Suomy Scrambler Helmet - Review

Sep 15, 2017
by Mike Levy  
Suomy Scrambler review test


If you're not from Europe, don't ride motorbikes, or don't follow MotoGP and Superbike racing, you're excused for not recognizing the Suomy name. The Italian company has a fairly strong presence in Europe since their conception twenty years ago, but the brand is relatively unknown in non-motorized circles, and that's especially true in North America... which means that I had to try one.

The $174.99 USD Scrambler ($149.99 USD for the solid color versions) is their enduro helmet, and it weighs a feathery 274-grams on my scale. There are eleven color options, too, ranging from "maximum European" to "He's probably from Europe."


Scrambler Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Twenty-three vents
• Single-dial retention band
• Four band height settings
• Adjustable visor
• Eleven color options
• Sizes: med (52 - 58cm), lrg (59 - 62)
• Weight: 274-grams (med)
• MSRP: $149.99 USD - $174.99 USD (depending on color)
www.suomysport.com


Suomy Scrambler review test
Suomy Scrambler review test



Design

Suomy could cross-pollinate their tech and marketing from their range of flashy motorcycle racing helmets but, somewhat surprisingly, they haven't gone down that road. Instead, the Scrambler is a pretty straightforward lid that's almost free of annoying acronyms and tag lines. Almost. At the back of the helmet, you'll find the 'Biaxial' retention band that employs a single, eight-position dial to fine tune the fit from 52 - 58cm on my medium-sized test helmet. The band also has four height options - it snaps into the shell via push-tabs - so you can adjust where it sits on the back of your head.


Suomy Scrambler review test


Air flow happens courtesy of twenty-three vents, with fourteen of those facing forward and the others doing exhaust work. The vents, along with all of the eleven color options, give the Scrambler a futuristic appearance that grew on me, but the look is certainly polarizing. Other details include a removable chin strap (the anchors snap out), an adjustable visor that can be pushed up nice and high for that enduro look, and anti-bacterial inner padding that can be pulled to wash the salt and grime off.


Suomy Scrambler review test
Suomy Scrambler review test


While a lot of other brands are making claims of improved protection by way of inserts that look like Haribo candy, slippery hair nets between your head and the shell, or even dual-shell designs, Suomy took a much more straightforward, traditional approach for the Scrambler when it was released back in 2015. Its construction consists of a polycarbonate outer shell and an EPS foam inner shell, which is all run of the mill stuff, but it adds up to a not so run of the mill weight: my medium-sized Scrambler weighs just 274-grams on my scale.

For some perspective, Giro's Montaro weighs 370 grams, a TLD A2 weighs 370-grams, and a Kali Interceptor comes in at 390-grams. Hold your horses, please; I'm not saying that the Scrambler is better because it's lighter than those options, or less safe for the same reason, but the weight is worth noting.



Performance

The Scrambler has a few things going for it, one of them be the aforementioned low weight. The 100-ish gram difference between the Suomy all-mountain helmet and some of the competition isn't just noticeable, it's also a big deal, at least to me. Having less weight perched on the top of your head means that your neck doesn't have to do as much work and, just so long as the fit is good, it'll also help the lid to go even more unnoticed.


Suomy Scrambler review test
Suomy Scrambler review test


And the Scrambler does fit quite well, at least on my head. The shape of the shell feels Giro-esque to me, which is to say that it's not odd in any way and will agree with most people's heads. It does feel like it sits high, however, something that's amplified by the sides and back of the helmet not extending quite as far down as some other all-mountain styled lids. I found it to be very comfortable, mind you, and the low weight and slim shape make it the most invisible feeling helmet that I've ever worn, but I'd also say that it's not as confidence inspiring as some of the heavier options out there that offer more coverage and make use of inserts or dual-shell designs. There are no add-ons with the claim of being able to reduce rotational impact forces, but it does carry EN 1078 CPSC, AS-NZS 2063 2008 certification.

The low weight and great fit make the Scrambler a favorite of mine, but it didn't feel overly airy to me at any point during our Sahara-like summer riding season. Decent air flow, yes, but maybe not as cool as I'd hope for. The shell, which is super slim, also plays nice with glasses and goggles, and the adjustable visor stays put.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIf you want something a bit different, and you're not fussed about MIPS and the like, the Scrambler is worth looking at. Suomy has made a lightweight helmet that fits great, but riders who would be okay with another 100-grams in exchange for some safety add-ons will want to look elsewhere. Mike Levy







48 Comments

  • + 76
 "The colours range from Maximum european to he's probably from Europe". Comedy gold. Well done.
  • - 3
 Looks like it comes in "Crash Test Dummy" color.
  • - 4
flag mergleman (Sep 15, 2017 at 15:10) (Below Threshold)
 Ugly.....absolutely ugly ! Safer tested MIPS helmets already have more style and are plenty light weight. Epic fail ... Next!
  • + 5
 @thatshowiroll: no, you're thinking of POC helmets.
  • + 27
 gotta be honest. im not really going to trust a helmet's performance if theres no video-proof of the tester doing mach one into a concrete wall and walking away from it.
  • + 3
 Amen. We want safety, so show us safety!! The more tests the better
  • + 1
 Along with that, I'm not going to trust a helmet called the "Scrambler". Helmets are meant too keep that from happening....
  • + 8
 An Italian company named "Finland"....k. Also, here's my obligatory bitching about how this helmet costs too much (which it does)
  • + 2
 What's the point about the name, Finland is Suomi...
It is a smart name if you try to google it...

If you think it is expensive, try to buy one of their motorcycle helmets. Top quality stuff made in Europe.

Better pay 20% less for helmets made in China for $1.99 and designed by kids just out of school?
  • + 8
 Is it just me, or does that visor ride awfully high? And it appears to have a lot more travel in the up direction. Maybe it's some kind of deployable air brake?
  • + 2
 gaaaaaaappppppeeeerrrrrrrrr
  • + 4
 Kinda shitty how you can buy a baseball hat in exactly the right number of centimeters for your head, but when it comes to something important, the range is one that would make the same baseball hat literally not fit on your head, to not even stay on straight. Good luck with safety.
  • + 6
 But most helmets are adjustable like a snapback instead of a flexfit. So at a far less cost to a manufacturer (and consumer, and I mean we already whine enough about price), they can create a helmet that fits a close variety of head shapes and sizes. Not to mention that a 3cm difference in circumference is only like 1 cm different in head size..how much closer can you get without doing custom sizing?
  • + 10
 Carve a helmet out of a watermelon. Use some shoestring licorice for straps. Custom helmet--done.
  • + 1
 Apparently you'd like the price of helmets to at least double. Me- no thanks
  • + 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: I mean, I just found a helmet that fit my head right. Those straps on the back don't actually do anything.
  • + 1
 @PinkyScar: don't forget the haribos as inserts mate, that's the whole point, right?
right?!
lol
  • + 1
 @noisette: Haribo is the new MIPS
  • + 2
 Just bought one of these in Oz. AU$120 (RRP is $240). Mine is the large which still only goes out to 62 cm. Mine weighs in at 310 gms on my scales which is a big improvement on the five year old 400 gram Lazer Genesis it replaces. Snug fit, good harness with plenty of adjustment (easy to manage as well) but only a basic buckle rather than the magnetic buckle of the Lazer. Visor can be removed for a roadie look if one is inclined.

Hope I never have to test it out.
  • + 2
 This helmet does an adequate job of protecting you from something bad that's exceptionally unlikely (a skull fracture during mountain biking). It does nothing -- it literally does not *try* to do anything -- to protect you from something bad that's vastly more likely (a concussion during mountain biking). Oh, and also it's wonderfully light and colorful.

Levy: The "more straightforward, traditional approach" to reducing concussion risk is NOT TO, you clever moron. Why are you spinning that? "Fussed about MIPS and the like" my ass. For what? Are you proud to write that? To publish it?

It's 2017, don't buy a 2006 helmet. But I do agree, the "ranging from" line was funny.
  • + 4
 A riding buddy of mine was wearing that exact helmet on Sunday. He did seem a bit light headed come to think of it.
  • + 1
 Having suffered from post concussion symptoms for over a year and a half now from a crash wearing a "more straightforward, traditional approach" padded helmet, made in Germany, I'm not prepared to shell out that kind of money for a lighter, and not quite so well ventilated,version of the same type.
  • + 4
 Mike Levy is not impressed.
  • + 9
 Yeah... need to buy some ads to impress
  • + 2
 Look like a kids helmet...And for $ 149 ??? Hell no, thanks, but i'll just stick my head with IXS Trail RS for cheaper price and better look.
  • + 7
 It's only 149 if you want the regular old single colour option. To get the next level multicolour version, it'll be 175.
  • - 3
 I got my TLD A1 on sale for 90
  • + 3
 Suomy are a very famous brand for moto helmets and have been doing a great road helmet for few years. They are also made in Italy. It is definitely better quality than ixs and on similar level as tld.
  • + 3
 agreed. they know what they are doing.
  • + 3
 @RedRedRe: Not wrong. Had one of there lids back in my mx days, loved that thing. It was damn near art!
  • + 1
 kept scrolling down to where he mentions how he smashes his head into a tree with the helmet . Nothing.
Not much of a hemet test then Wink
  • + 3
 MIPS is not proven but just a fad
  • + 3
 Is this review from the 1990's??
  • + 1
 no, but the helmet appears to be
  • + 3
 Whose the dork modeling the helmet? J.K. Mike
  • + 4
 yeah, he's not feelin it
  • + 1
 Pretty nice, you can tell because it looks nice in plain white, whereas 1980's rental helmets don't.
  • + 1
 That rear view on the rider's head made me think I was looking at a SONY helmet.
  • + 1
 The price is just ridiculous and that glossy "insert 90s cheap helmets type colors scheme here" doesn't help.
  • + 1
 Dechatlon same design for 20 eur ...
  • + 1
 And here I am with my 40 dollar Spyder Crane trail lid.
  • + 0
 Keep pushing MIPS... nobody cares about it...
  • + 1
 Also the Giro push "helmet shape is like a Giro"...
This helmet has been out since 2014... the outside may look whatever you want, the inside is what makes the difference.
  • + 0
 95% profit. 20% protection. No thank you.
  • + 2
 and 100% reason to remember the name
  • + 7
 These stuff is Made in Italy where they pay workers more than $1 a day and they have an history making helmets longer than anybody else.

95% profit is for the ones making the helmets in China for $2 each, and selling for over $80.. i.e. Giro, specialized etc etc.
  • + 2
 @RedRedRe: Gotta throw Specialized under the bus at every opportunity Wink
  • + 1
 @RedRedRe:

I've got one of these Scramblers. It says 'Made in China' on a big sticker inside of it.

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