Stan's S1 Wheelset - Review

Jan 11, 2018
by Paul Aston  
Stans S1 Wheelset - Review


Bored of reading reviews of carbon wheelsets that cost more than six-months' disposable income? Well, one of the longest-standing names in tubeless, Stan's NoTubes, has a new and affordable complete wheelset that won't smash your bank balance to smithereens. The S1 wheels feature the latest evolution of the classic Flow rim and Neo hubs, laced together with Sapim Race double butted spokes.

At $479 USD / £350 GBP per pair, they are less than a price of many single carbon rims. 27.5" or 29" diameters are available, along with hub widths and drivers to meet the latest standards. Weighing in at 2134 grams they're not super-light, but have been specced to get the job done in the toughest conditions at a competitive price.
S1 Wheelset Details

• Intended use: enduro/downhill
• S1 Flow 6061 alloy rims
• 27.5" / 29" options
• Internal rim width: 29mm (33.1mm ext.)
• Rec. tire size: 2.35” - 2.80”
• Stans Neo hubs
• 32h Sapim Race DB spokes
• BST Bead Socket Technology
• Rim weight: 584 grams – 29" (claimed)
• Weight: 2134 grams – 29" (995g front, 1139g rear)
• MSRP: $479 USD / £350 (as shown)
www.notubes.com


Design

The Flow rim has been around forever and the latest incarnation has been put through its paces by a number of brutal bike bashers like Sam Dale, Brook Macdonald, Wyn Masters and Martin Maes on the DH and EWS circuits. The S1 rim is essentially the same as the Flow MK3 but made from a slightly cheaper 6061 alloy over the 6069 of the latter. The S1 rims also come with steel eyelets and a sleeve joint instead of having no eyelets and being pinned and welded like the MK3. The S1 rim also has a slightly deeper rim section by 1.6mm, adding some extra bulk.

Because of this, the S1 wheelset carries an extra 214 grams over the pricier £520 MK3 wheelset, but that weight saving will cost you £1.25 per gram. Price isn't Stan's only focus with this wheelset, as reliability is prioritized over weight.

Stans S1 Wheelset - Review

Stans S1 Wheelset - Review
The budget S1 wheelset still uses the same tech as high-end Stan's products like Bead Socket Technology.


The internal width of the rim now sits at 29mm, which Stan's recommend for tires between 2.35" and 2.80" to slot into the BST–Bead Socket Technology. The BST is aiming to mirror the shape of standard tire beads, creating a seal around the bead rather than using pressure to force the bead and tire sidewall against the rim wall. This is said to help with tubeless inflation, and reduce the risk of rolling the bead off the rim.



The Neo hubs don't try to sing or dance, using simple flanges and 32 J-bend spokes front and rear. The front hub uses push-in end caps that are held in place with rubber U-cup seals; the maximum front hub diameter is 15mm bolt-thru, so no conversions available for the DH crowd. The rear hub has the classic freewheel option as well as SRAM XD drivers made from alloy, that run on six leaf-sprung pawls and offers 10º engagement. There is also a slim plastic washer that clips on to the inside of the hub to hold the pawls in place when installing the freehub body.


Stans S1 Wheelset - Review


Stans S1 Wheelset - Review

Stans S1 Wheelset - Review
The simple 6-pawl system has 36 points of engagement and an easily removable freehub body.



Performance


Setup: The S1 wheelset arrived taped and with tubeless valves installed as standard, so throwing a couple of Maxxis Minion tires in a DH casing was quick and easy. They both inflated easily with a normal track pump (even without sealant), although I did have an Airshot on standby. The tires popped nicely and accurately into the bead without having to over-inflate them to seat them straight. The 2.5" tires still maintained a good shape without getting squared off, which happens aggressively with the same tires on 35mm and 40mm rims.

Feel: The 10-degrees between engagement points worked well for my needs. I never yearn for an instantly or super-fast engaging hub, due to the fact that I rarely do trials on my big wheeler, and prefer the feel of a hub with a wider range of engagement when heading downhill, especially with some bikes that have a lot of chain growth.

The S1 had a great feel and tracked well in their 29" size. I have yet to find a pair of carbon wheels that I am overly excited about riding, as I prefer the feel of a compliant alloy wheel at my 73kg weight. I'm also typically riding the rough and choppy trails in Liguria, Italy, where grip is needed more than support; if I was riding hardpacked singletracks or bermed park, I might be looking for more stiffness.



Stans S1 Wheelset - Review
The rear wheel spins like a trouper and the bearing are still smooth.
Stans S1 Wheelset - Review
This ding managed to impact the rim bed, but the wheel stayed in one piece and the tire sealed.


Durability: For the riders looking at a wheelset in this price bracket, durability is going to be high on the wish list. Compared to some other wide alloy rims I have tested over the last twelve months that are simply stretched out, soft versions of their narrower predecessors, the Flow rim has stood up to the abuse well – I haven't found a rim yet that can handle ride after ride on Finale Ligure's limestone. The rims are not too hard, and I never suffered a pinch puncture on these rims, although I did get a few dings on the rear wheel. There is always a trade-off in this area, and despite a few dents, including one that impacted the rim-bed, the wheel stayed in one piece with zero air loss.

The rear wheel's spoke tension did need some attention; it survived numerous rides but then needed a tweak of the spoke key after most outings. It was typically only a spoke or two that had loosened, but it's something to keep an eye on - an additional dab of threadlocker would likely have helped here.

After plenty of abuse, the bearings were still spinning smoothly and there was little sign of dirt or water ingress into the hubs. Though, sometimes the front hubs caps could become a little loose when trying to install the front wheel which is a pure first world annoyance.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesStans have brought an affordable and well-considered wheelset to market that is tough and reliable, but not one for the weight weenies. Paul Aston







115 Comments

  • + 63
 Nice to see it's not a new "STANdard", I'll get my coat
  • + 15
 Cue rimshot
  • + 8
 enough with the HUBris
  • + 5
 Wheel yourself out of here before things really start to get rolling, man.
  • - 3
 @sideshowb: these puns don't leave me feeling wheel.
  • + 7
 Well don’t feel under pressure to make one @JesseE:
  • + 20
 I told myself there'd be no bad puns on this thread, looks like I spoke too soon.
  • + 2
 @metaam: Today's puns don't fall flat.
  • + 2
 Stans Notubes can't deny that a STANchion simply is a tube.
  • + 8
 You are all so engaging.
  • + 8
 I'd like to get my pawls on these.
  • + 15
 This got my nipples hard.
  • + 5
 @Monstertruckermotherfuker: I am not ENVEous .....
  • + 2
 @speed10: is that like a rim job?
  • + 1
 you just need to go with the flow
  • + 2
 You guys have spoken so much im tired
  • + 1
 @metaam: where bead pinkbike without any bad puns
  • + 1
 My fiancé said our engagement is off.
  • + 43
 Finally a review of something that people actually want to see! A reasonably priced, strong and modern set of wheels with decent hub engagement and a good width. These wheels will interest most riders much more than a set of high end carbon wheels. Great work!
  • + 31
 The problem with all these manufacturers offering their own hubs and rims means there are fewer options to mix and match. I would rather have stans rims and hope hubs all day long.

And have prices increased?? £350 used to get you a pair of hope hoops with flow rims.
  • + 116
 Congratulations on leaving the EU, and welcome to boundless inflation.
  • + 18
 MK3 flows with Hope Pro 4s and DT spokes are $600 now. Just ordered a set.
  • + 3
 @REDMAN4: same, coloradocyclist.com and I had a handbuilt set in under 2 weeks.
  • + 1
 @schuchard83: haha got mine from the same place!! Purple hubs all the way!!!
  • + 4
 @REDMAN4: My buddy is a wheel builder (he owed me a favor)... I ordered the Arch MK3's for $62 per rim. Hope Pro 4 hubs from Merlin for $210 shipped. And I splurged on some Sapim CX-Ray bladed spokes ($2.30 each x64) so I'm in a pretty sweet wheelset for less than $500... and it weighs right at 1750g.
  • + 1
 @REDMAN4: blue hubs here, i'll watch out for the purple's on the trail!
  • + 2
 @schuchard83: 2 weeks? I just had some hopes laced up to some spank rims in 3 days from my local shop
  • - 5
flag theminsta (Jan 11, 2018 at 10:29) (Below Threshold)
 @siderealwall2: When you're from California, the sanctuary state.
  • - 1
 @siderealwall2: and the EU doesn’t inflate their currency???
  • + 1
 @Tr011: Maybe if ordered custom hoops every month that would be a big deal but nope
  • + 5
 @gooutsidetoday: you can’t beat a good friend favor. Really can’t beat this setup for the price. All my freinds are @ssholes with no talents but they make good drinkin buddies.
  • + 2
 Building wheels really isn't that hard. Considering the prices these complete wheels go for, it seems like well worth the investment Smile . And you have the flexibility to use their 26" rims if you like. And actually have a DH front wheel that also works with a 20mm axle...
  • + 2
 @gooutsidetoday: nice build, at a nice price.
  • + 1
 @vinay: you Sir are correct. I have "pre-built" 2 wheelsets, I'm too cheap to buy a proper truing stand + tension meter, so I take them to the shop for dish/tension. It's therapeutic, and cheap, if you have the time of course.you can spend 250-300 USD on good hubs/spokes/nipples (DT/Hope) and then you choose your rim poison (alloy/carbon)...
  • + 3
 I always build my own wheels, I have since I was sixteen. Well I say always, I've built fewer than ten I guess. They save you a ton of cash, you can choose whatever parts you want, and you get a real sense of achievement when you finish one. I have not used a proper trying stand or dish stick since 1999 and it doesn't matter. I dish using a three cups on the worktop method, rolling different diameter sockets under the end caps as a substitute for the slide on a dish stick. Truth is overrated with today's fat tyres. Even tension is where it's at for a long lasting wheel.
  • + 3
 @Lagr1980: It doesn't really matter how much time you have, just how much you are in a hurry Wink . I rarely build my wheel in one day. I make myself a cup of tea and lace it (while enjoying my tea). Then put it away. An other day I finish truing it. Or even take two days for that. And by that I mean I only put in 20 minutes a day or so when I feel like. My next frame will be finished early March. What rush do I have to finish my wheels well before that? in total I may spend an hour or so building a complete wheel though obviously when using Shimano hubs, the first thing I do is put some grease in these hubs Wink .
  • + 9
 "The S1 rim is essentially the same as the Flow MK3 but made from a slightly cheaper 6069 alloy over the 6061 of the latter. The S1 rims also come with steel eyelets and a sleeve joint instead of having no eyelets and being pinned and welded like the MK3. The S1 rim also has a slightly deeper rim section by 1.6mm, adding some extra bulk. "

So essentially, "though they may look the same, they are a completely different rim".

While I appreciate the review, and candidly saying you prefer aluminum over carbon, the elements you describe as being different are fundamental to rim performance... despite their looking the same, they will perform completely differently... it's a little misleading to say otherwise.
  • + 8
 I have the same issue with spoke tension as the reviewing identified. Two sets of Flow MK3's, same issue with recurring de-tension after a few rides. One set was built by a builder, the other by me. Tire pressure really affects the spoke tension on these rims so I wonder if they are just too "soft". I like the ease of tubeless with these and generally the rims have been relatively dent free with a few exceptions on my DH set.
  • + 1
 Use DT-Swiss Super Competition spokes and increase the tension of the spokes to prevent de-tensioning.
  • + 5
 I had Flow MK3's on my DH bike. Chalk me up for spoke de-tension as well. 8-10 runs at a bike park and I have to re-tighten, some are ridiculously loose. Mine were built by a builder who has done nice work for me in the past on other wheels with no issues.
  • + 4
 Same problem for me. I have to tension almost half of my rear spokes after every single ride. I'm not talking about bike park thrashing either. Regular trail/xc rides. Hand built from a shop. My front wheel is flawless, but obviously some flex going on in the rear and casting spokes to bend and twist, I guess. There was a pinkbike questions post a few months ago covering this same problem with flow rims.
  • + 15
 when building Stan's rims, you need to put a fully seated tire on for the final wheel tensioning (pressure doesn't matter)
you will see that as soon as the tire beads pop up onto the rim ledges the spoke tension drops about 20%

when building some MK3 Arches I tested how tire pressure affected spoke tension and found that with beads seated that tire pressure didn't matter; however, while building some Mk3 Crests I had trouble getting a Specialized tire to pop up and seat on the ledges, and with a tube inside inflated to 40psi (but with much of the beads still stuck in the centre channel) spoke tension didn't drop. Then removed the tube and reinstalled the tire tubeless style and sure enough the spoke tension dropped

the drop in spoke tension may affect your dishing too

how many builders finish their work with a seated tire for tensioning?
  • + 0
 Dude, me too! I had some Stan's rims and such in a previous life and they kept losing tension. Switched to Spank rims, and they don't lose tension or true.
  • + 0
 @WaterBear: Ha! I actually did the same exact thing. I'll be buying Spanks again, not Stan's! Tired of worrying about destroying a rim every run.
  • + 1
 @taprider: Not sure, but after the first couple days on mine the builder went back over them and brought the tension up with the tire seated. Not sure how that would be any different than what you are suggesting, but even after he did that they still loosened.
  • + 1
 I wouldn't say threadlock is the answer, as Paul Aston suggested. Make sure spoke tension is high enough (though the tension recommended by the rim manufacturer is for the wheel without tire so no need to mount a tire for this) and there is no twist in the tire. When twisting a nipple, twist it slightly too far and then back off a little. Finally when the rim has already suffered plastic deformation, you won't be able to get a round wheel with equal spoke tension. There is no other way than to replace the rim.
  • + 1
 @monts: not sure why
the several pair of Stan's I have built didn't loosen off
spokes at near max rated tension with bead seated, which means they would be over tensioned without a tire, but if you are still riding your wheel without a seated tire your rim is hooped anyway
  • + 8
 Alloy is king! Nice seeing reviews of wheels we can actually afford to purchase.
Note, you can dent an alloy and continue to ride, carbon could have blown up and taken weeks to get that hoop back on there, even if it is "warrantied."
  • + 18
 A lot of assumption there.
  • + 5
 I rode my rear cracked for 6 months. I just had to quit riding the front after a full year. It rode ok until it started to wobble more and more. There was plenty of warning.
  • + 26
 @R-trailking-S: No way, it would have exploded send carbon shards into you riding buddies killing at least a few of them.
  • + 5
 Carbon would have required a much larger impact to do damage. More likely there would be no dent and no damage at all if it was a carbon rim.
  • + 1
 @R-trailking-S: Ballsy, I would not be able to trust a cracked part. Must have held up well. What rims?
  • + 1
 Reminds me of the 4x4 off-road world in the 90s. Steel wheels will bend but you can still get home. Aluminum wheels are gonna break and crack the rim bead. And if you ever did see a broken aluminum wheel, the steel guys reinforced there opinion. They would never admit the same hit would have taco'd their lip or stuffed it into the caliper. And now everyone runs billet Alcoas.
  • + 1
 I've seen people riding cracked carbon rims. As long as you stay close to home it's fine, but i wouldn't take a cracked wheel for a bike trip.

@TheOriginalTwoTone - no carbon rims don't always need a serious hit to fail. that's a vast generalization considering how big differences there are between carbon rims from one manufacturer over another. Same with alu. No WTB rim will ever take as much beating as corresponding high end DT Swiss rim. All rims fail, the main differences between carbon and alu apart from the price is that carbon comes only in two states: 1. perfectly straight and dent free 2.cracked.
  • + 2
 @MikeAzBS: billet alu wheels are different to cast alu wheels...
  • + 2
 I've virtually folded the sidewall on a crossmax SX rim flat, dented the rim bed as well. Amazingly it only had a little wobble and still held air. After being quoted £120 for a new rim I just hammered it straight (ish) on an anvil and spent a short while with a spoke key and it's still going strong 18 months later.
  • - 2
 @DC1988: Mavic is soft, especially Maxtal. Has always been. Around 2010 most of my friends were running EX721s and they were folding the beds like crazy. rims stayed rather true but beds were dented all over. I had 729s and Deemaxes for some time and also got some dents for no bigger reason. DT Swiss despite being thin holds rather well. I hucked into a rockgarden by mistake this season, severely punctured Spec GRID tyre and split the HuckNorris inside. Just a tiny mark on the rim bed there. Few weeks ago I cased Stans Arch Mk3 and punctured through Rocket Ron, two holes, immediate deflation. Not a sign on the rim. Similar cases were denting 729. Just because it's alu doesn't mean it's alu Wink
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns:
I've heard a lot of stories of the mavic rims being soft but I've only dented mine on that occasion and that was racing in the Yorkshire dales where it was very rocky. I've been pretty impressed with the wheels overall.

That said I'd never buy a similar set again as alu spokes are idiotic.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Completely agree. I am just very hard on wheels. I usually get a few months out of carbon before boom! My alloys are not straight, have several dents but somehow keep rolling. There is also the pinch flat issue that carbon wheels are notorious for. Id rather dent a rim, fix it with a crescent wrench, than crack a rim/ flat a $80 tire.

Also, being an environmental scientist, its difficult to continue throwing away a non-renewable resource( carbon), at least my alloy hoops can go into making beer cans and window frames!
  • + 1
 @DC1988: Exactly! Pull out the torch next time too and use a crescent wrench!
  • + 1
 @LoganKM1982: Light Bicycle.

I pinched flatted two tubeless tires on that rear wheel. Eventually low pressures and roots broke the rim bed in several places. Carbon is somewhat less than ideal in this regard.

I guess I am lucky that my fork crown pressfit loosened before my front wheel exploded or my cranks rattled apart...
  • + 1
 @R-trailking-S: there is another issue. Stiff rims, regardless of material make it more likely for the spokes and nipples to break. But maybe I have a bad luck. After the trip to Hafjell I broke 3 straight DT comps in DT350/EX741 wheel, and one went at the base... hmmm... I would not call my wheels as overly tensioned. I did mess up 2 Pillar Superspokes and 2 DT prolock alu nipples during one year with LB 33 rim. I Minnaared once, having the spoke/ nipple puncture the Stans rim tape from the inside. Anyhoo, all rims fail, aluminium ones, even the most expensive samples are cheaper to replace, than even the cheapest carbon ones (maybe you can get some cheap carbon rims from AliExpress but good luck with these). I also like working on my rims/tyres with metal levers since I have only one wheelset and DH tyres are a btch to fit. Heavier folks claim all alu rims are too flexy, hum... oh those power lifters. Considering average durable enduro carbon rim weighs 450g the weight argument is bollocks. But yeah, why not, your money.

If smeone wants I have 23mm inner LB in 26" rims for sale. Replacing them with Spank Race 33.Came with second hand wheelset, I was after Hope hubs that came with it. I have now achieved the status of a super cool bloke, Hope hubs. All the Brits love me now.
  • + 10
 A Canadian company is reviewing an American companies product, and giving us cost per gram of weight savings in pounds?
  • + 4
 these are the worst hubs I have ever owned. three freehubs this summer, averaging about 10 rides before the freehub eat it self. even with a replacement axle which was suppose to solve the problem. the rims are fine as far as a disposable item that you plan on replacing every season or less.
  • + 3
 These are not very appealing when at the similar price (400-450 euro) you can get DT Swiss XM481 rims, Comp or Comp race spokes and 350 hubs with 36T upgrade.
That wheelset is going to have proper tubeless bead and weigh around 1850gr in 29" size.
  • + 11
 Are you suggesting Stans does not have a proper tubeless bead?
  • + 2
 Indeed. I built an XM481 and EX511 onto straightpull 350s with comp spokes for €400 at the end of summer. About 1850g for 27.5".
  • + 4
 Nextie carbon rims on Novatec hubs with DT Swiss Competition spokes and alloy Squorx nipples for $500 if you can find the right hubset listing on eBay. 1600g also.
  • + 1
 @Lornholio: I got a E1650 wheelset deal for 160€. Apparently it's a wider (30mm) E1700 2017 model, which means 350 star ratchet hub and a welded rim. I never got confirmation from dt swiss or anyone, if the rim is the EX511 or not. If it's not, I don't know what else it can be...
So basically, it seems to be a 30mm EX1501 with 350 hubs instead of 240 (and their only difference is weight I guess?).
1850g for the set.

@msusic : maybe comparing the Stans to EX511 rims would be more relevant?

It seems like it's hard to beat DT, as even the mentioned custom wheels would come under 500€. Or alternatively, Stans rims on DT hubs and spokes.
  • + 2
 What not to like? the weight for a durable set of wheels is totally fine, it seems that durability really takes a hit as you decrease weight, in hubs and rims. A good product that I bet will see huge adaptation in OEM as Stans is a pretty big name now.
  • + 3
 why would anyone buy an airshot or other $200 floor pump with a pressure chamber when you can just get one of these for $30

www.harborfreight.com/5-gallon-portable-air-tank-65594.html
  • + 1
 kite board or inflatable raft pumps with their 3 L to 5 L large diameter cylinders work great for seating the tires, then switch to a normal bike pump to get to your final pressure
  • + 3
 Because, when you live in an apartment, folks tend to get pretty irritated when you fire one of those up while you're working on your bike in the livingroom at 11pm.
  • + 7
 @alperson: It's an air tank, not a compressor. Makes no noise
source: live in apt, own exact thing
  • + 2
 I had an earlier Stans Flow wheelset spec'd to my old Horsethief. And your durability take is spot on, as a bigger rider, 6'2" 220lbs, and riding mostly the rocky terrain in and around Colorado, I can confirm that the rims are quite durable, and took a proper beating, but the spoke tension did need some attention every other ride or so.
  • + 5
 Stan’s hit this one out of the park. Just what I’m looking for.
  • + 1
 Well I think I'm the only one, but I think these wheels are shit. They came on my bike, they pinch flatted my tyres all the time (with these wheels, I discovered that yes, you can pinch flat on tubeless), they dented to f*ck. I bought some Mavics, the bike now dances down the trails, I don't get flats and haven't dented the rims. Same tyre pressures. I aint no heavy weight at 65kg either. Just my tuppence worth Smile
  • + 1
 These come pre-taped, but valves are not included for us non-reviewer types. Nice review though, I've been interested in these. These hubs can also be upgraded to their NEO "Speedsync" freehub which will get you to 5 degrees between engagement points.
  • + 3
 Why would you get these if you cant get the MK3 version with Hope hubs for ~$525 for a wheelset which not only has better hubs, is also lighter.
  • + 1
 Exactly! I think you could get to the 475 price point with the MK3 + some Novatec hubs. I don't think that these stan's hubs are any better than some "Taiwane's standard" hubs.
  • + 2
 I like the durability of the rims on my hardtail, but after three freehibs in four months, I'm not very happy. As someone who sells this product I'm going to tell customers to avoid the hub like the plague.
  • + 5
 Stuff for the rest of us!
  • + 4
 Wheelset designed for enduro/DH but can't run a 20mm front axle? LoL
  • + 1
 Im really surprised this comment isnt higher up.
  • + 4
 If Danny Mac hasn’t tested it, then obviously I have to take a pass.
  • + 1
 The new MK3 rims are the worst ones yet. Ive gone through 4 this season... Way too soft for aggressive Colorado riding. Stick to Spanks or maybe Stan's can bring back the Flow EX.
  • + 1
 Had my S1 wheelset on my Pivot Firebird for 6 months doing multiple uplift DH days and they have been impressive. My rear wheel could do with a bit more spoke tension but I got them on offer for £280 so can't complain
  • + 1
 Looking at the DT Swiss E1700 Spline 30s, does anyone know the overall rider weight limit for the Stans S1s?

I'm 6'1 and 260 and need a substantially strong wheel build for a new bike soon.
  • + 1
 I was looking at Stans this morning before this review came up. 250lbs.
  • + 1
 @Rockyrdwarrior : I weigh 95kg (around 200lbs) and cheaper E1900 came on my Swoop 170. Heavily dented with one heavy bad landing on evil rock. Even with a new tire, truing etc, air leaked from the damaged sleeved joint, which is a problem that can't happen with E1700 welded rims, but I don't know if they're that much stronger.

What rims are on the E1700, is it EX471 for the 25mm and EX511 for the 30mm? If so, should be very strong.

For DH and piece of mind I know I'd still look at the FR570, under 500€ for a complete set with 350 hubs.
Otherwise my E1650 (=30mm E1700 I guess) are good for trail riding and 1850g was the good surprise!
  • + 2
 I've got DT Swiss M1700 Spline 30. Weigh in just at 200 lbs. I've put a hefty dent in my rear running 28 psi with a Maxxis Minion DHR. Very rocky terrain and during a race, but still. I'd recommend you get a wheel built with the DT Swiss EX511.
  • + 1
 I've been running these (27.5) since summer...so far so good! After reading I think I better check the spoke tension though...
  • + 1
 Bought a set of these for my new bike and have not had any issues so far. I upgraded to the 72 poe freehub and things are going strong.
  • + 3
 You had me at sub $500 pricetag...
  • + 1
 "This is said to help with tubeless inflation, reduce the risk of burping and increase rolling resistance"

Why would you want more rolling resistance?
  • + 4
 I was thinking the same. Could explain why I feel slow on my arch mk3’s

Or maybe I am just slow
  • + 2
 I think it means the tire bead rolling on the rim, not the tire rolling on the ground.
  • + 1
 I think that's a typo. Stan's BST helps decrease rolling resistance.
  • + 1
 Crushed 2 flow mk3 rims and an arch rim in 2017. Whilst one wtb rim git me through 2016 with more riding. I've only had bad experience with these rims.
  • + 1
 I just got a set of these, they're great, good to see new stuff available in non-boost. Only paid £285 from Winstanleys here in the uk, can't complain at that price.
  • + 1
 Don't put threadlock on your spoke nipples ffs! Just learn to true wheels properly. It's not exactly rocket science.
  • + 1
 I didn't know Stans did hubs. How do they compare to Hope for long term durability?
  • + 6
 They don't...
  • + 2
 They shoulda called it H1...for Heavy 1.
  • + 2
 Been really impressed by my mk3s, would buy again
  • + 1
 Going tubless with stans BST is a pleasure. I don't even own a floor pump. A humble Lezyne hand pump gets the job done.
  • + 2
 When is WTB gonna start doing wheelsets?
  • + 1
 They used to. And the hubs were pretty terrible.
  • + 1
 @nouseforaname: when wtb was wtb (before 97/9Cool their hubs and rims were the best on the market.
  • + 2
 Love the Flow rims!
  • + 1
 Why not the Speedsync freehub?
  • + 1
 I would love to see Stans use eyelits on all of the rims they make.
  • + 1
 I would buy a set of these tomorrow if it came in a 26".
  • + 1
 @Eirami94 tchass

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