To the casual observer, the bikes that Justin Leov and Joe Barnes will be racing at the final stop of the Enduro World Series look almost identical. Both riders will be aboard a Canyon Strive CF, the German company's flagship 160mm enduro race bike, and other than the fact the Leov is running a coil sprung shock, while Barnes has chosen air, the differences between the two bikes are difficult to spot at first glance. It's when you dive into the smaller details that things start to get interesting – the riding styles and physical size of Leov and Barnes have resulted in two completely unique race setups.



EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Justin Leov's Canyon Strive CF, size large.
EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Joe Barnes' Canyon Strive CF, size small.

Overview


Justin Leov:
Justin Leov stands 6' (180 cm) tall and weighs 183 lb (83 kg), and is riding a size large Strive CF frame with a reach of 468mm. Leov prefers a longer bike due to the increased stability at speed, and usually runs a 40 or 50mm stem to achieve the ideal body position.

His days as a World Cup downhiller no doubt play a role in how he likes his bike to feel, although up until the middle of this season the Kiwi's bike setup more focused on carrying speed on the less-rough section of trail rather than on being able to charge at full speed into technical sections. “My strengths in the past years have been in the physical aspects, and that's how I set up my bikes – they've been fast bikes that are set up more for carrying speed and maybe not so capable in the technical sections,” said Leov.

After being forced to take a break and miss part of the race season due to glandular fever, Leov started to experiment at the Whistler EWS round, and is now on a machine that's closer to a downill bike than a trail bike. There's a coil sprung RockShox Vivid in the back, and a 180mm Lyrik up front. “For me it's been a little bit of a breakthrough. The bike sits in a much better position, I've got a little bit more rowdiness in me. If I'm in a race situation I can go off a drop or get loose in a section and it feels to me like I can recover from that more like I'm on a downhill bike, where in the past it's been more like I was a passenger in those sections,” said Leov.


Joe Barnes:
Joe Barnes checks in at 5'8” (173 cm) and weighs 150 lb (68 kg). He's riding a size small Strive CF frame with a reach of 422mm. There's been a push for longer bikes and shorter stems over the last few seasons, but Barnes hasn't completely bought into that trend; this season he actually downsized to a smaller frame size. He also prefers running a 50mm stem versus the 40 or 30mm options that have become popular, due to the slightly slower steering that it provides.

“I've never pushed into holes or compressions when I'm riding – I never developed that style. I try to skip over stuff, and when I race I don't push harder I just get more precise,” said Barnes. While Leov's bike is closer to a downhill bike, Barnes' precise and nimble riding style (as well as his lighter weight) means that his bike isn't quite as singlemindedly focused on plowing through the rougher sections of the trail.


EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.

Suspension Setup

This is Justin Leov's first year riding for RockShox, which means that he's had to figure out entirely new base settings for his shock and fork. At the beginning of the season he was on a Monarch Plus in the rear and a 170mm Lyrik up front, but he's since switched to Vivid coil and a 180mm Lyrik.

Depending on the course, Leov runs either 3.5 or 4 tokens inside his Lyrik, which creates the greatest amount of bottom out resistance possible. This allows him to have a fork that feels supple initially, but then still has plenty of support and stability once speeds increase. The overall feel between the front and rear suspension is balanced, although riders that aren't riding at a pro-level pace would likely find it to be very stiff.

There's a 550 lb spring on the shock, and it's been custom-tuned with increased compression damping to prevent Leov from going through the travel too quickly. Leov and his mechanic have been experimenting with different rebound settings, but with only one race remaining they haven't gotten too crazy – the more drastic experimentation will take place in the off-season.


EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
An angleset is in place above the crown of Joe Barnes' 170mm Lyrik.
EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Justin Leov switched to a 180mm Lyrik partway through the season.


Joe Barnes is running a 170mm Lyrik, but he's also using an angleset, which slackens the bike's head angle out the same amount that a 180mm fork would. There are three tokens in the Lyrik, and the rebound is set on the fast side compared to what would be considered “normal.” Out back, the Monarch Plus is set up with 30% sag, and it's equipped with a custom shim stack to provide a faster rebound speed at the beginning of the stroke and slower rebound at the end. Overall, it's not that extreme of a setup, partially due to Barnes' riding style. If you're popping and skimming over the tops of holes and compressions you don't need quite as much support compared to someone with a steamroller-like riding style.


EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
A 40mm stem for Leov...
EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
...and a 50mm stem for Barnes.


Stem, Bars, and Brakes

There may be a four inch height difference between Justin Leov and Joe Barnes, but they're both running 740mm bars. Why? “There's so many stages we do that are through narrow trees, and if you ride a wide bar and have to cut it down for a race it feels unusual. If you're used to running a 740 or 750 bar you're used to it from course to course,” said Leov. But before you rush out to the garage with a hacksaw in a quest to gain EWS street cred, keep in mind that both riders ride with their hands hanging slightly over the outer edge of the bars, and the Ergon lock-on grips add about 5mm to each side.

The two riders also prefer low stem heights, although Barnes takes it the furthest, removing his head set top cap in order to get the stem absolutely as low as possible. It's a unique setup, especially considering that he's running a bar with 20mm of rise, but it's certainly not slowing him down.

If you were to walk around the pits grabbing the brakes of the pros in attendance at this weekend's race you'd find a wide range of settings. Lever angle, bite point – everyone has their own particular position that they prefer. Joe Barnes' lever bite point is on the extreme side of things – his brakes don't even engage until they're mere millimeters from the bar. “I have them really close in and then brake with the middle portion of my finger rather than the end... Everyone from Fort William runs them the way I do – we just never thought anything of it,” said Barnes.


EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
Barnes runs his levers as close to the bar as possible.

Leov sets his brakes up with the bite point much farther out, and said, “I cannot ride a bike with the braking point close to the bar. If I have them there something feels completely off.” He's also switched to Code brakes in order to help fight the tendinitis that he's struggled with this season – the additional power means he doesn't need to grab onto the levers quite as hard.


EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.
EWS 8 2016. Finale Ligure Italy. Photo by Matt Wragg.

Wheels and Tires

As enduro race courses become more and more technical, tire choice is becoming critical, and choosing the wrong tread pattern or casing can make the difference between standing on the podium or the sidelines. Leov says he can't get away with running tires that weigh less than 1100 grams, and for some races he uses a special insert, similar to what's used in the moto world, for increased pinch flat protection. Tire pressure ranges depending on the track, but the maximum he runs is 30 psi in the rear and 26 in the front. For slow speed, slippery tracks he'll drop as low as 22 psi up front.

Barnes is especially particular about his tire pressure, going as far as carrying a pressure guage with him on course and checking his pressure before every stage. “I always make sure that's the same and then I can trust my grip,” said Barnes. For this weekend he'll be running 21 psi up front and 26 psi in the rear, and will be using new tires from Mavic that have a prototype casing, one with a slightly stiffer sidewall for increased support.

Rim widths have been increasing over the last few seasons as well, and both riders said they've been enjoying the 28mm internal width on Mavic's new Deemax wheelset. They're still experimenting with different rear rim widths, and once the season concludes there's plenty of testing to be done to determine the optimum race rim width.



What's Best?

Justin Leov and Joe Barnes are extremely in tune with their bikes, but even though they can rattle off all sorts of geometry figures and shock pressures at the drop of a hat, their ideal setup is derived by feel. There's no magic formula that can be used to come up with a setup that works perfectly for everyone, and even the fastest riders in the world are constantly tweaking and refining their bikes in search of the ideal configuration, one that's comfortable and fast.




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149 Comments

  • + 106
 Joe Barnes should just take the brakes off at that point
  • + 29
 Wouldn't change his riding much tbh
  • + 12
 A friend of mine used to have his brakes engage when the levers touched the grip. The amount of cushion in the grip was how much bite the grips had! I made the mistake of riding his bike once and went directly off the trail as a result of his set up.
  • + 8
 I find that even after a hard day of riding they pull in a little more than they did that same morning. With this setup you would think they would be on the grip before they gave full power... but it obviously works for him. Slop mountain!
  • + 6
 @jaame: I'm with you. My earliest experiences of DH were me dragging an boiling brakes, and the lever pulling to the bar and nothing happening, had some proper scares. I've learned to brake properly since, but still like half an inch between grip and lever Just in case Smile
  • - 5
flag vinay (Sep 29, 2016 at 3:53) (Below Threshold)
 I use my middle finger for braking so that I retain a wider grip on the handlebar (index finger to pinky instead of middle finger to pinky). I therefore have to keep the brake lever reach and bite pretty far away from the grip. Otherwise the brake lever would squeeze my index finger. I could just as well not have these adjustments.
  • + 9
 I like them to engage pretty close to the bar, I can keep my hands more closed that way when off the brake and I like how that feels.
  • + 2
 I'd be crushing the side of my middle finder, I wonder how he gets it out of the way!
  • + 1
 @groghunter: For sure, a couple mm is crazy close.
  • + 1
 @DARKSTAR63: Ah, I finally get what people use bite adjustment for. I always prefer my brakes to engage as early as possible, I don't squeeze the lever for no reason. But of course you need the leverblade to be out of the way when you death grip so reach can't be too close but the bite point has to be close. I guess that's the difference with middle finger braking. The middle finger doesn't contribute much to the stability of your grip so it isn't much of an issue to have the middle finger that far from the grip. Whereas I suppose you do want to have the index finger close to the grip whether you're braking or not.

I think index finger braking is more common than middle finger braking. The only people I know who use middle finger braking are Emily Batty (XC racer), Steve Jones (UK Dirt Mag editor) and me. It could be worth considering though if you haven't tried it. Most people I rode with at the Megavalance Alpe d'Huez (which consists of some longer descends) had tired hands from braking so much. Exceptions were a lady running the powerful Magura Gustav M brake and me (braking with the middle finger). Of course many modern brakes provide high brake force comparable to good ol' Gustav. Though as people also typically run larger wheels (larger than 26") and smaller brake rotors (smaller than 210mm) I'm not so sure how that compares.
  • + 1
 @vinay: To be clear I don't pull the brake lever in while not actually braking, I set them close at rest and bite point is therefore fairly close to the bar. Not 2mm..but closer than I see a lot people running them.
  • + 1
 @DARKSTAR63: Ah, ok. So when you brake you just shift your index fingers slightly inboard? Then I can imagine you'd want them close as it would probably pretty hard to grab them when you need to. When I watch pictures of pro DH racers (Steve Peat etc) I often see them with their fingers over the brake levers when they very probably aren't actively braking. So I thought that's what they're doing, Grab them and hold them near the bite point without actually braking. So many people, so many different styles. I've been braking with the middle finger for over ten years now and it has served me much better than when I was braking with the index finger so I thought I'd just share my view.
  • + 1
 @vinay: I think some of that happens when riding, without thinking much about it. Pulling them in near the bite point without braking, and of course when you are feathering the brake - coming on and off it - you may never fully let the lever out. But when setting up the brakes, i aim to have a short throw to minimize that. I set the bite point as close to the bar as I can without the lever bashing my middle finger knuckle when fully applied. I basically go for natural, comfortable hand position. There are outside factors on set up when looking at different braking systems, not everything is fully adjustable and power/modulation ability trumps all. My Shimano XTR trail brakes and Saint m820's are my favorite in that regard. I can achieve near flawless set up with those two.
  • + 2
 I don't understand how everyone keeps raving about how powerful Code brakes are. I have had two sets and both were utterly useless in comparison to Saints. Is it just me; am I doing something wrong?
  • + 2
 @WayneParsons: consider yourself lucky you're still able to just write about that experience
  • + 3
 I don't know about everyone else but I drag my brakes a lot. When I race I have to consciously tell myself all the time. Fingers off the brakes! Four fingers on the bar! Don't brake through this section! Etc...
  • + 2
 I go the Leov way on my brakes. More room to play with and if you need a real power stoppie, you don't suddenly find the lever embedded in the grip and still moving...Crushed fingers are also a possibility. No doubt you can get used to anything however...
  • + 1
 @groghunter: if you place your lever inwards on the bar squeezing it won't affect the other fingers and give you more power to hold the bars
  • + 1
 @TheLongMan: That doesn't solve the real issue though, which is that if you're squeezing the brake lever it's because you need braking power. Once it's at the bar, that's all the braking pressure you're going to get. Very dangerous.
  • + 1
 @chrisingrassia: unless you opt for a soft and thick grip.. but probably the brake is set so that when the lever touches the bar it means the wheel is locked, not just engaged!
  • + 1
 @TheLongMan: Two problems with that: 1st:Braking force to lock the wheel is variable based on your speed.

The second isn't really a problem for a racer who gets new pad & a brake bleed every few days on the outside, but for the rest of us, a setup where the lever is powerful enough right next to the bar, won't be after a period of time. air or water in the lines, brake pad wear, etc, all conspire to move the engagement point of brakes, when the system is left to its own ends for weeks or months.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: yes I wasn't speaking about this as for any random dude but specifically commenting this rider's setup Smile for the rest I run a similar setup, and simply adjust the reach and pad contact while the wear increases. I also feel grip power is increased because my hand is more closely locked on the barsand the tip of my braking finger actually touches the bars. Given those conditions I can see some potential also for others, but of course the majority will stick to something else Smile
  • + 1
 @groghunter: that is an excellent point about service frequency
  • + 31
 Great. One of these at every round please.

Head tube length (especially with the angle set) looks ridiculous on Joe's bike. No doubt he has to run that bar but I bet he would rather have a lower stack.
  • + 5
 Surely they do a 10mm rise bar? Taking the top cap off is just... no. When you've got a 20mm rise bar it is anyway. Aren't those stems ten degree rise too? Run it upside down, perhaps?
  • + 2
 @jaame: naah this way looks better and he can probably shave some grams too
  • + 2
 Yes please! This is really a interesting read!
  • + 0
 @jaame: I'd take an educated guess at it being he likes the feel of the 20mm rise bars compared to the 10mm or 0 rise bars so dropping the top cap is a neat solution. Replacing the top bearing at the end of each day or weekend isn't really a hardship.
  • - 1
 Bottomline is if Renthal can't make a flat bar then Canyon should look for new bar sponsor. It's ridiculous that short guys still have to run 20mm rise bars these days with such low BB's.

Nino wouldn't use a 29" for years due to stack height even though he's now clearly even faster on the 29". Obviously stack height is more important for XC but still, Joe is hardly beer league is he?
  • + 2
 The fatbar is available in 10, 20, 30 and 40mm rise

Maybe they were out of stock when he removed the headset cover, or maybe he thinks it looks cool (which it doesn't).
  • + 0
 Why on earth they want their bars so damn low is beyond me. Must be for a reason that most WC downhill riders have some pretty tall front ends these days, isn't enduro supposed to be about descending as well..?

FWIW, I noticed Atwill is running quite a high bar as well on his Spindrift.
  • + 0
 @bonkywonky: IME, I keep low over the front end so I can sniff out grip around the front tyre. A mate of mine runs the exact opposite and has the highest front end he can get - his style is to get his CoG above the rear wheel so he can manual / pop through chunder really easily whilst I snake through it. I've come to his way of riding recently and spend a bit more time with the front wheel in the air - it's slower, but way more stylish!
  • + 1
 @bluechair84: I used to have a super low front end as well, inspired by Hill in his IH Sunday days but recently moved to higher bars and TBH I like this way better, even when cornering. That said there is a point where the front wheel becomes too light, which isn't even beneficial in the rough stuff as I found the bike wanted to loop out too easily here.

Seems like Atwill is quite comfortable when cornering as well, with bars that seemto be even higher than mine..
  • + 12
 “I've never pushed into holes or compressions when I'm riding – I never developed that style. I try to skip over stuff, and when I race I don't push harder I just get more precise,”

I wish I could say the same.
  • + 4
 Absolutely! I don't race, but I was trying to keep up with my son last night. He rides harder, so my only chance is to be more precise (and, of course, have a better bike).
  • + 10
 I too used to ride with my fingers off the bars. That is until I damn near ripped my pinky off.
  • + 9
 love this in depth comparo-bike check, thank you.
  • + 7
 Why no Vivid Air? Curious why one usually sees the Monarch Plus or the Vivid Coil in Enduro, but less the Vivid Air.
  • + 4
 it doesn't fit
  • + 0
 A coil would be more consistent too.
  • + 4
 Thank you Justin Leov for doing the lion's share of development work on the Fox DHX2 climb switch, which I am now enjoying and you are unable to do. I really appreciate it.

Vivid with climb switch debut next year?
  • - 1
 Not to mention the Monarch plus/debonair is worthless...doesn't matter as these guys have everything custom valved/shimmed but still...
  • + 4
 Everyone notice that the dropper posts aren't slammed to the seatstay... Yes that's right, your bike doesn't need a fucking 170-200mm dropper post to be able to descend steep terrain or be fast....
  • + 27
 They'd probably win more if they had the longer dropper, so thanks for pointing that out.
  • + 9
 Not everyone is short. 150mm drop is nothing compared to my 34" inseam.
  • - 3
 You just need to learn how to lean til your butt grinds them tyres.
  • - 7
flag 2bigwheels (Sep 28, 2016 at 22:17) (Below Threshold)
 @Marcusthefarkus: oh maybe thats their issue! Holy shit, never did I think that their dropper length may be what is causing them to have less than desirable race results.

Everyone! Get this @Marcusthefarkus guy on the phone with Leov and Barnes, he's got the answer to their problems!!
  • + 63
 Wow, it's not often that I read a comment so stupid that it disproves itself so let's try to explain. It's not slammed so that when the post is extended it's at their most efficient pedalling height, cos you know, they have to pedal. If they slammed it, it would pedal like shit so they set their saddle height by this - the fact it's not slammed shows that they could have more drop in their post and the seat be more out of the way. This would feel better. Maybe the seat post they use doesn't come in a greater drop, maybe it's less reliable or flexier with more drop, maybe it weighs more. As a final point my bike needs what the fuck I want it to because it's my bike, you can decide what the fuck you like about yours short arse.
  • + 9
 @acraftygnome: This!!^^^ On the money!
  • + 6
 @acraftygnome: Had a bad start into the day, fella?
  • + 4
 Idk, their clamp positions are pretty similar to my 170mm dropper. Goddamm 36in inseam. . .
  • + 2
 You stupid, contradicting yourself, obviously, pros run, efficient, top of the course, out of the way, longer, advantage, options, but what else would you expect, it's Pinkbike.

That sums up 90% of arguments on bike internet.
  • + 1
 @acraftygnome: upvotes till heaven (so only one, but who cares)
  • + 5
 Do you find it at least a bit ironic that you're making sweeping generalizations under an article that's all about how everyone's preferences are different?

Also, the "If pros can run it, you can too" argument isn't the strongest.
  • + 2
 It's also because the length of the 170mm revert doesn't fit inside the Strive frame unless you are really tall. I tried it and I was left with my feet hanging six inches off the ground at full extension. The 150mm would work though and would feel better than 125mm. I have to drop the seatpost down for really steep stages with no seated pedalling.
  • + 4
 I get the tall people arguments, the "cuz I can" arguments so let's get it out of the way. Now I am more than happy that companies still make 125mm droppers, because I don't need more, I rode a 170 dropper and it felt weird to need to push it that low, to get such a difference in bike handling between having it up and down. Considering I need to constantly remind myself to keep my chest over the bars to ride bike properly, even on steepest and bumpiest sht. That may be a personal preference but it's based on something: there is some universal proper form of riding a bike involving staying forward - please check how DH pros run their saddles, how high they keep their buts even in Val Di sole, check Minnaar in particular. Then the isue of using the saddle to steer the bike... So theoretically speaking medium and shorter riders don't need so much dropper travel. I've been given that DH bikes have more travel bollocks, don't, just fricking don't. Therefore "I ride so steep gnar here in Squamish bro" is out of the way. Where I am getting at with this is that long travel seatpost requires very low placement of the seat tube bottom, which crams even more sht into the BB area, filled with chainring, rear tyre clearance, chainstay, pivots, eventually even the shock. So basically long droppers are potentially harmful for the suspension and frame design while giving you little if anything for the quality of your ride. No probs on extra large frames, rather problematic on medium and small ones.

In the climate where lots of people btch on plus tyres being for poor riders, E-bikes being for absolute lazy morons, maybe supporting long posts by not so tall people is load of hipocrisy? Because you want all that sht in there and then you whine of shocks being driven by a yoke, fkng up your bushings and shock shafts

END RANT
  • + 10
 I'm 6 feet tall and I run a 125mm reverb because I feel I can control the bike a bit more with a slightly higher seat height. That's only my personal preference though.
  • + 5
 Its all personal preference. I found this post mildly irksome though because it appears that some people believe that because they don't want or need a product nobody else should either. And to tell other people they don't need it too...sheesh.

If we don't make droppers over 150mm, think of how we will be losing the gene for being over 6'4" due to all of the smashed testicles...who'll change all the light bulbs then?

Save the 6'8" testicles!
  • - 1
 @acraftygnome: tall people, yea, it's not a lot of math to do. But at the same tim as I explained > it will compromise frame design for medium/small frames, aaaand I would not say it is so obvious that the more drop the better, because alck of drop may not be the only reason you smash your balls into the back of the saddle. You may be behind it a bit too often that you should. I don't really believe in stuffing "your own preference" into every argument, because what do you base your preference on? Should we have 250mm forks and call upon "preference" argument? There's a spectrum of sanity to everything and "not interested in X bike - not fitting 200mm dropper" is something I am sure will come up in comments in close future. For SOME DESIGNS it will make seat tubes come at slacker angles (I don't men effective seat angle) to make room for the rear tyre, putting more leverage on bushings and keys, and it will move shocks further to the front, possibly messing up the pivot layout.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: "Should we have 250mm forks and call upon "preference" argument?" Why not, if a large enough number of people to warrant production would prefer it? Obviously the demand for long-travel droppers is there, so I don't see a problem. Making the frame design work with them is for the frame manufacturers to solve if they don't want to lose the people who want to use a long dropper.
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: 1bigwitless
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: I agree. It's worth noting that I'm only 5'8" ...so theoretically a taller person would want more throw if we are talking about a drop as a percentage of your height. With that said... 170 and over seems crazy to me... like your frame doesn't fit you, clearly. Only on my dirt jump bike is my seat that low, my DH saddle is kept just above the knee, so I can control the bike and still be able to pedal seated if the situation calls. I also like the saddle there to remind me I'm too far back, I want that message from my saddle not my rear tire, because now it's too late. Alas, it's all personal preference but I cant help but feel this is another example of not stopping someplace reasonable. Stems got shorter until they were 0mm in length, bars got lower until they were flat, bottom brackets lower until we were scraping the ground. All those things have reeled back in to where I feel they are "correct". If we can use that term, we shouldn't, but I will. I feel this way about droppers... 200mm ? That's ludicrous.
  • + 4
 @DARKSTAR63: I have always wondered why there seems to be a recent obsession with longer and longer dropper posts that allow silly low seat heights when people riding at WC DH level dont run their seat anywhere near as low.

Its not just customers, I have seen journalists criticise the fitment of 150mm droppers on bikes stating they would prefer a 170mm - Quite strange to see.
  • + 0
 @Racer951: yea, let the folks just look up Val Di Sole coverage, and I swear by my own sight, this sht is steep beyond belief, and some steep sections are really long, it's not about some occasional rock slab or rooty section into a catch berm. And these guys run seats high. Consider that DH cockpit is higher than Enduro cockpit, so check that relation BB - bars - seat height.

@Pedro404 - yea mate, public demand justifies everything. Like E-Bikes.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I thought a lightly humourous comment about testicles would help to avoid increased navel gazing about dropper posts but apparently it wasn't humourous enough to convince others that it wasn't a biomechanics analysis. Maybe I just don't get the internet.
  • - 3
 @acraftygnome: I'm sorry it all got so serious, I got winded up in my own hate towards people with long posts. I guess we can talk about man rape being an example where a short post is welcome. We can laugh at man rape because feminists are not interested in that subject, they probably support it. Case is serious though, NYPD estimates that 98% of man rapes go unreported. I encourage people to watch the short documentary "Bottom out" talking about negative rebound man rape victims must face after coming out with the secret.

From IMDB (spoiler alert) : "Bottom out" 2016 directed by Matthias Denison - A touching and shocking story of Angus Schwarzer, ranch owner and vivid downhill rider who crashed out on Crabapple bits after closing hours of Whistler Bike Park. He laid unconscious by the side of the track until an E-biker Daniel Heart riding up the trail found him lyting with cracked helmet and pants pulled down. He called for helicopter and in the hospital it appeared that Angus suffered a minor concussion and cracked butt. At first Angus thought he must have landed hard on his saddle, but during a party with his bros, he smoked marijuana at the back of his van and got a flashbacks of being repetively pushed into the ground while being unconscious. Another visit to the doctor showed clear signs of rape and hypnosis confirmed that. He decided to come out posting a story on Ride Monkey but he got laughed at. Broken, he decided to remain silent until 28 other victims reached him anonymously. All raped on Crabapple bits and A-Line after closing hours. 3 Perpetrators had been caught and put to trial. They owned a Black van with "F*CK Joey´s - Make Whistler great again" written on it. Group postulated for making all jumps on A-line into gaps filled with hungry black bears. Even though they got prosecuted his life was never the same. All DH friends turned away from Angus. Emptied of stoke, he finally reached out to his saviour, Daniel, and found new friends among E-bikers, building trails and promoting MTB access to the wilderness in United States.

Documentary has been awarded a "Shreddie" award on Reunion Fest in Squamish. Unique footage shot on GoBro 6S camera.
  • + 2
 @acraftygnome: I agree with your last sentence; set the bike up how you want. However, look at World Cup DH rigs and you won't find everyone running their seat like a dirt jumper. Having the seat so its somewhere around your knees gives more control over the bike and a spot to put your butt when you're squishing into a corner with the inside foot off the pedal. I've seen long-legged guys running their seats above the height of their stems (would be really high for me). Some of this depends on frame geometry but on a lot of bikes, it's just not preferable for most riders to have the dropped position as low as possible
  • + 2
 @Racer951: I personally have found many of my droppers to be too low when fully dropped. I can also provide a list of everyone, from pro DHers to weekend warriors, who will site correct descending seat position and say the same.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: @WAKIdesigns: as a 6'4 rider using a 150mm dropper I can personally attest to the fact that it forces me to manually drop the post a tad when I've reached a peak and am ready for a steep and technical descent.

We don't need our seats slammed like a DJer, but not all of us have the same "XC"-esque style that Minnaar has (straighter legs, ass high, chest low). Before everyone jumps on me for calling Minnaar's style XC...I just can't think of a better way to describe it. Anyone who is a competent rider has their chest low, obviously...

It's certainly nice to use your saddle to control lean with the inside of your thigh, and, as such, many of us do it, but that extra 20mm of drop doesn't limit any bike control abilities. What it would do is give me that little bit of extra leg extension where I wouldn't have to manually drop/raise my post for the majority of my descents/climbs.

I don't really mind the hassle of raising/lowering my post as my trail network is far less "enduro" from the perspective that we typically have a long climb followed by a long descent (long is subjective as we obviously don't have a ton of vertical in socal). For some of the more varied single track I ride in the santa monica mountains, it would be great to gain that extra 20mm so I could have a slightly lower seat for the downs while still having my preferred leg extension; funnily enough, 20mm kind of feels like a lot of extra room even though it's less than an inch.
  • + 1
 You do if the crotch of your shorts is halfway to your knees. I might be able to fit a 125 on my bike but it came with a 100 mm. I still occasionally hit my but on the back tire.
  • + 4
 The Canyon website has 2017 models of all other bikes except the Strive. Any clues if they're planning on updates for this awesome bike? I see they're doing clearance deals on the 2016 stock.
  • + 4
 I was at the factory last week to get myself a bargain CF 9.0 Race. From what I've heard they won't change the frame, they will upgrade (?) to Eagle and a 150mm dropper post and latest caliper for the Guides. It won't get any cheaper, maybe more expensive than the 2016 ed.
I decided to go for the 2016 model, already got a Fox Transfer 150mm and consider switching to Shimano brakes; I don't need Eagle since I come from XC and a 34t chainring makes me happy in any situation. Smile
  • + 2
 Great write up, i love the feel of low pressure but dont like tyre roll on more hard park corners and rim dings on rocky stuff etc,joe can probably get away with it as he weighs so little, also interesting that he has opted for a smaller bike and not gone with trends, although longer is definitely better on wide open courses joe rides a lot of steep tight tech (my favourite) again good subject, should do more of these
  • + 2
 Jeez!! Makes me think I'm getting away with murder, running dhr 2 exo 2.3 tubeless (for 6 months)on a dt Swiss xm481, (originally a roval fattie) and I haven't had any pinch flat issues, I'm 175 geared and a very aggressive rider. I never run less than 28psi in the rear though...
  • - 1
 Are you running thick rim strips? Even just Gorilla Tape will help quite a bit compared to the normal, weightless yellow stuff. I just got my first pinched tubeless tire yesterday because I didn't make sure I had a thick rim strip in the rear wheel (it was someone else's before I rode it)
  • + 4
 @trialsracer: I don't think it has anything to do with rim strip as it lies down in the bed of the rim, pinch flatting a tubeless tire results from something like a rock smashing the tire against the edge of the rim Smile
  • + 2
 @nomadrider10: I'm in the same boat...2.3 exo's dhf/dhr on my nomad...I'm 175-180 geared and am quite aggressive...28+psi in the rear, never have had a pinch flat (knock on wood).

28+psi in the rear won't entirely prevent pinch flatting and/or blowing up wheels , but it certainly helps. My buddies and I can never figure out why so many people run such low pressures...there's a reason racers and competent riders don't.
  • + 2
 @nvranka: yep! I corner to hard to run lower than 28 anyway, that feeling when your sidewall folds over the rim isn't one I like very much!!!
  • + 2
 @nomadrider10: same, i much prefer a controlled drift over a sidewall fold...can't beat the feel of a minion drift Smile
  • + 2
 blimey only just realised after a quick look at www.mbr.co.uk/news/canyon-2017-345647 video at the bottom that although the current current canyon strive is supposed to have a head angle in the slack position of 66 degrees these guys measured it at 67 IN THE SLACK SETTING.....blimey thats a little steep isn't it for its intended use. That said it still got a great writeup but as they say the geometry puts it more into trailbike territory. maybe the 2017 model will be slacker.
  • + 1
 don't think it will change in geo. maybe in 2018 o 19 I think
  • + 2
 I recently bought the 2016 strive. I was worried about the size of the dropper post after coming from my previous bike with a 150mm drop. I like the seat well out of the way when descending. I have not had a problem with it though. Due to how the frame is I don't even notice that it was less drop and have not got in the way or left me wanting once. As for the pro's set up. They have their bikes rigged for efficiency. Most normal bikes are rigged for this as well as comfort. The race bikes are not always their preferred set up for normal riding. Also bike set up is very individual. I had a friend comment on mine once telling me how I should have it set according to him. At the end of the day it's all personal preference. I have a few injuries to my body so I ride with a bike that's set up to compensate for this. As long as your on your bike having fun the who cares dudes. I changed my brakes for Shimano Saints just because I prefer them and also have all the oils and bleed kit which I didn't fancy changing. I am 5'9 and average build and ride a medium Strive Race. I find it's a great fit.
  • + 4
 dumb question: do they not run tubeless? If not, why not? If so, why do they need pinch flat protection?
  • + 21
 They do run tubeless. With tubeless tires, a pinch flat happens the same way it does with a tube, but in this case the sidewall gets pinched against the rim, resulting in a puncture of the tire itself.
  • + 5
 In theory, this should prevent the sidewalls getting pinched: www.pinkbike.com/news/huck-norris-anti-pinch-flat-insert.html
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: I bought some new DT Swiss XM481's and now I pinch flat my tubeless High Roller 2's all the time Frown
  • + 2
 @shawnca7: are they the 2.3 HR2's? I noticed exactly the same thing on EX471's, my DHR2's were pinch flatting several times a day. switching to 2.5 WT tyres solved that problem though.
  • + 3
 @shawnca7: downhill tires. I do not find exo to be sufficient especially in the rear
  • + 1
 @riish: oh whoa I switched tires after going through two brand new HR2s 2.3 on my rear. Pinched on some pretty tame stuff. I moved to a higher volume WTB tire and haven't had an issue
  • + 1
 @riish: interesting I had the same experience with maxxis minion dhr 2's. I am running xm481's and a rim at 30mm internal requires a bigger volume tire. I now run a wtb breakout 2.5 tcs tough on the back and it is glorious. Fast rolling, high volume and tough.
  • + 2
 @riish: same. Dhr2 2.4 exo on a 30 mill internal and a 36 mill internal rim. 4 pinch flats in the tire before I gave up. So far 2.35 magic mary with no problems
  • + 2
 @mojoriders: I wonder if it's due to the narrow tyre on a wide rim, or just EXO tyres being flimsy as shit. I love my doubledown minions though, they're on par with supergravity schwalbes.
  • + 1
 Recent DT Swiss rims have a rather thin bead sidewall so it punctures tyres a bit more, obviously. Love them nonetheless.Then if you run wide rims with Minions then the rim wall sits exactly under the channel between knobs which means when something squishes your tyre all the way to the rim, there's no knobs to provide the cushion, so no 1-ply tyre with such tread design would take it, be it Exo, Evo, Control etc. It has litgle to do with Exo specifically, Every 1-ply design is too flimsy for riding a 150-170 bike in terrain like this, at least on the rear. Both puncture resistance and tyre stability suck. You'd have to run like 35PSI to just keep handling acceptable. I rode Exos in the bike park once, no thank you, even I managed to fold them.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: So basically the bead sidewall is like a knife pointing up to the sidewall of the tyre?
  • + 1
 @riish: maybe this why they now sell a 2.4" HR2 in 27.5 as well as the 2.3" they started with on 27.5"....and then there's the new WT as well...

I've only run E13 since I changed to 29" wheel and wide rim Halo 30m ID....I was looking at also running a Mary on the front and either a DHR2 or HR2 on the back for the winter...is this a bad idea?
  • + 1
 @Travel66: maybe. the WT tyres are a good size, my 2.5WT dhf is noticeably higher volume than the 2.35 mary I've got on currently. as for your tyre choices, it comes down to how you ride and what your local terrain is like, honestly.
  • - 2
 @Travel66: knife is a too sharp word here, DT Swiss rims like EX471 or XM481 are not alone in that department. That features is more worrying when it comes to dents. I still have them as my favorite choice of rims for quite a lot of reasons. The biggest factor here is casing and tread pattern and I am yet to find a tyre I like that doesn't sport the channel betwen the center and side knobs. I am looking forward to try Huck Norris
  • + 1
 @riish: Yeah, they are the 2.3 HR2's. I'm grateful for all the input from everyone. I will definitely try some other tires or possibly the Huck Norris inserts.
  • + 2
 @shawnca7: I just got on some DTs and pinch flatted yesterday, my fourth ride on them. Might have to do split 24" inner tube in the rear
  • + 1
 @trialsracer: which rims and tyres?
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Have you tried procore? I'm sold. No more need for DH casing!
  • + 0
 @SintraFreeride: Too many instagram pics of a blown up rim, too many people complaining about it being a pain in the arse to set up. And procore is as heavy as going from EXO to Double Down casing. I'm waiting for HNorris.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: accidentally posted this lower... Ive been using the Hucknorris on a flow ex 29er with 2.4 ardent in the rear. I had pinch flatted a highroller exo a DHR and another 2.4 ardent in the span of a month. I ride rocky terrain on a Nimble Nine. 3-5 t drops werent the problem so much as high speed rocks or climbing up sharp rock. anyhow all was good. i dropped PSI by 5 from 34psi in the rear to 28-29. Two days ago I did a medium speed 3 - 4ft drop and y tire exploded off the rim. Ive ridden this trail a lot and never had this happen, nor a pinch flat in this location. anyhow with no more stans tire still seated back on rim with a trail hand pump. With a floor pump the tire seated at 8psi. i cant help but think the outward pressure of the Huck helped shuck the tire off the rim.
  • + 1
 @Nicksand5:
I like the Ardent (I run 2.4 and 2.25 on a HT but it just aint tough enough for sharp/abrasive rocks IMO. The 2.4 is a big round tyre without much carcass strength and I can see how it would easily roll off on a 25mm ID rim particularly when executing a move.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I found that going from a supergravity casing with normal tube to procore with snakeskin casing to have lost weight: around 200g per wheel. I also run 5 bar in the procore instead of the maximum of 6 and have no problems with the wheel. Plus the benefits of NOT burping and the huge gains in traction are just undeniable!
  • + 2
 This is my favorite from-the-pits segment yet! Would love to see more of this--comparisons of the Syndicate bikes? Connah and Josh Button? Even Loic vs Troy? (I'd say the Athertons, but I don't want to get buried...)
  • + 1
 Ive been using the Hucknorris on a flow ex 29er with 2.4 ardent in the rear. I had pinch flatted a highroller exo a DHR and another 2.4 ardent in the span of a month. I ride rocky terrain on a Nimble Nine. 3-5 t drops werent the problem so much as high speed rocks or climbing up sharp rock. anyhow all was good. i dropped PSI by 5 from 34psi in the rear to 28-29. Two days ago I did a medium speed 3 - 4ft drop and y tire exploded off the rim. Ive ridden this trail a lot and never had this happen, nor a pinch flat in this location. anyhow with no more stans tire still seated back on rim with a trail hand pump. With a floor pump the tire seated at 8psi. i cant help but think the outward pressure of the Huck helped shuck the tire off the rim.
  • + 3
 What's the offset angle of Barnes's angleset and the final head angle of the 2 bikes?
  • + 1
 By looking at the geo on the canyon website I believe they are on 65º at the moment. However, 65º with 170mm for Barnes and 65º with 180mm for Leov means Barnes is actually slacker when riding.
  • + 2
 I'm also interested to know Joes head angle, the design of the headtube means those angle adjust headsets add 10mm under the head tube, that alone make the 170mm the same slackness* as a 180mm fork plus what ever offset the headset has. Even with just -1 degree he should be rocking 64 degrees. (work components state that their -1 degree headset = -1.5 on the strive.)

*not sure slackness is a real word.
  • + 1
 To sum up, stock Strive head angle isn't steep enough for EWS Smile
I guess running coil shock makes a lot of sense on a Strive with Shapeshifter, no need for climb switch at all.
  • + 3
 Just get Leov back on a 29r then see the results come back
  • + 2
 So whats that supersecret special insert Leov is using in his tires? Another foam thingy or something completely new?
  • + 2
 I wonder if their shapeshifters work ?
  • + 1
 i like the cf strive nice looking bike. have they fixed the issue with the shape shifter yet?
  • + 2
 please PB, keep stuff like this coming
  • + 2
 What kind of Angle set has the spacer cup on the bottom?
  • + 2
 Work components has an angle set for Canyons. -1° is possible.
  • + 1
 We need way more articles like this! Thanks pinkbike. Keep the good stuff coming!
  • + 2
 Cannot noticed the difference between S and L at first.
  • + 2
 Because Joe has used M size frame.
There is an error in the description, S size frame looks different.
coresites-cdn.factorymedia.com/dirtde/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/20141001_CanyonStrive_3748.jpg
  • + 2
 @DocG: thats because these guys use the strive 'RACE" frame which has a longer top tube than the standard strive frame you have linked too . eg joe's small race frame is equal to a Medium standard strive frame .
  • + 1
 Glad to see I am not the only person that runs brakes contact point that close
  • + 1
 what wheel size is the bike ?? and tempted to try a coil on the trail again .
  • + 1
 @oronaut: how original , that was so helpful .

Comparison review on 2 bikes , they list all the nitty gritty dimensions such as frame size , bar width , tokens in the fork , stem length and why for each yet no where mention the actual wheel size that the bike uses .
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer:

Thanks Mike with companies starting to offer the same model bike in 27.5", 27.5"+ and 29" one never knows if it,s not in bold numbers on the tire .
  • + 2
 @cheetamike: you really weren't sure whether or not they ride 27.5+?

Lol.
  • + 1
 @nvranka: some 29" bikes also fit 27.5+" tires so I included it
  • + 2
 What bottle cage/CO2 holder thingy does Justin have on his bottle cage?
  • + 1
 More of these please!!! Great read!
  • + 1
 Anyone have an idea where you can get one of those Garmin stem mounts?
  • + 1
 It looks like a SRAM Quickview MT mount. LBS should be able to get it for you.
  • + 1
 @baronKanon: Thank you!
  • + 1
 there both nice!!
  • + 1
 Very cool content here!
  • + 1
 I counted 8 !
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