The Bonas Labs Disc-O-Matic is a Brake Bedding Machine for Bike Shops

Jan 3, 2023
by Dario DiGiulio  
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You don't typically see reviews of tools here, except those you can stick in a pocket or a pack for trailside use. Especially unusual here are shop-specific tools, those that are either too large or too expensive for any home mechanic to be able to justify. Today I'm highlighting an interesting invention that is both: the $3,500 Brake-O-Matic from Bonas Labs, a small one-man operation looking to increase the efficiency and value of professional mechanics. The Brake-O-Matic is a brake bedding and burnishing machine, essentially replacing the repeated back alley sprints otherwise required to bed in a brand new set of disc brakes. As a critical step in the process that is often overlooked by eager customers who just want to ride their new bike, the bedding/burnishing procedure is ideally done by a shop before sending a bike out the door.

Living in Massachusetts, Bonas founder Jonas Mikolayunas wanted to develop a tool that was usable in high-volume shops through the brutal East Coast winters, when heading outside to bed in a set of brakes is simply not an option. Starting off with a free treadmill, and after tinkering for some time, the Brake-O-Matic was born. Jonas is serious about the science of disc brakes, even citing multiple academic articles on his website, if potential customers should want more info on the topic.

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Every bike has its place on the Disc-O-Matic.

The Bonas Labs literature intentionally refers to the process as a two-part sequence, as the tool works differently to maximize those two processes in distinct stages. The Brake-O-Matic has a simple user interface that reads the load and pressure in the system, giving an indication as to how much braking force is being applied by the mechanic. With a foot pedal the user can control the speed of the rollers, and apply the brakes as intended for the given stage of the process. Jonas has developed a thorough instructional guide for use of the machine, which is simple enough to repeat easily after a first use.

Bedding is the initial process in which pad material is transferred to the rotor, maximizing surface area contact. This results in a visible change to the rotor, either as a high-polish look, or a slight graying of the metal, depending on brand and model. Burnishing is the phase where pressure and heat both increase, resulting in the creation of what is called a tribofilm on the two surfaces. Without getting too into the weeds, tribofilms are a mix of all the contact materials in a brake system, and are ultimately what make the brakes feel "stickier." There is no visible tell for tribofilm development, unless you have some lab-grade spectrography equipment, but you know it when you feel it.

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The Brake-O-Matic is designed to work just as well with the front wheel...
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...as with the rear.

Thought Jonas aims to lower the pricepoint of the Brake-O-Matic as things scale up, this tool is certainly not aimed at the home mechanic in its design intent. The prototype stage of the development was conducted at a shop that sometimes peaks at 500 bike assemblies a week, so volume and efficiency were primary drivers in the final product. Jonas has even built a savings calculator that allows service managers to get a sense of whether or not their shop warrants an industrial tool like the Brake-O-Matic. Home mechanics are probably still best off heading to the biggest hill in town and doing some repeated slow-downs, but for the busiest shops out there, this could be a hugely useful tool.

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A 1-horsepower motor drives the whole wheel.
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And these idler rollers keep things in place.

With an obvious focus on user interface, long term durability, and right to repair, I think the Brake-O-Matic is a well considered tool that should serve the right people quite well. I haven't had a chance to get my hands on a set of brakes burnished on the machine, but I'd be curious to see if there's any improvement in performance in a controlled setting versus the relatively haphazard methods I tend to employ.

For those working at shops cranking out dozens of bike builds a day, you can find more information on the Bonas Labs website.

Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
147 articles

241 Comments
  • 459 8
 I am not saying I am the kind of person that just puts in pads and then just goes riding, but I am the kind of person that puts in pads and just goes riding. Maybe do a few hard stops on the way to the trailhead.
  • 44 17
 Yeah, in my ~20 years of mtb, I've seen one buddy have a minor crash cause he didn't bed in pads. It's really doesn't seem like a huge issue...
  • 27 5
 @kcy4130: I had a pretty good crash last year I will happily blame new pads on. Might have been a little rider error in there too.
  • 83 4
 @kcy4130: its not about crashing before they bed in..its about getting the best performance AFTER they are bedded in. On CODEs I've found properly bedding vs not makes a HUGE difference in performance.
  • 7 0
 @wolftwenty1: The question i'm left with is, How do you reverse improper beddiing and are rotors ruined?? This seems to be a mystery.
  • 22 19
 @kcy4130: mountain bikers don't have this issue as much as they brake very aggressively, for brief periods frequently. Road bikes and hybrids are the opposite to this. A lot of people who are slightly anxious about cycling will hold the brakes lightly instead of shaply which quickly leads to glazes pads and rotors. Nothing sandpaper doesn't fix

Personally and unfortunately this tool looks like one of the most pointless innovations, right up there with the handle bar laser. No work shop will have the space and you can put substantial upgrades/investments into the rest of the workshop for many mechanics for the same money.
Plus sandpaper and a splash of water works just as well.
  • 2 2
 @likeittacky: little bit of sandpaper could do the trick...you'll likely never get the full potential of performance at that point but should make it better than the willy nilly approach. This has been my experience with SRAM brakes at least.
  • 32 14
 Don’t know a single shop that would bed in brakes for you. And I’ve been to many many shops.
  • 15 0
 Needs more lights and shining spinny mirrors.
  • 9 0
 Also doubles as a manual training machine, with actual gyroscopic stabilisation from the rear wheel. So so useful. Im sure shops can will have membership for customers to come and train on it. Gonna get rich!
  • 35 7
 This is so dumb, the purpose of a test ride isn't just to bed in the pads but also to make sure every single part of the bike works properly while riding, sometimes you catch things you wouldn't expect, this process only addresses one thing only and neglects everything else, just my opinion...
  • 26 3
 @rich-2000: This shop does, every time, even in the rain.
  • 3 0
 @rich-2000: This. We would do it on a case-by-case basis. Like repeated brake issues (as a trouble shooting thing), or if we knew the customer was not understanding our "things to do on new bike day" checklist and it would come back with glazed pads anyway. Otherwise we didn't purposely bed brakes on any of our bikes if it didn't fit a good case-by-case assessment.

Also, I required a 30 minute coffee brake to recover from parking lot sprints if I had to do it...as the oldest, heaviest member of the service crew. This was the main issue ;-)

However, being in Europe now, it seems, as always, there are different takes on how and when to provide certain services.
  • 6 0
 I bedded in my brake at a bike park. I recommend that. It helps with the "pre-ride". It's easy to pre-ride when your brakes suck.
  • 20 0
 @rich-2000: Us mechanics doing laps in the parking lot to bed in your pads take offense
  • 5 9
flag neroleeloo (Jan 3, 2023 at 17:20) (Below Threshold)
 Are you also the kind of person who spends top dollars to get the top gear?If so,you’re losing significant performance out of your top of the line brakes riding around with glazed pads buddy.
  • 5 0
 @rich-2000: At my shop if we install them we bed them. It's actually part of the brake adjustment process. That said it's a fairly basic bed in. We have a small hill near the shop that allows for this. A tool like this would allow any shop to get it done right. But I think the price tag is too high. For $3500 we opted for an EVT Lift Stand. THe Sinter product that should be out later this year is about $1000.
  • 3 1
 @andrewyoung: exactly. this isnt a time saver for a shop that builds a lot of bikes, or pumps out tune ups. the only type of shop this would make sense in is maybe one where people are coming in all the time just for new pads, like at whistler, but even then it probably makes more sense to tell the customer to ride down something semi mellow for their first run.
  • 4 0
 @vtracer: seriously; I consider that part of a tune or bleed.
  • 5 0
 It's interesting the number customers saying they've never had brakes bed in for them YET the number of mechanics saying they always bed in brakes for customers...???

That does not compute..
  • 4 1
 @stiingya: the possibility that these people on the internet don't live or shop in the same towns as one another?
  • 4 0
 @vtracer:
Obviously this is just something not done in the UK, and not common in the EU then. I have bought many bikes over the years from UK and EU and not one has ever been bedded in for me.
  • 3 0
 @kcy4130: for Customers especially eBike eMTB/City/Touring People that usually ride around city or to work and dont brake hard need them worn in once they get their bike back. Other wise they will be back in 2 days with glaced Discs and complain about the Service Big Grin

But yea, i ride hard and my trails are steep. If i put in new Pads or i get fresh Bikes i just go for a lap and its fine.
  • 3 0
 @felimocl:

Wait... There's a laser for your handlebars... I thought my life was complete (if you ignore N+1) but it now has a gaping - laser firing handlebars sized - hole in it.

Damn you!
  • 1 1
 {insert Austin Powers - I also like to live dangerously meme} you're my kind of people.
  • 1 3
 Surprised to read this is even part of the service. Brakes are typically designed such that the consumer can replace pads themselves but even when the bikeshop does it, they can just tell the customer to do the sprints and stops themselves, right? If the customer then requires that the mechanics do that too, they can give a quote. But just riding the bike, that's the customer's job. Usually it is just a very good interval training. 30 sprints per brake, up to 30km/h. If you can't be arsed to do that, then you probably also don't need such powerful brakes.
  • 2 0
 @rich-2000: We do @cyclelife in Port Perry / Pickering Ontario Canada
  • 2 0
 @rich-2000: all direct owned trek shop its standard practice to bed in pads.
  • 2 0
 @andrewyoung: Agree, every summer when we get some new kid assembling basic bikes they’ll forget something and find out on the test ride.
  • 1 0
 @wolftwenty1: Yeah, I definitely bed my pads in. I'm just saying if a home mechanic or a shop forgets to bed them in it's not a huge deal, first time you brake it's obvious and it only takes a few hard stops to bed in, a few minutes at most. It's not a ride ruining or liability issue like forgetting to install pads or oil contamination.
  • 1 0
 @scottty: get back to work, you jerry.
  • 3 3
 @kcy4130: A few minutes? Having a long enough descend (or pedal assist) may help, but on the flat it feels like half an hour to get there. Thirty times from zero to 30km/h, that's quite something. Especially for the rear brake as it feels harder to come to a full stop with just that brake without skidding.
  • 1 0
 I live at the top of a decent hill. No need for me to do anything special - just a few hard brakes on the way down hill to the trails after fitting new pads. As the brakes don't get much use on the road bike, I do need to actually use that hill to cook the roadie brakes from time to time, or they just stop working well
  • 2 0
 The article calls it the brake o matic but the product is labeled disc o matic.
  • 1 0
 Within the article not the name.
  • 4 0
 Depends on the pads. On my Codes R and Shimano XT, it was a non-issue. With my Magura pads, the first time I applied brakes was as though I had replaced the pads with pieces of wood: there was no stopping. Had I been on anything steep, I would have set a new record of how much poo my pants could hold.
I proceeded to use the manual-described method of bedding them in and it wasn't until the middle of the bedding-in that I got real feeling with multiple fast stops, which really showed just how much effort it took to get them to bed in

So, if you get a brand new set of brakes and cannot get the front to grab hard in the parking lot, bed them in before the trail so you don't get a lovely scare
  • 1 0
 @mjscyclery: When you said "a tool like this" I thought you were talking about the "small hill"
  • 2 2
 @rich-2000: you don't know a single good shop.
  • 1 0
 @rhinochopig:
Wait to you see my portfolio of utrerly pointless innovations.
You heard of bull horn style bars, what if I told you about bull horn bars......
  • 2 3
 @carlomdy: Your missing the point. Statistically, overall; if the majority of bike shops were bedding in brakes then statistically a larger percentage of mountain bikers would have experienced having their bike come with bedded in brakes... I've never had a new bike come with the rotors bedded or know of anyone that has...???
  • 2 0
 @vinay: You don't need 30 times from 30kph. It's just the initial bed in to transfer some material, and it gets better over time. You feel the brake improve quickly even over half a dozen pulls. And they're pulls, not stops...good 75% hard pull but let the bike roll before you skid/stop. Even if we were to do it at the shop in every case (in good weather, gets wintery in Canada), it would only take 5-10 minutes to have a good feeling brake and then the customer riding finishes the job.

It's not that big a deal whether the shop does or doesn't do it, I just complain because it's 10 more minutes of needing my sunglasses and whining about having no peak watts.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I'm not sure why you're being downvoted here, but you're right. Thankfully I have a hill that is right outside my shop.
That said, I always bed new brake pads, and when I'm changing them out I'll refinish the rotor as well. Coming from the automotive world, I've carried over a lot of rules from there to mine and my friend's bikes.
  • 2 0
 @andrewyoung: @andrewyoung: very good point. Sometimes when changing pads and replacing a shifter cable things seem to be in perfect adjustment on the stand, but on the test ride on the street the cable needs adjusting slightly. Pedal around, bed in the pads and finely tune the shifter cable. Check the bike over 100%. The device saves time but the hands on test ride ensures things are working (adjusted) perfectly.
  • 1 0
 @iammarkstewart: I thought it wasn't just about the good feel, but also to kind of protect the pads before I hit the dirt. I'll have to dig out the workshop manual to see what they say about it exactly, but I recall this is what was recommended so this is what I do. It doesn't hurt to do an interval session like this anyway. Instructions differ between brands too. I've always been on Magura disc brakes aside from a small stint on Shimano Saint and I've just always followed the Magura instructions. But I tried some pads from Superstarcomponents once and they recommend to cool the pads with water after the bed in whereas Magura recommends to ride on and allow the pads to cool more gradually. The Superstar approach worried me a little so I made sure to keep the wheel spinning as I poured water over it so that at least the rotor got cooled evenly rather than very locally (which would happen if I'd water it with a static wheel). I don't think the Superstar pads are better than the Magura ones so next time I'll just use Magura pads again.
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: For those Brake dancers not into Disc-o, maybe
  • 1 0
 @iammarkstewart: Just get on your bike and ride. That's the right way to bed in brakes.
  • 1 0
 @rich-2000: I've had one shop do it for me when I bought a road bike (o no, here come the downvotes!). Never had it done for MTB's. They probably think mountainbikers are real men and women you can do things themselves, while roadies don't know bikes and only complain when things don't work properly...
  • 1 0
 @vinay: No shop, even if they bed pads, is doing any of that. I don't fault you for following the manual, but shop or my personal bike, I just do it by feel other than not locking them up and it takes little time.
  • 1 0
 @Ajfreshfuzz: I basically almost do that other than a few runs up and down my alley or in the shop parking lot. It's plenty of other people who want the shop to do it or have it take 30 minutes. I'm almost on your side here.
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: sand the rotors and the pads then rebed them.
  • 2 0
 @iammarkstewart: Oh yeah, initially I thought there were shops actually doing all that which really takes quite some time no one is going to pay for. The first initial stops just to get the brakeforce back, that's doable indeed. I've never had a bike shop change brake pads for me. I did have them face my IS2000 brake mounts for me but I don't recall they also bedded in the pads. Fewer stops from a lower speed should probably be sufficient (and I don't even know whether I'm reaching 30km/h as I have nothing to measure that) but as it is just my own bike that needs the odd brake pad change, I think I'll stick with the manual. It doesn't hurt.
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: sand em'. Clean with alcohol
  • 1 0
 I don't think the PB audience is the type of LBS customer that would see the most benefit from something like this.
  • 2 0
 @garrettstories: My favorite is when some flat land roadie firmly states that it's dumb to bed in pads because they've never done it. Living in Whistler, I go through 3 sets of pads every summer, and there is a benefit to long term use of pads after bedding them in properly.
  • 1 0
 Bless you for not being a whiney customer but some people will whine and whine about the slightest noise even if it goes away after ten minutes we can get a bad review over it.
  • 98 0
 At first look i didn't realize the scale, I instantly thought it was a machine that you would insert the pads and rotor and 15 minutes later done! Then I see a picture of a whole bike on it, hmmmnnn...
  • 44 2
 The Boner Labs Dick-O-Matic is what I thought it said at first, had to put my glasses on, still confused!
  • 1 0
 I did the same
  • 5 0
 @OldFatBassTerd: Now THAT is something I’d spend my money on
  • 8 0
 I had the same thought. I was thinking it was maybe a version of the Canyon DH factory team mechanic's device:
http://www.vitalmtb.com/features/The-Wizardry-of-Canyon-Factory-Mechanic-Nigel-Reeve,2756
  • 1 0
 @vesania: hell yeah! simple is better.
  • 1 0
 @vesania: That is exactly what I expected to see as well. I've often thought about how bedding in new brakes is often overlooked by my riding buddies, but having a crude setup like this in my shop could be a nice, simple addition to get them stopping better.
  • 2 0
 You know, the sad part is that this is what it should have been. It could have been relatively small, with some provisions to do both brakes at once (or even more), and even had a small fan that pushed sufficient air over the rotors to keep them from overheating. Or the same concept where you just put in each wheel, rather than strap on the whole bike. It's not that difficult to remove a wheel on a bike being serviced or just being brought in, and neither is the pad removal. But, I guess it does save some time if that matters.

Fun fact, I once did the same thing using a Milwaukee Fuel drill for shits and giggles. I use some random polishing attachment and used it to spin the wheel while applying enough brake to not stall it.
  • 1 0
 @vesania: I know what I am making this weekend!
  • 66 0
 Okay spin up the rear wheel as fast as possible and see if we can get this customers bike to ghost ride itself clear across to the other side of the shop...3..2..1...GO.
  • 7 0
 I’m willing to bet you could ghost ride bikes clear across the parking lot with this thing
  • 11 0
 @onawalk: I bet you every shop mechanic is now not going to spend their time on, "Extended test rides," but instead on seeing if they truly can get a bike to ghost ride across the parking lot with this thing
  • 1 0
 @Stickman1029: that and seeing how red you can get a worn out rotor!
  • 4 0
 A chance for K.I.S equipped bikes to outrun the competition, as wheel flop won't be an issue
  • 29 0
 This would not surprise me given that when I was in the bike biz I once saw a shop:

- Have a wheelie contest where riders had to make it one lap around the store with the front wheel removed
- Wagering on a darts contest using a blow gun powered by the air compressor which would shoot bike spokes across the shop hard enough to go through a piece of plywood (aka, the wall).
- Conduct a fashion show using all of the clearance clothing rack items, few of which were even close to fitting

All of these were during store hours.
  • 4 0
 @pixelguru: the blow darts are not limited to bike shops, this is a favorite pastime of aircraft mechanics as well!
  • 1 0
 @pixelguru: was that shop run by Scotty Cranmer and family?
  • 1 0
 @pixelguru: seems incomplete without some sort of bike riding on the showroom floor
  • 3 0
 @pixelguru:
Long time since I worked in a shop, but some of my favourites were:
- Race round the shop on 12" kids bikes (at 6'3 I was definitely at a disadvantage)
- Hide and seek
- Track pump BB fights. You can jam a bb in the pump and fire it out. We didn't have a compressor which was maybe for the best
  • 1 0
 @vtracer: That was the no-front-wheel wheelie contest course - one lap around the showroom.
  • 1 0
 @pixelguru: that's it?
  • 1 0
 @Mr-Gilsch: nah it would just tip over without the front wheel being able to compensate
  • 67 0
 *immediately tries to make disc glow red*
  • 4 0
 Don't, you'll brake it...
  • 46 0
 These zwift cheating devices are getting out of hand!
  • 46 2
 What happens if you stick your penis in it
  • 10 0
 Hold my beer
  • 2 2
 Try it and let us know...My guess is that you'll come out short. Then, you'll need to change your last name to "Cockburn" and pronounce it "Coburn".
  • 1 0
 it would go bzzzzzzt
  • 28 0
 interesting looking manual trainer
  • 1 0
 That was my thought. There must be hundreds of sets of rollers people don't ride anymore they would gladly donate. ride and brake for 5 minutes...done.
  • 5 1
 @aquanut: I’ve never ridden a trainer or rollers so someone please correct me if I’m off base. But it would seem there wouldn’t be enough force on the wheel to create enough drag to bed in brake pads.

When you are actually riding a bike there is a large amount of momentum created by the wheels rolling and the mass of the bike and rider on it. This allows the bike to keep moving even while dragging the brakes decently hard.

A bike on rollers would have no momentum besides just the back wheel spinning. I feel like this would be more like trying to bed your brake pads in while just spinning the wheels with the bike in a repair stand.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: You would simply keep pedaling. 1 minute at 200 watts (something nearly anyone can do) would allow you to bed them in perfectly, gradually increasing the pull on the brakes.
  • 1 0
 @aquanut: wouldn’t peddling while dragging he brakes hard enough to properly bed in the brakes be pretty choppy?
  • 1 0
 @sino428: No, ideally when you bed your brakes you want to transfer an even amount of pad material onto the rotor. Keeping it consistent even as your progressively squeeze the lever works well. Maybe for the final phase the watts get pretty high and it's harder to modulate. But we're talking about bedding rotors, not rocket science. Anything other than slamming your brakes straight out of the block works pretty well.
  • 15 1
 Most of my wrenching takes place at night before the kids go to bed, or on a rainy day. I put a sticky note on my grip, on whatever side got new pads that says. "BED IN BRAKES." That means next time I grab the bike, I'll do a few sprints and hard stops in front of the house before I hit the trails.

I can't imagine the volume a shop would have to do to make this pay back.
  • 5 1
 well lots of sprints surely beats someone up, can't do that all day. meanwhile, hard stops are much more energy than ANY sprints and that machine sure af can't pull that off, it can only do continuous light braking. still, better something than nothing
  • 5 2
 In my experience shops just tell you to bed them in (or don't) anyway. I haven't had a shop bed my brakes in before. Maybe they just assume I know what i'm doing, boy are they wrong, I'm an idiot!
  • 2 0
 And if the shop said ‘£10 extra to bed in your brakes’ I’d just do it myself for free…
  • 4 1
 My record pad/rotor changing in a day was 27 bikes, not all f/r swapped. Split between 5 mechanics, plus other work. Thanks Shimano.
  • 4 0
 @5afety3rd: But, did you bed them in for customers or just hand the bikes back? Never had a shop bed brakes for me. But come to think of it... never had a shop swap rotors or pads for me either as it's such simple work. Have had shops do a few full builds and a couple half builds... but never got the bikes back with bedded brakes, and wouldn't expect it either.

But ya, if a shop said... "For $10 bucks we can bed your brakes." I'd probably do it. That's only 350 bikes to break even... After that, it's years of extra profit.
  • 3 1
 @islandforlife: I personally bed the brakes of every set of pads I replace for customers, even make sure the rentals are bedded properly after washing them each day. I'm sure @5afety3rd does as well, I've seen his work! Smile
  • 3 0
 @baca262: Have two teenage interns who want to be fast, on alternating days. Their job is bedding in brakes.

After a few months of 3-4 interval sets a week, they'll have some legs on them.
  • 1 0
 places that assemble bikes.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: brilliant!
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: suckers! lol
  • 14 0
 We have one similar to this at the shop I work at and it's nice to have. Less time spent on test rides bedding in brakes and you can do it inside in case of rain. Definitely not a must have, but so much easier than pedaling up to speed, breaking hard and repeat. Also, with a mtb customer base, it's easy to tell them that the pads aren't bedded in, but for the average joe with his city e-bike not so much.
  • 1 0
 Exactly. Nice to have for those Rainy Days.
  • 18 3
 If you look closely, the tire size options are 20, 24, and 29. This is final confirmation that 27.5 is indeed dead.
  • 6 0
 That or the more likely reason is the plywood slats are too wide to do increments that small.

You have to upgrade to the 3D printed Ti version for $8K
  • 11 0
 The #26forlife crowd is gonna be furious about this!
  • 2 0
 27.5 is dead, now bring me back 26"
  • 4 0
 @onawalk: nah, they run v brakes
  • 12 0
 Looks like a turbo trainer for people who ride e-bikes
  • 13 4
 All those critiquing this invention have never considered the thought processes of a dentist…
  • 4 0
 Actually my titanium gold plated pads don't need bedding in.
  • 2 0
 or a high quality high volume shop floor
  • 6 0
 The machine is a cool idea. In terms of service, if a shop replaces brake pads/rotors and doesn’t bed the brakes in, they aren’t finishing the job. Most customers have no idea you even need to do so and their brakes may never work correctly.

-mechanic/shop owner
  • 1 0
 @Maxcycles, so would you buy this?
  • 6 0
 I went to Kicking Horse with new pads in front and rear and brand new rotor in the rear. One ride down that road from Gondola and my brakes were 100% bedded in Big Grin
  • 2 0
 The top of It's A 10 is about as good as you get for bedding in pads. Big Grin
  • 9 0
 This is slightly more obtainable for shops than a dedicated gondola for bedding in brakes
  • 1 0
 @vtracer: based on how much money RCR spends on maintenance of their resorts I think this is more expensive then a Kicking Horse Gondola Big Grin
  • 4 0
 This would get way more use on the dirty, screaming, fat-bike covered in road salt discs than anything else for me! How many of us have spent the first 10 mins of our winter rides waking up the neighborhood and angering any dogs within 2 miles?
  • 2 0
 Oh yeah. I continue to be impressed and thankful for what a beating the fatbike takes without complaint
  • 3 0
 As a Shop owner we have a SBR Brake bedding machine, i can tell you it is an amazing product.

www.cyclonbikecare.com/nl/product/sbr-inremmachine

We are located along side the coast and squeeling brakes is a day to day thing here.
90% of the bikes we sell are normal e_bikes for commuting but we fix all other bicycles as well.

It's not a machine we charge the customer for but it a service and only to make our job easyer and much faster
  • 3 0
 yeah, great.....take one of the last joys away from a busy shop mechanic. the test ride. wherein, you get to go out for 5 min and not deal with some idiots backwards fork or sheet metal screws attaching his frame bag. just....awesome.

spending $3500 just to steal 5-10 min of joy from a guy making $20/hr, is about as Scrooge McDuck as you get.
  • 3 0
 The best things about it are probably the consistent speed and ability to keep the wheel spinning after each braking action.

One of the biggest mistakes people make in doing sprints or fast downs is they accidentally come to a complete stop and end up with a build up of tribofilm in a few spots on the rotor. Those high spots cause heat build up and work hardening of the rotor at the leading edge of the high spot, and then you get stuttering brakes, kinda anti-ABS.

Being able to keep the wheel spinning at a constant rate and preventing any full stops until the system has cooled should provide for a very consistent burnishing and thus a very consistent braking feel, which is really the best thing about discs (that and not making the rim do double duty, so better materials can be used for both braking surfaces).
  • 3 0
 It takes you 5 minutes to bed in pads the normal way.
A mechanic is usually paid 20$ per hour.
So the cost for 1 bike is 20/12 = 1.66$
3500 / 1,66 = 2100

So you need to do it on 2100 bikes to makes it worth it. If it takes absolutely no time and works straight away 100% of time...
  • 6 0
 Bed my brakes in while wearing out my tyres.
  • 5 0
 Bed in my brakes while wearing underwear in my house.
  • 3 0
 I don't even think my local shop beds in brakes after replacing them, let alone while setting up a bike. I see the point here, but it's not something I think I'd see in every shop.
  • 4 0
 Is no one going to mention Dario and his sudden appearance on the PB article scene? Mad kudos to Dario for the high quality entertaining and well written articles.
  • 5 2
 Perfect tool for a high volume shop, especially in a winter environment. Any shop that tells you to bed in your own brakes is too lazy to complete a job properly... or worse, risking liability.
  • 6 0
 $3500.00 to keep an underpaid mechanic in the shop, what an effin joke!
  • 4 2
 Seems like the issue here is mechanics taking 4/20 breaks when it isn't 4:20. A machine like this takes a few minutes to do a few minutes of work-and someone needs oversee the process. Pretty sure mechanics will find another reason to slink behind the dumpster if you take away the breaking-in brakes breaks away from them.
  • 5 0
 Also cleans dog poo off tires. Disclaimer: may end up on the shop roof or employee backs
  • 2 0
 Very seriously thinking about ordering this for my shop.

Regarding shops not bedding in brakes, I would be surprised. That being said when I talk to perspective customers (free agents) not feeling they have gotten a good value out of their tune up is often why they are shopping around for a new LBS.

If we didn't bed in our brakes I don't think we could sell very many bikes. The test rides would be awful. It is most noticeable on lower end components and worst on cheap road bike mechanical discs. Those customers are not going to be familiar with the bedding in concept and certainly are not going to do it themselves. They just are going to have a terrible experience and want to go back to rim brakes.

All bikes get test ridden, but a function check should be just that. The bedding in part of the test ride, when needed, adds a lot more than 5 minutes. Having all the work done prior to the function check would be more efficient.
  • 2 0
 Couldn’t I just use a bike stand and a free treadmill and get the same effect? This seems like a solution to a problem that didn’t really exist. I’m no expert but I definitely just change pads and ride.
  • 1 0
 ...I appreciate the inspiration--how about securing a bike in an adjustable bike stand and lower it down onto a treadmill--as others have mentioned--allowing both wheels to spin freely at speed whilst brake pressure is applied...
  • 1 0
 At 3.5k I dare say most LBS would just save the cash and get the new lad to crack on with the repeated sprints if they even did it at all. I’ve never seen a UK bike shop bed them in as it kind of goes with the territory of buying a new bike for you to do that kind of stuff yourself.
  • 2 0
 This is a great idea, but the price is a bit steep. The shop I work at picked up a cheap treadmill from the side of the road and modified it to fit a wheel by taking off the running track and fitting some rollers.
  • 2 0
 uhhhh, I think you are describing the prototype & bonas labs is in the same parking lot
  • 3 0
 Or just do what WC mechanics do and run pads under water while rubbing them together, then put them on the bike and ride. Works every time.
  • 1 0
 If bike rental shops took the safety of their bikes more seriously, I’d bet there’d be a lot less injuries.
This thing, plus an algorithm for proper suspension set up, and I might just fly to a cool destination instead of alway being the one with the car.. I’ve never seen a rental bike that was even close to a proper set up.
Ski rental shops have been sued right out of sending bad equipment out the door, bike rental shops need to catch up!
  • 1 0
 @andrewyoung: very good point. Sometimes when changing pads and replacing a shifter cable things seem to be in perfect adjustment on the stand, but on the test ride on the street the cable needs adjusting slightly. Pedal around, bed in the pads and finely tune the shifter cable. Check the bike over 100%. The device saves time but the hands on test ride ensures things are working (adjusted) perfectly.
  • 3 0
 So this only works assuming that the builder actually beds in the pads......
  • 6 4
 $3500 or tell customer to be careful for 20mins of riding, I know what most bike shops suffering from post-covid financial issues will say.
  • 1 1
 Considering the whole breaking in thing a favor. Maybe clients want to swap out pads from something else then stock after they take the bike home. Anyway an initial break in of the rotors and pads doesn't have to take tuns of time. After putting customers onto their shop SAG, a break in takes about 2 minutes and customers can take it from there. The bedding in run is also a nice time to test the bike a sec and see if anything needs tweaking. The machine all in all looks nice to have in the shop tho.
  • 3 0
 Shops need to take bikes for a test ride before giving it back to the customer anyway so this is redundant.
  • 3 0
 Yes and no... maguras can take 30-50 pulls per brake, and if you're assembling volume, your're burning 10 minutes instead of 3
  • 2 0
 When I saw the thumbnail and title I tought it would be something heavily overprized at around 800 Dollars or so. Boy was I wrong...
  • 2 0
 Price is bonkers but i like the idea. When you have 200 rental bikes to build each season its a pain in the ass to bed in all the brakes.
  • 1 1
 When there's nothing to improve (or you have no new ideas), make ppl believe a (nearly useless) product is absolute necessary.
Since disc brakes are present in bike industry, I never seen, any manufacturer to bed in brakes. Retailers simply told their customers to be careful for the first few miles, while the stopping power may not be ideal.
But nowadays, when we need(?) "steering stabilizers", ABS on our brakes, handguards on the bars, etc, why I believe MTB newbies won't injure themself without some "properly pre-bed" brakes on their new bikes?...
We're on a good way to replace skills, reflexes and experiences with pure technology.
Will remain anything from those good old bike-rides? The last step will be a self-driving bike, that through a GoPro 42, will transfer the video in real time, to your VR headset, and you'll watch the Megavalanche trail from your secure couch in your livingroom. Then you'll post on social media what a great ride you had. Can't wait for it...
  • 2 0
 Ive always just gone on the treadmill with my bike to bed in my brake pads. Hasn't failed me yet!
  • 3 0
 I've long wondered how world cup mechanics bed in brakes, anyone know?
  • 2 0
 They do the spit n rub.
  • 2 0
 Swore I saw an article awhile back and the mechanic was using an electric drill to spin the rotor and the caliper was mounted in some bracket.
  • 1 0
 @panaphonic: and then sort the brakes?
  • 2 0
 Your shops bed in pads? I’m lucky if my new bike has straight wheels and correctly set limit screws
  • 1 0
 For me, "New Brake Pad Day" doubles as "Sprint Interval Training Day". I get to smoke my brakes and my legs at the same time! So fun!
  • 1 0
 I'm so oldfashion with just putting water onto the rotors then push fast on the lever while riding...until brakes don't squeal and tada...
  • 1 0
 I can see it being useful on a race team. And maybe as a "burn off contaminated rotors" item. But still only for the richest teams and shops!
  • 2 0
 A mechanic bedding in brakes for a customer is like a dentist who brushes the patients teeth.
  • 1 0
 I could see this being used at a manufacturing facility, prior to bikes being sent out to distributors/dealers. Would actually be appreciated.
  • 1 0
 I have used this product before and it worked great, this is not meant for at home use but instead for an industrial setting.
  • 2 0
 I hope that thing has ceramic speed bearings
  • 2 0
 I'd rather put controls on foot switches than near fast moving parts.
  • 2 0
 I thought that's what e-bikes are made for
  • 2 0
 i love shop tools. this isn't making the cut into the service course
  • 1 0
 1. Install new pads 2. Go ride the Whistler bike park. 3. Brakes are bed in half way down Captain Safety
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure they'd be ready halfway down O-Sin actually. Last time I replaced my front pads I dropped straight into Sourkraut..didn't brake too well on the first feature, was perfect on the second one 5 seconds later. So I guess you need one sea to sky feature to bed brakes in, I'll keep my 3.5k I think!
  • 1 0
 I expected more price police on this machine, from the pinkbike pricing mob.
  • 2 0
 This looks really "made in a basement" for that price.
  • 4 0
 I actually appreciate it uses wood over whatever plastic you could print or make it out of. Looks pretty cool and probably has a better enviromental footprint, while likely being just as sturdy. No doubt it's heavy too, and it's not like I have any need for it, but I like how it's made.
  • 2 0
 @MrDuck: I was thinking more it should be cut out of aluminum or steel. This is clearly made out of wood to be cheap, even though the finished product is not cheap. In a shop environment it's not going to hold up unless they take really good care of it.

Plastic would look more janky with that construction.

You could probably present some college kid this idea and they could build you a functionally identical prototype AND pay them by the hour and still spend less.
  • 1 0
 I actually bought 2 of these . One for the front wheel and one for the back . I can now save more for time you no believe .
  • 2 0
 Or the shop can just remind customers to bed their brakes.
  • 2 1
 all that talk about professional shops and the photos have a bottle of sedimented shimano mineral oil in the background
  • 3 0
 Shops have to dispose of old oil properly, usually in an old container. That’s probably what that is.
  • 1 0
 @MmmBones: would think if you’re spending 3k on a wheel spinner you could drop $50 on a waste oil container that isn’t identical to a new oil container
  • 1 0
 @knarrr: Reduce, reuse, and recycle... or just run what you got
  • 1 0
 @vtracer: as long as they don't recycle that oil into someone else's brakes by accident
  • 3 0
 April already??
  • 2 0
 i dont like this because I like going on my extended bike tests...
  • 1 0
 So nor trying to be that guy, but it's essentially a roller you use brakes on.
  • 1 0
 Bad try, because you are that guy.

Yes, it kind of is, that's kind of the point. Except:

* it takes up less space than a set of rollers
* doesn't require the mechanic to be able to ride rollers
* it has a motor for consistency (compared to a chipper mechanic right after morning coffee vs tired mechanic at the end of the day after the 17th explanation of why internal routing is making a headset bearing change cost $150 bucks and 13 roller rides to bed in a bunch of brakes)
* doesn't require the mechanic to ride rollers even if they can

So... way better than rollers, or even a wheel-on trainer, because of the motor and intentional design (right tool for the job).
  • 1 0
 This $3500 tool is a great solution for Freds who don't know how to ride rollers.
  • 1 0
 A much simpler and cheaper way to do this is to have a parking lot or sidewalk outside.
  • 1 0
 At our shop we have minions and a hill. Works even when it's raining if I buy them pizza.
  • 2 0
 Let the mechanics have their test rides!!
  • 1 0
 How to stop squealing brakes and get more power (bedding in brake pads and rotors) | Syd Fixes Bikes
  • 1 0
 So someone actually built a life-size Evel Knievel Stunt Cycle toy. Finally!!
  • 1 0
 Stop with the brake stories and reviews.
  • 2 0
 Why
  • 2 0
 sand paper
  • 1 0
 Wait, is it the brake-o-matic or the disc-o-matic?
  • 1 0
 bass-o-matic
  • 1 0
 If this went on Dragons Den it wouldn't make it up the lift.
  • 2 1
 I'm pretty sure my £400 treadmill will do exactly the same thing.
  • 5 4
 Is it April 1st. The tool every bike shop doesn’t need.
  • 3 2
 April 1st comes early this year
  • 2 1
 Oh wow, $3500! I suspect they will sell one as shown)... at a discounted price Wink
  • 1 0
 This is the best thing I've seen since last April.
  • 2 1
 April fools start early this year...
  • 1 0
 Well,better bed the brakes than break the bed,I guess.
  • 2 0
 Wasteful.
  • 2 0
 I wood not buy that
  • 1 1
 I don’t like this. I like going on extended “test rides” with cool bikes
  • 1 0
 Used treadmill seems more practical
  • 2 0
 Yawn...
  • 1 0
 Pedal up a hill, turn down, break, pedal hard to bottom. Bedded.
  • 1 0
 That's it!!! I've officially seen everything!!!
  • 1 0
 This is how you know there’s nothing left to invent.
  • 1 0
 Can't wait until the Lawyers get a hold of this especially in the US
  • 1 0
 Another solution to a problem that doesn't exist.
  • 1 0
 Revolutionary breakthrough for the industry
  • 1 0
 Can I pair this with a wheelie trainer
  • 1 0
 emm, does it really necessary beyond parking lot brake bed?
  • 1 0
 I thought it was a brake bleeding machine. That would be better.
  • 1 0
 this is stupid. Cool contraption but yea...
  • 1 0
 At least tell me it also polishes your shoes.
  • 1 0
 Just spray wd 40 all over the bike like a real mechanic.
  • 1 0
 Genius!
  • 5 7
 Or... Hear me out... Or.. you could just ride around the parking lot and stop a few times till they're bedded in... Just a suggestion....
  • 1 1
 Bonas Big Grin ? I mean really? They couldn't come up with a different name?
  • 1 0
 Dirtyfingers logo haha!
  • 1 1
 eeerrrrrr just run the new pads over a (clean) file...............?
  • 1 0
 Treadmill.
  • 1 0
 Wet the bed
  • 1 1
 Or buy a treadmill
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