Syntace C33i Straight Carbon Wheelset - Review

Apr 6, 2018
by Richard Cunningham  
Syntace C33i Straight Carbon wheelset
Syntace C33i Straight Carbon wheelset


Syntace is a strong supporter of aluminum when it comes to wheel and frame construction. Their debut of a carbon wheelset, then, is a huge break from tradition and begs the question: "How can Syntace deliver the impact resistance and durability that it has heaped upon aluminum in a carbon fiber rim?" Well, the answer is not complicated, but it deserves some background. First, Syntace has been designing carbon handlebars for a number of years, so they have developed some skills. Second, they are crazy about testing, so when they claim a product is X-times stiffer and X-times better in impact resistance than product Y, they can prove it.

The new C33i rim is claimed to have massive impact resistance, enhanced spoke attachment points, a bead-locking internal profile and a weight of only 435 grams in the 27.5 size. Further enhancements in the
C33i Straight Carbon Details
• High impact hookless flange design
• Rim width: 40mm outer, 33mm inner
• Molded and angled rim holes (28 spokes)
• Syntace MX straight-pull hubs (Boost or EVO6 width)
• 45-point fast engagement star ratchet freehub
• Weight: 435 grams (rim) 1580 grams (pair, 27.5 wheels)
• 10-year limited warranty
• MSRP: $1480 Euro
Syntace
wheel are low-inertia, straight-pull hubs, a fast-engagement star-ratchet freehub with a steel-reinforced cassette spline, and oversized high-load bearings and axles. C33i Straight Carbon wheels use 28, same-length spokes and are available in Boost or Syntace's zero-dish EVO6 spacing for 1400 Euro. Weight for the pair in 27.5 (tested) is 1580 grams and Syntace backs the wheelset with a ten-year warranty for manufacturing defects. Full specifications here.

Syntace C33i Straight Carbon wheelset
Syntace says that angling the rim all the way to the rim flange terminus is key to maximizing impact resistance.


Features and Construction

C33i rims: Syntace has been on the cutting edge of the wider rim movement, and they have learned a lot about the concept since the inception of their aluminum MX wheelsets five years ago. Short rim flanges free the tire to follow the terrain, while providing more support. Bead locking internal profiles that guide tubeless tires through the inflation process and efficient V-profile cross-sections that transfer loads without creating a non-compliant structure are a few gems.

Syntace included those lessons, and then took advantage of the carbon process to add some new features that were not possible or practical for aluminum construction. The rim flanges are double thickness for impact resistance, and, inside the rim, triangular cones are molded into the structure to reinforce the spoke entry points, which are correctly angled and tapered to fit Sapim Q-lock nipples. The new interface, says Syntace, is stronger than the spokes. The carbon used for the rims is engineered to be much more ductile, and thus can survive impacts, reportedly, far beyond those survivable by heavier aluminum rims. Finally, Syntace has reconfigured its hub-flange spacing to eliminate most spoke dish, which means all the spokes are the same length and nearly the same tension - an improvement that eliminated the need for the spoke offset of its original W-series rims. Going forward, all Syntace rims will be drilled symmetrically.

Syntace C33i Straight Carbon wheelset
Double-thickness rim flanges and bead-locking ridges. Syntace pre-tapes the rims for tubeless.
Syntace C33i Straight Carbon wheelset
The 33mm inner width and short rim flanges give the tire a wide stance, but with a rounded profile.


Straight MX hubs: Syntace is especially proud of its latest MX hubset. They incorporate straight-pull spokes, made for Syntace by Sapim. Syntace says that the smaller flange diameters help reduce fatigue and rotating mass. Internally, both the front and rear hubs use thin-wall oversized steel axles (20mm for the front and 17mm for the rear), and special triple-sealed high-load bearings, said to increase load-carrying capacity by 90 percent. Axle widths are Boost 110/148 and Syntace supports both conventional, centered-rim lacing and its EVO6, offset-rim lacing that is used on Liteville frames to maintain near-perfect spoke angles and improve the chain line. Both conventional hub caps and SRAM's Torque-Cap interfaces are also supported, and rear hubs support SRAM XD or Shimano cassettes.

Both the hub body and the cassette splines are machined from 7075 alloy aluminum. The freehub splines are reinforced using the patented and proven steel insert developed by American Classic. Inside the freehub, Syntace uses a star ratchet similar to DT Swiss, with 45 teeth, dropping the interval between clicks from 10 degrees to 8 degrees. Syntace says that they designed in some noise reduction to mute the ratchet, but it still makes a deceleration whine that is wonderful for some and..... well, I like it.

If you are the hands-on type, Syntace's MX hubs are easily serviceable with simple tools and they stock parts. To ensure smoothly rolling wheels, the hubs have threaded preload collars that lock with a small Allen screw. If you are familiar with this feature, you can attest to how simple and effective it is to achieve perfectly spinning hubs.
Syntace C33i Straight Carbon wheels


Syntace C33i Straight Carbon wheelset
SRAM style Torque Caps interface with RockShox forks. The preload-adjust collar is just behind it.
Syntace C33i Straight Carbon wheelset
Straight pull hub flanges are lower and stronger than conventional flanges. Sapim makes the spokes to Syntace specifications.


At present, Syntace only offers the C33i wheels in the 27.5 size, but it shouldn't be a long wait for a 29-inch-wheel version. As mentioned, Syntace has an extensive in-house testing facility, in addition to a cadre of real-life test riders that they employ to vet out any flaws that may require design improvements before going to production. On that subject, Syntace offers a limited, ten-year warranty that covers manufacturing and material defects free for the first three years and at 50% of the MSRP thereafter for the years remaining.

Syntace C33i Straight Carbon wheels
(From left) C33i features at a glance: 45-tooth star ratchet-type freehub, internally-molded spoke reinforcements, double-thickness, low-height rim flange and bead lock, steel cassette-spline inserts, and high-load, triple-sealed bearings.


Ride Report

Setup: Our C33i Straight Carbon wheelset was supplied with the Liteville 301 MK14 we reviewed earlier. Riding was shared between RC and fellow PB rest rider Harold Preston on various all-mountain and DH trails, most of which feature embedded granite rock, many square-edged impacts, and medium-height jumps and drops. Tires were Schwalbe Hans Dampf (rear) and Magic Mary (front) with pressures ranging from 20 to 26 psi and set up tubeless.

Technical performance: Removing and reinstalling tires requires a firm press with the edge of a shoe to unseat the bead from the C33i rim's raised locking ridge. The force was not as great as is required to free the bead from an Enve or the new Syncros carbon rims, which can be a tough job. Once the bead has been broken, tires can be removed or installed by hand. Inflation was uneventful using a floor pump and there was no need to remove the valve core to achieve maximum air flow. Throughout testing, which lasted approximately three months, neither of us burped air, cracked a rim or experienced a spoke failure. Spoke tension and rim runout remained consistent.

The faster engagement ratchet mechanism is an improvement from the previous W35 MX aluminum wheels I have been using for a number of years, and the growling sound they make is music to my ears. I had no need to adjust the bearing end-play, but I did anyway to check the feature. Finger pressure to rotate the Allen-clamp collar was all I needed to zero out the bearings and the hubs run so smoothly that I still spin the axles to experience it when I remove a wheel. The front hub was outfitted with oversize Torque Caps to interface with the RockShox fork dropouts. They hung up on the fork and typically required some shuffling to slide the wheel in accurately (no fault of Syntace, this is also an issue with SRAM's Torque Cap hubs).

Trail impressions: I rarely break wheels, but co-rider Harold Preston does. Neither of us were able to damage the C33i carbon rims in any way. The wheels are true within a millimeter, and there is no blistering on the tops of the rim flanges where sharp-edge rock strikes often leave their mark.

Ride quality is the talking point of these wheels. They are precise feeling in the turns, most likely due to their lateral stiffness and also for the secure footprint that the 33mm inner-width, low-flange design creates for the tire. Pressing the bike into a corner flares the tire's tread into the soil without any sensation of rolling or folding at pressures near 20 psi (Schwalbe 2.35" EVO casings). A number of wheels can make that claim, but few in the all-mountain class can boast the deft, lightweight feel that this 1580-gram wheelset delivers both while maneuvering, and when under power. Syntace has found the nexus point between a stupidly stiff build, and the twangy sound and feel of an overly lightweight build.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesSyntace states that they would not consider building with carbon unless they could achieve significant weight savings over aluminum at greater strength - and be able to back the product for ten years of service. While some competitors offer lifetime warranties, that's still a bold claim for an all-mountain wheelset based around carbon rims. So far, the C33i Straight Carbons are measuring up well. It's not an inexpensive set of hoops, but you'll be hard-pressed to find a better option for the same money. If you are looking for reliable and lightweight wheels that can survive ten rounds in the long-travel trail bike ring, I think Syntace C33i wheels would be a good bet.RC
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107 Comments

  • + 36
 I have a Megaforce 2 stem...... unfortunately that's all I can afford from Syntace.
  • + 12
 I'm still saving up for the Quadrant ring...
  • + 2
 Yeah... When I could get a new bike for this price, these wheels had better be good. That said, they sound amazing, and l have nothing against them or the people who make or buy them. Great job Syntace. It's just that I can't afford them atm Frown ... Saving for a bike first. Big Grin Wink
  • + 16
 $1800 or a small vial of hobbit tears... either way
  • + 8
 Less than ENVE and probably just as good or better... I'd run them preferably, given the choice.
  • + 4
 @n1ck: enve come with Chris King hubs though which are 72t and the ratchet us far more reliable. In my opinion, a super fast hub makes more of a noticeable difference, particularly on technical climbs where you are having to put in half pedals etc
  • + 3
 @Will-McCurrach: agreed I’d rather a King. I simply hate the idea of pre-loading your bearings on things, like some early internal BB’s. great to have a weak as f*ck 2.5mm Allen key on a weak alloy flange to tighten up. Ideal for holding massive loads transferred through. Gash idea, although 99% of Syntace stuff is great.
  • + 1
 @cunning-linguist: steel cassette-spline inserts and a 45-tooth star ratchet-type freehub though, let the Syntace rock your Chris King fanboy crush.
  • + 1
 @n1ck: I’ve not owned King, only worked on them. Star ratchets are good, I’ve had DT Swiss ones (these are probably made by them), profile racing are nice, I have hope and i9 at the mo, both good. To me, so long as they go round & don't misengage often, that’s ace.
  • + 1
 @cunning-linguist: Do you know if the DT and Syntace ratchet rings are interchangeable? Looks 50/50 in pics...
  • + 12
 For longest time we heard "32 hole is the only way to go, don't settle for less!" Now it seems like every other wheelset features 28h hubs and rims. I'm a clyde, and my 28h wheelset lasted exactly 4 rides before buckling. Hopefully carbon rims help with that...
  • + 4
 Wheel companies making old hubs obsolete. I have 36h hubs for my DH bike that are still in great shape, but struggle to find replacement rims. Looks like 32h hubs might become obsolete the same way in the years to come...and let's not even talk about boost, axles, etc.
  • + 2
 Downside to that molded spoke reinforcement I guess. Making a rim with a different number of holes would require another expensive mold.
  • + 9
 2pheller: Carbon rims are stiffer and hold their shape better, so the spokes play more of a structural role and less are needed. At Comparative weights, many aluminum rims need more spokes to both maintain trueness and structure. Ironically, Mavic pioneered the stiffer-rim/fewer-spoke design with its aluminum wheels, but the principles are the same.
  • + 19
 @RichardCunningham: a hub sound vid when doing wheel reviews would be great.
full setup with tires an cassette in the trueing stand and in the frame.
thanks!
  • - 2
 @THomer: Is the sound really that important? I've got the W35 wheelset (though haven't yet tested them, still need a frame to go with it) and the freewheel is indeed noisy. You can get the silencer kit which is basically another clutch plate with a single spring instead of four small springs. Syntace says it increases service intervals too. So I don't quite get why they install the standard kit in the first place. Syntace doesn't seem like the kind of company that sells sub par gear so that customers need the upgrade anyway. Would most customers prefer the noisy hub over something with longer service intervals?
  • + 8
 @THomer: HAHA! That's a great idea!
  • + 2
 @RichardCunningham: Richard, I’ve always considered Rolf Wheels as the pioneer of the stiffer rim/fewer spokes design modality. Do you know of a pre 1997 example from Mavic that illustrates they were first? Cheers.
  • + 4
 @PHeller

I own DT Ex741 on 28 spokes, 27,5 and regular pressures. Could not expect anything more of them. 3 broken spokes, before that rim went no more than 3mm of true. Wonderful compliance. Replaced spokes, what can hou do. For comparison I broke 4 spokes on Mavic EX729.

For that reason, carbon, no thank you. Any rim lighter than 500g is fkng light, and if they hold up to what I am able to put them through, why bother spending double in best instance, if not 10 times as much in the case of Enve.
  • + 6
 Geeting rid of spokes is a cheap way to save weight, it's why roadies will teeter around on 20 spoke wheels that fold in half if you look at them funny. 28 isn't actually that bad, the fashion of 24 and 20 spke mtb wheels died a suitably rapid death.
  • + 4
 My BMX has 48 spokes front and rear. I can hardly fit my spoke wrench in there.
  • - 1
 @vinay: hands down.... it it is!
  • + 1
 @ripplemuncher: I can't speak to who was first, but Rolf have a much lower maximum weight for their 24 spoke rims. I have a set of the Dolomites in a 26" from my old Trek XC bike. I'm giving them to my 140 lb son for his trail bike. ;-)
  • + 1
 @Fix-the-Spade: why not go all the way like Spengle and only run 3 spokes?

On a side note my mate borrowed a set and apparently they were really good etc...
  • + 2
 @Fix-the-Spade: Actually, road wheels have primarily dropped spoke counts to improve aerodynamics. The structural strength of carbon rims has allowed most mid-section carbon wheels to drop spoke counts into the teens. Aerodynamics have improved, but (clincher) wheel weights have actually gone up as average carbon rim heights have increased. Most road racers around here roll around on 50-60mm carbon clinchers w/ 14-20 spokes that weigh 1600-1900g. My 30mm aluminum training wheels w/ 20-28 spokes weigh 1400g: they're lighter, but less aero.
As for the tradeoffs that come w/ dropping spoke counts, I've had to walk home in socks after breaking a single spoke on a 20 spoke wheel. That was just once in the last 25yrs since I stopped using 32h on the road, but I simply won't ride less than 32 spokes on the dirt: I break more wheel components on the dirt in a year than in a decade on the road.
  • + 2
 @Trailsoup: i have seen riders laced their 36H hubs to 32 rims. Problem is to find an experienced wheelbuilder.
  • + 1
 Agree. My boost hub bike came with 24f and 28r rims, obviously designed to undo all the good boost does... and they are as heavy as f...!
  • + 1
 @mtnrush666: most carbon rim mfg can drill 36 hole for you.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I don't think spokes break due to the rim. Usually more to do with the builder.
  • + 3
 @Veloscente: I used to deal with folded up road wheels every weekend in summer. For all the talk of carbon rims being stiffer they still don't hold up to high side loads particularly well. The story would always be the same too, the bike would slide, get a bit sideways and when the tyre found grip again the rim would go 'nope' and fold over. The kind of slip that would barely register on a mtb and wouldn't be exciting on a touring bike reliably murders road wheels. You can even watch it happen regularly in the pro tour too.
  • + 0
 @FLATLlNE: that may be the case. And it further proves the point that 28h isn’t that bad for a modern rim. Having said that I went for 28 only because I got straight pull DT hubs for super cheap. Never again. 32 all the way
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I do agree. 32h is usually all I lace up myself.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: do you find you have a lot of bad luck with the 28 hole? Should we keep 28 hole wheels to trail and XC bikes?
  • + 2
 Hulk Smash. Please. Its not the rim. Or the 28h lacing. Its your skills.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Luckily that isn't really the case anymore. A 30 to 36 mm rim with 36 spokes is pretty standard these days. 48 hole rims are pretty much extinct.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: if the rim is stiffer and holds shape better, would the spokes not play LESS of a structural role? There fore you can use less of them?
  • + 3
 Some misinformation here. Spokes don't make a rim stronger, they offer next to no compressive or lateral reinforcement to the actual rim itself, spokes are thin flexy pieces of steel or alloy.
Higher Spoke count increases the wheels stiffness and strength as a whole in that spokes support themselves; the presence of fewer spokes of the same calibre is only effective in reducing weight (mainly for the purpose of a good advertised catalogue weight), it will always result in a weaker wheel though, having a stronger rim does not substitute having less spokes, and it's rare that a stronger rim is paired with less spokes anyway, normally the other way around, and quite often thinner and weaker spokes are used where there are less too.
For example a rim will have the near-enough the same impact strength with no spokes in it as it will fully laced, this is why carbon tri-spoke wheels that have huge spaces between spokes still work, the wheels integrity in this case if maintained by fewer much stiffer and stronger spokes.
  • + 1
 @mtnrush666: china carbon suppliers will drill just about any hole you want...

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puns get down voted
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: carbon wheels accelerate much better. Have much less flex and in the right hands are more precise. And they never go out of true till the end. Only negative is one feels more vibrations and thus fatigue, and the obvious, when they go they go quick....
  • + 1
 @gibspaulding: Yeah, standards change in BMX too Wink . I bought this one in 2004 (though as an ex demo it was probably older than that). 14mm axles front and rear, ACS freewheel on a flipflop hub, 48 spokes front and rear, about 16kg even with a CrMo front triangle... My local BMX shop now sells less than 12kg bikes even with a full HiTen frame. It really is tempting. But nowadays I'm pretty much only riding it a few times a week on the pumptrack. Both wheels have developed a wobble and I haven't even tried to true them. Too many spokes!
  • + 1
 @FLATLlNE: untrue. A good solid rim can be built by idiots like me and stand the abuse. With a bad rim: spoke threads blow, rim bends... A solid rim is essential. Good builder important and spoke quality marginal (given the spokes are not rubbish). Since i laced my 26 inch mtx33 rim to my enduro bike my life is much better. I cant imagine myself depending on a good wheelbuilder, because i'm adjusting my spoke tension/centering my wheels so often that the initial situation doesnt matter at all.
  • + 1
 @Zeeroone: the rumor has it that rim stiffness also plays a role. Too stiff rims are said to break spokes more easily. That was one of the theories behind Minnaars flats. I am a sht wheel builder but I can easily tell a difference between Stans Arch MK3, DT Ex471, Spank Spoon 32 or a monster like Mavic EX729. The last one is almost as stiff as a regular carbon rim. It's easy to build it but it's hard to tension it evenly. I failed horribly when building wheels with carbon rims. I had to retention 3 times. I broke 2 spokes riding in the mean time. Once just like Minnaar - all the way through the tape and the tyre.
  • + 1
 @Zeeroone: the point of a good wheel builder is that you won't need to constantly readjust spokes! Unless of course you are on aluminum rims and you are actually pounding the rim out of shape. A descent wheel builder will ensure a wheel is properly bedded in, stressed and destressed to the point where you can rail the wheel hard and tension and shape will remain pretty well consistent, unless of course you are bending/denting/flat spotting a rim.

I'm not sure what you mean when you say you have seen spoke threads blow. If you have proper spoke length your flange will break or your nipple will pull through the rim before you have e a thread failure.

None the less, yes, a good rim is important, but both rims waki listed are pretty good rims. And unless he has abused the rim in such a way that has changed its shape, and thus created low spots in the tension, broken spokes are definitely not something caused by the rim. And even if this was the case, it would be because of the rim damage, and then lack of maintenance afterward. If the rim remains true, a well build wheel should remain well tensioned and spokes should not break.

A poor wheel build means uneven tension, and low tension spokes get loaded and unloaded more frequently, until spoke fatigue enough and fail.
  • + 1
 @THomer: Interesting. I haven't ridden the wheels yet so I don't know whether I'm going to like the sound or whether it is actually going to bother me. But I think when the time comes I'm going to install the silencer kit. Not just to make it more silent but I understand (from Syntace themselves) that you need to replace one of these toothed rings when one of the four tiny springs come loose. But I don't like the idea of having a loose spring in there, not sure what damage it could do. I guess the silencer kit makes it more like a DT hub which is fine by me. The one thing I don't like about the DT hub is that unless you use higher end cassettes with an alloy spider, the sprockets dent the freewheel body which makes it hard to remove it again. It is what made me choose for Shimano hubs most of the time. I don't mind servicing my bearings on a regular basis, I just definitely don't like filing the freewheel body back in shape. I understand DT used a particularly soft aluminium alloy at the time and Syntace also offers a freewheel body with some steel ridges to support the cassette, so this made me give it another shot. Obviously I hope it keeps up as it is.
  • + 1
 @vinay: no, but is one of two points. second ist engagement. at least for me.
over the past 24 years riding less than 5 degree @ CK or 3 degrees @I9 is noticeable and i do not like it.
i worked a whole summer at the age of 14 for my first pair of ck hubs with ceramic rims. and will never go less engagement. Wink
  • + 13
 Not cheap but lovely engineered stuff from Syntace as usual.
  • + 11
 still no carbon for me. thanks.
  • + 6
 As a hobbyist who has built a couple hundred sets of wheels over the years, those look well designed. I’m not at all concerned with 28h as most carbon wheels I’ve built were 28h. I’m a Clyde too, at 275lbs. 32 and 36h are from the days of cheap single wall rims and even modern aluminum rims like spank are good at 28h.
  • + 1
 28h WTB aluminum stock wheels on my Santa Cruz wouldn't hold a true for more than a month. 28h aluminum wheels on the Scott Spark I demoed this summer wouldn't hold a true for a week. Break one of those 28 spokes & you have even more frame rub for the ride home (or maybe enough to stop rotation entirely for the *walk* home).
I prefer 32 CX-Ray bladed spokes: you drop more weight than w/ 28 double butted spokes, and there is no durability downside: more redundancy & they actually have a higher fatigue strength.
  • + 1
 @Veloscente: just changed my cx Ray spokes on 32 spoke wheel for double butted 2/1.8’s as they were too flexible and I’d break a few a year.
  • + 1
 @Veloscente: CX Rays (or any bladed spokes) are quite sensible to scratches etc. from rocks though. But they ride beautifully and I did not manage to break one yet after 2 years. Heavier friends did crack a single spoke a couple times but without consequences for the wheel.
  • + 2
 @jzPV & @fussylou: horses for courses & all that. I prize precise lateral tracking in wheels, so I build w/ stiffer rims and hubs with wide flanges (not as big of a factor on mtb wheels w/ discs, but on road wheels, bracing angles make a *huge* difference). In conjunction w/ a stiff rim & optimal bracing angles, I find a resilient spoke like a CX-Ray to offers a really durable, low maintenance build. Yes, the caveat is that tall, sharp rocks can potentially gouge the thin blades. If I were a 200lb+ WC DH racer on a super rocky course, I might go for a beefier spoke to hedge my bets. I'm a lighter guy, but my local trails are rocky as hell, and I ride aggressively and don't baby equipment. In the decade I've been riding CX-Rays if anything I've had fewer breakage & truing issues w/ bladed than non-bladed wheels. YMMV
  • + 1
 @Veloscente: OEM Wtb rims are much crappier than the retail models. My shop just rebuilt an oem wheel with a new i29 rim and the difference was kinda shocking.
  • + 2
 @Veloscente: i find CX-Rays the strongest spokes I’ve used. I use pillar bladed spokes as second option if budget is a concern. I don’t like pillar nipples, but there are a ton of other options to use.
  • + 2
 @Veloscente: rocks flying into the wheel seem to be the problem. Mine have quite a few scratches on the rear wheel. Nothing at the front. But I'm a fan, and as long as budget allows I'll use them.
  • + 5
 $1800 US? I'm usually not one to complain about $$ but unless there is something life changing or significantly better, I don't really see the need for lengthy articles about new carbon wheelsets. They essentially all work just fine and the reality is 98% of everyday riders couldn't tell the difference between $1000 Light Bicycle carbon wheels and $2700 ENVE wheels out on the trail.
  • + 1
 nailed it.
  • + 7
 10yrs... Lifetime.... These warranties are pointless as in 3yrs we'll all be riding the new 28.25 wheel size and will have no need for obsolete 27.5 or 29 inch wheelsets.
  • + 9
 You fuckers are violent today...
  • + 2
 "Second, they are crazy about testing, so when they claim a product is X-times stiffer and X-times better in impact resistance than product Y, [there is no need for anybody to question it]."
  • + 6
 @JVance: I have been to their HQ - I know what kind of testing they do. Trust me, they are really special in that regard. (since I work for them as a third party contractor, you may question my objectivity, but take this for reference: When I started working for them, first thing I got was a ton of testing equipment worth a small fortune).
  • + 3
 I've always thought that about mountain bikers. That's why I love it so much. Not sure what all of this let's hug each other and make friends is about. Let's go out and shred and tear s*** up. Destroy the competition and send it farther than anyone. The one who bleeds the least tries the least. This is what I remember about the early days of mountain biking and how it always was with the group of guys I rode with. If you got hurt you rub some dirt on it and try it again.
  • + 1
 You must be new around here... Generally speaking: Attention PB'ers are violent EVERY day. Attention You have been warned...
  • - 1
 Wait... *checks profile*... Member since 2013. Very confused Error -Does not compute. Where you been? You must've missed something. Razz
  • + 1
 @mtbikeaddict: Haha that was the first pic I posted. I've been a pb member since 09. Thanks though ????
  • + 5
 RC, how about ride quality in the straight rough stuff? Seems like you commented on cornering, but what about your hands and teeth?
  • + 5
 @papawheelie Softer ride than Enve, for sure and on par with Santa Cruz carbon wheels in a straight line over steps and roots. no teeth chatter and no claw hands after a 12 mile technical descent.
  • - 2
 @RichardCunningham: At this price, these should all be givens. What sets the wheels apart?
  • + 1
 I really like the engineering behind the rim*, but I wonder if the hub's missing a spacer between the two hubshell bearings. Flashback to Easton Haven hubs...

Tougher flange that flares outward like like Newman/moto, short like Stan's, with UST-like bead seat and hook and reinforced molded spoke reinforcements (molded hole too?)... just missing Vittoria's assym channel ramp and zero dish, even-tension geo.
  • + 4
 Low inertia hubs...because they weigh less, or because they're smaller in diameter than a comparable hub?
  • + 2
 That’s also a total load of gash when companies tell you that. A nicely machined alloy flange will weigh a lot less than the steel spokes instead.

Just got my first set of i9 wheels and I can’t imagine it possible to upgrade from there...
  • + 1
 don't settle for lame limited warranties covering only "manufacturing defects" -- We Are One and Santa Cruz both have no-questions warranties that cover trail damage, and the wheels cost less to boot.
  • + 0
 Wheels,especially rear are disposable items, so for me a hundred buck alloy rim is fine. Had carbon and they ride great but the price tag and fact that they end up smashed rules them out.
  • + 1
 Good looking wheel set but the POE isn’t enough. The more is always better!!!
  • + 2
 any team using them in Croatia?
  • + 2
 If only I had 1480 Euro...
  • + 2
 Or 1800 USD.
  • + 19
 Or 2300 in Canadian tire money
  • + 2
 @zion-i: Cambodian Tire
  • + 2
 @zion-i: Jesus, I'm dying from breathing too hard. I guess if you have a billion dollars, and want a wicked bike, there shouldn't be anything stopping you. I respect that there's a high end market, not complain.
  • + 1
 Syntace's website is a fun read. They're quirky.
  • - 1
 I feel very emotionally unstable today
Don’t F$&&k with me RC
  • - 3
 Straight pull...*cringe*
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