The Bakery: Revelling in the Joy of Our Anarchy

Feb 15, 2018
by Danielle Baker  
Bakery Logo

I recently had the opportunity to help with promoting The Moment - a documentary about the history of freeride. Most of the people I reached out to were thrilled with the idea of the film and with having a showing in their town, but a few of the responses I received back surprised me.

"Does the film reconcile or reflect on the change in times or does it revel in the joy of anarchy?"

This question wrapped up a larger message of concern about "weed talk," rogue riding culture, and the lack of marketability the film would have to an all-ages audience. Another response I received was in respect to taming down mountain biking's extreme image.

"I'm trying to promote mountain biking to women and I'm not a huge fan of promoting the gnarly stuff like Rampage and freeriding because I think it scares a lot of people away from the sport."

Don't get me wrong, at the heart of both of these examples are genuine issues that people are considering. This is a time of hypersensitivity around illegal trail building in some places and I do understand that the mainstream media version of mountain biking may not be truly representative of what is available in the sport to everyone. But since when does that mean we shouldn't celebrate our history or that we should leave out the bits that are inconvenient to our current (or sometimes individual) concerns?

The documentary tells the story of the moment freeride began by using footage from the North Shore and Kamloops in the 90's and current interviews with some of the people who were involved in pushing the boundaries back then. The filmmaker, Darcy Turenne, takes us to the roots of a movement that has impacted all areas of mountain biking, including bike technology and design, trail building, photography, and skill development, to name a few. This story isn't meant to encapsulate the entire history of our sport, but, instead, to highlight a key point in its evolution.

So why are people feeling squeamish about acknowledging these roots of mountain biking? Freeriding isn't some estranged family member who's gone off to live in the woods, its influences can be seen in everyday riding and everyday people - every day. It can be found in the drops I was practicing in lessons ten years ago and in the baggy shorts, I still opt for today. The gravity-fed trails that bring a smile to your face - even if you don't want to admit it - are a result of the days in the Kamloops gravel pits.


The Moment Movie Reunion
  Behind the scenes while filming The Moment the crew looks at old photos of the famous gravel pit in Kamloops.

I understand that everyone thinks back to their own history occasionally and wonders if life would be different if - if I hadn't dropped out of college, if I hadn't married my high school sweetheart, if I hadn't become a brain surgeon, if I hadn't swiped right. But, if you can look around and appreciate where you are in life at this very moment, then even the most cringe-worthy memories were worth it. So, it stands to reason, that if you love mountain biking today and what it's provided in your life, you have to embrace the history it comes with.

The people who were smoking weed and building trails or taking headers into the dirt while sending in on pinner bikes back in the day weren't thinking ahead to whether or not their footage would be shown to an all-ages audience nearly three decades later. And they shouldn't have been. Even just ten years ago, mountain biking movies, in Vancouver at least, were shown predominantly in bars. The sport wasn't old enough to be thinking about the next generation yet. Remember Pedalfiles? That movie came with the message, 'Warning: this film contains boobs, fire, fights, and bikes.'

The athletes back then certainly weren't focused on making what they did mainstream and accessible to everyone. As noble a pursuit as this has become, I'm not entirely sure - outside of making a profit - why we care about this so much now. And let's be honest, the barrier to entry with mountain biking has a lot more to do with the current price of bikes, than whether or not it's perceived as dangerous. When you say to a friend, "You've really got to try this new sport, but be warned, you might crash and need stitches" versus, "I know you're really going to love it, but you need to drop $3000 just to start," which one do you think is the bigger deterrent?

The Moment Movie Reunion
  Brett Tippie, Wade Simmons, and Richie Schley charge down the gravel pits last summer while filming a reunion for The Moment.

There is a scene in one of the old New World Disorder movies where Aaron Chase is bleeding from the head. Chase puts his helmet back on and keeps riding. Genuine concerns for his well-being aside, that image was what inspired me to get on a bike. Fifteen years ago, there were only a few women riding and they were all shredders; none of them represented me, an awkward beginner, who was in no way a natural, and who hadn't ridden a bike since she was eight. But I still wanted to ride because when I did, I felt badass. I wasn't an athlete. I was terribly out of shape, skinny fat, as the saying goes. And yet I still identified with riding, because it was for me. I didn't need anyone to put lipstick on it, tame it down, and try to mould it into an image that they thought I would want. And let's be honest, back then I was the key demographic that companies are now targeting. So, maybe we all just need to take a step back and let mountain biking be, let it attract the people it speaks to, and not try to change it. I mean, my whole life I've been told that you have to love someone for who they are and not who you want them to be. If mountain biking leaves the toilet seat up now, let's just accept that it always will and save ourselves the trouble.

Much like that scene with Aaron Chase, The Moment unapologetically celebrates the good, the bad, and the ugly in mountain biking. It excites the audience because it connects us to something bigger. It ties our passion to the culture that existed in our sport at that specific moment in time. This film salutes our gritty pasts, to the regrettable and the great one-night stands, to the one beers too many, to the speeding tickets and the stitches, to our messy roots that make us truly unique individuals. This movie reminds us why we should appreciate and value the "weed talk" and rogue riding culture that we've come from. That an all-audiences rating isn't something to consider when you're telling a true story. Let these kids grow up and if they still love mountain biking enough they will seek it out (realistically they just have wait until it comes out on iTunes and their cool parents rent it for them).

Mountain biking won't build a sustainable relationship with anyone if it has to change who it is or deny its history. Acknowledging our past is so incredibly important, because, as they say, you can't know where you're going if you don't know where you've been. So, let's revel in the joy of our past anarchy just a little bit longer and be grateful that we can.

The Moment Movie Reunion



78 Comments

  • + 72
 Mountain biking is constantly growing which means it attracts all sorts of people. By the basic principle, the people who "know what the sport is about" and have a certain riding portfolio to back it up with, are in vast minority, no matter the discipline they choose. By the principle the businesses are working they will focus on the majority, adressing the "outliers" to a very limited extent. Businesses shape the sport as well as insane achievers. We have to understand that if you can send some scrubs down the A-line, ride off camber corner in control, pop a manual over a dozen of rollers, complete EWS or BC race without collapsing, climb 5k vertical meters each day for a few days in a row - you are the outlier, and at the same time, consequently, an outkast. So if you spend your time pondering how to elevate others to appreciate what you appreciate in this sport, whatever values you have, you will just grow miserable. everyone is in it for whatever reasons they are and many of them may correlate with your values and kinks, but most often than not, they won't. Hence the only good way of keeping yourself and the sport healthy is to do your own thing and be kind to people, but at the same time don't be affraid to react when someone goes way off the rails, destroying trails, engaging in all sorts of selfish counterproductive ideas. But don't hit them on the head with the "what mountain biking is about" Bible or kick them in the face with flat pedal shoe - try to understand them and react accordingly. Because it is you who may be wrong. But use yourself as an example to others, don't jump into telling someone to watch X movie to learn what's cool and what's not. Most often than not, the idealistic approach is as harmful as mindless exploitation.

Ride and let ride. Be your continuously changing self.
  • + 27
 i have nothing against mountain biking be inclusive, but when we have to make trails easier to make them accessible when bikes have never been more capable that is really starting to piss me off. And now the masses have invaded fatbiking as well, and they pollute facebook with their constant whining about the less than perfect grooming of the snow.
  • + 8
 @RoverDover: I think in relation to what you talk about, Team Robot had a great take on dumbing down of A-Line. But it's a give and take. Easy trails fund more "keep it real" trails. There will be new easy trails popping up, old trails being dumbed down, and new hard trails popping up. Then very occasionally, there will be making "off bounds" trails harder. If you want to protect your trail - keep it to yourself.

As to social media attention whoring... the only thing you can do is to look beyond it and do your own thing. Trust me it's a very healthy attitude... Wink
  • + 5
 @RoverDover: Keep in mind that without easy trails there wouldn't be nearly as many bike parks/trail centres etc so a lot less gnarly (up)lift accessed trails either, which are a nice addition to self built lines in the woods IMO.
  • + 18
 @WAKIdesigns: I’m just thankful we have you to teach us the appropriateness and ethos of “social media attention whoring”
  • + 2
 @RobaDob: I don’t do it for attention - now please exercise your resentmentBig Grin
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: *exorcise?
Doing what you want and not dictating to/trying to sway others is sadly at odds with human nature. Which is why I'm wondering why we need mtb to be bigger and more popular. The less niche it becomes, the more vulnerable it will be to all that is wrong with mass consumerism/sport. Fortunately, mountain biking (as opposed to riding off road) will be immune to mass participation for as long as it is exhausting and potentially painful. People hate that shit.
If it's purely to improve trail access, that's a domestic issue for those countries who restrict their land to those who donate the most to political parties. The problem is being attacked from the wrong end. Sadly, I doubt much more can be done just by adding a couple of hundred enthusiasts a year. The only effective solution is bikers collectively raising a few million/billion and lobbying like the rest of them. Basically, every rider in the States needs to chip in at least a grand to get the govt on side. Good luck.
  • + 12
 Waki, honestly that is the best comment you’ve ever written. Now stop giving us windows into your self and moral compass outside of your sense of humorous angst. You have a reputation to uphold here sir, and possessing a lucid, composed, reasonable world view isn’t part of it. JK.
  • + 2
 @RoverDover: To a point although easier trails are needed to attract beginners especially at bike parks, my local bike park has one green downhill run and any beginner would die on it. I often want to take new people riding but most bike parks only offer one or two greens, I'm obviously not opposed to the harder stuff but at least from a bike park stand point we need more easy trails.
  • + 11
 If I cared about what other people thought I probably wouldn't be mountainbiking.
  • + 10
 @DeadThrone: Xacly... I'll put it like this, I am extremely fortunate father to a 6 year old girl who likes to show off no matter what she does. So I'll try to take her to Hafjell this year with her 20" Commie meta along with my wife on her 26" Meta. And the only reason I can even think of taking them there is because guys at Hafjell built a super easy trail with berms and small smooth rollers. Otherwise I'd have to be an idiot to risk them crashing and swearing at me for taking them there already on the first trip. And building such trail is hard, how do I know? Because I haven't seen a single trail like that in other places.

Also just because it is machine dug, doesn't mean it's easy to ride it fast. I have some beef with the more far left part of "what real MTB is about" mob who glorify natural trails and whine on machine dug stuff saying it's for losers. Sorry Bobby, just because you get wobbled like hell in a rock garden, or slide a lot with your foot out in mud, shouting woohooooo! doesn't mean you are any good at it. It just means you are willing to do it. Let's just go back to times when "huck to flat" was the old Enduro, like around 2005. There were dudes on Azonic eliminators hucking from 10ft+ drops and then there was a DH comp with the track going through some of those hucks, they got demolished by folks on hardtails. The only thing they could do was hucking and talking crap about others not having balls.
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: You are simultaneously the most upvoted and most downvoted person on Pinkbike.
  • + 4
 @BenPea:
Fortunately, mountain biking (as opposed to riding off road) will be immune to mass participation for as long as it is exhausting and potentially painful

This is one of the joys of the sport. It is HARD work and not for the faint of heart. It requires balance, timing, endurance, cardio, strength, and a mental fortitude. Which is exactly why I abhor eBikes. When the difficulty of the sport is removed by electric motors, it opens it up to a wide range of people who have no appreciation for the strength and determination it takes to become a good rider. Along with that comes the taming of trails, "because they're too bumpy", and the removal of or modification to access to the type of trails that we have grown to love. It won't happen in a year, but give it 20-30 and this sport will be dead as we know it today.
  • + 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: as far as I am affraid of certain aspects of E-biking, mainly safety, it is still a tool. If I had an E-bike I'd make it hard for myself, one can push himself on anything. Just like you can push yourself on a Dh bike on A-line, just like you can push yourself on a BMX on a parking lot, just like you can do it when commenting on Pinkbike... wait!
  • + 3
 Seriously, what would we and Pb do without WackDesigns superior knowledge in every f&ckn comment section
  • + 2
 @RoverDover: Whining on pb about whining on fb...
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: Sure you would. But you aren't the target audience of an ebike, are you?
  • - 1
 @RobaDob: Waki is the biggest tool I've never met.
  • + 1
 @fattyheadshok: This guy gets it! lol I was thinking the same thing
  • + 4
 @BenPea: Totally with you on the potential dangers of mountain biking becoming less niche. Whenever I hear about growing our sport I think "careful what you wish for".
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Stop! You really must stop. Your reasoned replies are actually disturbing the balance in the universe. There is no prediction in Einstein’s universe for the WAKI effect.
  • + 0
 @fattyheadshok: haha the WAKI effect..... good one!
  • + 1
 @metaam: corruption, doping (yeah ok...), cheating (hmmm...), race fixing, politics.... Let's just keep this to ourselves yeah?
  • + 0
 @fattyheadshok, no worries I have some disturbing MTB related comic to balance things out... coming soon...
  • + 1
 @Poulsbojohnny: “When the difficulty of the sport is removed by electric motors, it opens it up to a wide range of people who have no appreciation for the strength and determination it takes to become a good rider. “

The difficulty of the sport has been reduced by in many ways since I got my first got my first MTB and started racing in ‘87. Things like disc brakes and suspension on bikes. How about uplifts and shuttles? Maybe you are opposed to these options as well. Uplifts, snow grooming, and advances in equipment have done the same thing for skiers who once had no other choice than to bust the their butts hiking up the mountains for some hard earned turns downhill. Back country skiiing is alive and well.

Here in Washington State, I couldn’t care less if someone chooses to ride an eMTB as long as they stay in areas where motorized vehicles are permitted (or private property) as current law requires. Furthermore, ebikes seem like a very good option to combat the horrible traffic, hills, and expensive parking here in Seattle.
  • + 26
 Mountain biking has this strange thing going on where some people (who arrived late to the party themselves) feel like it has to be made inclusive to everyone.

Should we welcome new comers, absolutely? Should we whitewash history and change the present to attract the absolute lowest common denominator? Hell no.

But the money behind the sport wants eBikes and dirt sidewalks so nobody thinks it's too hard and quits to take up taking Instagram pictures of artisinal food.

Mountain biking is not for everyone yet many people want to push it on everyone and think we need to adjust what makes it great to attract everyone.

Whitewashing history or dumbing down your favorite trail, it's all the same.
  • + 10
 Don't forget how the article started:
"
MOST of the people I reached out to were thrilled with the idea of the film and with having a showing in their town, but A FEW of the responses I received back surprised me.
"
So don't make it bigger than it is really. You're always going to have the odd individual who go "oh but if it shows some 25 year old stuff that goes against the very adult values I have now..." but please don't let that keep you from just seeing all those who're thrilled.

If this is a document, then document and show it the way it was. Of course the weed debate is always going be a silly one especially when compared to alcohol use (oh, but this a very fine wine you really need to learn to appreciate, or well actually our economy thrives on the use of alcohol so please don't tell any inconvenient facts that could harm our business more than it does our customers).

The one thing I don't really stand behind is the saying "you can't know where you're going when you don't know where you've been". Drive me around in my sleep. When I wake up (and there is actually some daylight) I can go somewhere and know where I'm going. The deeper meaning of the message then. Sure acknowledging is important and there is a huge lot you can learn from it. But these guys didn't need to study the history of bicycle riding to come up with the idea to ride some of the gravel they had in their area. Some great things come from having a vision. And some great things just come from living in the moment and just go and have a blast. You'll always end up somewhere. Or not. But you're only going to find out once you're there.

Seems like a cool video. Bring it out on dvd and I don't mind watching it with my kids. Really if they can see people drink wine and smoke their cigar, there really is nothing wrong seeing others have some grass.
  • + 5
 50:01 crew will single handedly save mountain biking
  • + 2
 @pbuser2299: Nah, pretty much all Caldwell documents is in my view nicely on par with that. Luckily there is more than 50:01!
  • + 9
 "Fifteen years ago, there were only a few women riding and they were all shredders; none of them represented me, an awkward beginner, who was in no way a natural, and who hadn't ridden a bike since she was eight."

EXACTLY! None of them represented you but you wanted to try it anyway right? Why do so many today need to see an image that "represents them" in order to have motivation to try something?

Show the fun. Fun is attractive. Fun is fun. People like to have fun.
  • + 2
 That's a basic problem mostly of the younger part of our society. They have manifested unreflected opinions about a lot of things, which "represent them/their identity". Any change in that opinion will therefore lead to a feeling of giving up themselves because they found their pride and identity in their opinions, not realizing an unreflected opinion isn't worth anything.
It goes along with the "there are no loosers/everyone is a winner" and "there are no wrong answers"-concepts of raising kids, as the kids will inherit these concepts feeling to be able to achieve anything until they realize later in life they in fact can't without serious effort, which they never learnt to invest. The former problem is just this an aspect of the latter problem, used on reflected opinions/identity.
  • + 1
 @Highclimber: bro...so true
  • + 7
 Brings back memories of hike-a-biking up mountains in Cape Verde alone to put first tracks down. Most riders now have no idea what it is like to carve out a virgin line. I know it is considered anarchy and the domain of bad boys. It really was a different and special time I would not trade it for all the bike parks in the world. It was about can it be done, like when Brett Tippie visited MBA and dropped that cliff that no one had considered before. Sure he split this forehead open even with a full face helmet on, but somehow it was way more magical than the Oakley sender ever could be.
  • + 6
 Hell yes!!! Probably the best opinion piece I've ever read on PB. This article made me realize, yeah, I started riding, by myself, because it was hard and dangerous. Not because I wanted to be a part of any group. If others like doing hard badass stuff in the woods that's awesome, let's ride! But I'm sure as hell NOT slowing down or staying off pirate trails I helped build and love just to make hippies and wimps like me more. In fact, F off and catch me if you can!!!
  • + 5
 I got into mountain biking because I like to smoke weed in cool places and do fun shit. You start infringing on that and I'll move on to a different thing...maybe powered parachute gliding. I already have to move from my home state because we have to cater to the bourbon industry and people still view weed as a cheech and chong movie. In conclusion.....I don't fall for the marketing bullshit by any industry... Leave me alone
  • + 2
 perfect recipe for fishing as well...relax, watch for the fish rising, and go
  • + 4
 I thought this was a great movie, and didn't really notice the negative parts. What I saw was a group of guys that didn't follow the status quo, were willing to push the limits and challenge what was acceptable at the time. There was no money in what they were doing so they were purely doing it out of passion for the sport. One of the best lines was when the director was asked to reshoot his footage but not show mountain bike tires touching dirt. Definitely a movie to buy when it is comes out.
  • + 5
 Catering to the lowest common denom just boils my blood..................it's not just in MTB, it's f*cking everywhere; and, it disgusts me.
  • + 5
 I build my own trails. They are gnarly. They are challenging and fun. And the best part, no one can find them except me and the boys!
  • + 3
 If you clean up the history of nearly anything, you wind up gettin rid of most of the interesting people in the process. A lot of history was, is and will be made by hooligans who dance on the rim of the volcano and we should celebrate those people to the fullest. Those ole boys that dumped the tea in Boston Harbor weren't considered refined gentleman, nor were the G.I. s of WWII but they are all heroes now as they should be. I'm lookin forward to the movie and if some people find it offensive they can ease out the same door they came in thru.
  • + 2
 I'm lookin forward to the movie and if some people find it offensive they can ease out the same door they came in thru.

- and they can take their barely ridden $6k bike with them while they are at it.
  • + 2
 @Poulsbojohnny: Let them know i'll give them $1500 for it if they don't want it collecting dust in their garage/basement.
  • + 3
 I really want to comment here but you’re touching on so much that I don’t want my comment to exceed the article in length! In short you’re indicating everything that’s currently going wrong with the sport. Bikes are more capable than ever but all I see getting built on “trail days” are beginner trails or taking blue and black level trails and turning them into easier trails. By being “inclusive” the sport is being exclusive of the types of riders that made it cool in the first place. Some of us need to be able to ride gnarly tech stuff. It’s what we like. Do we get hurt? Hell yes. Cracked ribs punctured lungs separated shoulders. Yep. Been there done that. Does it make me wanna ride green trails?? Nope nope nope. Does it make me want to refine my technical skills so I can can nail the hard stuff safely?? Yep. If everything’s made into a trail that anybody can ride then what you basically have is a line that you can comfortably push a baby carriage through. Guess what? You’re no longer mountain biking at that point. The mentality about people being upset about weed talk? C’mon learn how to parent already. It’s a matter of personal responsibility not some dumb ass quasi Puritan ethic. I myself am not a weed smoker but that’s my choice. One of the 20th century’s greatest minds was a heavy weed user. He and his wife both responsible for the communication content representing our species onboard voyager and coordination of the voyager space program. Both of them pretty heavy smokers. I’m guessing so because Ann Druyan was the director of NORML for many years. Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan hardly qualify as Cheech and Chong. Anyway, I’m happy with MTB being a rowdy fun and chill sport. I ride for my soul and to get away from all the “normalcy” in life that makes so much noise in your head you can’t even put a single thought together. Folks need to take their uptight self righteous stuff that amounts to nothing in light of the world’s real problems and let MTB alone!
  • + 3
 Why not whitewash mountain biking’s history? Is that not the trend these days in all aspects of history? f*ck that! I’m with Danielle, embrace it all. How does one ever learn and grow by denying history, the truth? Be honest, whether it’s raising your children or the history of Mountain Biking. Make corrections for yourself if need be but don’t deny the past and most importantly how can I buy this film?
  • + 3
 When Free riding was all the rage we had VHS tapes No social media Free riders were viewed in magazines It's too easy to see what we are doing The romance of anarchy is a moment long gone Please show the origins of Free riding with the good the bad and the ugly
  • + 4
 Agreed, but please use punctuation for readability.
  • - 1
 @mammal: your joking right?
I live in a country made up of people from all over the world
I prefer to have the decency to listen and understand the point being made
Correcting people's grammar and spelling is pointless and derogatory
It does nothing to contribute to the conversation
  • + 2
 @Sshredder: Be offended if you like. You're obviously writing your comment to share your opinion, and punctuation helps you get your point across. There's a reason it's a part of the language.
  • + 2
 Mountain biking has been polluted by "growing the sport".
Long Live real riders and rogue trail building, huge drops and all night parties! To all the new people, go back to whatever you were doing a couple of years ago. Freeride doesn't need or want you around....f*ck off kooks
  • + 2
 I’m right there with you man. Love me some rogue trails, drops, and general gnar gnar. Thing that most people don’t get is that “sustainable trails” are ones that abide natural terrain. It’s when you go in with bobcats, and crap trying to smooth things over that you can run into problems if you don’t know exactly what you’re doing. This new trend of removing obstacles to improve trails is complete crap.
  • + 1
 This line right here encapsulates exactly what mountain biking is for me: " So, maybe we all just need to take a step back and let mountain biking be, let it attract the people it speaks to, and not try to change it." Why try to be more moto? Try to get DH in the Olympics? This sport is about participation, not audience excitement. Participate and enjoy no matter what "the image needs to be"
  • + 1
 good idea behind this article , new bikers or non bikers don't usually get the Freeride stuff ,they think spandex and hardtails ,it is tempting to let them know there is so much more but sometimes you should just let it be and see what happens
  • + 1
 Anytime I've ever told someone I mountain bike, 2 out of 3 ask,"Do you do the stuff on tv (Rampage)". I just kinda laugh and say, "Not really. I could ride a few ridge lines and maybe do a few small drops, but not the 50 footers.. or even the 20 footers." And they lose interest in my experience as an mtber. I don't think they realize there is so much more to it, for everyone. Based on "interest" from the commoners, Rampage is far more interesting than "I have a local trail with 4 trail heads that have a mile loop, 200 feet of climbing with 25 mph rooted flowy singletrack downhills". They never want to try it when I offer a ride. My daughters love those loops and go their own speed. It is nice seeing more women on the trails these days. 20 years ago, it was a rare sight.
  • + 3
 The only thing i want to know is when can i buy the movie?
  • + 3
 Now the real question is if it looked like a Session back then already?
  • + 5
 It was lookin’n’crackin like a Kona. It may be that up to this day, no company has managed to make a nearly 5kg alu frame that was weaker than the lightest XC bikes of today.
  • + 2
 No that was back when treks looked like Banshee screams and ugly Konas
  • + 1
 Hello. If you have just started reading the comments section of this post I say to you "Go ride your bike" all you will find here is opinions on opinions.

Have a great day.
  • + 1
 Yep. Opinions and opinions from people who love the sport. Let it ride.

*Disclaimer: I've only been a PB member for a while, but have been riding since the rigid fork days (yes, I know that makes me old). So there. Big Grin
  • + 3
 I just got back from a ride. Can I read the comments now?
  • + 2
 @metaam: I wouldn't... But hey. Lol
  • + 2
 You mean there are people who mountain bike and DON'T smoke weed?!?
  • + 3
 I had a witty reply lined up, but for the life of me I can't remember what it was.... anyone got any chocolate?
  • + 2
 Wade Simmons is the man.
  • + 1
 Someone should show it to Richard Cunningham
  • + 2
 Weed talk is our past?
  • + 3
 It's certainly heavily entrenched in "Free-ride Mountain Biking's" past. If you love the modern mountain biking culture, that culture has been heavily shaped by the original free-riders... So, yes is the short answer.
  • + 4
 @mammal: I get the historical reference. I was there. What I mean is it's not in the past. I don't know a mountain biker who doesn't know what a safety break is for--and plenty will still join in. Which reminds me...
  • + 1
 @pedalmore: Gotcha. I didn't get your angle at first, but yeah, agreed. Most people understand the references.

I'd still say that the ratio of riders that I've been acquainted with who actually partake in such things is still only 2/3 at the most. I'm sure in many corners (bible belt, for example) you'd probably get quite a bit of "weed talk" resistance, even among mtb circles.

Perhaps that's were these concerns that Danielle mentions, come from. That said, this community of ours tends to be pretty open minded on a lot of things... Oh look, it's exactly 4:20!
  • - 3
 Mountain Biking is expensive, white collar sport!
  • + 4
 Life is expensive get used to it.
  • + 4
 Nearly every mountain biker I know is 'blue collar'. And quite often the guys working in trades earn more than the guys working in offices.
  • + 3
 Most mountain bikers I ride with their bikes cost 5 times more than their vehicles. I would hardly call them white collar.
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