The Best Tech From Lenzerheide DH World Cups

Aug 13, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  
2015

Lenzerheide Randoms
A different kind of pike. Keen angler Adam Brayton was stoked on his custom helmet.

Lenzerheide Randoms
Lenzerheide Randoms
Emmeline Ragot's Mondraker sitting pretty with customised brake levers and prototype wheels

Lenzerheide Randoms
Sam Dale switched to flats for Lenzerheide. Yes, it's a track that looks quite bike parky from a distance, but the loose, marbly surface means going foot out, flat out is a regular occurrence.

Lenzerheide Randoms
Lenzerheide Randoms
Scott-Gstaad mechanic Ben keeping mud at bay with moto foam in the cranks and tape over the fork crown.

Lenzerheide Randoms
Blenki's modded pedals allow him to guide his cleat in easier.

Lenzerheide Randoms
Lenzerheide Randoms
A compare and contrast of two drivetrain setups. Gee Atherton (right) goes 7 speed while Taylor Vernon (left) goes 9. Both riders had the smallest 2 cogs the same size as there were no spacers to take up the room

Lenzerheid Randoms
The no-quali party might have got a bit wild...

Lenzerheid Randoms
Lenzerheid Randoms
To help combat his asthma, Eliot Jackson was using Nose Magnets from Asterisk. One pole goes on your nose, the other inside your goggles and your nostrils are pulled apart for better airflow

2016

Second to suspension rebuilds brake bleeds were a top priority for most riders today.
A lever held in place for an hour or so lures any lingering air in the system to the lever

Gold bling Ti-Springs for the Intense boys.
Gold bling Ti-Springs for the Intense boys.


We re not sure quite what to call this one.
Troy s Jersey is done up to match.
Tony Bauman's finest handiwork went into Troy Brosnan's galaxy-themed Demo, check out the matching kit featuring Brosnan's pet dogs

A little extra grip for Marcelo Gutierrez. While this was needed in the mud of Les Gets we assume it will be removed for more tame track in Lenzerheide.
A little extra grip on the saddle for Marcelo Gutierrez.

Blenki Bike Check - Lenzerheide World Cup
Check out the tie through the pivot bolt keeping the cabling neat.

Wyn Masters Bike Check
Wyn Master's Bulls bike doing the high pivot idler thing before it was cool

Wyn Masters Bike Check
Have. Fun. Always.
"Have. Fun. Always."

Tom Duncan models shat s left of Sam Dales wheels after Crankworx Les Gets. Needless to say that was a tough one on bikes...
Tom Duncan models what was left of Sam Dales' wheels after a week of racing at Crankworx Les Gets.

2017

The monstrous 6 pot brakes have been dropped with less of an emphasis on braking here.
The team were surprised with just how well the brakes dealt with the long and brutal Andorran track. Not even reaching the lowest reading on the temperature gauge.
Count the pistons...

There s three positions of adjust-ability to lengthen the wheelbase...
... and coincidentally on the longest setting they fit 29 wheels we ll see whether Walker opts for them further down the line.
Saracen's bike in 2017 allowed for three position adjustment to chainstay length, with the longest allowing for 29er experimentation

Miranda Miller s shifter is cooler than yours.
Miranda Miller's shifter is cooler than yours.

A fresh range on an e 13 cassette for the Polygon crew. A 10-20T compared to the old 9-21T for those interested...
The fine margins that make up a downhill bike, Polygon making the switch from 10 to 20T to 9-21T for a smidgen extra range.

2018

A red shock colourway for Greg Minnaar this weekend.
2018 was a World Champs year and we have a custom bikes article in the pipeline, but for now here are some cool details that jumped out to us, starting with Greg Minnaar's red Fox spring.

Caitlin Fielder provided Wyn Masters with these one of a kind Shimano AM9 s.
Caitlin Fielder provided Wyn Masters with these one of a kind Shimano AM9s.

No yellow Ohlins coil this weekend for Adam Brayton.
DH World Champs 2018
Hope never disappoint when it comes to custom builds. Even Ohlins chipped in with a white spring deviating from their standard gold.

The detail on the worlds bikes this weekend are crazy. Props to the painters.

Emilie Seigenthaler's bike would be useful if she gets lost on course.

Best topcap ever?

2019

A more eco-friendly version of the brake hack above.

Old school wheel stiffening methods at the Santa Cruz pit.
Old school wheel stiffening methods at the Santa Cruz pits.

A custom linkage on the wild Cannondale bike, it's a real shame it seems to have been shelved now after a year on the circuit.

Vergier s mechanic PA gets that tyre milk distributed.
Vergier's mechanic, PA, gets that sealant distributed.



55 Comments

  • 36 3
 The old Gamber- what a bike. It will go down as a classic. I only rode one once with rental level components, and it still could just plow. I get the new one is "better", but man that thing was a bike to be remembered.
  • 6 0
 With you on this one! Hands down my favorite downhill bike I've ridden over the years. That thing without a chain was untouchable.
  • 2 1
 @kev1n: Ya, so if you look at the pivot location, that thing must have had a boatload of antisquat and chaingrowth. Don't tell all the armchair engineers, but it still rode amazing.

Maybe I'm wrong, and thats why the world cup team experimented with an idler pulley.
  • 2 0
 yeah, my friend has one and especially for jumps that thing is a beast, even on the tech it just plows through it
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: It certainly did (look at this graph), however without any dinner plates in the cassette, DH bikes can get away with that kind of thing can't they?
  • 3 0
 Just picked up a 2018, best all around DH bike for sure. Plows but still plenty poppy for jumps. So stoked on it
  • 2 0
 @boozed: Either I didn't get what you mean or you have it the other way around. There's a way to get rid of the chainsquat and chaingrowth on the old Gambler. Just install a 48t chainring on it, it will be perfect!
  • 2 0
 @sb666: You got it from Al's didn't you?
  • 1 0
 @Ajorda: indeed!
  • 2 0
 @sb666: That sale was wild. A buddy of mine picked up a 910 for $1,500.
  • 18 0
 No surprise, Miranda Miller's everything is probably cooler.
  • 18 3
 Gloves suck till your palms get shredded after dismounting your bike over the bars!
  • 2 1
 Ya, I used to always ride gloves (like 10 years ago), then when I started "free riding" I rode glove less, now I'm old I'm back to gloves.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I've gone gloveless before too, but after OTBing in the parking lot, I always wear them now. ????
  • 15 1
 Gloves suck until your hands sweat so much you can't grip the bars
  • 2 0
 @mnorris122: This!!! And torn up hands suck and seem to take the longest to heal.
  • 3 0
 @mnorris122: yep. My hand slipped off the bar whilst pulling up on a take-off once. Sweaty palms, so always wear gloves now.
  • 2 0
 I refuse to ride trail without gloves mainly due to sweaty palms and my hands slipping but yeah, shredding your hands sucks too lol. I do ride gloveless when I'm on my DJ though, I prefer the feel when I'm gripping and pulling up as hard as I do on that bike.
  • 13 0
 A little off topic, but I still can't get over the fact that they didn't name the lower vent system Fox Air Release Technology, would've made such a nice acronym.
  • 10 0
 What's this business about zip tying brake levers to get air out? Never heard of this, but will defs try when im home lol
  • 6 1
 I guess the extra pressure on the system probably makes the bubbles smaller, allowing them to travel more easily through the brake lines more easily? That's my guess just based on bleeding experience and applying pressure via the syringe. Maybe someone who actually knows what they are talking about can chime in and correct me.
  • 2 0
 @fowler22: I'm with you. That is definitely what happens.
  • 4 0
 I’m not sure how pressurizing the system helps. I learned to “de-gas” brake fluid while in the syringe by pulling up on the plunger against a closed syringe nozzle - gas comes out of solution the same way it does when opening a can of soda.
  • 7 1
 Yeah I don't really see how this would work. Since air is way more compressible than brake fluid, the density of the air bubbles is increasing a lot more than the density of the brake fluid when you pressurize the system. That would make the bubbles less buoyant and less likely to get to the top. Like @fartsmellow said, it would actually be better to do the opposite, if you can put the system on a vacuum, the air bubbles expand and increase buoyancy which would make them rise to the top. That's part of what happens when you do a top-end only bleed on your brakes.
  • 2 0
 Wouldn't big bubbles go up faster because they have more buoyancy? If yes, then compressing the fluid and bubbles would slow down the progression of the bubbles to the lever.
  • 2 0
 Pressurizing the system frees up stuck air bubbles from the weirdest places, pressure actually helps air to rise to the top, although bit slowly ( that’s why you leave it like that for a few hours , even overnight) and the last extra feature is that the system expands a bit, taking in a wee more fluid. Result is super stiff bite point and far less dead lever throw than with regular bleeding only.Moto guys been doing this for ages. Works as well on all different brands of brakes too.
  • 1 4
 If you’re in a pinch, raise the back wheel off the ground until it’s straight above the front wheel. Quickly press and release each lever 5-10 times. It should firm your lever up enough to finish your run, or get you through the day. It’s the sneaky way to get reliable feeling Shimano brakes if you’ve got the inconsistent lever feel.
  • 1 0
 I'm not sure how it works but it does.
I used to do it on my moto race bike in the 80's and always had good brakes.
Usually bad brakes are for a reason thou, a good bleed and new pads fixes "brake problems" best.
  • 2 0
 @cedrico: yes, actually rising rate is ~-r² so a smaller bubble rises at a much lower velocity. But I've also tried the lever thing and it works., so.. Magic I guess?
  • 5 0
 Increasing the pressure causes the air bubbles to shrink, allowing them to hide near edges in the system (typically near connectors). But if you quickly release the lever, you both get a drop in pressure (causing the bubbles to swell) as well as a liquid flow towards the reservoir. So that's where the bubbles will end up. Not sure how much sense it makes to keep the lever depressed overnight but you surely need to keep it depressed for a while. You want the oil flow to stop completely before you release the lever again. If you open the lever too soon, there may still be waves heading down dragging the the bubbles along. Similarly when you release the lever. Wait a bit, allow the bubbles to rise before you squeeze the lever again otherwise you'll chase them down. So when you pump a brake to chase the air toward the reservoir, squeeze slow, hold it a few seconds, quickly release the lever, then wait a bit more and hit the hose to chase the bubbles.

I rarely go for a full bleed but I use this method to trap air in the reservoir. I then open the reservoir cap, push the brake pads back (pushing even more oil and air towards the reservoir), top it off and close the cap again. I know some people prefer to overfill (not pushing the pads back) but I'm not a fan. If you need to resort to that, either your pads are already too thin or your brake manufacturer went too weight weenie and made the reservoir too small. I realize water could pool in the caliper but as the boiling point of my oil is 120degC already anyway, it shouldn't be too much of a deal (unlike brakes designed for oil with a higher boiling point). As for corrosion, it isn't the water causing corrosion. It are minerals. Not sure if brakes designed to use with mineral oil would be so susceptible to corrosion. My calipers are from 2007 and still working perfectly fine, so I'd say corrosion wouldn't be too much of an issue.

TL;DR: Yeah sorry, wandered off again. The on topic bit is the first section.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: no, this is awesome I appreciate it Smile
  • 1 0
 @vinay: and people are surprised I use mech brakes (yeah kids I know, but your experience is your own)
  • 2 0
 I think giving the brakes a once over with your wife's magic wand would be more effective at loosening the bubbles.
  • 7 0
 I wonder why the hope team had a 6 pot brake caliper...
  • 6 0
 It's so old, that it all feels new again. What year is it....
  • 3 0
 Why in the world would you put tire tread on your saddle? Someone enlighten me!
  • 6 0
 @reindeln help to grip the seat if its muddy, sam hills mechanic started doin it then sdg made the ifly storm
  • 2 3
 @savmeister: but why the hell would you want to grip the seat? Other the the side but you don't really need grip you just need a seat to press on...
  • 6 0
 @Bikerdude137: Because sliding off the back of the seat in a compression is never a good time.
  • 3 0
 Best Tech! Zip Ties For The WIN!
  • 2 0
 Part of me wishes hope would bring back a 6 piston brake
  • 2 0
 Wants that stem cap
  • 1 0
 Looks like Blenki wants some Time pedals.
  • 1 0
 Time pedals that you can't pull your feet out of (that's not a bad thing that's just what ht is known for)
  • 3 0
 @Bikerdude137: never had an issue with accidental release on Times but yes I’ve heard HT are extremely tight.
  • 1 0
 Curious how much tying your spokes together stiffens up a wheel.. anyone?
  • 1 1
 Ever squeezed the 'cross' in your spokes? By reducing the deflection, you are keeping the spoke at its true length and refusing compression and lateral forces bowing and flexing the wheel.
  • 5 0
 It’s a farce.
  • 1 1
 It stiffens the wheel relative to the hub, it doesn't stiffen the rim itself
  • 4 0
 Its a roadie trick from probably 50years ago or more. Makes zero difference on modern wheels
  • 4 1
 More likely useful to stop a broken spoke getting in the chain.
  • 1 1
 @bigtard: indeed, WTF do professional race mechanics know about that shit eh?
  • 2 0
 @SmallBrownDogMTB: They try a lot of things. placebo?
  • 2 3
 Blenki has never been the same since he switched to SPDs
  • 12 0
 exactly, he's faster

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.016342
Mobile Version of Website