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Tech Week 2023: A Spa For Your Bike, Tools For the Workshop & Trail

Oct 28, 2022
by Matt Beer  
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Views: 2,421    Faves: 1    Comments: 0


Dynaplug Covert MTB Plug and Plunger Kit

Dynaplug's Convert MTB kit stealthily hides inside the end of your handlebar and doubles the plug applicator as the bar end. Each bar end cap and plunger weighs 42g and is stocked with two plugs at either end.

This of course requires a set of grips that leave the end open and must have an inner diameter of at least 18.42mm. The female end is first fixed to the inside of the bar via three set screws and then the male end cap threads in hand tight. Included with the system is the necessary short allen key to reach the grub screws inside the bar.

The $125 USD patented Covert kit is made in the USA using state-side materials and comes with a lifetime warranty.




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Silca Bike Spa Cleaners and Wax

“Bike Spa” is a bit of a hyperbole, but these cleaners and wax finishing products aim to leave your bike as good as new through a four-stage process that Silca dubs “detox, scrub, seal, and renew”.

Their Ultimate Brake and Drivetrain Cleaner goes on first to pull off the gunky mess of old chain lube or brake dust. Next is the concentrated soapy wash liquid to pull dirt from the components. That's followed by a graphene spray wax that is said to offer a nano-scale protection layer to the bike’s paint. Then, there’s also a ceramic waterless wash for touch-ups, which claims to lift away dirt without harming the finish. Keep in mind, both the graphene and ceramic sprays should steer clear of coming in contact with any touch points or braking surfaces.

Each 473ml bottle comes with its own spray nozzle and the full spa kit includes two microfiber towels for $135 USD.




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Park Tools Team Issue Bike Stand

The $409.95 USD PRS-26, better known as the Team Issue Repair Stand, is a foldable, lightweight aluminum option that weighs just 5.7 kg (12.6 lb) for at home or on the move and uses a quick-close clamp. Three legs fold out to reach 126cm from the base, with the help of a hinged arm for security, and it can be set up between 97 and 147cm high.

As for the clamp, the 100-25D Micro-Adjust Clamp quickly threads in to close grasp and locks on by flipping the handle 180 degrees. That clamp has a width of 70mm and can hold objects between 23 to 76 mm. At the back of the clamp head, another handle can be released to spin the head 360 degrees, which will retrofit to any of Park Tools other stands as well.


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Park Tools Piston Spreader and Needle-Nose Pliers

These 6” Needle Nose Pliers let you reach tight spaces with a flat and curved gripping surface. On top of the cutting edge at the inner reaches of the pivot, there are four crimping guides. It retails for $29.95 USD.

At the same price point, the PP-1.2 Hydraulic Brake Piston Press has a tapered leading edge to squeeze between the pads and uses a rubberized handle. It's thick enough to manipulate a set of pistons while holding two more at bay.




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Pedro's Pro Cutting Guide, Star Nut Setter, and Crowfoot Flare Wrench

In this bundle are a few key items for working on your bike at home. Ever tried cutting a steerer tube or handlebar without a guide? Me neither. Okay, maybe once or twice... actually, way too many times. Pedro's Pro Cutting Guide holds any tube between 19 and 39mm. Those numbers are visible on the laser-etched detailing and the width can be adjusted for carbon or metal cutting blades.

After you cleanly cut that steerer, you can set a star nut nice and square with their second-generation Star Nut Setter that fits 1" and 1&1/8th tubes. Both tools retail for $59.99 USD and have replacement parts available.

Hiding in the frame is the convenient 7 and 8mm Crowfoot Flare Wrench for quickly finishing up brake fittings and the like. The little tool goes for $9.00 USD and uses a 1/4" square drive.




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Unior Tools Home Tool Kit

For jobs on the move, the Unior Pro Tool Roll Kit includes all of the essentials but still fits in a backpack.

Built into the waterproof polyurethane material are two eyelets that allow the tool roll to form its own display by hanging from the headrest in your van or the like, and there’s an abundance of pockets to personalize the $199 USD kit yourself.

All Unior Tools are made in Slovenia, and the ones included in this kit are the most common allen key sizes (1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm), a chain cutting tool, spoke wrench, 2-for-1 disc brake tool, plus a cassette wrench and lock ring tool, just to name a few.




Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
353 articles

69 Comments
  • 138 4
 Shout out to park tool for making the exact same product line for the last 10 years while still promoting it each year like it’s new.
  • 10 0
 Think they maybe should have just linked to a Dave Rome Cycling Tips article. Nothing interesting here.
  • 45 1
 Park makes some good specialty tools, but I don’t get why anyone would buy their basic hand tools that are available at any hardware store for 1/10 the price. Is it really that important that all your tools have blue handles?
  • 6 30
flag femto505 (Oct 28, 2022 at 19:41) (Below Threshold)
 @boopiejones: maybe because it's made in the USA
  • 11 1
 @boopiejones: buy some plastidip and your handles can be blue too!
  • 4 18
flag spuddo (Oct 28, 2022 at 20:02) (Below Threshold)
 I mean fair enough, they've got the best professional tools in the industry (and you only need to trade a couple organs for them)
  • 1 3
 Sustainability is the word here.
  • 16 2
 @femto505: what? Like 10% of their stuff is built in the US by someone else. Unior is an actual tool manufacturer that makes some bike tools on the side.

After years of being on the tools in bikes and other industry’s. The only American made tools I will buy are things like pry bars, punches, drifts, etc. everything else I’ve owned American made has been a joke.
  • 8 0
 I just wish they would bring out a stand for tall people. In all my years wrenching I've never had a stand that put the bike at an ergonomic height when mounted on the top tube or seatpost, and I'm only small-tall at 188. I ended up extending my home stand with a spigot and a tube.
  • 1 1
 @L0rdTom: I'm at 193 and just clamp lightly at the frame carbon or aluminum. Never had an issue.
  • 2 0
 @boopiejones: I have a set of blue handle allens in my shop... they are harbor freight, came 1.5mm-10mm AND same range in SAE, for $16, 10 years ago, with a stand. I've got a set of SnapOn Allens for my socket driver for the nicest jobs, but harbor freight wins more often than not lol
  • 1 0
 @boopiejones: Well I can say for a fact that their allen wrench set is significantly cheaper than the identical set from snap on. Like a quarter of the price cheaper.
  • 2 0
 @g-monster: Exactly. An Allen head screw is an Allen head screw. We're not machining blades for fighter jet engines here. Good grief. Sure, you wouldn't want tools from Dollar Tree, but for a bicycle? HFT stuff is more than adequate.
  • 1 0
 @bigogoat: lucky you, clearly your back is a lot better than mine!
  • 4 0
 I've had various Park tools, and a stand, for literally, wait for it... 30 years. (yea, I'm old). Also had cheapo no-name allen set for the same time. Their stuff you buy once and never again. If you're just a super basic bike maintenance person, maybe not worth it. If you know you're gonna be on a bike regularly for the rest of your useable life and do ALL of your own wrenching, buy Park once and never need to again.
  • 1 0
 @boopiejones: you can always buy Gedore pliers to get better quality with the same color. I'd go for Knipex myself, but those add red to the blue handles.
  • 2 0
 @brassinne: you sure they're made by Snap-on? Because PT usually has acceptable, but not great quality. Regardless, for allen keys I'd get Wera. Hex Plus is a life saver when a bolt is a bit rounded and you still want to get it out.
  • 2 0
 @Mac1987: I doubt the snap on set is actually made by snap on. I literally have both a set of snap on mertic allen wrenches and a set of park tools. They are identical in every way, including the holsters. The only real advantage with the snap on set is that when the tool truck comes by, I can hand them a broken one and they give me a new one no questions asked.
  • 1 0
 @boopiejones: Ask the professional mechanics who buy SnapOn or Mac screwdrivers that make Park's prices look bargain basement.
  • 1 0
 @roxtar: I don’t doubt that at all. And if my livelihood depended on my tools and I was using them 8 hours a day, 365 days a year, i would probably buy expensive tools with a lifetime warranty as well. But for my own purposes, which involves an above average amount of bike wrenching (keeping a family fleet of 10 bikes running smoothly) I’m still using the same set of harbor freight Allen wrenches I purchased a decade ago.
  • 22 0
 $135 for a wash kit? It probably does a great job at keeping the bike looking pretty, but I think my amazon finish line bike wash for $12.99, wal-mart chemical guys degreaser $9.99 and costco 36x microfiber pack for $21.99 will keep the bike just as clean, and leave some money leftover for a bike wash 6 pack Smile
  • 25 1
 Still spending $44.97 too much.
  • 19 1
 Dish soap
  • 15 1
 @wyorider: dish soap and cheap turtle wax. For 3 dollars I can make my bike just as clean and shiny as this $140 kit.
  • 5 0
 @RonSauce: I use dollar store degreaser and a dollar store dish brush. So it only costs me $2!!!
  • 1 0
 @boopiejones: $2 store.
  • 1 0
 @boopiejones: im fancy, I spent $6 at harbor freight on a set of car wash detail brushes.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Exactly. I use the cheap Carnauba car wash, some Pantico bristle (natural) brushes I got at Home Depot, a tampico auto wheel spoke brush, and cheap chain cleaner using cheap citrus cleaner from Autozone too. And my bikes are known amongst my crew as the most anally rententive clean bikes ever.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Get a bottle of car wash-n-wax. Dish soap is a little too aggressive and removes wax super easy.
  • 23 4
 I've never understood why people want a guide to cut a steerer tube with a hacksaw. Just use a tube/pipe cutter!
  • 24 11
 Aaaaaand that's how you mushroom the end of your steerer tube.
  • 8 1
 I agree on steel or aluminum steerer but not carbon.
  • 11 1
 @wyorider: Not if you take your time with it and use a good quality cutter, no need to put too much pressure into the cutting blade
  • 2 3
 @fabwizard: Fair point - in that case I just make a 'straight line' on the steerer with tape that's easy to see (eg white electrical tape) and use a cutting disc on a dremel
  • 5 0
 @wyorider: Just use an outer reamer and it fixes the problem. When I worked in a shop I used a saw and a guide but now i don't even bother to remove the fork and just use a pipe cutter.
  • 3 1
 @wyoride www.ridgid.com/us/en/223s-227s-inner-outer-reamerr:

Not cheap but if you need to cut steer tubes regularly, a pipe cutter and this tool is the best choice.
  • 1 0
 Exactly!
  • 2 0
 @DaveRobinson81 With a good quality guide (Park), it's worked for me for several decades.
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: I have a Bahco, it's great. I've never thought I have to replace the blade, but if I do feel the need, it's possible.
  • 1 0
 @DaveRobinson81: And how much does a "good quality cutter", that will go through 1/8" wall aluminum, cost?
Probably more than that guide.
  • 1 0
 @roxtar: A Bahco cutter (I've had one for about 15 years, no problems, haven't changed the cutting disc) is about 20€ - but soo much easier to use than a hacksaw and dead straight every time.
  • 15 1
 Love Unior tools. Great value, well made. For the love of all that's sacred to you PinkBikers-if dish soap and water are good enough for just about every pro mechanic, stop wasting your beer/taco money on fancy "bike wash" products!!
  • 4 3
 Unior stuff is straight up overpriced junk. The stuff that is ok is rebranded and marked up 30%.
  • 2 1
 Actually the dish soap is not that good idea. It is a degreaser - it has to clean greasy dishes after all! Liquid hand soap is a better option. The cheaper - the better as the expensive ones can have things that makes your skin soft, but that is not really good for your bike.
  • 16 4
 “Wait, let me get my Leatt monosuit and $135 Silca kit so I can take my $13k Yeti to the bike spa” - my dentist
  • 11 1
 I wonder what would be the maximum amount that a mountain biker should spend on his bike without triggering the community?
  • 10 0
 Jeez Silca is a totally parallel universe. My MTB is going to be leaving the alley bar, drunk and dripping dish soap and bump into somebody's immaculate bike that is coming out of the spa, smelling like hibiscus and roses. And one of those bikes is gonna mug the other.
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: I have a number in mind, but I guarantee it would offend even the most frugal member of this forum. Suffice to say I'll never spend more on a bicycle than I'd spend on a very used car.
  • 4 0
 I've worked in a shop, used several different tools but primarily Park. Sure, not cheap, but they're not the only ones with expensive shop tools. I have 3 sets of Wera hex/torx wrenches, and I really like them. And yes, I got an industry deal on my PRS-25 (2-leg team issue)...and despite some folk's claiming it's not tall enough, for me it's almost as good as the PRS-33.2 in the shop (same clamp) and a boat load lighter than my old PRS-9. Deal or not, I'd recommend the PRS-25 (or 26 if you like the 3 leg set up) if you're setting up your home shop space, need an easy fold, portable stand or just want something quality that will hold and e-bike and swivel it around.

Park Tool may not be perfect, but they do make some good stuff and they've been dedicated it to it for quite some time.
  • 6 2
 NOTICE TO PB:

Please stop promoting "bike wash" kits and items, as well as chain lube. These are both predominantly populated by total money grabbing scams. It's been commented to death here, bike wash kit is easily put together for $20-$50, including chain cleaner. Even cheaper if you're scrappy. Chain lube is like the vitamin trade, overpriced and unsubstantiated claims. Get a can of Boesheild T-9. Made for airplanes, has worked amazing for bike chains for many decades. Cheap, and it'll last you several years, if not more.

It's totally tone-deaf on your part to promote this stuff, what with today's economic climate. Crazy expensive bikes, fine, it's par for the course. But obvious scams like these, if you have any ethics at all, you should eschew.
  • 5 0
 Was just going to grab a Silca chain lube, but they can FO now considering their $135 bike wash kit is just absolute peak absurdity.
  • 2 1
 Couple of comments on the silica stuff. It’s not clear from this write up but if you watch their video on YouTube the first two bottles are theoretical made to not wash the wax off your chain when you’re cleaning the bike. I’m not sure if it’s legit or just marketing bs but that is what the videos say. The last two bottles seem like a bunch of nonsense to me but maybe if you are racer who has the potential to end up on TV it makes sense. Personally, I just know when I wash my bike I’m going to spend an extra 30 seconds adding their drip wax.

I wouldn’t let the overpriced bottles of cleaner deter you from their chain waxing products. I’ve been using it for about a year and am happy with it. I do the melt wax every 200 miles and apply the drip wax when my chain gets loud. I clean my bike when the chain gets loud so it’s done all at once. I would say I do the drip wax after the first 100 miles and then again at 150. If I had a complaint about it it would be there is no real warning to when you need to apply it. It’s not a gradual process. It’s just the chain is fine, the chain is fine, the chain is loud.
  • 2 0
 @fftfk: I'd recommend you look into Boesheild T-9. Seriously. You can get in can or drip.
  • 3 0
 In. Sanity. "Bike wash?" $125 for a tire repair kit? $400 for a bike stand? $199 for a miniature tool kit? Are you freaking kidding me? I'm thinking a whole lot of folks out there are trying to impress us by spending money. In the words of Freddie Mercury, get on your bikes and ride. SMH
  • 3 0
 You should come to my garage and I’ll impress you with my cheapness. Most of my tools are homemade from scrap metal. or hardware store tools that I already owned - when needed, I will modify these to work on a bike… Like grinding the camfer off a socket to fit a Fox fork topcap instead of buying an expensive camferless socket.
  • 3 0
 Pick a tool and be a dick about it..park makes good and less good stuff...blue isn't my favourite colour,so use a good mix of Unior, Wera, Knipex,Shimano,Bacho,Facom, etc etc,
  • 1 0
 Agreed, but I wouldn't order Bahco tools from Aliexpress anymore if you received something marked 'Bacho' Wink
  • 2 0
 Always fancied a nice matching tool set but just can’t bring myself to buy one when I know I already have all the tools contained in most, having bought them individually over over the years.

Also got a few specialty tools my favourite being the full Giant Maestro bearing puller / press set in it’s nice polished wood box.
  • 5 0
 We call those Park Tool pad tools "cheek spreaders", just saying.
  • 1 0
 Wiha. Nice torque tools. Some pre-set. Rigid for the steerer tube. Go slow with new sharp wheel nice and square then de-burring tool. Some Green some blue something old something new.
  • 2 3
 The whole dynaplug thing reminds me of pre smart phone when either Garmin wouldn’t license or the car companies wouldn’t pay and the cars all had navigation systems that sucked in comparison to the little Garmin unit you suction cupped to your dash. I wish all the OneUp pump, handleqr plugs, etc. would just use dynaplugs. So superior to everything else on the market.
  • 2 0
 You can get an adapter for the oneup tool to use a Stan’s dart. Not dynaplug but it is better than bacon strips. You’ll also be supporting a PBA competitor jankcomponents.com/products/love-dart-edc-pump-stans-dart-add-on
  • 2 0
 @pisgahgnar: Have you actually had good luck with the dart? Myself and some friends have tried them on several punctures without success. I've found them to be way too tight...one cracked rod, a few times where the frills just fell off before it got inside. Seems to me they should include a reamer. Maybe it's fine on a bigger puncture or thinner casing.
  • 1 0
 @pisgahgnar: thx for the info. Jank definitely making some cool stuff and have had good experiences with them. you can also modify the oneup pump to use dynaplugs and there’s a guy on eBay doing a 3D printed piece that makes it super easy. But it sure would be nice if the setup (esp the threads) was alloy instead of 3D printed and native to the pump.
  • 1 0
 @kevinjordans: I haven’t put a plug in a tire in 3 years so honestly I don’t know. DD casing and I guess luck or smooth rocks here in Pisgah. The last time my plugs were used was a few weeks ago but that was to help seal a friends tire after he dented the rim.
  • 1 0
 @kevinjordans: Plugged an EXO+ with one a while back (Jank Dart tool) - worked a treat. Carried on using the tyre for a couple of months after without any issues.
  • 1 0
 Seems strange that in 2022 none of the big name took kits come with a torque wrench.
  • 1 0
 * tool







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