Tech Tuesday: How & Why to Upgrade Your Pads and Rotors

Nov 22, 2022
by Travis Engel  

Bike brands have to make a lot of difficult decisions when picking exactly which components they’ll spec on a given model. There’s always a price point that needs to be met and profit margins that need to be satisfied. It’s no surprise that, on a large production run, a difference of just a few pennies in wholesale pricing can start to become pretty important. That’s why you’ll sometimes see odd choices like brand-X cassettes paired with name-brand derailleurs, a single-size dropper post specced on every size frame, and today’s topic, adequate brakes running on inadequate rotors and pads.

We’re focusing on rotors and pads because upgrading the entire braking system may not be necessary to get you the power you need. Especially on more affordable bikes, brands often choose pad and rotor spec that will get the job done for most riders, but maybe not for you. We’ll break down a little about the difference between the variety of pads and rotors you have to choose from, and what you need to keep in mind when you’re ready to hop up your stoppers.

Pad material

Bicycle disc brake pads are divided into two categories. There are ‘organic,’ also known as resin, and there are ‘metallic,’ also known as sintered. Organic pads are usually a mixture of fibrous particles bonded together by a resin glue, while metallic pads are made of metallic particles that are compressed and bonded together with heat. On the trail, organic pads tend to be a bit quieter, but they are less effective in the wet and will lose power as they heat up under prolonged braking. Metallic pads work great in the wet, and do well when subjected to prolonged heat buildup, but they are more likely to be noisy, though that’s rarely severe enough to overshadow their benefits. They also are harsher on rotors over time, and some lower-priced bikes come with rotors that can not be used with metallic pads.

Though this is not always the case, lower-priced bikes tend to come stock with organic pads. The dry, cool-temperature, moderate-speed performance of metallic and organic pads is very similar, but organic pads tend to give the brake a slightly softer feel at the lever. If that bothers you, or if your descents are prolonged and steep, swapping to metallic pads is an inexpensive way to improve your brake performance as long as your rotors are compatible. If the rotors are not compatible, they will almost always be laser-etched somewhere indicating they are for “resin pads only.”

Identifying the pad material is sometimes more difficult. Most brands will identify a pad’s material by stamping it in the metal backplate, but not always. There is no reliable way to go by color or texture to identify metallic or organic pads. Metallic pads may have some shiny or reflective particles, but if an organic pad has been used, there may be specks of material smooth enough to reflect light like metal. Some organic pads use an aluminum backplate, which you can identify easily because it is not magnetic. Some metallic pads use titanium backplates which also are not magnetic, but this is extremely rare.


If you have no visual clues which pads you have, go by your experience. If your brakes tend to lose power, or ‘fade,’ on long descents, it is possible that they are organic, and a $20 to $30 (per wheel) trip to the bike shop is a good place to start. In the case of some entry-level Shimano brakes or on brands like Tektro or Promax, the brake manufacturer may not make metallic pads for your particular brake, but there are third-party manufacturers like EBC, Clarks, Galfer or Jagwire who likely make metallic options for your pad. Just make sure you follow their guide for picking the right pad because many look similar.

If heat buildup is indeed the problem you’re facing, Shimano has introduced the pads you’re seeing in these photos, with aluminum heat sinks that dissipate heat into the air with an increase in surface area. All but the most entry-level Shimano brakes can be fitted with on-brand heat sink pads. Aftermarket brands like Kool Stop and Swisstop may make a heat-sink pad for your brakes if you are finding a drastic loss of power after your brakes have built up extreme heat on a prolonged descent. Just keep in mind that heat sink, or ‘finned’ pads tend to rattle in their calipers, enough to be a deal-breaker for some riders.

Whenever working with rotors and pads, be sure to keep them away from oil and wax, as the pads are porous and can get ruined if they are contaminated. Always wipe off the rotor with alcohol and a clean rag after handling it.

Rotor material

If you are swapping rotors in order to change to metallic pads, it’s simple to tell if it’s necessary on major brands Shimano and SRAM (possibly branded as Avid, depending on your bike’s age). Shimano rotors will always indicate if they are resin-pads only, and SRAM does not make resin-only rotors. It is not as simple on other brands of brakes. If it is not written on the rotor, you may be able to tell by looking closely at the rotor itself. Less expensive resin-only rotors are usually manufactured by being stamped, not machined, and you can tell by looking closely at the edges of the rotor material. If they are sharp, square edges, it is likely a higher-quality rotor and you’re free to use the pad of your choice. If they are slightly rounded or chamfered, you may have a resin-only rotor.


But that is definitely not the only reason you might want to change rotors. The easiest and cheapest way to increase the power in your braking is to swap to a larger-diameter rotor. The three most popular diameters are 160, 180 and either 200 or 203 millimeters (some brands use 200, some use 203, and no, that doesn’t really make sense but we’ve gotten used to it).

There are a few 140-millimeter rotors in the lightweight cross-country and gravel market, and a growing number of 220-millimeter rotors in the downhill and enduro market. A larger rotor gives the brake caliper more leverage against the wheel, simply offering more power. It also provides more surface area to distribute the heat buildup, leading to less fade. But larger rotors are heavier, and are easier to slightly bend if they come in contact with objects on the trail or if the bike is not carefully transported, though most riders with large rotors consider it worth the risk.

Before increasing the size of your rotor, keep in mind that some frames and forks have a maximum rotor size. If it is not indicated on the component itself, it is safest to check with the manufacturer.

Your rotor size will be stamped somewhere on the rotor itself. Most bikes, just like most cars, will run a larger rotor in the front where there is the most potential braking power and a smaller rotor in the rear where too much may just send you skidding. If you are finding yourself putting enough force into your brake levers that your hands and forearms are becoming fatigued, but you are still not slowing down quickly or consistently enough, or if you are experiencing brake fade despite running metallic pads, it is probably time to go to larger-diameter rotors.

Rotor diameter

There are two ways that rotors can be attached to the wheel. The vast majority use six small bolts, but Shimano introduced a system called Centerlock, using one large hollow ‘bolt’ concentric with the axle. This requires a special tool to change. If that large hollow bolt is notched on its inner surface, you need what is often called a ‘cassette lockring tool.’ If it is notched on the outside, you will need a 16-notch 44mm bottom bracket tool. If you have Shimano brakes, it may be equipped with either system, but nearly every other brake brand will be six-bolt, which requires only a T25 Torx wrench, and it is likely on the tool you already take on the trail.

Once you’ve gotten the right rotor interface, and you know your frame or fork can handle it, all you need is the correct caliper adapter to position the brake itself out on the larger diameter rotor. For several years, there has been one standard on forks and frames called ‘post mount.’ These threaded ports will usually default to a 160mm rotor, meaning the brake caliper will bolt on directly with no adaptor if you are using a 160mm rotor. On more aggressive, gravity-oriented frames and forks, they may default to a 180mm rotor.

Finding the adaptor you need is simple arithmetic. If you have a 160mm post mount and you want to install a 200 or 203mm rotor, you need a 40 or 43mm post-mount adaptor and the accompanying bolts, which will come packaged with the adapter. If you have a 180mm post mount, you will be looking for a 20 or 23mm adapter.

Again, the brakes themselves can be upgraded, but that can quickly become a several-hundred-dollar job, whereas a larger rotor and adapter may only cost $50 per wheel, and different brake pads may be even less. And the best part is, these swaps only require simple tools and minimal experience in wrenching on your bike.


271 Comments

  • 89 3
 Brakeless its the future
  • 6 68
flag Rexuis-Twin (Nov 22, 2022 at 8:29) (Below Threshold)
 I know you're joking, but MTB could benefit from going back to it's roots. Like using bmx cranks, stems and stuff.
  • 61 3
 considering how everything is getting more expensive and where bike prices are going, the future is more promising bikeless…
  • 13 1
 @Rexuis-Twin: yeah, and square wheels with wooden rims are also the future, believe me Smile
  • 31 1
 @Rexuis-Twin: Why is that "stuff" better?

Also MTB's roots is not embiggened BMX stuff, it's beefed up beach cruisers and road bikes.
  • 10 2
 Wireless E-Brakes are right around the corner, don't forget to charge your batteries!
  • 12 3
 Nah, pick a brake pad and rotor and be a dick about it.
  • 4 3
 Running your front brake cable through the middle if your damper and out the bottom is the future. #internal
  • 13 5
 Do you mean like with clipless, whereby brakeless bikes would be the ones with brakes?
  • 16 3
 @MuddyBrit: wasn’t it named clipless because mtbs had toe clips and then spd replaced toe lips so it became clipless
  • 5 2
 Actually regenerative braking on ebike could be amazing
  • 3 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: add a reverb dropper and sounds like a dream bike.
  • 5 0
 @Compositepro: yeah really the confusion started because people started called the binding mechanisms 'clips' or 'clipped in'. Toe clips were there first!

What's pretty funny is Decathlon have a Giro flat pedal shoe on their website and they are describing it as clipless!!
I'm not sure how many ways wrong this is anymore ...
  • 1 1
 @Compositepro: I assumed that was the case, but just because it's logical doesn't make it less weird Smile
  • 1 0
 @Kmccann137: Probably only a matter of time. That would really help for those of us that do a lot of up/downhill riding and less of the rolling terrain variety.
  • 1 0
 @Kmccann137: ebikes with hub motors do it. It's not amazing yet.
  • 1 1
 @willdavidson9595: if we keep talking about internal brake routing through the fork it’s going to happen. Please let’s all keep this out of existence
  • 1 1
 @fuzzhead45: Fly By Wire technology in brakes makes total sense.
  • 2 2
 @Rexuis-Twin: You mean like mountain biking has bmx background?
  • 1 1
 Wireless brake its the future
  • 3 0
 @Flexpipes: Pretty convinced they are wireless now, hydraulic fluid gives the game away?
  • 1 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: having been mountain biking for a very long time I think I’m in a position to say that BMX cranks, stems and stuff are not the roots of mountain biking.

They were used by some on some bike but weren’t the roots.
  • 1 0
 @danstonQ: they are, as long as you are riding on the right surface. Unfortunately, that surface is quite rare on MTB trails...
  • 2 0
 Brakes only slow you down
  • 44 1
 I used to think that everything this article says about pad compound was true, but Trickstuff pads are resin, and they are the shit.
  • 9 0
 They are indeed. Trickstuff could use a US distributor, though.
  • 5 0
 Best pads!
  • 8 2
 Hayes resin pads are amazing, too.
  • 22 3
 Trickstuff power pads are amazing. Until you ride them somewhere gritty when it's raining. Then you rapidly discover that the steel backing of the pad does not have the stopping power of the pad that just seemingly dissolved...
  • 6 3
 @mountainsofsussex: oh yeah they dissappear in certain conditions, i remember i lost %60 of the pad in one run. would never use them again because of that.
  • 10 2
 @mountainsofsussex: hahaha...true indeed!!
I remember doing the lollipop route in Torridon this summer (so the weather was horrendous). I checked the pads the night before: half way through, I'll be OK, I thought......
Ended up with no brakes 300 mts before the end of the descent!!!
Ordered 8 more pairs from Germany the day after that.
Oh, and Brexit is shite.
  • 6 0
 Thing about resin pads is that there are lots of resins and lots of different materials to embed in the resin in varying amounts. I mean, the same kinda goes for sintered, but since there is always lots of metal in sintered pads, allowing for easy generalizations about metallic/sintered pads. They _will_ handle/transfer more heat, they will be loud when wet, they will be longer lasting in the wet/mud.

But yeah, modern resin pads are amazing and so much better than older compounds.
  • 6 0
 @Bitelio: you bought them again?! I was just thinking that the brakes weren't working great due to the weather until I ended up hugging a tree... Fortunately only a 5 minutes ride back to the car from there, where I had a spare set of SRAM sintered, and that's basically all I've used since
  • 3 0
 @Bitelio: you bought them again??
Even magura race pads lasted 6 times of the trickstuff, should've bought galfer
  • 2 1
 @rtiEDGE: I've had the opposite experience. Threw my resin pads in the trash and only run Hayes metallic.
  • 2 1
 @mountainsofsussex: if you like SRAM sintered, try MTX. Sintered power, "SRAM Power" compound modulation, resin quiet (mostly, if it's really wet, they're gonna make noise, but that's because they're working!).
  • 1 1
 @mountainsofsussex: Yes, I definitely wouldn't run them in UK weather!
  • 1 1
 @porkchopsandwich: what happened with the resins?
  • 1 2
 Anyone have experience w/ swapping from Shimano resin to metallic pads using the same rotors? Sand rotors, clean w/ iso alcohol, re-bed with new pads, all good? Or will there forever be resin left in the rotor that will decrease braking performance?
  • 2 1
 @mountzlu: no problem; just heat them up on a long descent
  • 1 1
 Brake authority pads made in France are also the shit! A bit less bite than the tricks tuff ones but a much longer lifespan. Still lot more power and consistency than pure sintered.
  • 1 0
 @Simzesun: I want to try the ones called "LessBrake", made in Spain
I've heard good things about them.
  • 3 1
 Agreed all resin pads suck except trick stuff power pads which are amazing but will die in a day at a bike park.
  • 2 1
 @justinfoil: Agreed. I only run MTX Red Label now. They rock.
  • 1 0
 Running hope e4 220f 209r, tried trickstuff in the front and they were great until they dissolved over two wet runs in British weather. Can highly recommend the ebc gold sintered pads, not much drop off from trickstuff in all conditions and don't dissolve. Noisy when wet though
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: see, I use Galfer standar (black ones) and just went thru them, I was really surprised how fast they wore … t wasn’t more than 400km’s on one set. but the feel and stopping power is totally worth it. add their rotors and it’s amazing (and wears even faster )
  • 1 0
 @Yurifi: i use rear brake heavily and i went through the trickstuff on a 8 km singletrack in rainy muddy winter, But on dry it lasted quite a bit of time so if you're in a dry climate they would work great. Pad material is thinner than oem pads though
  • 1 1
 Shimano Saint/Zee resin pads are also a better choice than metallic ones for all but the steepest, wettest longest descents. But to be fair, they're actually more of a semi-metallic compound than most resin pads.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I would argue that any pad that dies in one day also "sucks".
  • 1 0
 @mountzlu: I switch back and forth with no issues. Multiple sets of pads worn out a year and usually one set of rotors. I prefer the silence of resin on my trail bike and metal performance for the park bike.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: they’re for racing that’s why they’re designed the way that they are. All performance no consideration for durability.
  • 29 7
 One of my favorite tricks i learned from the PB comment section: To align you brakes, install the caliper with pads, leave the bolts loose. Slide a buisness card between the pad and rotor on each side. Tighten the caliper bolts, and remove the cards. Easy
  • 61 0
 You can do this without the business cards and still get it aligned correctly.
  • 29 1
 @Ironchefjon:
I just eyeball it. If you can see a gap between the pad and rotor on each side you’re good
  • 3 0
 One of the reasons I love my old hopes. There's a line in the caliper that I line up with the rotor for perfect balance (unless of course you have a sticky piston but, hope so not an issue)
  • 14 0
 Not "pull the brake lever" somewhere in there? Haven't tried your approach but the typical way of doing was to not have a card or anything in between. Pump the brake lever until the pistons are close enough, then tighten the PM bolts as you keep the lever pulled. This obviously won't work with IS or floating brake calipers, but these are getting less common on peoples bikes. But do your business cards replace the need to pull the lever and if so, is your experience that this works better than the usual way?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: yes thats how i used to do it, but i find that the card trick works better as you end up with the rotor perfectly in the middle everytime.
  • 15 0
 @Ironchefjon: you definitely can, i found that the caliper would always shift slightly when i tightened the bolts down, using cards eliminated that. Maybe im just a shitty home mechanic
  • 1 0
 @vinay: floating calipers?
  • 3 2
 @arrowheadrush: Not saying anything about what home mechanic you are Wink but you can keep the caliper from shifting if you alternate between the two bolts as you tighten them up to the torque spec (6Nm in my case). This way the friction under the other bolt is already high enough to keep the caliper from shifting. That said, it also depends on the stiffness of the rotor, which in turn depends on the diameter, construction and thickness. My rotors are 2mm thick, have a spider and usually aren't larger than 180mm or 190mm (though the 190mm one doesn't have a spider). I can imagine that if a rotor is flexy, it may not hold the caliper in place when tightening.
  • 3 0
 @justinfoil: Magura Gustav
  • 62 0
 I have a set of Trickstuff Maximas, so my butler alligns them for me.
  • 5 1
 No need for business cards. I always start out the same way, with loose-but-not-rattling bolts, but then rock the bike forwards using my weight, and with the brake lever pulled. The caliper settles into the position it 'wants' to be in. Then carefully ease off the forward push, and tighten bolts. Bongo.
  • 24 1
 Where do you get your enduro-specific business cards?
  • 9 0
 @slovenian6474: i had Enve mill me some out of titanium, they're the down-country model
  • 2 0
 @naptime: hopes are the way. Best pad compounds ever created
  • 14 0
 "Impressive", Bateman mutters. "Let's see Paul Allen's card."

"Look at that subtle colouring. The tasteful thickness."

His face creases in horror.

"Oh my God. It even has a watermark."
  • 1 0
 @Bitelio: your butler would love some Hayes Dominion A4s with Crosshair alignment. Still don't understand why nobody else uses this system after faffing about with regular calipers.
  • 1 0
 @slovenian6474: they're on CRC on discount now that most have switched to the more durable e-bike business cards.
  • 1 0
 @Mac1987: I still prefer the IS mount. Once I know how many spacers to use, I can always consistently install my brakes. I get that for the OEM market, PM is just quicker so once most bikes came with disc brakes anyway, PM became the default. Could also be the reason why the crosshair thing isn't common (aside from that it might be patented). It is either one more step during the installation process or they ignore it during installation and then find people on the forum claiming that the assembly line is cutting corners and is not using the adjustment. If the assembly line can set up a brake well enough with a regular PM interface, there is no advantage for them getting this additional feature. And remember, the biggest customer of brakes isn't the person riding the bike (and the subset thereof that actually works on their own bikes). It is the big bike brand that counts the time spent on the assembly line as money spent.
  • 33 13
 I prefer Centerlock rotors. Only one nut instead of 6 bolts to tighten and always tightens with even pressure around the rotor hub. Makes swapping rotors super easy as well. It makes my bike feel like F1 with only 1 nut ;-)
  • 40 11
 I respectfully disagree. CL has a single point of failure Vs 6 and is basically impossible to retighten with a multi tool (let's face it, even the most prepped of us won't be carrying a cassette tool with us, though I've just spotted the Unior 19g pocket cassette tool!). Bend a rotor? Practically any bike shop will see you good with 6 bolt. Not so with CL. 6 bolt will always be cheaper to manufacture for both rotor and hub. CL is multi part disc, with large diameter fine threads on hub and bolt
  • 26 2
 I tend to associate one nut and bikes with Lance Armstrong. I didn't realize F1 driver only have 1 nut. I suppose in that sport you reduce weight by eliminate redundancies everywhere you can.
  • 6 4
 I fell out of favor with centerlock after having them on my enduro and 6 on my trail. Trackstanding briefly before some new tech section I’d feel the dreaded centerlock rotor rotate slop. It’s far worse than the tiny shift you can get with pads moving. I hated it and it only gets worse as the locking teeth wear from banging. Moved the centerlock to my trail bike and running 6 bolt on enduro until the day I can afford to (or am forced) to replace wheels.
  • 6 2
 Only easier in your workshop.
On the trail, or in the wilds in general?
Not so much.
6 bolts rotors can be swapped anywhere with even the cheapest multitool. CL can't. You need a wrench and a bb nut.

In my humble opinion. 6 bolt is the far easier design than cl.
Just my 2 cents.
  • 32 6
 Where the hell are all these trail side brake rotor emergencies happening? Never seen it once. CL for the win.
  • 10 3
 @Rich-Izinia: I’ve removed more than one bent-beyond-possible-redemption rotor on the side of a trail. Riding out with one working brake kinda sucks, but way less than pushing a bike with a wheel that won’t spin (or with a caliper unbolted and swinging free). 6 bolt FTW.
  • 11 1
 @mountainsofsussex: you can also use a brake rotor bolt to replace a lost clipless cleat bolt in a pinch. I found that out on a very remote ride this year.
  • 3 1
 oh yeah, the rotor-swapping frenzy... that I do once in two years Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @jwestenhoff: that's a hack of the day prize right there!
  • 6 5
 @Rich-Izinia: I used to wrench at a shop. At least 50% of center lock rotors came in needing to be tightened. Most wouldn’t have any noticeable slop but man some did. It felt like they had a headset with no bearings. CL sucks
  • 1 0
 @highndry: Wait, was it the rotor and hub splines having some play? I had some weird movement trying to hold my front brake on my ride today, also CL. Couldn't figure out what it was.
  • 3 0
 @mountainsofsussex: I do actually carry a tool to retighten the centerlock nut on long rides, Terske makes a nice tool that easily fits in the pouch with my multitool.
  • 4 0
 @FuzzyL: The Terske tool is great to get you out of a jam.
  • 6 0
 I've never had a Centerlock come loose across multiple wheelsets. I've also never had a 6 bolt rotor come loose. Correct torque and inspections whenever a wheel comes off for preventative maintenance FTW.

because of this, I've never had play in the Centerlock splines as well. Thats another plus for CL, you only need to check torque on one nut (40nm) and not 6 tiny bolts (4-6nm). More torque = more better.
  • 1 0
 @nowthatsdoomage: try just tightening your rotor
  • 2 0
 @Rich-Izinia: I have bent rotors on rides and have had it happen to friends on rides in the USA south west.
  • 2 0
 @FuzzyL: ooh, that Terske tool is neat. Good use of the axle as a lever. Looks like you could stand half a chance of getting a disc off to remove or replace a spoke too. Wonder if it would fit a cassette with the wheel in the frame so you could loosen a cassette (needing the chain on to hold the free job from spinning)? If not, the Unior tool is the winner there
  • 2 5
 @mountainsofsussex: yep centre lock needs to go, it’s a terrible design that never worked not like Shimano are going to care or do anything about it, they’re still using cup and cone bearings.
  • 5 0
 @Rich-Izinia:

All the people talking about trailside repair, is there anyone who takes a spare rotor on a ride with them? Even if you are on a road trip and you've brought a spare rotor, its 100% going to be in your vehicle. If you've thought that far ahead, you probably have a decent tool kit with you and the proper CL tool for the style on your bike.
  • 3 0
 @VtVolk: I'd rather remove the caliper in a situation like that and zip tie it out of the way. You don't even have to take the wheel off to do that fix.
  • 3 1
 @OneTrustMan: except you're bound to lose one of the six bolts or 3 security tabs when swapping a rotor trailside...
  • 1 0
 @NBainas: yep, solid option
  • 2 0
 @nowthatsdoomage: It was the rotor mounting splines mating to the hub splines. No matter how tight there is play when you roll back in the slightest with brakes on. Yes I am always breaking in the forward direction but sometimes I need to pause or roll back slightly on a tech section and this bothers me to no end. Could just be the tolerance between Shimano and the hubs (DT 350) but the play is growing.
  • 2 1
 @highndry: yep you brake over rough ground and the spokes rebounding literally unscrew your centrelock rotors. It happened to me only last week, utter trash, terrible design and overpriced. Meanwhile there’s never been a recorded example of a 6 bolt failing ever and if it was you’d be able to fix with a multi tool.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: 6 bolt hubs fail, though usually (always) it's because someone failed to torque the bolts properly, or keep them torqued properly. The result of loose t25 bolts is actually pretty catastrophic. I have several of them in my shop where the rotor has completed torn away from the hub, taking part of the brake flange with it. After that, the hub is a write-off.
  • 1 1
 @privateer-wheels: let’s have a look. I need to see it to believe it. Haha seriously though you’d have to try destroy a 6 bolt or ride it while it was noticeably loose to have any issues. With centrelock it is definitely going to come loose on a ride at some point.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I'll try to remember to take a photo for you later this evening! But 100%, I think it's generally because someone has failed to spot loose rotors bolt, you're right.

On center lock, the room seems to be split, but I know far more people who have never had one come loose than people who have. Some mechanics say they see it occasionally, others say they never see it.
  • 1 1
 @privateer-wheels: mine come loose all the time and there is still skin missing from getting those ridiculously bolts to the unnecessarily tight 40 nm. Everything about them just sucks just like the rest of shimano’s hubs. Cup and cone. Dangerously unpredictable free hub failures. Cassettes that chew themselves into the freehub body.

Haha well don’t go out of your way but that would be definitely cool to see.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: here ya go! DT 350, customer ripped the rotor clean from the hub in the middle of a race, and continued to ride and finish the race with the rotor rattling around the axle:

m.pinkbike.com/photo/23794796
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: TBH, if the owner of that hub can't be trusted to check those simple to tighten T25s, then they probably can't be trusted to find the right tool and torque wrench, pull both wheels off and set to 40Nm without mauling the interface, or overtightening or simply being too clumsy to put the axle back in afterwards...
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: the owner of this hubs is a super nice guy who didn't realize his bolts were a bit loose.

He's also 6'11, 275+ lbs, and pretty fast. I imagine he puts a lot more force on brake mounts than most.
  • 3 0
 @mountainsofsussex: you can even oneup that and be (over?)prepared, swap one disc bolt for a cleat bolt and that way your pedals continue to work just fine even once the swap is done!
  • 22 0
 Stop it
  • 9 0
 I need a brake from all this tech talk.
  • 3 0
 Have a break, have a ... ?
  • 1 0
 I'm on my lunch brake!
  • 10 0
 This comment is for a niche group, but if you fatbike in the cold and need the stopping power, resin pads simply work better when cold. I use Hope brakes and the metallic pads are useless until there is a little heat in them. Switched to organic pads and it feels way better.
  • 9 1
 What about rotor thickness? Intuitively thicker is better because they have more material to sink heat, but because the they are stiffer they can cause issues if you don’t recenter the pads on the rotor periodically and cause pad wear imbalance and noise.
  • 2 0
 In my opinion, thicker rotors are a game changer. The new SRAM hs2 rotors are amazing. I think they make the pads last longer as well as they help the brakes maintain the same feel as the pads wear. I feel like they have more power too. Probably the biggest change to my bike in several years.
  • 11 0
 Galfer rotors with MTX Gold pads>
  • 6 0
 +1 for MTX, tried them a year or so ago when it was impossible to find pads, and they've been great.
  • 1 0
 My Galfers with XT calipers are squealing like SRAMs. I'll now google MTX Gold pads
  • 2 0
 MTX are very very good in my experience. True to fit in my XT 4 piston. So good I took them off my trail bike and only run them for enduro.
  • 1 0
 Someone here actually knows what's up
  • 1 0
 MTX gang, does anyone have any issue with the thickness? I used red on my hayes dominion A4, on regular 1.85mm rotors and there's barely enough clearance. Love the pads but been wanting to try 2mm rotors too, I feel that's a bit too close for comfort.
  • 2 0
 @chaoscacca: I’m not running A4s so my answer might not mean anything but I’ve used the pads with up to 2.3 rotors on codes
Never had an issue with thickness
  • 2 0
 @chaoscacca: All brake pads are the same thickness. You need to push your pistons in flush with the caliper body. Thats it. Pull the brake pads out, and carefully pry them flush with a plastic tire lever.

All brake pads (believe it or not) are the same thickness, with very-slight variances. 2mm of backing plate, 2mm of compound material.
  • 1 0
 @mtxbraking: y’all still have rotors in the works?
  • 1 0
 @mtxbraking: so stoked for them!!
  • 6 0
 Worth mentioning too that floating/heat dissipating rotors can have a really positive impact on braking performance. I swapped from XT M8120s with Shimano RT66 rotors (180r, 203f) on pvreious bike to the same brakes on new bike but on the RT86 rotors (icetech floating ones, still 180r, 203f) and the difference on long descents is crazy.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: as long as you're not dragging the brakes (which is always good advice, but not always followed).
  • 9 0
 Galfer pads are really good.
  • 1 0
 Their rotors too are supposed to be pretty good as well
  • 1 0
 @MarioandKristie: I've been rubbing their Wave 203 rotors on my big bike since the spring and love them. I never really had complaints about Shimano rotors but the Galfers are more flexible and less likely to pick up a permanent bend which is something I was dealing with frequently with Shimanos. Usually easy to sort out with a quick bend back but sometimes I'd end up chasing a rubbing spot around the rotor and could never get it right. With the Wave rotor I've never had the issue. They also look really good which is always a plus.
  • 8 2
 What about rotor thickness? The biggest change in brakes is the advent of thicker rotors that don't bend easily when they heat up. A lot of important stuff left off.
  • 4 2
 I recently put some 2.3mm TRPs on one bike. They are awesome and massively reduced the free stroke of my Shimano brakes. The only downside is dialing them in needs to be perfect because there’s so much less space to work with.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: that and sandwiched rotors with radiators. Why mention finned pads but not finned rotors? Rotors overheat just as quickly as pads, and even more so when using metallic pads.
  • 5 0
 What about 2 pot vs 4 pot? Seems 4 pots are all the rage these days. I've always ran 2 pot Shimano XTs but have always been happy with their feel and performance. Is 4 pot really that much better?
  • 4 0
 I have 4 pot XT's and my girlfirend has 2 pot XT's. Every time I hop on her bike I am pleasantly surprised by how good the 2 piston brakes are...and so much cheaper. I've only tried them in the parking lot though, I wonder if there are differences in fade characteristics?
  • 3 0
 @Benjamin97: the difference between 2 pot and 4 pot is only how evenly more "pots" can distribute the force across the pad. A strong brake with only two pistons will cause the leading edge of the pads to have increased wear. You can even see that on the individual pads of Magura 4 pot brakes (one pot per pad)
  • 3 0
 XT 4 pistons / 200mm rotor Front + XT 2 pistons / 180mm rotor Rear on my Transition Smuggler. Right balance for me.
BTW: I stopped bying the overpriced ventilated XT pads + the Ice-Tech rotors. Saint pads and normal (metal) XT pads are half the price and they perfectly do the job added to some cheap SLX-Zee RT66 rotors. Cheers!
  • 1 0
 @danstonQ: Try TruckerCo's on Amazon. $10 bucks, and are every bit as good as Shimano's except they dont wear out as fast.
  • 2 0
 This article is about rotors and pads, not how much pot you smoke.
  • 1 0
 Would love to hear some more input on this. I run SLX 2-piston brakes and have always envied 4-piston brakes because more pistons are obviously better and I don't know what I'm missing out on currently. I've been fishing for some more braking power lately so I bought 203mm rotors and brackets earlier this week, but since I'm pushing the line into clyde territory Ive been wondering if I ought to just bite the bullet and buy 6120 brakes.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: depends on size of the pistons. Bigger 2-pots can be more powerful than smaller 4-pots, but on average 4-pots are more powerful with better heat handling.
  • 5 0
 After reading this it makes me want to upgrade my brakes. too bad I'm broke
  • 8 0
 So buying brakes would break the bank?
  • 2 0
 @tbmaddux: piston broke
  • 3 0
 So can someone explain to my how a metallic pad doesn't work on a 'organic pad only' rotor. I get the rotors are manufactured differently, but it is still a metal disk with something clamping against it...
  • 1 0
 Organic pads aren't abrasive enough to cause much wear on the softer resin only discs. Metallic or sintered pads are more "abrasive" and will wear down the softer resin only discs fairly quick. You can run metallic on resin only discs, but just watch their thickness. You can get some decent life from them. DAMHIK
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: friends of mine tried metallic pads on Shimano resin-only rotors, having had the same impression as you. They still don't know why, but there was hardly any power. We thought the rotors would simply wear out faster or overheat quicker, but they somehow braked like crap...
  • 3 0
 @Mac1987: I feel like there is a chromium or similar type of coating on the Resin only discs, but I assure you, give it a bit of time, it will wear off, and they will start to grab with sintered or metallic pads.
  • 4 0
 Recycling these old Beta articles, which has been happening a bunch lately, is weird.
  • 1 0
 Anyone have experience with using bigger rotors with G2’s? I’ve switch to metallic pads already but still not getting the power I want. Considering going just going to Codes but if I can get the performance I want with just bigger rotors it will be a cheaper option.
  • 4 0
 Bigger rotors will give you more power and will be cheaper. Now, would it be enough for your needs, only you can answer this.
  • 1 0
 MTX Gold pads made a world of difference for me. I was also considering buying a new brake set but glad I explored this route first. I also upgraded my rear rotor from 180mm-200mm at the same time to have 200m front and rear. I wouldn't be opposed to trying a 220 on the front if you have the option or are a bigger person. I'm in the 190-200lbs range for your reference.
  • 1 0
 @loamfiend: nice one man I’ll check into that yeah I’m in like the 160 range these days so I’ll probably experiment with the 200’s
  • 2 0
 @KUBBY: I have a pair of G2 RSC, and I replaced some 180mm Centerline rotors with 200mm HS2s and it was an improvement. They are still not as good as Code RSC but I had to replace rotors anyway so the only real cost was the adapters. I'd recommend it.
  • 1 0
 20mm difference in rotor size makes a bigger difference than 2 vs 4 pot brakes
  • 1 0
 @olafthemoose: but they aren't mutually exclusive
  • 4 3
 "If your brakes tend to lose power, or ‘fade,’ on long descents, it is possible that they are organic,"

It's also possible that you just have much too small rotors (and/or calipers) for your riding. This article is just completely full of ambiguous "it might be" statements that provide literally zero help. Might as well just flip a coin to figure out what your brake setup is, instead of following this joke.
  • 2 0
 Might as well let off the brakes a bit they just slow you down
  • 1 0
 I thought it was a pretty good article. A bit basic perhaps, but a good outline for someone who has just bought a bike and wants to make it stop better. I like seeing this kinda stuff, cos it means articles that take a deeper dive into the more interesting parts of brake pad design (or spoke material, or types of damper, or a million other things) might be on the horizon.

Yeah I would have liked to have seen a bit more about different rotor thicknesses, floating designs, shimano ice-tech rotors etc in this article. And maybe a little more on the various pad compounds available. But I'm certainly not complaining about articles like this getting more common
  • 1 0
 @gabriel-mission9: "Basic" is "big rotors and big calipers (more pistons) are better when you need lots of braking over and over again, to control the heat."

There were so many "sometimes this means that" statements that it didn't answer any really questions. "How do I know if I have resin pads?" "Well, you can check for non-magnetic back plate, but sometimes resin has steel and sometimes sintered has aluminum." "Oh, well then that doesn't help really at all, I'll just know if my backplate is steel or not."
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: Yeah it's certainly not perfect. Defo sounds like it was written by someone who just looked all the info up on google 5 minutes ago. But at least it's arguably an article about mountainbikes. Most of the influx of articles since O+ happened have been way more off-brand than this. I feel like this is a good time to choose your battles wisely, and an article that gives some patchy info about how to improve your brakes is (IMO) less of an issue than one trying to sell the benefits of lycra and endurance to an audience mostly interested in gravity riding, just cos the lycra brigade is where the money is at...
  • 3 0
 I feel stupid: doesn't the radius from a 160mm to a 200mm rotor increase by 20mm, therefore you only need a 20mm adaptor, not a 40mm?
  • 5 0
 You are right, but an adapter called "+40" actually only "adds" +20 in radius. It is not 40mm tall.

So you effectively need a "+40" to go from 160mm to 200mm disc
  • 2 0
 @Uuno: thanks, makes sense Smile
  • 1 0
 This confused me in the past as well. Makes no sense
  • 1 0
 It's because they don't just do a straight offset of 20mm. Because Post Mount is one of the most illogical "standards" out there, you can't just space the caliper 20mm straight out along the bolts. To avoid _that_ confusion, it's better to specify the rotor diameter change the adapter will handle, because that's the only thing that can be listed with just one number.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: that makes sense - they could only offset the 20/23mm directly along the radial line.
  • 2 0
 Why not discuss the thickness of the rotors in the article? Lately there are some choices, and they make a big difference. I want to know the compatibility with the new thicker rotors and different callipers...
  • 4 0
 As a bike shop employee I would just like to take the time to thank Shimano for centerlock
  • 1 0
 Man, this story is really one that can set a room on fire....

Brakes are soooo personal.

That said, before hating on your brakes try different pads. Maybe a bigger rotor. Then start looking.

What I wanna know what I really wanna know is how it is that pads can become contaminated so easily. We have had several bikes (customers and our personal bikes) have pads become contaminated literally just sitting overnight in the shop. I'd pay a bit more for pads that had a no contamination guarantee. Not possible I know but since we are dreaming about perfect brakes....
  • 1 0
 "If they are sharp, square edges, it is likely a higher-quality rotor and you’re free to use the pad of your choice. If they are slightly rounded or chamfered, you may have a resin-only rotor."

Just tell this to Shimano. They started with the SLX, then now also the XT rotors are stamped and made in China, while a few years ago both SLX and XT were laser-cut rotors.

BTW, thx Shimano, for lower quality at a higher price!
  • 1 0
 Unpopular opinion: Ice tech Rotors suck. Expensive, warps easily and is a pain to get back in true. Have seen more then one get cooked before it was all worn out with the alu part pushed out, and not on a 180mm or 160mm one but a 203mm. If you are overheating your brakes you need bigger rotors with better pads (i.e. not OE pads). A laser cut 2mm or thicker steel or appropriate size with quality pads is all you need.
  • 1 0
 Word. Plus, they get worn out super fast. On my previous bike I was burning through one set of Shimano rotors per season, until I have swapped them with Magura rotors. When purchasing new bike, there was no room for Shimano brakes left, I went back to Code, zero issues, happy days. Pads - Silver Swisstop, Disc E. Wonderful stuff for tricky business, long lasting, perfect modulation.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone successfully run SRAM (HS2) rotors with Shimano brakes? I got sick of warped Ice Tech rotors (tried 86s, 76s and the new XTR discs), and finally the HS2 seems super promising.

I've swapped the adapter ofc (203->200mm) but the wear marks indicate that not the full rotor brake area is used. It *seems* that the wear on the pads is correct, but I experience a slight gobble feel esp. when I brake harder at slower speeds. In the meantime I have found a couple of rotor pictures of a full SRAM setup and it seems that there is an unused braking area as well of some 2mm (hazard guess), innermost area.
  • 1 1
 Machined or stamped rotors? I thought most brake rotors are laser cut.

As for resin vs sintered, things may have changed but I thought all Magura brake pads are resin. They have endurance and performance pads, but they're all resin. They're not supposed to get that hot anyway as their oil has a lower boiling point than the competition, so maybe that's why resin is less of an issue for them.
  • 2 0
 I believe their performance pads are some type of hybrid metallic pad. I had to move away from Magura pads I was using a set of pads in 2-3 rides in the wet/mud on my MT5/XT Shagura setup. I put new pads in, did a long day in the wet and by the end of the ride I had no pad left in the rear. I was using Kool Stop Red pads for a a while but supply chain issues decided I wanted to try something new. I'm on to a set of Galfers now in their Pro compound and am happy with the power, bite and feel, but I've only got a couple rides in, so I don't know about longevity.
  • 1 0
 Same with TRP
  • 1 0
 Dude what are you talking about
  • 1 0
 You don’t mention it but it always seems to me like resin pads have more bite when they are cool than cold metal pads. For me I think I prefer metal in the back and resin in the front.
  • 4 0
 Galfer rotors + pads rule!
  • 4 1
 Or do it like the pros: 1 side organic, 1 side metallic. Best of both world. And it actually works! Smile
  • 2 2
 Is it just me or organic pads result in more wear on the rotors? 200 mm centerline rotor was down to the min thickness after 2 sets of Galfer purple pads. Dirt particles get embedded in soft pad material and act as abrasive, I guess.
Similar story with copper coated backing plates on sintered pads, they wear out the pistons.
  • 1 1
 A) Bike companies that say they are designed in the PNW or North Shore and then spec their bikes with resin pads can suck my big toe; resin pads have no place in wet climates unless you're racing...maybe.
B) I didn't see mention of the fact that Shimano has narrow and wide pads. Make sure that your rotor surface is compatible with the pad face, and that your pad does not extend past the braking surface.
Here is the pad rotor comatability chart.
shimanobikes-nz.prontoavenue.biz/ts1570079501/attachments/Page/20/Disc%20Brake%20Pad%20Compatibility%20Chart.pdf
  • 3 3
 "Bicycle disc brake pads are divided into two categories"

Semi-metallic? Ceramic? And "resin/organic" is basically a category in itself, because modern resin compounds are so much better than older ones, and quite varied as well. It's pretty old-skool slash wrong to generalized about resin pads the way this article does.
  • 1 0
 Aren’t you smart
  • 1 1
 A larger diameter rotor on the front makes sense on a motorcycle especially when you consider engine braking, but on a mountain bike I think it's an odd choice. Most riders use their rear brake a lot to control their speed. Especially on steep trails, a rider may use the rear brake nearly continuously, and modulate the front as needed for steering etc. Greg Minnaar recently made a comment about how he thinks his rear brake builds more heat than the front in DH racing.

The other thing to keep in mind is going the next rotor size up, usually yields about a 10% improvement in torque, but pad compound is far more sensitive. You find 2 piston brakes that have more power than a 4 piston brake. The problem is, the pad shapes are usually unique so you get locked in. If you want good pads, you have to buy brand X brakes.
  • 1 0
 Where did Minnaar recently make that comment? Not arguing it as I believe it to be true too! Also you can see when someone like Bronson sometimes runs larger rear rotor…
But would love to give it a listen
  • 1 1
 @stormracing: Because when you’re racing the rear is used for most braking power, the front is for finesse braking. Reasoning being is that you can slide the rear, while still shaving speed, and still maintain momentum. Try to do any braking with the front and maintain momentum, you really can’t. Which is why the front is “feathered” to finesse the front in and out of features/obstacles/corners etc. Hole this makes sense.
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: My bad, read “why” instead of “Where” haha!
  • 2 0
 EBC RED - sport resin - they aren't very economic in use but there is no fade and the power vs the GOLD (metallic) is muuuuch higher
  • 2 0
 You guys like center lock hubs and rotors? They seem like they are prone to noise as the interface gets worn in?
  • 1 0
 I have a shimano disc that won't mate properly with my Reynolds hub. There is rotational play in the system. I don't know if it's a Shimano defect or hub issue.
  • 12 10
 I've been running centrelock for many years and had zero issues with them. Always seemed a better solution than silly little bolts which get chewed up and slip a torx or allen so you can slice your knuckles off.
  • 7 2
 @codfather1234: Fish-fingered mechanics beware!
  • 2 5
 The only thing worse than centerlock is having to use a centerlock to 6 bolt adapter because you have Shimano hubs and someone else's brakes. So much play in that system.
  • 4 0
 Not in my experience. Had Centerlock for 8yrs. Other than a crash damaged rotor and many sets of pads they worked great.
  • 5 0
 @WestwardHo: The only thing worse? I can think of other things worse than centrelock. Such as being made to eat a big bag of sand. Or being attacked with a halberd.
  • 1 0
 Shimano rotors on centerlock onyx hubs, no problems. Brand new magura rotors on the same hubs= knocking noises. No noticeable signs of wear on the hub interface at all.
  • 3 0
 I put a galfer 223 rotor on my Dh bike and it works great
  • 2 2
 If you live in the UK, Uberbike have you covered for pads (and rotors) covering the major brands. White race matrix ftw, £11 a pair and normally on sale with a voucher code on high days and holidays.
  • 3 0
 They overheat so fast and melt to to the rotors leaving black stick stains that cause the brakes to howl like I’ve tarred my rims to do a bit of trials. Just pay the extra from sram or shimano metallics.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I have heard a lot of people complaining about uberbike pads melting. It's kinda scary companies are still allowed to release products that bad.
  • 1 0
 Definitely some rotors are better than others and can be quieter and have more stopping power. That is why I use a older model of rotors.
  • 3 0
 Brakes really hold the industry back.
  • 1 0
 I much prefer the feel of resin pads, anyone got any top tips for saint/zee?
I’m currently being impressed by swisstop silver resin but i’ve not checked the wear lately
  • 2 0
 Would have been nice to have some comments about Rotor Thickness since that has become a thing these days.
  • 1 0
 Might be worth doing a part 2 where you cover when to replace pads and rotors, how to tell if pads are contaminated and what to do about it, common brake troubleshooting etc
  • 1 0
 Somewhat unrelated, anyone in France have a suggestion on where to find 90+% isopropyl alcohol? Some things are just not intuitive here.
  • 1 0
 Carrefour or any supermarket? If bot just go to castorama o anything like and get disc brake cleaner
  • 1 0
 @mrmm8900: No dice. The alcohol at the grocery/bricos is not iso. It's 70 or some other lesser percent and often scented for cleaning. Now that I'm back to old school in an apartment (with wife and cat) I don't want an aerosol. Even our vet here says you can usually only buy it for medical purposes, meaning you need a licence or some other good reason for having it. Completely unlike Canada....just waltz into any pharmacy and you're done.

Amazon it is I guess. Unrelated, we did a day trip to Grenoble a few weeks back (if that's where you currently live). Nice town, will visit again to see if I can find a car-less way to any trails. Also sounds like a good place to stage for a shuttle to Alpe d'Huez...want to eventually try that on the road bike.
  • 2 0
 @iammarkstewart: yeah, mine is 70% and went to 2 supermarket till I found it. Guess I got lucky.

There are alot of trails that you can access without car. St nizier, frange vert, mont rachais and 4seigneurs. For those far away, just put it in the bus rack, thats how I get to seigliers-chamrousse, st nizier, 7laux. For the return you just need to go down the mountain.
  • 2 0
 @mrmm8900: Thank you good sir, your info is in my notes!
  • 1 0
 Shimano - Govno! SRAM - Dobro! But SRAM on DOT freezes in the cold. And Shimano on mineral oil does not freeze. Shimano, what's wrong with you? Why don't you freeze?
  • 2 0
 Coaster brakes are making a comeback. Front brakes are for sissies
  • 1 3
 The wear pattern on that IceTech rotor in the pics is frightening. There is _zero_ clean rotor at the outer edge, which tells me that the pad is very likely to be hanging off the edge, and that some of the pad is not touching the rotor and not wearing down. Eventually those unworn sections could touch, stopping the pads form being pressed into the rotor, drastically reducing braking power. Looks like someone tried to shift the caliper outward to "better fit" a 203mm rotor, and went too far.
  • 1 0
 Just ordered a set of Mile Racing Pads on Amazon. Any one on these? Like em?
  • 2 1
 Because with Shimano Icetech you can melt the alloy inserted between the 2 steel parts.
  • 1 0
 After endless tinkering over more than 2 decades -hayes A 4 organic pads; Galfer 223 Rotors -done
  • 1 3
 "and you can tell by looking closely at the edges of the rotor material... If they are slightly rounded or chamfered, you may have a resin-only rotor."

Or you could tell for real by just looking for the "resin pads only" etching. SRAM and others have been putting chamfers on at least the outer edge of normal rotors for a bit now. That advice is like saying "if your truck is tan, you might have a Toyota".

Who else beyond Shimano even makes resin-only rotors?
  • 2 0
 Who needs brakes? All they do is slow you down. I wanna go fast.
  • 1 0
 This is the way
  • 1 0
 Question. Is it better to change your rotors with new pads? Or vice-versa, is it better to change pads with new rotors?
  • 1 2
 I change pads regularly, rotors rarely, close to never.

Here's what works well enough to never have to write this article again (although I imagine there's been a push to solicit beginner pieces to become some sort of "one place on the web for information, experience, and community" or whatever the autoplay overlords said in the meeting) - four (4) piston hydraulic brakes. Metal pads. 8 inch rotors (which is where the 203mm comes from, ya dingbats). Let's move on!

*uh-oh, I forgot we have to drop the employee with the head injury somehow... seen that too.

ROBIN: your thoughts!
  • 1 0
 You shouldn’t use resin pads with rotors you’ve used with metallics as they’re abrasive and score the braking surface but other than that it doesn’t matter. Just stick the rotors in the dishwasher and you’re good to go.
  • 1 0
 Wouldn't post mount adapters only be half of the difference in the rotor's diameters?
  • 1 3
 what about 50 bucks SRAM pads vs 5 bucks no name eBay pads? I got 10 bucks pads from totalbleedsolutionsuk from eBay as it looks like specialty store, yeah they do not last as long as branded one, but they do last about 50% compare to those and usually about 15% - 20% of the price
  • 3 0
 This is not the way
  • 3 0
 @olafthemoose: why tho... everyone says that but no one can confirm that 5 times cheaper pads are 5 times shittier. I ride DH parks with same amount of power, they just wear off faster. Paying 100 bucks for 2 - 3 full days in bike park just in brake pads is insane.
  • 1 0
 @valrock: I’ve had some major issues riding steep trail with not even cheap pads heating up. Galfer makes great compounds that aren’t crazy expensive that have good power and work well when hot.
But hell, I guess on a lot of bike park trails you can get off the brakes for almost the whole thing, and they handle speed well even when steep and rough. So if you’re not having issues then that sounds like a sweet deal. But riding really steep rough cut trails with off camber unsupported corners where slowing down quickly is essential, the low end stuff just doesn’t work for me. I end up having to ride slower because I can’t shut it down when I need to.
  • 2 0
 Galfer rotors: nuff said.
  • 2 0
 MTX Gold is end game
  • 3 0
 Sram Codes + These. They are legit.
  • 1 0
 Give me a brake, surely everyone knows this (trick)stuff?
  • 2 1
 Cheap slx rotors > ice tec
  • 1 0
 Cheap slx rotors are so bad. Never tried ice tech but man those slx rotors are bad
  • 1 0
 @olafthemoose: So which ones are good?
  • 2 1
 220F/200R rotors on an enduro bike should be standard.
  • 4 1
 no, too big of a rotor is a thing. If you run metal pads and super large rotors while being small \ light rider you actually will struggle with getting those pads hot enough ( because bigger rotor == better cooling) and your brakes will actually underperform. This is perfect example when MORRER is not GOODER Big Grin
  • 1 1
 @valrock: frontbrake yes rear, nah. For this reason i often run sinter in the front and metal in the back. Sinter usually offers more modulation but gets too hot in the back metalpads need temperature to start working. If its steep for a decent amount of time a 200 mm rotor will turn blueish even with 70 kg rider.
  • 1 0
 There is actually no reason for a smaller rearrotor on a gravity bike besides tradition. (AC used to run a bigger rearrotor though)
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: I found that a 220 in the rear locks up the rear tire too easily for me. To each their own.
  • 1 0
 @duanehundley: brakes are a lot about your style and preference. I am a dragqueen i smoke rearrotors.
  • 1 0
 What about floating discs vs normal ones - is there real benefit in MTB?
  • 1 0
 Same Hope discs since 4 years and half, 0 problem
  • 1 0
 no use for 7- or 8-incher it if ain't thick (dick in german)
  • 1 0
 What a waste of attention, this.
  • 1 1
 Where are you getting rotors and pads at 50$ a wheel???
  • 3 0
 "whereas a larger rotor and adapter may only cost $50 per wheel, and different brake pads may be even less."
  • 1 0
 @AvidTrailRider: Ill make sure to show this comment to the bike shop as they are ringing up my bill.
  • 1 0
 @AvidTrailRider: username checks out!
  • 2 2
 Still waiting for ABS (at least/if only for the front)
  • 7 7
 trp. end of discussion.
  • 3 0
 While I agree, that TRP brakes are the best in that price segment, their pads absolutely suck!
  • 4 4
 Trp brakes are for people who ride up the trail and shuttle down the road
  • 6 0
 @olafthemoose: I replaced a set of Dominion a4a with TRP DHR Evo. The DHRs are so good. I never think about them.
  • 1 3
 "Some organic pads use an aluminum backplate"

And so do some sintered pads, so that's a useless thing to check.
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