Technical Tuesday: Chain Lube Explained

Jul 6, 2010 at 0:09
Jul 6, 2010
by Mike Levy  
 
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Today's Tech Tuesday takes a closer look at chain lube. There is a great video inside explaining the differences in lubes, as well as showing you the proper technique to use when lubricating your chain. If you think nothing of spraying your chain with WD40 then this is the Tech Tuesday for you! Inside you'll find information on:

Which types of lube to use for your conditions
What never to put on your chain
How to properly lube your chain

Read on...

For a lot of riders it is a victory if they simply have some sort of lube on their chain, but using the right kind of lube for the conditions at hand can actually make a big difference to how your drivetrain performs. Applying the wrong kind of lube can cause all sorts of problems, from a gummed up and slow shifting drivetrain, to one that won't be quiet, but the end result is always accelerated wear that will cost you time and money in the long run. But that is only half the battle... How you lube your chain can have just as big of an effect, if not more so, than what lube you are using. You won't be doing yourself any favors if you are going to town with a can of spray lube and have shaky hands from downing too many energy drinks. In fact, you're doing more harm than good by overdoing it as excess lube will only attract dirt and grime. The key is to only apply the right amount in the right places.

Watch the video to learn all about lube and how to properly put it on your chain:
Views: 54,758    Faves: 71    Comments: 12





Types of chain lube

Teflon based lubes are by far the most common type of bicycle chain lube used, and for good reason. The name Teflon is actually DuPont's brand name for what is known as "PTFE" in the chemistry world, or polytetrafluoroethylene. Teflon has an incredibly low coefficient of friction when used between two solid objects like chain plates and rollers and is used to lube much more demanding mechanics than our simple bicycle chains. In order for the PTFE to properly penetrate into the inner workings of a bicycle chain, as well as stick around long enough to be useful while still having self cleaning properties, it can be mixed with many kinds of oils and solvents depending on the conditions that it has been designed to perform best in. The general rule of thumb is that the thicker the lube is, the longer it will last in wet conditions, but the stickier and messier it will be. If you live in a rainy environment like we do here on the West coast of B.C. you will be best off using a thicker lube because it will last much longer and not require as many reapplications. If your home trails are dry and dusty, then you'll be much better served to use a thinner lube that won't collect as much dirt that would gum up your drivetrain and create a mess like a thick lube used in that sort conditions would.


We used Park's Synthetic Lube with PTFE as it works great for the dry weather that we're coming into
We used Park's Synthetic Lube with PTFE as it works great for the dry weather that we're coming into


The other common option are wax based lubes. Just like Teflon chain lubes, wax lubricant can come in many different kinds of mixtures depending on the conditions that it is intended to be used in. Wax based lubes are generally thought of as a cleaner option to Teflon, but they have some drawbacks of their own. While they certainly collect less dust and dirt, you must be very conscious of how much wax lube you are using because it does have a tendency to build up and create a mess. Picture big globs of wax caught up between your pulley wheels and derailleur cage and you'll get the idea. Wax lubes also require the chain to be quite clean before you apply them for best results, and even then they won't last as long as their Teflon based competition.

There are all sorts of lubes and concoctions that you shouldn't use on your chain, most of them are either two thin or two thick. One example would be the popular Phil's Tenacious Oil. It is the perfect lube for inside of freehub bodies, but far too thick and stringy to be used on a chain. While it would last much longer than standard chain lube, the mess and build up that it creates can be quite nasty. On the opposite end of the spectrum is the ever popular WD40... this is not a lubricant for bicycle chains! WD40 is far too thin and acts as a solvent that actually strips the chain of any lube that may be present. Use WD40 to free up old and rusty parts, but not to lube your chain. You are far better off heading down to your local shop to pick up some proper lube designed for where you ride. If you're not sure what to get it is worthwhile to ask.

Lubing your chain

I know a lot of you are happy just to have a chain that doesn't squeak and scare away fellow riders, but by properly applying lube to your chain you can limit the amount of dirt and trail grime that it picks up, which will increase chain life and cost you less money down the road. Oh, and as a side benefit your bike will also be quieter, shift better, and you'll be less likely to be that one annoying guy who's bike can be heard from a kilometer away. Below is how I like to lube my chain, your method may differ and there are countless ways to do it, but the goal is always the same: to apply the right amount of lube to the right places.

Step by step instructions

What you need: Chain lube and a rag.


Step 1. Begin by shifting the chain to the middle ring and a middle cog for a straight chain line. Use a rag to clean any dirt or grime that may be on your chain before you add more lube
Step 1. Begin by shifting the chain to the middle ring and a middle cog for a straight chain line. Use a rag to clean any dirt or grime that may be on your chain before you add more lube

Step 2. I prefer to use a drip bottle as it is far more precise than an aerosol can
Step 2. I prefer to use a drip bottle as it is far more precise than an aerosol can

Step 3.  Apply lube sparingly to each roller on both the top and bottom sides of the chain while pedaling in reverse
Step 3. Apply lube sparingly to each roller on both the top and bottom sides of the chain while pedaling in reverse

Step 4. Keeping it in the same gear while you pedal the bike for a few minutes to let the lube penetrate into the chain's inner workings
Step 4. Keeping it in the same gear while you pedal the bike for a few minutes to let the lube penetrate into the chain's inner workings

Step 5. Use a clean rag to wipe off any and all chain lube that may be on the outside of the chain, including the side plates and the derailleur's pulley wheels. Extra lube will only attract dirt and create a mess. The only lube that you want on your chain is in the rollers and between the chain plates
Step 5. Use a clean rag to wipe off any and all chain lube that may be on the outside of the chain, including the side plates and the derailleur's pulley wheels. Extra lube will only attract dirt and create a mess. The only lube that you want on your chain is in the rollers and between the chain plates




Past Tech Tuesdays:

Technical Tuesday #1 - How to change a tube.
Technical Tuesday #2 - How to set up your SRAM rear derailleur
Technical Tuesday #3 - How to remove and install pedals
Technical Tuesday #4 - How To Bleed Your Avid Elixir Brakes
Technical Tuesday #5 - How To Check And Adjust Your Headset
Technical Tuesday #6 - How To Fix A Broken Chain
Technical Tuesday #7 - Tubeless Conversion
Technical Tuesday #8 - Chain Wear
Technical Tuesday #9 - SRAM Shift Cable Replacement
Technical Tuesday #10 - Removing And Installing a Headset

Have you found this tutorial helpful? Share any of your hints or tips below!

Visit Parktool.com to see their entire lineup of tools and lubes.
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113 Comments

  • + 45
 As simple as this may seem I'm sure it will clear up some things for a lot of beginners! I remember back in the day when i used wd-40 Razz
  • + 20
 Tri-Flo Superior Lubricant FTW!!!
  • + 15
 na mate crc 5.56!! it says on the bottle, "for bikes"
  • + 15
 good article though,learned some stuff i never would have gave thought to.
  • + 12
 good article but cant tech tuesdays get a bit more advanced?
  • + 1
 what do you clean your chain with before putting wax on it??
  • + 5
 Actually WD40 is very useful for after you wash your bike. It stands for "Water Displacement" and sheds water from your chain. Do that first then lube and your chain will last a very long time.
  • + 9
 Ya, but at the same time WD40 is very abrasive and could result in damaging your chain
  • + 3
 haha do you really ride chainless GoAnDRiDe ? must be boring as hell going so slowly
  • - 11
flag Zane92651 (Jul 6, 2010 at 10:03) (Below Threshold)
  • + 1
 huh, i dont get it,
i have a single speed,
andd i just use somee of my dads mechanic thingyy...is that badd :O
andd i used wd-40 on my old hard-tail haha Wink
  • + 8
 he can lube me up anyday...
  • + 2
 no homo?
  • + 1
 bigburd yah i ride chainless haha i dont wanna have a single speed kit on my bike cus its got verticle drop outs and halflink chains are shit,but i can still dirtjump and ride park just as good,if not better without a chain...OR BRAKES!
  • + 1
 xx cassette is tooo trippy while peddling forward
  • + 19
 I know I'm going to be criticized for this... but Mike you should have also considered what lubricants are the most friendly to the environment and visa versa. In many instances I've seen people applying insane amounts of harmful petroleum based products to their drivetrain, and in turn having the excess drip needlessly everywhere. There are alternatives, it's just about finding them and applying the product correctly and in correct amounts. Cheers.
  • + 1
 You could just not let it drip, I have to lube up on some decking so any drip=stained decking.
  • - 1
 ajanthon your right studies have shown that the accumulation of petroleum based bike lubes have had equivalent effects on the globe as the BP oil spill and the Alberta tar sands combined! Come on man there are far worse things to worry about then bike lube. As many tree huggers there are in this sport, this sport is not exactly earth friendly. Ever think of the amount of hydro carbons put in the atmosphere from shuttling bikes to the top of the hill or driving to the resorts, or the planes that transport your favorite world cup riders from event to event, how about the giant holes being dug out of the ground to provide materials to build your new rig. The list goes on and on obviously dont be a b!tch get real man if you care that much stop biking and take up barefoot hiking or some Sh!t
  • + 13
 Yeah, that's right! Why bother making a effort at all? I'm gonna stop taking my litter home with me and start taking dumps in the middle of the trail. Screw everyone else.
  • + 12
 Every little helps, douchebag.
  • - 11
flag zackmorris-1975 (Jul 6, 2010 at 9:17) (Below Threshold)
 you wanna make a difference then do so. I try to everyday but don't be a b!tch about it telling people what to put in there write ups n' sh!t.
  • + 3
 If this bothers you enough, theres eco specific bike lube and cleaning products from Green Oil on CRC
  • + 16
 Don't know why you'd get criticized for that. Every bit helps and some might know about alternatives
  • + 4
 I thought it was a good point to bring forward. It didn't hurt anyone.

I don't know why you have to be such an ass about it? It seems hard for me to believe that you're (zackmorris) trying to make a difference everyday.

...being environmentally conscious apparently makes me a b!tch.

Nice article - thanks to pinkbike for all the tech tuesdays!
  • + 2
 I've used Green Oil's Ecogrease on my hope headsets and it's been perfectly ok so I reckon their chain lube might be worth a try. It's clearly a small thing but it still helps and the way things are going, showing our sport to be environmentally aware is probably the way to go.
  • + 3
 Also another important thing to keep in mind is that Teflon is def NOT an 'environmentally friendly' product. Although it might wear off your chain, the actual chemical is perfectly inert and lasts as close to forever as anything can. There are some nasty murmurings about potential long term effects although nothing is clear right now. Take a look at new non-stick cookware.....not Teflon like it used to be.
  • + 3
 Zackmorris, your statements and attitude embody why I said the things I did above. If you truly support those ideas and ideals, good luck down the road (I hope you picked up my sarcasm, I laid it on thick like you do the petroleum lube). Lets hope you don't reproduce at least...
  • + 2
 Using petroleum lube on some of your parts will reduce the chance I guess.. Wink
  • + 1
 ajanthon, you ride with hope brakes. The brake fluid in your system isn't eco friendly either. What happens when you bail and rip a line out? Hypocrite.
  • + 1
 textbooksonic I do try to make a difference everyday. My loft is a converted structure which is located 5 minutes from work, the building itself is retrofitted with all sorts of energy saving products. I drive an "eco friendly" compact car and when I fhuck your mom we use water based lubes. O and buddy you don't know sh!t, 2 weeks ago I helped file a report because some dumbshit was dumping chemicals behind my shop. And guess who was dumping.. a recycling company that charges a premium, but due to expensive eco friendly environment charges many company have to dump the crap to stay in business, the city came down and had to do a cleanup with a giant tampon. About 3 months ago I called the services on a drycleaner that was dumping cancer causing cleaning agents in the drain. Again high cost recycling leads to illegal dumping...you should see all the engine oil in container along the roadside back in the industrial area's around here....old skewl car mechanics usually.
  • + 3
 ajanthon tell me, how much water do you waste every time you wash that finely detailed intense slopestye? And to think in places like Africa people are dying of thirst...shame on you. Let me guess your fork oil is made of old french fry oil.

Don't sit there and worry about your chain lube because at the end of the day the only difference is a little voice in your head that makes you feel better about yourself. "Eco Friendly" is just one of the worlds newest industry out to grab your hard earned cash at a premium price! There are bigger things to worry about thats all I've been trying to say here.

Did you guys know soybean productions has a greater carbon footprint then chicken farming, Eco friendly bio fuels are creating food shortages in some countries which are driving the cost of rice,soy and corn prices up making it hard for some people to stay alive.

The world will go on way after we are gone. The only point in protecting it is for ourselves. Regardless in 5 billion years the sun will burn up and our solar system will be lifeless!
  • + 1
 if anyone is worried about excess lube, hang your chain from a wire or similar single ended rod and slowly drip the oil down the chain, allowing and watching as the lube fully adheres to the chain. At the base, place a pan to catch the runoff. Leave the chain for a few minutes as the lube will dry. Once dry, replace chain in drivetrain and wipe excess lube while cycling the gears. 0 lube loss. You sacrifice time for environmental friendliness. Oh, and im sure most of us own a vehicle (i dont) and idling a vehicle for more than 30 seconds drips enough oil and grease in its lifetime to fill it twice over. Multiply that by approx. 500 million vehicles on the road. We're screwed no matter what we do. enjoy it all while its here. VIVA LA REVOLUTION!
  • + 0
 simmer down now children. its only pinkbike.
  • + 13
 i don't lube mine at all in the summer, too much dust and sand where i ride, every time i put lube anywhere near it all the crap gets attracted to it not lubing it is probably not the best solution but its an old chain so i'm not bothered
  • + 2
 That's not just bad for your chain but your ring's and pulley wheel's to.
  • + 4
 yeh, use a dry teflon based lube and clean it every few days at least much worse to not lube it
  • + 3
 If you read the article you would actually learn that there are lubes specifically for dry conditions.
  • + 8
 i use wet lube all year round mainly because the british weather is shite
  • + 13
 +1 for shite weather, although amazing summer so far
  • + 1
 Agreed, i've got wet lube on at moment and the summer has been so unusually good that the chain has been getting clogged with all the dust on the trails. Time to switch over to some dry lube for whatever is left of the summer i think Wink
  • + 2
 thanks for this one i have been using wet lube of the past year on my race bike and have to clean it after every ride because it gets so gummed up. now i think im going to head on down to the bike shop and get some dry lube .
as a side note what are so opinions on ceramic lube ?
  • + 1
 Ceramic lube... Use it for ceramic parts, such as bearings.
  • + 2
 I have always just used wet lube, however the places I ride are often a mix of different conditions e.g. wet sections and then dry as hell sections, is there like a mix of conditions lube? (no I have not gone down to the shop to look) but yes can you get mixed condition lube?
  • + 1
 You can still use dry lube for all conditions, it just needs to be applied more regularly, as it is thinner, water will wash it off. Only real diffrence between the two, but obviously, as wet lube is thicker, it attracts dust. If you ride a mix of conditions, i'd concider just running dry lube, and if your on an all day epic (not so much for DH) take a small bottle with you, and lube up on a rest break.

Hope that helps, if i've missed anything let me know and i'll do my best Razz

Craig
  • + 2
 you could just use both lubes together. that would be a mix
  • + 1
 I don't think it works that way. CraiGee's got it right.
  • + 1
 I know, i wish it was that simple. I tried it earlier on an old(but still in okayish coditionn) chain and I don`t think that it has worked very well.
  • + 1
 Cant mix lubes,. Different viscosity in different lubes prevents oil saturation. You simply cant mix solvents. Solvents dont absorb solvents; thats what solutes are for.
  • + 2
 Note to all of you who lives here far up nort were it´s -30C in winter. You want to use very sticky vaselin to your chain because otherwise the chain will freeze and also sticky vaseline will give your chain a longer live time. And to all who is thinking yeah but it will collect all dirt in chain it whount if there is 60 cm of snow.
  • + 1
 Wow, this went off to the my Dad can beat up your Dad thing for a bit there. Anyways, I've tried many lubes and came to realize that I hate any that leave my parts with black gunk. White lightning was good but didn't last nor did Pedro's Ice and both are worthless in the cold. Phils lasted but was messy as hell as was any oil lube, even ProGold. I love Squirt. Its wax based in water rather than solvent and has a much higher amount of actual wax than the others, and it lasts, even through wet rides. No it is not a long lasting lube like say a wet conditions oil but its super clean and doesn't leave everything black! Just my opinion but I feel that a clean and lubed chain is better than a dirty lubed chain. After-al, its the contaminants that grind away the chain, the oil just slows the process whereas wax actually blocks it from entering. It seems to attach to the grit then flake off . You do have to apply to a completely cleaned chain but if ou stick with it your drivetrain remains way cleaner.
  • + 1
 I would have liked some tips on applying wax based lube. I have a bottle of it but can't work out the best way to get the tube into the rollers and between the plates without getting far too much of the stuff on the chain and having to wipe most of it off.
  • + 1
 Between the plates of the chain doesn't matter. It is the pin and barrel of the chain that transmit torque. As long as a drop gets onto the pin and barrel your set. The lube will seep into the gaps in the chain. Apply, wipe excess off, and let the lube fully dry before riding. You can't avoid wiping excess lube off there is always residual lubrication that must be removed.
  • + 1
 While steps 1-5 above are great if you are about to go for a ride, I recommend getting into the habit of doing 1-4 (wipe and apply lube) post ride and let sit/soak until the next time you ride.
Leave a clean rag on your tire/seat/etc, then before you go ride wipe the excess lube off. This allows for good penetration of the lubrication into the inner workings of the chain.

As for cleaning the build-up off the pullies, I found dental picks work wonders (hard to get sometimes, but one of my favourite piece of gear in my toolbox).
  • + 1
 Try o-ring picks. You can get them from any place that sells tools.
  • + 1
 Ahh...good call. Thanks.
No more Hepatitis shots for me! Wink
  • + 1
 Pedro's Extra Dry was the best lube till they stopped making it..... The new Go! stuff is pretty good too though. Next time your at your LBS ask a mechanic about trying to clean a drive train where the person who owns the bike has repeatedly used WD40 as lube.....
  • + 1
 I use Rock n Roll Extreme lube, and it is awesome. It is a wax/lube hybrid, so you get the best of both worlds. It cleans and lubes at the same time. You just use a ton of it to clean the chain, then wipe it with a rag just like the instructions above. For an extra dirty chain, just repeat. This stuff works unbelievably well. It works even better if you let it sit for awhile before riding (as with all lubes). Tri-Flow is also a really good product. I use Rock n Roll on my chain, and Tri-Flow everywhere else. I ride in mostly dry and dusty conditions, but definitely deal with some rain and mud at times also.
  • + 1
 That actualy helped me a lot, as through 8 years or so I have never lubricated my chain properly... pretty ironic when I'm thinking about perfectionism I try to apply into servicing my forks.

Still: how about we make this MacGyver contest: Fix a broken chain without a chain breaker using only what you find in the woods Smile I'm sure some skinny enduro maniac that does not like to carry chain breaker, found a way after walking tens of miles in his life in SPD shoes with broken chain in hand
  • + 4
 its happened, i used rocks, got me back to the car.
  • + 1
 I found a multi-tool in the woods once, with chain breaker. Sorted.
  • + 1
 that's cheating iamamodel... though... I think if you broke your chain what heppens very rarely, and then find someone's lost multitool with chain breaker just after it happens: then well: u are top ten pretender for decades "the most lucky bastard" award Big Grin
  • + 1
 I use Wurth HHS, comes out thin like water so it penetrates into the inner workings of the chain, then the solvent evaporates and leaves a nice thick synthetic grease. I also lube from the inside of the chain not the top, then wipe excess off.
  • + 1
 Wicked info, some people assume that the chain doesn't need any maitainence, uuuuuntil it starts to squeak. So they go after WD40.. Thanks for the write up. The word lube was mentioned 76 times so far. Haha!
  • + 3
 LOL these comments are hilarious! fuck the tech stuff, just read it for a laugh!
  • + 3
 oups i m using my father motocycle chain lub , is that good?
  • + 5
 If you have an O ring chain it is lol
  • + 1
 i used to lube with engine oil,which is pretty thick but later found out that it corrodes rubber tyre.
  • + 1
 ok thanks
  • + 2
 Wtf? ive used wd40 for over 15 years on my chains! does this mean ive been doing it all wrong? :-P
  • + 1
 See my comment ^ up there.
  • + 2
 I've just bought a bike off a lad who's been using a similar product to WD40 - The bearings in the hubs have started to go after 6 months from new as the stuff has worked its way in. The chain is also a mess and the paintwork is damaged from the product sitting on it for weeks. The rear axle bolts had seized onto the axle as a result of the product being there too long combined with poor maintainence. This is why WD40 should not be seen near a bike unless you know exactly what you're doing when using it as a cleaning product and the bike is seeing regular race-ready maintainence.
  • + 1
 WD40 leaves a silicon-based wafer thin coating after it dries. It is not ethonal based and thus does not fully evaporate its ingredients. That coating is what destroys bushings, bearings, and all things that rotate. Friction is hell. Just ask your hand after lubeless masturbation. BUT! bearings can be brought back to life. sealed bearings have plastic, sometimes metal (in which case youre f*cked), coverings that can be removed (usually a little damaged in process) and reinserted. Cleaning the bearings that reside and re-lubing with a thick version of dry lube, such as canola based oil products from Green Oil (if your conscientious). Canola forms covalent bonds with water and ionic with metal which correlates to a resistance to water as it will favor metal bonding.
  • + 2
 Well i know how to do this, but i got a good thing. I never done the step 5. Smile . Thank you it will helps Razz .
  • + 1
 I notice WD40 BIKE LUBE dry lube made chain into black.

WD40 Bike Lube dry lube is supposed design for derailleur and brake?!?
  • + 1
 Ever since I've been lubing my chain, I've had a few problems with chain drop. I use a dry Teflon based lube, could this problem be a result of me applying too much lube?
  • + 1
 WD40 was a big surprise to me i never used it but but all my mates do better tell them :L
  • + 1
 Same here, i used WD40 on my chain yesterday, looks like im going to have to redo all the lube-ing on my bike.
  • - 2
 Lube is lube. I use 10W30 motor oil most of the time. I saturate in a container for ten minutes then remove from oil and let sit on metal counter. Then after most of the residual oil has seeped out, I put on bike and pedal backward with a rag to remove any more residual oil. Cleanliness is next to godliness when it comes to anything mechanical. A clean drive train is a happy drive train. As long as proper maintenance is performed, your drive train should last for awhile. Fancy "chain lube" or not. Teflon lube is probably one of the worst lubricants for a chain anyways.
  • + 0
 "Teflon lube is probably one of the worst lubricants for a chain anyways."

Yes... Ofcourse it is. Thats why almost every chain lube uses teflon, PTFE, isn't it... Cant believe how utterly stupid and ignorant people can be. Keep using engine oil... Enjoy your filthy gummy chain. Moron.
  • - 1
 No not all chain lube uses Telfon. There are plenty of different lubricants that will work on chain you tit. Just because they aren't purchased in your LBS doesn't mean shit. You must be way smarter than I am, maybe you should crawl back on the bed sheet you came from.
  • + 2
 Not only did your comment not make any sense, it would appear that you didn't even read my original comment "almost every chain lube uses teflon". On this basis, i suggest that you re-insert yourself into the arse of the bear that shit you out, you fool.
  • - 2
 I can see your really intelligent. Must be cool knowing everything. Punk.
  • + 1
 Never said that, but making a comment like "Teflon is a bad chain lube" will get comments like mine. Just think about what you say...
  • + 1
 Also, I apologise for calling you stupid, thats probably not true, and it was a bit of a shit thing to say.
  • - 1
 Think about what I say... I have more technical education than you could shake a stick at punk. If you knew anything about what you speak of, you would have given me a stated reason why my post was so wrong. Excluding all experience you have with using chain lube, and bike chain. Tell me, without researching it. What are the separate parts of roller chain called? What is the correct term for the center to center distance of roller chain? You will be the only one to know if you researched this information, so if you lie, then your just kidding yourself.

How mature of you to apologize to me, now I can sleep at night. Thank ya Jesus!
  • + 1
 Well, if you think teflon is a bad chain lube then you dont have "More technical education than i could shake a stick at". As a matter of fact I'm doing a masters in engineering, so if im honest with you, its me that has the technical education now. Dont know a full break down of what every parts technical name is, but you have the pins, barrels, inner plates and outer plates. Feel free to explain to me why teflon is a bad lubricant, and i will correct you where you are wrong. Dont even mind if you use google, might open your eyes.
  • + 0
 Yeah an 18 year old kid going for his Masters in Engineering, first year in University is it? Good one, punk. The components are correct, you FAILED to mention the roller, only the most important part of a "ROLLER" chain. The center to center distance is called a "pitch", you only learn about roller chain in school though right. So much for the Masters your going for, "MR. A" student hahahahahahahahahha. I have worked as a Mechanical Engineer in the field for a year an half now. I am going for my Professional Engineer certificate in the next two. I am done with you, if you had training or the education you speak of you would know that a teflon lube isn't a superior form of lubrication. Who am I kidding I'm talking to a punk kid that just graduated from high school.
  • + 2
 Yeah, i put my real date of birth on pinkbike. Sorry to disapoint, i handle the less greasemonkey side of engineering. Thermodynamics, resistance curves, turning moments and other such things.
  • + 1
 Hey buhgina, I'm 16 and I know all the parts of a roller chain and what the CC distance of it is called. Dont think youre some hotshot engineer just because you know that. I can bet you one million dollars that I know more about CNC machining/G code and parts manufacturing than you do. Doesn't mean that I'm some badass like you think you are. Just because you're a mechanical engineer with 1.5 years of field expierance doesn't mean that you're the best. I have more field mechanical engineering and machining expierance than you and I'm 16. So shut the f*ck up and stop acting like a know it all. I got a patent at age 13 and Im pretty sure that you still don't have one of those. f*ck off.
  • + 1
 I once read that the key lubricating property of chain lube is film strength which seems to make sense to me. Despite being called rollers the interfaces between tooth to roller and roller to inner plate flange aren't a true rolling motion. As such, a coating or barrier like PTFE seems ideal and I can see no logical reason why it wouldn't be at worst fit for purpose and at best the most suitable option out there. What's your rationale for arguing otherwise?
  • + 1
 White Lightning is awesome and so is Purple Extreme , always lube the chain Link by link...Awesome
  • + 1
 Machine gunners lube you heat it up and put it on the chain and it will soak into the aluminum and wont come off for months
  • + 1
 Pretty sure chains arent made of alu...
  • + 1
 aluminum cassette and steel chains but the gunners lube has been on the and been smooth for over a few months.
  • + 1
 Pretty sure your cassette is steel as well. Not saying your lube doesn't work though...
  • + 1
 either way it works on gun parts and most of them are steel but it works other metals also i swear cassettes were aluminum because i have never seen it rust and my chair rusts
  • + 1
 they are made of stainless steel, that explains the non-rusting capabilities of your cogs
  • + 2
 Oh my, typical American right here boys and gals. USE GUN LUBE, GUNS ARE METAL! YEAH GUNS!
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 Whats wrong with gun lube one i get it free and two it works amazing never comes off even if you wash the bike if you get it right Its more like Americans are full of good ideas.
  • + 1
 And i also use a SRAM XX drive train so the cassette is all aluminum maybe other cassettes are stainless steal but not XX.
  • + 1
 Only the large cog is aluminum on the XX cassette. The rest are steel. www.sram.com/en/XX/products/cassette.php
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 I probly should read better then i swear it was cut of a solid aluminum block.
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 Aluminum is pretty soft for chain rings any way.
  • + 1
 Yeah Aluminum wouldn't stand up to the shock loading caused by switching gears. Plus two dissimilar metals of differing hardness, you would see major wear on the Aluminum teeth. That's why the largest sprocket on the xx cassette is Aluminum, because there isn't much torque being transmitted.
  • + 1
 And a steel chain with aluminum sprocket wouldnt be a very good combo
  • + 1
 The increased peak loading potentially experienced during gear changes is actually minimal in reality due to how derailleurs move the chain gradually with rotation and that most riders reduce chain load during shifting. Once in gear the greatest torque is most likely to be transmitted through the lowest gear, that's what it's there for after all. Aluminium has been deemed unsuitable for smaller cogs on grounds of durability.
  • + 1
 ive found that ATF is the best lube ive ever used. auto tranny fluid
  • + 1
 i like turbo lube 6000 and steve's azonic compound
  • + 0
 Area all these Tech Tuesdays going to be based around what tools Park sell?
  • + 1
 Can't wait for todays installment of tech tuesday. Big Grin
  • + 1
 thanks for the post!
  • + 1
 I use vodka as lube

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