1.7/1.8mm
Nipples: Sapim Secure Lock Alloy Black
Hole Count: 32-hole
Drilling Style: Asymmetrical
Rim Material: Carbon
Color: Black
Wheelset Weight: 1,674g (27.5”) / 1,761g (29”)
Rim Weight: 420g (27.5”) / 455g (29”)
Front Wheel Weight: 776g (27.5”) / 820g (29”)
Rear Wheel Weight: 898g (27.5”) / 941g (29”)
Max Rider Weight: 250 lbs (113 kg)
Max Spoke Tension: 105 KgF (1,030 N)
Wheelset MSRP: $1,399 USD
Rim MSRP: $600 USD

For more info, check out www.NoTubes.com



33 Comments

  • 77 0
 Jokes on them, my rims become assymmetrical on their own
  • 33 13
 If you think carbon rims feel good, wait until you try alloy!
  • 30 6
 It probably feels good in your pockets, but deep inside you dream carbon
  • 22 4
 (Pastes a random rant about carbon rims being harsh)
(receives an answer from carbon rim owner)
(Pastes a random rant about it not being true)
(revieves a rant from the carbon rim owner)

I can see the future!
  • 5 5
 Carbon does not have the correct properties for a my rim. It is too brittle and harsh, and instead of sending it will just snap. Also all the pros prefer detensioned aluminum runs for traction.


Like that?
  • 6 2
 Im not a wheel destroyer by any means, but had 2 sets of the first arc30’s and those things were pure butter. Out of true snd flat spotted just looking at them. Then had the flow mk3’s, AWESOME wheelset laced to 240’s. Never dented or flat spotted in me, only out of true every so often.

Been on a friends enves, and had an original set of nobl tr38’s as well and always liked the feel of the aluminum rims better.

Then came my set of we are one agents. Ride feel is just as good as my flows were, havent had to true them once after A LOT of hard riding. Did a race down neds atomic dustbin (seymour on the north shore) all rock and not very forgiving, flatted about 2/3 way down, after adding some air a short while down she went flat again. Was about 100yards from finish timer, pushed on expecting to get home after and have damage or be out of true, NOTHING at all. Perfectly true still, no marks, and no flat spots at all (not that carbon would do the same as aluminum) but after that experience im sold on the we are ones. Good product and even better customer support. If ur on the fence about pulling the trigger or a set, u wont regret it.
  • 5 0
 My friend broke 2 Neo free hubs in the course of 3 weeks. To be fair he is 215 lbs of muscle and we were doing a lot of hard climbing, but still. I wouldn't trust them in the back country.
  • 3 1
 Don't you mean Downcountry?
  • 2 1
 @crazyXCsquirrel: Actually we call it Upcountry.
  • 1 0
 I have had 3 Stan's hubs and every rear hub has broken; 3.30 lasted a year, one Neo 6 months and the other 4. I would not trust a Stan's hub for anything, but especially not a ride that takes me far away from a car or road. Service them and you can tell why. The pawls, when compared to I9 or Hope, look cheap. Never had a problem with any other hub I have used.
  • 1 0
 The Neo is a pathetic excuse for a hub and does not belong on any high end bike or wheelset. The 6 pawl freehub doesn't help a whole lot. I killed a couple, my LBS confirmed some riders getting only a couple hundred miles out of them!
  • 7 0
 60 grams for 500 bucks, hmm..
  • 5 1
 never have to true your wheel again ...
  • 1 0
 @duzzi: so carbon wheels never require truing? Wow, the magic of carbon translates over to the elastic materials holding a wheel together.
  • 6 0
 Olympic level acronym creation!
  • 13 0
 BST, BullShit Terminology
  • 3 0
 Stans Alloy rims have been good to me. Carbon rims also have their place, but are only as good as the warranty they come with......
  • 1 0
 Wonder how customers will RiACT to a redesign in a few months and then needing Neo hubs because the freehub detonated.

"Our lack of testing found that the last new and improved version sucked balls so we are introducing the NEW IMPROVED VERSION!"
  • 1 0
 My biggest issue with my aluminum Stans rims is the narrowness of the sidewalls. I think they may be the narrowest out there. They're strong, but they tend to cut the sidewalls of my tires rather when they pinch. Looks like the sidewalls on these are much thicker. Could be a good combo.
  • 2 0
 Wondering with all these different rims will created different sounds...so we could have a whole symphony going on race courses.
  • 3 0
 600/rim or 1400 for a wheelset? am I missing something, only $200 more for hubs,spokes and build?
  • 3 0
 It's $400 for spokes and build minus $200 to replace the rear hub when it dies an early death.
  • 1 0
 27.5 Plus size Wheelset for 1674 grams is awesome. It’ll make for a fast Plus trail hardtail with the correct tires. Yum yum.
  • 2 1
 Are these not the same rims as the Ibis s35 carbons? Same collaboration of Stan’s/ibis...
  • 1 0
 Think they differ slightly but the Ibis rim alone is $525 vs Stans $600. Same warranty.
  • 1 0
 Their the same and cost more. I have two sets of the alloy 935’s which are the predecessor to the Ibis/Stans collaboration and pop rear spokes all the time. Recently switched to a non asymmetrical hoop and haven’t had those issues.
  • 2 0
 So Flow is a S28 and Baron is a S35
  • 1 0
 Sure looks that way
  • 11 9
 Buy We Are One’s.
  • 1 0
 Are the 29" BST rims still not compatible with wtb tires?
  • 1 1
 Next would be to say that they have invented asymmetric rims Smile
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