10 Products I Loved in 2020: Daniel Sapp

Dec 22, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  
This year, Pinkbike's editors decided to take a page from the CyclingTips playbook and put together a few “10 Things I Loved” lists of our own. Think of it as a more personalized version of the Pinkbike Awards, a place to recognize the bikes and equipment that left a lasting impression on us over the last 12 months.

For the last several years, I have averaged over 100,000 miles of travel by plane. This year, I can count on my hands how many times I left the county on one hand and I sure haven't left the country. I established some strong routines, which often carried over into my riding gear selection. Reliable, comfortable, and practical are key, especially when living in an area that receives a lot of rain along with big temperature swings.








Specialized 2FO Roost Clipless Shoes

The riding around my house often involves some hiking through creeks and across some slick rocks. Being that I ride clipped in most of the time, I like my shoes to also have really good tread so that I'm not falling as I'm pulling off the "Pisgah Pendulum" across a river - there aren't many things I dislike more than getting my feet wet mid-ride on a cold day.

The latest generation of Specialized's 2FO shoes have become my go-to in the latter part of 2020. They've proven to be plenty sturdy for pedaling hard while offering enough traction to keep me from busting my ass. They also fit my slightly narrow foot really well. When I do get them wet, they dry quickly and don't become overly water-logged. Additionally, they deflect wind well enough to keep my feet from getting really cold on brisk days, which is about all I can ask for...except, I hope there will be an option in the future with a BOA dial as laces just aren't quite as fast.


Price: $130 USD
More information: First Look: Specialized's New 2FO Roost





In keeping with the theme of comfortable and dry, the Fox Ranger kit and Defend Pro Fire gloves help me ride when the weather outside is frightful and I just don't want to.


Fox Wet Weather Gear

I really struggle with the motivation to ride in the wet. In the summer, it typically rains by noon, and in the winter, things stay saturated longer...plus, it's colder and I really dislike being cold. Ever since a tango with some mild hypothermia several years ago I've been overly sensitive to chilly weather. Even on a beautiful sunny day there are still creeks to splash through where I live, and if it's at all above freezing even sitting on the ground results in being fully saturated.

Fox's Flexair Neoshell jacket, Ranger 3L Water pants, and Ranger Water shorts have become staples on days where there could be muddy roost or there's a light mist in the air. The jacket isn't the lightest shell, but it keeps the warmth balanced to where I don't feel as if I have a trash bag on and I stay fairly dry when the bottom drops out. The pants do an excellent job of keeping everything else dry and work well when the weather is cool too. Getting wet doesn't matter as much if you're just doing DH runs, but if you are spending a lot of time in the saddle and have to climb out after a descent having a dry chamois is nice.

Additionally, Fox's Defend Pro Fire gloves aren't overly bulky. They offer a little bit of additional warmth and then block the wind and light precipitate as well. I'd opt for something more heavy duty if it was dumping rain and around the freezing mark, but usually I just opt not to ride when it gets that brutal out.

Price: Jacket - $400, Pants - $175, Shorts - $80, Gloves - $70
More information: Fox Racing








Revel RW 30 Fusion Fiber Wheels

Revel's RW 30 wheels are more of an outlier in the carbon wheel world, and stand out in a unique way - the rims can be recycled. Now, they can't be turned back into wheels after they are broken down, but the rims can be made into other products and that's pretty cool.

I've had these wheels on everything from heavy-duty trail bikes to 170mm travel bike park rides. They've also been passed around within my circle of friends who I ride with, some of who go through wheels faster than a set of brake pads. It's been a nice surprise to see these hold strong where some other wheels, both aluminum and carbon, haven't fared as well.

The rims are built on I9 hubs and the overall ride quality is great. Besides being reliable, which is really what matters the most, it's awesome that Revel did something different and I'm looking forward to seeing this technology, hopefully, applied in varying ways in the future.


Price: $2,200 USD
More information: First Ride: Revel's Recyclable RW30 Fusion Fiber Wheels







Teravail Kessel Tire

Sure, it looks a lot like another tire out there but that other tire works really well. Teravail's Kessel tire is the brand's more aggressive trail tire. I've had a few sets that have rotated off and on bikes over the last several months and I've been more than happy with the performance.

Lots of tires come and go but there are very few that stand out equal to or better than some tried and true contenders. The Kessel offers up plenty of grip in technical terrain, it rolls well, and wears well. I've had (knock on wood) no flats after months of riding them and they seem to bite a little bit more aggressively than a Minion DHF in cornering traction.

For a house brand from big bike distributor QBP, Teravail is a solid option. The price may make it a little steep for someone trying to picture it as a "bargain version" of a Minion, but I'd propose that it's not that. It's more of an even competitor with a slightly different ride feel and completely worth a consideration for someone in the market for a new aggressive trail tire.

Price: $85-90 USD
More information: Teravail Kessel Review







POC Clarity Glasses

I'm really picky when it comes to riding glasses. They are, after all, helmets for your eyes. I have used a number of different brands and tints and styles over the years but was really pleased with POC's DO Half Blades that I reviewed last year. This year, I was fortunate to find a new pair of POC's more mountain bike specific Crave glasses which I've taken care not to scratch or lose, as I really like the way they fit and work.

The lenses are interchangeable and typically I ride with what POC calls a Cat 1 lens that's very minimally tinted. This is great in the deep woods around me and it helps add a little texture to the trail, which can all look the same at times - even though there are plenty of rocks and roots lurking just under the leaves. The glasses fit well and don't pinch my head in a way that is uncomfortable. They stay put in rough terrain and fit nicely in the back of my favorite helmet - up next.


Price: $265 USD
More information: POC







Specialized Ambush Helmet

Helmets are a personal fit thing and some fit people better than others. I've always had a good fit with POC, Bell, and Specialized for the most part, and the Specialized Ambush is my go-to for helmets. I've worn this particular helmet far longer than I probably should have, but it only has one dent in the top of it that I don't think was even from a crash.

What's awesome about it? It fits, for one. The visor is easily adjustable, and it has a MIPS system in it. Most importantly, my glasses fit in the back of it. Where I live, it can be extremely humid and misty rain can pop up out of nowhere making the glasses inoperable if they're on your face, especially if you don't have anything to dry them off with.

While a lot of helmets claim to fit glasses in them, this one doesn't have a catchy gimmick that doesn't work. It just cradles them where I leave them. I tuck them up with the ANGi sensor on the helmet (I don't use it for anything but a glasses cradle) and know that they're pretty secure, even on a rough descent and especially on a climb. The arms don't poke me in the head and it's a worry-free interface.

While the Ambush isn't brand new this year, I hope that whenever Specialized comes out with a new helmet it still has the same fit and features.

Price: @200
More information: Specialized Ambush








POC Rhythm Resistance Pants

For years, riding pants meant whatever worn-out pair of jeans were kicking around or, in the worst winder conditions, maybe a waterproof hiking shell on top of riding shorts. In more recent years I mostly wore XC-oriented gear: leg warmers, knee warmers, pads on top, etc to stay warm when it was cold out. DH or wet weather pants are really good, as mentioned above, but a cool weather riding pant hasn't been on my radar all that much until recently.

POC's Rhythm Resistance pants have become a staple on cooler days where I don't plan on getting too deep into wet terrain. The pants are comfortable, offer a good cut for riding, and keep me plenty warm. I've managed a number of long days in the saddle with these pants on and had no complaints whatsoever. They're a solution to a problem I didn't realize I had until I stopped getting dressed up in lycra to go ride a trail bike.


Price: $200 USD
More information: POC







Shimano XTR Trail Pedals

Wait, those aren't the new XTR trail pedals...That's right, they're not new at all. They're almost a decade old (PD-M985). I can't count how many times I've thought they were done for. Just three years ago, I was complaining to Kaz at Crankworx about needing some new pedals because mine felt horrible. He gave me another set of SPD style non-Shimano pedals he had kicking around that are good, and have served well, but mine never died. I came home, clamped these in the vice, pulled them apart, cleaned, re-greased, tightened the bearings up, and it's like I had a brand new set.

There aren't a lot of products that just keep working day after day and year after year, especially with little to no maintenance but, these keep on doing what they're supposed to. Sure, a new set would look nice but, I'd be genuinely upset at this point if I was ever not able to rebuild this set of XTR trails I bought some years ago.

Price: $180 USD
More information: Shimano







2006 Honda Ridgeline

Stop right there. I know what you're thinking...and, I'll admit, I probably thought that too but, then through the good fortune of my newer car dying, I came upon this beast parked, unused for months in a good friend's shed. Sure, it's not the coolest or best looking and some people who drive around what they feel is a "real truck" don't quite know what to think, but when they get stuck I know who they call.

I can't say that I've ever had anything much more functional to drive than this 2006 Honda Ridgeline. I can easily fit five bikes and five people plus their gear, although I rarely want to be around more than my immediate family these days. There's storage in the bed of it that can lock, and I've hauled ton after ton of construction supplies from the hardware store to my house.

Steep and slippery grade? No problem, there's a differential locker that helps out quite a bit if things get too crazy; you know, if you're loaded down, and pulling a broken down car with towing a trailer full of firewood behind it (true story). Still not enough? Just get a running start and go a little faster. I have story on story about meeting other Ridgeline owners who share similar experiences. While I can't say it'll be the perfect family car, it's the perfect car for a family to have, and at 210,000 miles it's just getting broken in.

Now, I'm not trying to add any more dents to every single body panel that already has a dent in it (there's really at least a dent in every panel), but I'm not too worried if I do. And when I jump into it after a rainy ride, soaking wet, I don't care that I get the seats dirty. I'm certainly not worried about resale value because I'll never sell it.

For me, practicality is king and the Ridgeline is at the top of practical. It's served well, especially in this year of using it more than I ever imagined I would due to the lack of work-related travel, and that's why it's a product I loved (and will continue to) in 2020.


Price: $ ?
More information: Honda





Often a jersey by itself and sometimes with a light jacket, I'll use the Gryphon for anything from sub-freezing to just slightly chilly conditions.


7Mesh Gryphon Crew LS Jersey

I'm rounding out my list with another softgood. Yeah, it's a lot of them but, 2020 hasn't sent quite as many bikes this way due to shipping and logistics, and there's a lot of really good gear out that helps me want to ride and be comfortable while riding.

7Mesh's Gryphon long sleeve jersey has proven to be a crucial piece for me because of how versatile it is. For one, it fits well and doesn't fit like bike-specific clothing. If I want to wear it while out on a hike, etc. it still functions without having goofy pockets I don't need that feel weird under a pack. The cut isn't obnoxious like a lot of bike wear is, there aren't goofy graphics, and it is equally versatile to wear around the house.

I've used the jersey as a base layer on cold mornings and as a top layer when a light jacket may or may not be necessary. It is constructed out of Polartec's Power Grid fabric and it breathes really well and seems to retain a good amount of heat without causing me to sweat more than I should be.


Price: $120 USD
More information: 7Mesh





212 Comments

  • 255 4
 The Ridgeline is the Crocs of trucks.
  • 74 8
 So like a highly versatile, lightweight, all terrain, enclosed toe sandal with a backstrap just now becoming recognized for its fashion?
  • 46 1
 TIL I look great in Crocs.
  • 26 0
 @chrischapman: backstrap = locking rear diff, but both have their limitations when it comes to serious off-roading.

‘Fashion’ is debatable though lol. Let’s just say that they both are great when you’re going to and from rides, practical, comfortable, have heavy dad vibes, and are aging quite well.
  • 8 0
 @chrischapman: I would say more analogous to the El Camino being the mullet of automobiles.
  • 3 3
 It's the same chassis as the pilot; no solid rear axle.
  • 2 0
 Awesome, I've been looking for a new vehicle to use when putting the bins out.
  • 10 0
 ....."and at 210,000 miles it's just getting broken in."

Not good, Sapp. Never brag about the reliability or longevity of your vehicle: It always breaks down right after you do.
  • 9 2
 I leave crocs on when I F*ck
  • 2 0
 "I'm certainly not worried about resale value because I'll never sell it." Ah, a fellow man of culture who views his vehicles just like me. Smile
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: so you’re the one
  • 2 0
 Its also the minivan of trucks. Kind of the same thing I guess
  • 1 0
 The Ridgeline is quell! The floor board is flat and it's fully independent suspension with rear diff clutch. I hope Honda gives changes the new version to compete with Tacoma
  • 1 0
 I can UPVOTE comment enough
  • 2 0
 The best truck I never wanted. Now I can't replace it, because no other truck is as functional. Maybe some of the future electric trucks will incorporate more storage, and lose the frame/solid axle that is so limiting to advancements in truck design.
  • 80 2
 +1 on old Shimano pedals. They are just in a class entirely of their own when it comes to longevity. Still have the first pair of PD-M540s i bought 13 years ago, still fine. Same for the 10 year old DX pedals.

@danielsapp Using those XTRs for 10 years without buying new stuff did more good for the environment than any downcycling plan for carbon wheels ever could.
  • 25 2
 Not to mention, that old Ridgeline. Way better for the environment than a new Sprinters
  • 65 0
 Spoiler: SPDs are getting a lifetime achievement award from us this year. There are so many momentary products in MTB these days, not a lot stands the test of time like old SPDs.
  • 9 0
 @brianpark: I’m om the same Time attacks since 2009. Annual rebuild and good to go.
  • 8 0
 I’m still riding 747s that I bought in junior high...
  • 3 0
 @ebschroderus: 747’s for the win! When I brought them into the shop when I bought my new bike a few years ago. The younger mechanic freaked out and said “no way! Are these the first ever clueless pedals?” ???? I have since swapped them for some Shimano pedals that are only 10 years old, but I know they just need to be rebuilt and will be good as new.
  • 5 1
 Still got a pair of DMR V8's from 2002.
  • 3 1
 My next bicycle will probably be a DMR, I was so impressed with them.
  • 4 0
 @mikedk: I very rarely use my Atacs now, but they've never even needed servicing.
Meanwhile I have to replace the bushings on my flat pedals at least once a year.
  • 2 0
 I have several sets of 747s. They all still work fine. I ride the same XTR's and Dan's on my bike, and its the same story. They take a lickin and keep on tickin.
  • 5 0
 +1 for DX pedals. Older Shimano pedals seem to go on forever. Once got a pair of OG Spds (PD-M520??) knocking around on an old pub bike from about 2002
  • 1 0
 Shimano clipless are so reliable that I honestly don't know anyone who prefers another brand when theyre spend their own money.

I have a pair of 636's from 97 that work great but are on hiatus because I've gone back to flats on my mtb's and a pair of 747's from the same period on my gravel bike that I have put ~20,000km on during the last three years alone. Never a problem.
  • 6 0
 @brianpark: Still rocking a pair of 535's I bought in High school in 1996. They just won't die.

At this point just seeing if they can outlast my marriage!
  • 1 0
 @Kramz: I still have my V8s from 98. I had them powder coated red again along with the bodies of my 636, a couple of years ago. They both had been polished raw from use for many years prior. The V8s are on my dirt jump bike atm.
  • 2 0
 @mikedk: I am running a pair that is even older than that, they have never been serviced and still work perfectly.
  • 1 1
 Hmm. I've had two sets of XT Trails and after about 3 years the cleat interface gets pretty sloppy even with new cleats, which desn't feel so nice if you're a hack like me and pull up on your pedals a lot. Axles are slightly bent too, but not noticeable while riding. Yeah they still "work" and are in my parts bin but each time I got new ones I felt like it was €40 well spent for that new pedal feeling. I have Looks now actually, which cost the same and are blacker so I thought I'd give them a try; they're holding up fine but have a tiny bit of axle play after a year which requires a proprietary tool to open and service. Can the XTs' cleat mechanism be tightened up, or is the old axle service and regrease all you can really do? Do XTRs last longer?
  • 1 0
 Prices have gotten pretty crazy on them in the past year, $120 all of the sudden
  • 1 0
 @ebschroderus: I switched to flats a few years ago, but had my 747s up until then... great pedals!
  • 2 0
 @Kramz: I've still got some from 2004 that get used regularly. Coming up for their first overhaul soon.
  • 1 0
 @ccrtech: they'll outlast any future grandchildrens marriage.
  • 59 0
 Fox must go out of their way to send the well stitched goods to tech editors...my fox Legion gloves tore at the seam on my first ride. TLD, Alpinestars, Giro, and Thor have figured out how to properly stitch gloves, so I’ll go out of my way to avoid Fox gear.
  • 11 0
 Same, my first pair of dirt paw gloves lasted about 3 months, second pair lasted 3 rides. In both instances the stitching on one of the fingers came away. Garbage! Have a pair of TLD on the way, hopefully they are more durable!
  • 3 0
 @Davec85: I’ll be surprised if they don’t last, I have pairs that are 5 year old that look kinda gross, but the stitching and fabric still looks good.
  • 3 0
 My fox gloves have lasted ok but I agree the stitching / seems are poorly done, misaligned and just janky
  • 1 0
 @Davec85: I have a pair of TLD gloves, can't remember the name but they're the lightweight kind, but they're awesome except watch out if you graze the sides of your hands on tree bark. The sides of the fingers have mesh sewn into them for extra breathability but it doesn't handle tree bark at 10mph too well.
  • 1 0
 @sjma: TLD Xc. Best gloves ever. On about my sixth pair, but been wearing them more than a decade, including lots of moto and trail clearing day’s
  • 3 0
 I feel like fox has cheaped out. I've got a pair of dirt paws I got back in 2017 and they're just starting to really fall apart. Seems these days they last more like months than years from what people say.
  • 3 0
 I have had several pairs of Ranger shorts and they held up ok until they all blew up in the same way: in the crotch area after getting hung up on the saddle on a dismount. The included chamois is garbage, stitches come out of the pad almost immediately. They are fine for entry level use but that is about it.
  • 1 0
 I've had fifteen pairs of fox gloves come apart in under two months. I honestly thought they were just a disposable good like tires.

Then I bought a pair of gloves that has gone two seasons already. You won't believe me but: G-Form. Their armored gloves are lighter and more breathable than unarmored competition. I can't explain it but they are amazing.
  • 21 0
 When the rain kit is only $750 who cares about stitching?? It's practically disposable
  • 1 0
 Dakine makes some good gloves. I have had some that I used for several seasons and beat the snot out of them.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted cant say the same, my fox gloves have 3000km on them this year ans are still ok, the smell is another story
  • 2 0
 @DylanH93: agreed, i had a pair of fox shorts, lasted years, thicker material, double seat, double or triple stitching. When they died I thought it was an easy choice just buy another pair. New version lasted months, single seat, single stitching, thin material. And the new ones cost as much or more than the old.
  • 4 0
 I had a pair of for ranger gloves come apart in less than 5 bike park laps. No crashes. The went from brand new to totaled in about 30 minutes of actual riding.
  • 2 1
 @Austink: My Ranger gloves lasted at least 5 times that long, but I was riding gravel with them...
  • 3 0
 Also had bad luck with newer gen fox shorts and pants. Used a lot of their winter / wet gear. Really nice stuff but it’s all fallen apart at the seams within the first few rides.
  • 1 0
 Thor, oneal or TLD are the only way to go for gloves. All fox stuff of the last decade has fallen apart on me. Both mx and bike. The moto stuff has been the worst tbh. It sucks because the proframe is the only lightweight full face that's big enough to fit my head.
  • 1 0
 @Davec85: have been using the TLD Air glove for the past 2seasons, stitching all good and has survived.... it's that rubberized texture on the fingertips that have worn out and the gloves are pretty dirty, never have 'washed' them. For $40cdn they've been a great riding attire, not really anything worth to complain, but they suck for anything in cold weather rides
  • 1 0
 I've had multiple Spec' gloves fall apart quickly at the seams. Nowadays I just buy chinazon gloves that really have been just as good and better in a few cases for way less.
  • 24 1
 Glad to see someone else keeping their vehicles for a long time. There is a lot to be said for keeping something around for a while, both from a financial standpoint, and from a environmental impact standpoint.

I work with a lot of people that tend to have very new things for whatever reason. One memorable conversation with my skip level manager (managers manager), where she was trying to decide which car to let her new to driving teenager use. One was a manual, and "old and unsafe", and the other was their new car (more $$$ to repair and insure, but safer if the teen crashed it).

Further into the conversation I found out that the "old and unsafe"" vehicle, was a 3 yr old Honda...
  • 3 0
 Omg so a 2017 Honda? Do those things still run, being that ancient?
  • 1 0
 You should have offered to take it off her hands and dispose of it properly. For safety!
  • 2 0
 @StradaRedlands:

I should have!

You should have seen her face when I told her that her “old” vehicle was 12 years newer than my “new” vehicle, and 20 years newer than my daily driver (1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee).
  • 25 0
 Jesus, Mary and Joseph! Can someone tell me why MTB glasses are more than helmets?!! Can a brother just get some damn glasses?
  • 2 0
 You can sometimes find POC sunglasses on the pros closet for a significant markdown. i got the same ones for like 120 a few months back
  • 15 0
 A huge part of the problem is that Luxotticca owns like 95% of all eyewear brands so they artificially inflate their prices. There are plenty of smaller brands that are popping up now days that offer almost all the lense technology (I'd love to see the fancy Oakley and Smith lenses put to the test vs the smaller brands and see how much of a difference there is). Melon, Blenders, Tifosi....and I'm sure many many more.
  • 1 0
 @Trudeez: melon's new Alleycats look like the bollocks and customisable too
  • 2 0
 as newbermuda mentioned you can find these on the internet (in the US and in Canada) for at least 50% off - but yeah even then that's a lot of $ for these. They feel cheap when you handle them too. And for me the top of the lens touches my forehead leading to fogging at the top. Went with the Attacks instead - much better choice.
  • 5 0
 Have you tried Shimano CE-Technium glasses? They come with a trail-friendly amber lens, a soft microfibre bag and a hard shell case with a clear lens to boot for about $60.
  • 3 0
 And on the other side of the table there are the cheapskates like me who are perfectly happy with their €4 Decathlon clear glasses
  • 6 0
 Tifosi
  • 3 0
 Check X-Tiger: www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NLRNVJ4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Unfortunate, cheap sounding name but: $25, have been very durable, have great coverage, hard case for the frames and lens, and I think they actually look pretty decent. I would definitely buy again.
  • 2 0
 @LifeIsGouda: X-Tiger is life. $25 for 2 lenses, and all the extra bits is an easy decision all day long!
  • 2 0
 @mkul7r4: I bought a pair of Tifosi glasses 5 years ago and they are still my only riding glasses. 3 different lens sets including clear for $25.

They may not look like something Macho Man Randy Savage used to wear but they work well and are just plain glasses.
  • 1 0
 @danielfeary: Interesting! Thanks mate!
  • 2 0
 @mybaben: I've got a pair and they've worked out well. On dull, cloudy days they brighten up the sky and trail. The style is rounded and less like a pair of optimus prime lenses from the year 2100. The silicon nose piece is okay, not as good as Oakley, can move when things get sweaty. The arms are straight and play nice with my trail lid, but interfere with my road lid. All round effective at a good price.
  • 25 4
 I own that same Ridgeline. Ill never sell it. What for? Then I'd have to find another truck that has a trunk & maybe talk to another car salesman. Just get a rack on and you are set for anything. My trips to the lake with the fam with 4 paddle boards. Out to the trail with bikes. To the lumber yard, all good to go.
  • 10 1
 I've had my 09 since new. Such a great vehicle for a mt biker and now dad. My near seven year old twin daughters still fit snugly in the back, even for long trips and I can take four bikes plus camping gear for family trips with the addition of a $40 cargo hitch from harbor freight. I use a tailgate pad full time and have a long u-lock in the bed for locking up my bike. The real differentiator is the trunk, it's a mini bike shop so my gear always comes with me. I've had the Sprinter bug for a long time now, but just can't seem to justify it with how well this vehicle performs. My mechanic even tried to buy it off me every time I brought it in for years until he bought his own.
  • 11 4
 2019 Ridgeline owner here. My 4th truck; my first Honda.
My last truck was a Tacoma that I owned for 16 years, so I like to hold onto them. The Ridgeline is a better rig in every way. Yes, it's our family vehicle. It has more room than our Outback, and the rear seat, which is 60/40 split and folds back instead of forward allows the boy to sit in his seat and the dog to lie on his bed on the floor. Fold the whole seat back and you can fit a large MTB in the back. It also makes for a great road trip vehicle. I did a 600-mile trip with three buddies who are all north of 6'2", 4 bikes, and gear for 4 days the first summer that I owned it. There was plenty of headroom and legroom in the back. Much of our gear fit in the trunk, bikes went on the tailgate, and bigger items filled out the bed without a need to stack. It gets better gas mileage than other trucks, has a better interior and ride quality than anything in its class, and (did I mention) has a TRUNK!
  • 9 1
 @cdussault: The only negative I can say about my 2017 Ridgeline is that it’s not a real off road truck. Not enough ground clearance. I bought mine for the low door sills and dog friendly rear seat area.
  • 5 7
 I looked at a really cool 06- I can’t believe how cheap they are. I was almost sold, but the ground clearance was the deal breaker. Not going to get much further up a dirt road than a Subaru.
  • 4 0
 @cdussault: You need to get a job with Honda. Your post has me looking for a used Ridgeline.
  • 3 1
 @speed10: Think a lift kit would do the trick?
  • 1 0
 @bigbrett: I guess that depends where you wanna take it. Where I’m shuttling it wouldn’t work with out a serious lift. But for trail centers it would be fine.
  • 2 0
 Please don’t call it a truck.. or at least use quotes around it (i.e. “Truck”)
  • 21 0
 I just want to know how fox is charging 400 bucks for a rain shell.
  • 42 0
 Who do they think they are, arcteryx
  • 1 0
 @diegosk: shots fired!
  • 17 1
 We’ve had a Ridgeline for 13 years. It’s hideous but the most reliable and generally useful vehicle I’ve ever owned. This spring, my wife announced she wanted a truck too. 2 kids that are starting to ride, sometimes whole family, sometimes separate. So we sold our van and car, bought another Ridgeline and everyone is stoked. Tailgate pads on them both, ready for anything. We briefly looked at other trucks but imagining a truck without a trunk was unthinkable and frankly uncivilized.
  • 17 0
 I just re-read that article about Revel recyclable rims. Then I saw some old Waki's comments about life and environment... And my nostalgia of Waki is gone !...
  • 11 3
 Where did Waki go?
  • 18 1
 @kingpine: I heard he fell in a K-hole.
  • 5 7
 @kingpine: another victim of 2020
  • 2 0
 Good grief what a shitshow
  • 17 18
 @kingpine: I never miss an opportunity to point out he got banned for being a c*nt. The great BLM movement shamed pinkbike into taking responsibility for their comment section and actually dealing with the toxic commenters that were putting of regular bike riders. Comment section has been a pleasure ever since.
  • 14 1
 @Peskycoots: he left on his own, not banned.
You shouldn't let trolls, or internet comment sections be the driver of your happiness.
  • 3 11
flag Peskycoots (Dec 23, 2020 at 6:28) (Below Threshold)
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: he got temp banned for 200 or something days then rage quit like a pussy rather than try to not be a twat. And to be honest his presence did not alter my happiness one way or another, but his constant being a c*nt stopped me enjoying or bothering to get into the comments, which is kind of the point of coming to a site like this eh?
  • 8 0
 Probably gonna get downvoted for this but Waki was very helpful to me and offered great advice for my kids bike. So while he posted lots of sheet. So he also has a soft and fuzzy side.
  • 3 4
 @fabwizard: which is a shame, he was clearly interesting and knowledgeable but he kept spoiling it by being a twat. Failure of moderation I reckon, no one stopped him so he kept going.
  • 5 1
 @Peskycoots: I don't think Waki ever said c*nt or pussy or twat as much as you just did. Do we need to have a chat?
  • 1 2
 @suspended-flesh: aye if you want c*nty x
  • 4 1
 @fabwizard: I think PB was some sorts of intensive release for him, any interactions I've dealt with him was always punctual and informative. Yeah he talks alot of sheet, but he'd definitely catch Pinkbikes attention. I'd always log onto PB thinking "what's Waki gonna say today" .....and I hope wherever Waki is, I hope he's riding his bike and having fun!
  • 11 0
 The ridgeline gets a lot of hate, but mine was by far the best vehicle (not just truck) that I've ever owned. I got 265,000 miles on mine and the only things it needed was brakes, tires and fluids. Never left me stranded or stuck in 10+ years.
  • 14 0
 $265 sunglasses. lol
  • 17 0
 hey injection molded plastic made in china is a premium product! From the same factory happy meal toys come from.
  • 10 0
 Levy gets the Grim Donut as his thumbnail while D-Sapp gets a tire... #rigged
  • 11 2
 Wet weather gear? It rained precisely once this summer in Utah
  • 5 1
 More than it did in Vegas!
  • 11 0
 I see a lot of reviews of wet weather gear, I really wish there was a little more cold (like below freezing) weather gear. Our soil here gets destroyed if you ride while wet, so some of the best winter riding is when its about 20f. I probably go through a hundred dollars a year in chemical toe warmers.
  • 8 0
 @ICKYBOD: It’s very PNW focused on PB. If you ride in the PNW you realize that if you aren’t prepared for wet weather riding you have about a 3 month window to ride your bike in mid-summer when it’s bone dry
  • 2 0
 @gafoto: ya I understand. I was born just a few miles from Bellingham. I'm just whiney because its going to be 17f tomorrow morning.
  • 1 0
 Like the change of seasons, I like the change of clothing. Very happy to wear my Nukeproof or Spec pant with a Endura or Gore jacket to find out they really work.
  • 8 0
 Should I get theTerravail DHF, the Hutchinson DHF, the Vittoria DHF, the Bontrager DHF, the DHF, or the DHF?
  • 4 0
 I drive a "real" company truck for work and do truck things like carrying crates of stone and stacks of scaffolding. It's a great vehicle for its intended purpose, but it's not nice to drive. Ridgeline is near the top of the list for when the time comes to own my own vehicle again. Sure it's ugly as sin, but it's not so bad I'd take a Pilot instead and give up the tailgate (best way ever to carry bikes).
  • 8 0
 You can have all of ours
  • 8 5
 I bought a 2006 Ridgeline brand new fully loaded best car ever made i used to do 80 mph in snow storms to get to top of Vermont and for biking thing was unbelievable bring 4 people to the mountains no prob .....and has same motor and tranny as Acura mdx ....i put over 200.000 miles on it with just tires brakes and oil changes ...can't beat that
  • 3 0
 It finally dawned on me this year that I’ve only run Maxxis or WTB for the past 6-ish years and Maxxis for 90% of that. It was time for a change. I decided to try out some Teravail. Put a 2.6 Kessel up front and a 2.4 Honcho out back and Ho-Lee Shirt! Both of those tires blew my expectations up! They both lock in and don’t quit. Even climbing while standing on some loose crap, that Honcho devoured it!

New fanboy here. For sure!
  • 1 0
 Bought a 29x2.6 honcho for the rear and love it. Such a crazy amount of siping. Only shitty part about them is trying to scrape shit off them. It also makes my 2.6 vigi look small up front. The honcho might be the most voluminous 2.6 casing out there
  • 6 0
 06 Ridgeline is boss, wish I still had mine- totaled it a few years ago Frown
  • 3 0
 I’m the same with the 2006 Ridgeline, it’s an amazing vehicle mine has a small lift. Great family adventure vehicle with a ton of storage. Love that truck thing as much as my bikes lol.
  • 2 0
 Definite thumbs up on the last gen XTR pedals. I had very minor issues with them. Only bad part was the lips in the center where the log is at was self sharpening when you ride alot of rocks. I sliced my leg open a few times. The current gen are junk after three replacements I sent them back for an exchange with XT's. No issues at all.
  • 7 2
 I wish we had the Ridgeline is Australia
  • 14 0
 I'll take your Utes and camper vans though.
  • 13 17
flag phops (Dec 22, 2020 at 15:29) (Below Threshold)
 Ridgeline sucks compared to a body on frame truck with actual 4x4, which cost the same. They are a little nicer to drive on the roads, though.
  • 4 0
 They drive like a 1998-2002 Holden Rodeo (the 3.2/3.5 litre petrol ones) but aren't as competent off road.
  • 4 0
 I wish I had a diesel landcruiser truck. But we all want what we cant have. Lol
  • 1 0
 I second the Fox Defend Pro Fire gloves. They are best cold weather gloves (20-40F) and are still thin enough to provide dexterity for braking/shifting. They are not much thicker than a regular glove.

The only weird thing is that the cuff goes pretty far up the wrist, so they sit a little funny if you wear a watch.
  • 7 0
 I’m imagining someone charging through a rock garden in slo-mo with gold Rolexes on both wrists.
  • 1 0
 @gafoto: Gold teeth and chainz too, cuz. LOL
  • 2 0
 this comment is late to the party, but within the veritable cornucopia that is bicycle genres, "anything from heavy-duty trail bikes to 170mm travel bike park rides" is the difference between a gourd and a squash
  • 4 0
 @danielsapp I remember Steven T shuttling us up Hawksnest in white ridgeline.
  • 1 0
 This is that same Ridgeline. I got it from him.
  • 3 0
 @danielsapp: nice! Hope all you guys are doing well!
  • 1 0
 +1 on the Revel RW 30 wheelset! I demo'd a set from their HQ, and was immediately sold. Compliance and damping is next level, and far better than high-end aluminum. Lateral stiffness was still very good (at least in 27.5"). The cost is definitely a consideration, but the environmental factors and Revel's support are definite pros.
  • 2 0
 Goldrun, Old Potrero and Whistlepig (who make Piggyback) are 100% rye.

(There are wheat whiskeys too if you don’t have wheat allergies).
  • 2 0
 Sorry, this was threading gone awry.
  • 2 0
 @MtbSince84: made me laugh, thanks!
  • 2 0
 @dolface: It was just *sitting* there! :-)
  • 1 0
 The specialized Ambush is great but the non-MIPS version is even better. About the only helmet that fits narrow heads like mine. Please make a non wobbly MIPS version again please Specialized.
  • 1 0
 As a truck owner, I think its fantastic how many mountain bikers think they need a trail ready vehicle to make it to their local trail head and up logging roads.

Spoiler: you don't.
  • 2 0
 I'm also a big Ambush helmet fan, I really think it fits an oval-shaped head better than anything else out there.
  • 7 8
 The Ridgeline is *like* a truck by several metrics, but I always felt it was a chopped-up version of the Odyssey minivan. I believe it is a unibody rather than a body-on-frame truck. the berr cooler in the bed is cool but a 4x8 plywood seems like it would be a challenge. I had a 2007 Odyssey (250k miles - no real problems) and it was faster and handled better that a lot of 'sports cars' I have driven/owned. I understand that this fell into your lap and they do have their charms, but I'd take a Tundra over it all day.
  • 8 0
 Thats because, it is, in fact, a chopped up odyssey minivan. Kind of. The current generation is based on the Pilot (wikipedia says it shares 73% of its parts with the Pilot). But that platform is also used in the Odyssey.

Apparently the first gen was less odyssey though. But they all use variations on the same 3.5L v6, so again, kind of the same.

Which isn't to say thats a bad thing.

I have no great hate, or love for the Ridgeline. But will say its a good option for people that need the utility of a truck bed, that also don't have the need for heavy towing (over 5k lbs). Its kind of functionally the same thing as the front 2/3 of a Pilot/Odyssey, but with an open back that you can hose out. So I can see it working great for mountain bikers.
  • 7 0
 4x8 fit perfect (no wheel wells getting in the way) with the tailgate down. I've hauled many many full sheets of ply and drywall with mine. more of a cut off Pilot. Mine has been great, easy to maintain and it was significantly a better deal than a Toyota when I was looking. Sure the Toyotas look a lot better but the Ridgeline is better on the highway and has lots of features that are so useful for the mountain biker.
  • 1 0
 @ocnlogan: I had a Pilot. Had to do a quick evasive move on the freeway and the body lean convinced me to replace it straight away with a Tundra, now closing in on 309k miles
  • 1 0
 @codypup: Tundra is a great truck for sure, I've owned one in the past and might own one in the future. I found the emergency lane change to be more of a handful in the Tundra compared to the ridgeline. I think the Tundra is better if you have to tow over 5k lbs, want more off-road capability and resale value. the ridge is a better highway traveler, better mpg, more comfort. Both trucks are the best rated trucks for reliability, and they each have unique strengths of their own. different strokes for different folks.
  • 4 0
 The Ridgeline is more than enough truck for 95% of truck owners if they were honest with themselves about what they actually need.
  • 2 0
 As an owner of two Fiat Multipla (2001 and 2010), I have a sweet spot for old, useful beaters.
  • 3 0
 This is not a cheap sport.
  • 2 0
 Rhythm Resistance pants?

Must have been what George Michael was wearing when he wrote Careless Whisper.
  • 3 0
 120 dollar shirt ?
  • 2 0
 Looks like the same grid fleece Patagonia uses in their R1...which is $130 with a zipper.
  • 3 0
 App State for life.
  • 1 0
 Indeed.
  • 1 0
 Those are the pedals I said I would try... 3 years later and I'm still a clipless virgin
  • 3 2
 I wish i was able to just ride my bike all year and write cool stories; stupid bills
  • 1 0
 Those POC glasses look much safer than Levy's slicers. However the price is a tad out of reality.
  • 2 0
 Tifosi...
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: They are safer but dorky. I bought the $25 fakes on Amazon and returned them after I looked at myself in the mirror.
  • 1 0
 $5-10 buys you certified safety glasses with neutral optics (no distortion) at any decent hardware store.
  • 1 0
 Gotta look into those 2FO shoes, looking like a solid pair of biking attire!
  • 1 0
 My 2FO 2.0 flat versions have been doing great for well over 3 years. The grippy soles are getting a little ragged from my spiky pedals and I recently had to replace the laces but it looks like I should easily get at least another season out of them (riding several times a week). Will definitely buy another pair if they keep the same quality.
  • 1 0
 Wasn’t 7mesh product made in Canada not that long ago or am I remembering incorrectly?
  • 2 2
 Never understood rigerack, looks ugly, technically odyssey without closed trunk, towing capacity subpar; impossible to go offroad
  • 1 0
 all i have to do now is sell the bike to afford all this shite to look like the rest of the sausages on the track.
  • 2 0
 400$ jacket, 2200$ wheels, 265$ glasses... Gucci much ?
  • 2 0
 What's the point of a Minion knock-off that costs more than a Minion?
  • 2 0
 D Sapp, that Mr. Trottier's old Ridgeline???
  • 1 0
 @Royallsn - Sure is. Still running like a champ. Isn’t it funny seeing people question it’s reliability and capability, knowing what it’s been through?
  • 2 0
 I'm sorry but I hate everything you loved.
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp, how's the sizing on the Ambush? I've read that they run large. Thanks
  • 1 0
 @Danielsapp how come microshift advent x didn't make the cut?
  • 1 0
 It’s a really great product, and a great value, but these are my personal favorites.
  • 1 0
 what happened to the micro shift review?
  • 1 0
 Any of the Revel bikes you tested scratch near the list?
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I'm a huge fan of the Rascal and have been riding it all year. I almost put it in but the wheels stood out as a bit more unique IMO.
  • 2 1
 "Pulling off the Pisgah pendulum"? Make sure you do that in private...
  • 1 0
 No beer preferences yet.
  • 5 0
 100% rye, or Tequila
  • 2 0
 @danielsapp: OK, you got me listening! What's your favorite rye right now? It's the tipple of choice with my riding crew (for those who drink) and we're always looking for new ones to try.

My current fav is High West Double Rye or Michter’s Straight Rye.
  • 2 0
 @dolface: I have some weird food allergy stuff so I’m only able to do the real pure, 100% rye with no corn or - no blends. It and tequila are actually the only alcohols I’ve had luck with lately. Turns out there’s corn in damn near everything.

The most affordable and good one I’ve found is Whistle Pig Piggyback. It’s still $50 a bottle and they go up from there but I don’t make a habit of having all that much at once. It’s pretty interesting getting into the tech of that and learning how taxes and prohibition changed a lot of the finer points like what can or can’t be in certain alcohols etc. 100% rye was for a bit even harder to find than it is now. Any suggestions? Let me know.
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp: @danielsapp: Tell me about what Corn based alcohol does to you. I've got the corn allergy, that wrecks my insides so I mostly avoid it accept for when a craving hits a couple times a month... I've never thought to try to cut it from my booze. So I'm curious. The buzz better? Hangover is less bad? I went as far as sourcing corn-starch free baking powder but couldn't tell a difference in my baked goods.
  • 1 0
 @laksboy: the negative varies from a histamine reaction to brain fog with alcohol from what I can tell when I have something I shouldn’t. I’ve been really strict for the last few months with little alcohol at all so at the moment, the buzz is better and I’m at 100% the next day.
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp: Goldrun, Old Potrero and Whistlepig (who make Piggyback) are 100% rye.

Redemption Rye is 95% rye and 5% malted barley

I've had all of them and enjoyed them. Goldrun is probably the most interesting taste-wise.

There are also wheat whiskeys and wheated whiskeys if you don't have wheat allergies
  • 1 1
 @danielsapp: if I drink too much heavily oaked wine or beer that's been in oak barrels, my Uvula in the back of my throat will sometimes swell up to the size of my thumb after I go to sleep. I finally figured out that anti-histamines takes care of it in the morning. Goes along with an "oak" pollen allergy I guess. Allergies are weird.
  • 1 1
 wow Daniel Sapp you got a FAT FAT wallet
  • 4 6
 Does naming you clothing company 7Mesh count as cultural appropriation these days?
  • 8 10
 A used f-150 is the best value truck out there change my mind
  • 29 1
 A brand new Tacoma is only a few hundred more than a 5 year old Tacoma...
  • 14 2
 Which one? The one with the self-ejecting spark plugs? Or the one with the spark plugs that break off in the head and don't want to come out?
  • 5 16
flag Hiben (Dec 22, 2020 at 15:30) (Below Threshold)
 Bruh, u ever done maintenance on a ford? Thats the whole reason Im dodge for life
  • 8 0
 Before the prices went through the roof, a 3rd gen 4runner was a good one.
  • 9 0
 @suspended-flesh: "Before the prices went through the roof..." So you mean the early 70s?
  • 7 1
 @krisrayner: Ok just confirmed with two of my buddies who own f-150s that does tend to happen
  • 2 0
 @krisrayner: so true, I have the ones that break. The good news is that it was a plug flaw not an engine flaw so once you change the plugs it won’t happen again.
  • 6 0
 @unrooted: I get that Taco's are the unofficial vehicle of mountain biking. I always wanted a fancy new one but the timing was never right. I had an old Toyota PU in my early 20's that I loved. A few years back I went to the dealership to finally buy one and test drove a few. Hated it. I think anyone over or around 6' that says they love it is a liar. They do not accommodate long legs at all. I'm very happy with my Tundra. Couple years deep into it now and it is a reliable and super comfortable truck. But yeah- Ford F150's, Chevy's, Dodge... the power of people's opinions on trucks is perhaps the only thing that surpasses mountain biker's opinions on wheel size in dickery. Pick a truck and be a dick about it. Hope people enjoy what they drive as much as I do. The thing is so functional for our family.
  • 2 0
 @snl1200: WHOOSH!
  • 2 0
 @Hiben: nope, i've never needed to
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: HAHA no, specifically the 3rd Gens that were only made from 96-2002 and have gone up 2x/3x in price in the last 2 years, unfortunately. I paid 3K for mine and couldn't replace it for less than 8k now if I was lucky. I mean c'mon, that's in the Dentist Bike price range.
  • 3 0
 @Hiben:
I’ve never owned a Dodge but I have driven a lot of them for work. All the Rams start losing interior parts at 20k and mechanical bits in the engine starting around 30k. I’ve never driven a vehicle that fell apart so fast. They’re comfy and nice to drive but the build quality is atrocious.
  • 3 0
 I own a Tacoma now, previously it was an F150 eco boost. The Ford was much better in almost every way.
  • 1 2
 @Hiben: F.ricker O.nly R.uns D.ownhill!
  • 1 0
 Even if f-150s have some maintenance issues, go on cars.com and look how incredibly cheap a 2012 F-150 is compared to any other truck.
  • 1 0
 For shits and giggles I looked up some used F-150s near(ish) me. How does a 2011 Lariat with 116,000km on it for $118k sound?

Or a brand new Raptor... $220k.
  • 2 0
 Third gen 4runners, 80 series Land Cruisers. Garbage on fuel, but great value and great in general before the price skyrocketed in the last few years.
  • 1 0
 @suspended-flesh: Gen 3! Except when I wish it was a van. My 3.5 supercharged manual gets 19-20mpg regularly. Maybe because I don’t have to downshift? I’d go Ecoboost before new Toy though for sure.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: your countries pricing is bananas lol
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