Stevie Smith's Devinci Wilson - Lourdes DH World Cup 2016

Apr 9, 2016
by Paul Aston  
Stevie Smith s new fully carbon Devinci

bigquotesWe have a new carbon frame for this year but the carbon swingarm is the same as last year. We still use the aluminium chainstay for extra stiffness, it's better for this application than the carbon - this part of the frame works in extension so it's related to how much it stretches - imagine trying to stretch a beer can, it will only go so far. - Nigel Reeve

Stevie Smith s Devinci Wilson

bigquotesWe use Guide Ultimate levers with Code calipers, for more power and better heat management as there is more metal surface area to dissipate heat, and brakes are the last place to consider saving weight over performance. The same Easton Havoc wheelset we have been using for a couple of seasons but we have changed to Maxxis tires. Shorty ST on the front and 3C on the rear with a couple of top secret cuts on the front tire. - Nigel Reeve

Stevie Smith s Devinci Wilson
Stevie will definitely be looking to remove that number two again this year.

Stevie Smith s Devinci Wilson

bigquotesThe bike has 26% sag at the rear, and not very much at the front, the bike sags 7mm front and rear under its own weight. - Nigel Reeve

Stevie Smith s Devinci Wilson
Stevie runs a 50mm stem and his own 30mm rise signature handlebar. He also uses the latest Flow grip from ODI.

Stevie Smith s Devinci Wilson
SDG I-Beam saddle and carbon post.

Lourdes World Cup 2016 - shock article
A 400lb spring from Super Alloy Racing with a thrust bearing to prevent coil binding.

Stevie Smith s Devinci Wilson
The drivetrain is a standard X0 DH affair with E*13's latest device.

Stevie Smith s Devinci Wilson
The Wilson chainstay is still aluminium though Stevie has moved to the new carbon front triangle for 2016.

Stevie Smith s Devinci Wilson
The team has changed to Maxxis for 2016. Shorty tires with 26/29psi with a tube/tubeless system

Stevie Smith s Devinci Wilson
If there was a competition for best World Cup mechanic, I think Nigel Reeve would easily make the podium. This is his 9th season and 6th working with Stevie.



110 Comments

  • 134 2
 well...sag under it´s own weight. i maybe should get my suspension to service soon...
  • 5 1
 Nigel's a great guy - he came to my old shop at Esher when he started working for Devinci racing, to come and check out the new Wilson (we were the UK distributor)

ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb6310659/p4pb6310659.jpg

great to see him still doing good work these years later! Best of luck to Stevie and Nigel for 2016.
  • 75 5
 "Sags 7mm under it's own weight"? WTF?
  • 7 14
flag Ride12 (Apr 9, 2016 at 13:02) (Below Threshold)
 weight of the bike
  • 8 7
 7mm with 200mm is 3,5% SAG but maybe is a mistake
  • 5 1
 @munteanuHILL: He said front and rear in it's own weight (the bike).
  • 9 2
 @munteanuHILL: That's without a rider on it.
  • 2 1
 my bad
  • 17 3
 Yes he knows its sagging under the weight of the bike but that doesn't even make sense. Is that desired? Is that even possible? lol I've never heard of such a thing but I'd love if someone had an actual explanation.
  • 13 1
 @joalst: They don't do random at that level, it must be desired and with the extreme precision at which they tune their suspension I don't see why it wouldn't be possible
  • 20 0
 @joalst: perhaps it's related to reduced stiction with the factory suspension? Motorcycles always have static sag but they are much heavier.
  • 29 0
 7mm sag under the bikes own weight yet still maintains 26% sag with rider weight. That's pretty cool.
  • 3 1
 @TPLRacing: still seems a lot for the weight of bike?
  • 2 0
 @gonzoracing: agreed but I have to assume Nigel knows!
  • 15 1
 Sag 3% under it's own weight, 26% with rider... that's some insane ramp-up!
  • 3 0
 Long time ago Missy Giove Foes has a sag ib her bike like this without the rider.... Looks like its very smooth suspention at the begining of the stroke
  • 24 5
 Why are you all spazzing about the sag under its own weight? That's nothing unusual.
  • 7 1
 My old Risse Champs used to sag under their own weight.
  • 3 1
 It's maybe less likely with an air shock through stiction but,with a coil and most air shocks it should sit into its travel.
  • 80 8
 Nothing to write hime about. My Mom sags under her own weight too. Then with the rider on she rampsup rather quickly.
  • 34 2
 My balls are at 75%
  • 1 0
 @minty1: Exactly, most DH bikes sag a bit by themselves, nothing that weird.
  • 7 7
 @WAKIdesigns: awesome comment waki
  • 2 0
 My current downhill bike has a bit of negative travel, I thought that was totally ordinary.
  • 2 0
 @minty1: bodoinnnng ha ha like it.what psi?
  • 2 1
 A 400 lb spring is fairly stiff (thus 26% sag under rider weight). With that in mind, theres most likely not many turns of preload and thus a very supple initial stroke (first few mm). I would like to say that the thrust bearing has something to do with the initial sag but coil wind-up should only occur when the coil is deeper in its travel.
  • 1 0
 @joalst: he's probably running coil springs with very little preload.
  • 2 0
 I think the 7mm of static sag says something about just how supple these factory suspensions are. MX bikes have a static sag setting that you aim for to see if you are sprung correctly, so I imagine this is something similar and made possible by the ridiculously smooth suspension action of a world cup level machine.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: how do you know?
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: Yea...because they weighed 16 lbs
  • 3 0
 @Ride12: I believe that shoes how crazy plush and active the suspension is at the top of its travel, it probably tracks like a beast
  • 4 0
 @joemo5: if you're using "turns" of preload then you're doing it wrong. Spring should have as little preload
On it as possible.
  • 1 0
 @joalst: lets say the bikes weight is 15 kg, minus all the unsuspended weight, there are maybe 10 kg actually loaded on the bikes springs. Causing 3,5% of sag. Now with stevie on the bike, maybe with a weight of 80 kg and the 10 kg of the bike there are 26% of sag.
Doesnt seem unlogic because the springs are a bit pretensioned and there will be some progressivness in the bikes suspension design. if you had non of these two you can simply calculate the sag. The weight with rider is nine times higher so the sag would be 9*3,5%=31,5%.
I think most of our bikes won´t have this kind of sag because our springs are roughly preloaded and the friction of the nonserviced dampers and forks are crucial in comparison to a freshly serviced wc fork with extra low viscosity.
  • 1 1
 @bubbrubb: Speaking to the general Pinkbike audience, any measurement other than "turns" might go misinterpreted. Lets not forget that a "turn" of preload can be directly related to a linear measurement of preload biased off of the thread pitch of the threaded collar and shock body. Using some sort of linear measurement would be more more accurate but if Fox, Cane creek, and many other suspension manufacture's reference preload using "turns", its good enough for me too.
  • 1 0
 @minty1: YOU must be at my age then. grip tape my friend grip tape.....
  • 1 0
 @joemo5: right cause saying "more preload" would go misinterpreted. If you're doing turns you're on the wrong spring case closed.
  • 2 0
 @bubbrubb: 'I have 0.1 turns of preload'

That's more preload. It's still 'turns' and is not too much.
  • 41 3
 If Tom Hanks road DH he'd ride this bike.
  • 5 1
 I see what you did there... good one.
  • 27 1
 Wilsoooon
  • 31 2
 NO!! Because Devinci Code !! Smile
  • 11 3
 Rode*
  • 4 0
 This has made my day
  • 21 0
 That paint job looks really good. Best of luck for Stevie!
  • 12 1
 Im sorry but Im gonna need more details about how the chainstay works more in stretching and how aluminium is better than carbon for stiffness please.
  • 2 2
 Right? I was thinking that's the perfect place to use carbon
  • 3 1
 Yeah. I'm not sure if he's intentionally dusting his tracks, but pretty nothing in his comments makes sense or checks out.
  • 3 0
 I thought metallic materials have the same Young's modulus and ultimate strength regardless of tension or compression loading. I also thought carbon fibre is very strong in tension, but useless in compression, hence the use of UD carbon sheets to resist loading from all directions.

I call BS on "only extension" too. Even though each end of the chain stay can be analysed as pinned (due to the bearings) and appears to be a truss, the systems receives lateral loads and the member has to resist torsional loading. Designers use finite element software for a good reason; the loads and analysis are not simple.
  • 1 1
 in 2015 he had a aluminium bike with a carbon chainstay
www.redbull.com/en/bike/stories/1331741158356/up-close-with-the-canadian-chainsaw-massacre-dh-racing

now his bike is made out of carbon except for the chainstay
  • 1 0
 @vhdh666: He had carbon seatstays, but aluminium chainstays, the only difference with his current steed is the front triangle material
  • 8 0
 show em your stuff Stevie!!
  • 9 3
 You're looking at the fastest bike in Lourdes!
  • 5 18
flag jack-aldred (Apr 9, 2016 at 14:42) (Below Threshold)
 No you're not
  • 1 0
 @Jack-McLovin:
  • 1 1
 Sorry, won't tell the truth again Razz
  • 6 1
 My birds tits sag under there own weight and their nowt to get excited about
  • 1 0
 Haha gravity can be a cold unforgiving b*tch
  • 2 0
 @TPLRacing: Hence why he's on the blackbox program...Those boxxers and vivd shocks are modified to have the lowest amount of friction, also helping the fact is that he probably gets a service done after every day of racing, higher end coatings and other kinds of mods are not uncommon on the wc to get the best small bump compliance possible in first part of the stroke, but then again im sure its also a rider preference..
  • 4 0
 What does "26/29psi with a tube/tubeless system" mean? Is it a combo of tubes and tubeless f/r?
  • 4 3
 Tubeless with an inner tube to ensure he doesn't flat
  • 3 0
 @TPLRacing: Is it a bit like that Schwalbe procore thing then?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I think procore is a product that Nigel invented, not sure if he gets royalties but it's interesting that the team have moved on to Maxxis.
  • 1 0
 I see two valve cores.
  • 4 0
 26 psi front tire with no tube, 29 psi rear with a tube
  • 1 0
 @leon-forfar: There are two valves, front and rear. I am guessing that the tire "tubeless" pressure, with some kind of procore-like set-up with a tube at higher pressure.
  • 4 0
 sweet ride, now get er across the line 1st Stevie!!
  • 3 0
 @paulaston what size frame is Smith using? Love all these bike checks...more, more
  • 1 1
 Large
  • 1 0
 I like Steve Smith, I like Nigel Reeve and I like Paul Aston. A trifecta of awesome dudes.
  • 4 0
 Running a coil fork instead of the World Cup fork. Interesting.
  • 1 0
 Also, the top crown is custom. It's flatter than the stock Boxxer crown. Rock Shox please make these standard.
  • 6 0
 probably half of the Sram athletes are running a Boxxer Team, for the same reason they run a coil in the rear.
  • 1 0
 He runs a coil, correct!
  • 3 0
 I think you mean Easton Havoc wheelset, unless it's just a havoc decal?
  • 2 0
 Wonder why hes running the old Avid Rotors?
  • 2 2
 More metal to heat up. Peaty used to run the cable version of whatever brakes he was running at the time because they had more metal than the hydro version.
  • 3 1
 I've seen this multiple times by Pro riders and I've wondered the same thing. I do the same but my reasoning is a little different, aka I'm too cheap to buy new rotors and the old ones work.
  • 2 0
 Rad! Ride... Stevie smash it!!
  • 1 1
 Mtb spanners measuring static sag what's weird about that? In MX taking your static sag and rider sag numbers are standard procedure to find the right spring and set up
  • 4 1
 Because most mountain bikes dont sag with their own weight.
  • 1 1
 @nehuen93:
The thing is, that most long travel bikes do sag under their own weight.
  • 1 1
 @chaserider: ehhh no they don't
  • 1 1
 @nehuen93: But they do. Usually not by a whole lot, but a bit.
  • 1 0
 Wilson is always good on track, very balanced, sic as bike SS, smash it this weekend, go the Stash!
  • 2 0
 So, how do photo bikes always stand on there own?
  • 1 0
 Remember that bit about Steve in Seasons back in 2010ish... he ripped then... still rips... GO STEVE!
  • 3 1
 sick as!
  • 1 0
 Frame size? And what #spring does he run in the fork?
  • 2 2
 air
  • 3 0
 sorry my mistake its a spring
  • 1 0
 misread post and cannot delete
  • 1 0
 He runs a Race Only Spring, steel, progressive...
  • 1 0
 so they cut sipes into the side knobs, just like in a dhf.
  • 1 0
 whats up with that missing right fork bumper on the frame?
  • 1 0
 I believe in miracles,
Where're you from?
You sexy thing!
  • 1 0
 What happened to his schwalbe magical Mary's?!
  • 1 0
 Front shock bolt drilled out to save weight - awesome!
  • 1 0
 not really... those small holes in the hex are for safety wire, standard procedure on motor race bikes...
  • 1 0
 Ketchup and mustard paint
  • 3 2
 Ugly chainring
  • 1 0
 Its the crank, not the chain ring.
  • 1 0
 @Fifty50Grip: nope. Definitely the chainring. The crank is ok looking, if only they weren't so fragile
  • 1 0
 ..
  • 2 2
 mcdonald
  • 1 2
 The more carbon the better. That Bump stop looks shady though.
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