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The European Bike Project: 5 Exciting Products from Small European Manufacturers - January 2022

Jan 10, 2022
by TEBP  
The European Bike Project is one of our favorite Instagram accounts and his feed is constantly updated with everything from interesting curios from tiny manufacturers to inside looks at European manufacturing to analyses of the environmental impact of our sport. He's going to be doing a new regular column for us here at Pinkbike and Beta that will be mainly focussed on bringing you exciting products from small European manufacturers. Here's is his second edition that includes a prototype Senduro frame, a very unique stem and more.


Reichmann Engineering Senduro Prototype


Matthias Reichmann gained quite a lot of fame among German downhill racers for designing the RIP downhill frame. Over the years, the RIP saw four different iterations and, as the lines between enduro and downhill are getting more and more blurred, it's no surprise that his latest creation is a very capable frame that can be pedaled uphill. Since 2021, Reichmann Engineering is a part of EMRG (emerge), a new company that is working on several exciting products such as a virtual pivot headset.

The frame has not four or six, but some mind-boggling seven pivots and a suspension design which is based on a Watt's linkage. They say that the modified Watt's linkage helps them to tune the suspension exactly to their liking. Basically, their frame offers a lot of sensitivity in the first third of the stroke, support during the second third and a lot of progression towards the end of the stroke. Have a look at their Youtube to see the linkage in action.

So is it long, low and slack? Yes, definitely. Currently, the geometry of the prototype frames is based on a 62.5° head angle and a 76.5° seat angle. Reach in Size 1 is 470mm and in Size 2 510mm, with a wheelbase of 1280 or 1330mm respectively. The EMRG team is planning to offer adjustable chainstays which can be set to 440, 450 or 460mm. While a 250x75mm shock will generate 195mm of travel, a 230x65mm shock will reduce the travel to 170mm. Recommended fork travel: 180 - 200mm. The frame can be built as a full 29er or mullet bike, bottom bracket drop for a full 29er will be -32mm. The current frame weight is 4kg.

At the moment, the EMRG team is testing several prototypes and they are planning to make the frame available by Summer 2022.


Details
- Frame made in Germany
- Weight: 4kg
- Fork travel: 180 - 200mm
- Rear travel: 170 or 195mm
- Pre-orders are planned to start in Summer 2022
- More info at https://emrg.bike/


DH Sign HPX stem


Working in the marketing department of a stem manufacturer can probably be difficult: While most stems look more or less the same, it's not easy to find that one feature that makes the stem stand out from the crowd. This is not the case for DH Sign from Italy: Their stems are probably the only ones that use a steel sheet to clamp the handlebars.

DH Sign was founded back in 2013 in a small town near the Dolomites and today they offer a nice range of quality products including flat pedals, chain guides, this stem and a rim repair tool.

When designing the HPX stem, they really wanted to create something special and came up with a very clean looking product. They say that they wanted to ditch the "unsightly" front screws because they make it more difficult to mount GPS devices and they didn't want to interrupt the lines of the handlebar. As a plus, the pressure is applied to the handlebar very evenly, without creating stress risers. The steel sheet comes in either brushed steel or a new "black ice" finish. The aluminium stem body is available in several anodised colours. Obviously, the installation procedure differs from what we are used to, but it remains simple.




Details
- Made in Italy
- Length: 37 or 50mm
- Diameter: 31.8 or 35mm
- Various colours and finishes
- Weight: 95g for 37mm length / 118g for 50mm length
- Price: 140 - 160 Euro
- More info at https://dhsign.it/


Frozen cool grips


The perfect grips for the Grim Donut come from a new German company that has set out to bring you transparent grips with a customisable look.

One of the founders of Frozen also runs a custom motorbike shop where he was experimenting with transparent grips for quite a while. His goal was to create unique grips that would allow his customers to change the look of their bikes by simply switching between different printed stickers that go below the grips. What works for motorbikes usually can't be too far wrong for mountain bikes, so the Frozen team decided that they wanted to bring the customisable grips to the mtb world too.

The Frozen cool grips are locally made in Germany from a recyclable, Reach certified Thermolast plastic. They are sweat resistant, come with a polygon body shape, grip rips and a two-zone thumb area. According to Frozen, the grips are also hard wearing and won't get sticky over time.

The stickers can be purchased individually at the Frozen webshop for €5, while a set of grips including stickers will cost you €39. If you feel creative you can also print some stickers at home, but Frozen say that your self-made stickers should have the same dimensions as the original Frozen stickers.

Even though push-on grips can be really comfortable, they don't get a lot of love recently because their lock-on siblings are very easy to install and remove. However, the “how to mount video" makes it look very easy, so let's hope that the cool technology allows for an easy installation.



Details
- Made in Germany
- Weight: 90g (pair)
- Length: 133mm
- Diameter: 31mm
- 40A soft compound
- Price: 39 Euro
- More info at https://ridefrozen.com/


Pembree D2A pedals


I've been running Pembree D2A pedals for 10 months or so on my Enduro and I'm happy to report that they're still running perfectly smooth and I've lost only one pin. While that doesn't sound extremely exciting, we all know that there are a lot of pedals out there that need a full rebuild after a season or even earlier. However, it's not just the quality of the products that makes Pembree stand out from the crowd, it is the way that the company is run.

Phil, the owner of the company, is aiming to create a very transparent company that acts responsibly. If you have a look at their website, you'll see that they share detailed information for every single piece of their pedals. For each component, they state where it is made, how it is made, which material it is and they also include some details sustainability and recycling.

As you might know, machining metal needs quite a lot of electricity. Luckily, Pembree's own CNC machines are run by 100% renewable energy. On top of that, Pembree also calculated the CO2 footprint of their pedals. They say that each set of pedals is responsible for 92kg of CO2 emissions - the full calculations can be found on their website. Pembree have partnered with Temwa to balance the carbon footprint of their products by planting trees.

Pembree started selling pedals in 2020, which was a very difficult year. Despite being a relatively small company, they really do go the extra mile and I have a lot of respect for that.

Pembree D2A Pedals

Details
- Made in UK
- Weight: 446g (pair)
- 100x110x15mm
- Several colours available
- Warranty: 5 years / 2 years for bearings
- More info at https://pembree.com/


720 Protections Awake helmet


While bike tech is constantly evolving, it's interesting to note that the vast majority of helmets are still based on the same principle as 30 years ago: styrofoam, some padding and a thin hard plastic shell. Yes, rotational impact protection has definitely been a huge advance in safety but no matter whether your helmet cost 30 or 300 bucks, the tech is mostly the same.

I'm not saying that these conventional helmets are bad, they've surely helped to save thousands of lives and have prevented many more bad injuries but at the same time, it's exciting to see that some companies are looking at new technologies that are different from the classic styrofoam helmets.

One of these companies is 720 Protections from Italy (South Tyrol / Alto Adige to be precise). The honeycomb structure is the core of their helmets and is made of H.E.A.P. (High Energy Absorption Polymer). H.E.A.P. deforms in the event of a crash and distributes impact forces over a larger area than usual helmets, 720 Protections say. Also - that's another key feature - it returns to its original shape.

In order to get a certification, European standard EN 1078 requires that helmets transfer a maximal acceleration force of 250g to a cyclist's head. 720 Protections say that from a medical point of view, 250g is more than your head can handle without sustaining severe injuries. Luckily, average helmets take that value down to ~170g, but obviously those values can vary quite a lot. The 720 Protections helmets offer a value that is as low as 115g, outperforming most helmets on the market. The Awake helmet is not for die-hard weight-weenies though, as it comes in at almost 500 grams.


Details
- Made in Italy
- Weight: ~500g
- Patented Hexago technology with elastomer honeycomb structure
- Adjustable visor
- Fidlock magnetic buckle
- More info at https://720protections.com/

Photos: EMRG, DH Sign, Frozen, Pembree, own.

Transparency: I have received Pembree D2A pedals and the 720 Protections helmet for reviewing and use.


148 Comments

  • 139 2
 Senduro is too good of a name not to already exist.
  • 15 0
 Yea, seriously, how was this missed?
  • 23 1
 It exists as a trail name near me
  • 5 0
 @mayha49: and it’s a good one
  • 3 0
 Retrotec makes a Funduro, I guess this is it's big brother.
  • 2 0
 Chumba makes a Sendero frame, and pretty sure another Senduro already too
  • 3 1
 And the fact that the other prototype from Reichmann Engineering is equipped with a bunch of Cornelius Kapfingers parts makes it even more impressive... or proper German...
  • 2 0
 You're right, it looks there's a town in Indonesia which is called Senduro ;-)
  • 6 1
 That’s a friggen beautiful bike
  • 3 0
 @DHhack: Love me some NoCo gnar.
  • 3 0
 just google Senduro... it's a GOAT
  • 1 0
 This was already in the lexicon I thought? Anytime somebody gets a bit rowdy on an enduro bike - which is frequently these days!
  • 4 0
 Looks like a Furious, but more "german". Absolutely gorgeous.
  • 5 0
 @RobertGrainier: "Sendero" is just Spanish for "trail" though.
  • 1 0
 Cam mc caul runs the Slopeduro race, close!
  • 2 1
 First Goddamn thought. Levy's kicking himself.
  • 1 0
 It’s been the name of a Remington rifle for years. One made for longer range accuracy.
  • 1 0
 WTB makes a gravel bike tire called the Sendero...
  • 1 0
 Whenever I ride, it’s always shreduro time!
  • 1 0
 @mayha49: it certainly does. Always gotta get a senduro lap in
  • 2 0
 @mayha49: yep, we have a trail of the same name in Sth Oz.
  • 31 0
 So nice to see Entertainment 720 finally putting out some products!
  • 7 0
 Tom Haverford and Jean-Ralphio Saperstein will go far in the bike biz.
  • 22 0
 I love the name: SENDURO - it also looks quite nice despite being still a raw prototype.
From a technical point of view a Watt's linkage frees not only the progression curve it can also be used to fine tune the axle path. This is also being used in some tricky tank suspension systems (Tanks use some of the most advanced suspension technologies on the market)

And if I remeber it correctly Matthias Reichman had used this system before on one of the early RIP DH bikes, wich worked superb.
Nice to see this frame come to life
  • 20 0
 -So, how many pivots do you want?
-Yes please
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: all of them

Watts linkages are found on older-type cars with live axles too. They've only gone out of fashion in recent years.
  • 1 1
 But can it take a water bottle?
  • 20 0
 Grips look like something she would buy from Ann Summers...
  • 7 0
 Had to look that one up. LOL, nice.
  • 16 0
 I was thinking Lisa Frank. But thanks for that. Now I have to throw away my work computer.
  • 5 0
 I think they looked at condoms for inspiration...
  • 2 0
 @vapidoscar: hahahahaha!
  • 16 0
 'EMRG (emerge), a new company that is working on several exciting products such as a virtual pivot headset.'

Wait, what? We need more information on this.
  • 2 0
 Have a look at their website, the headset would need an own article in order to explain everything.
  • 3 0
 @TEBP: from what I'm seeing it's not that complicated, it's just offsetting the fork from the rotational axis, which is what I presumed it was after thinking about it. Definitely interesting though, not that I'd benefit from it, I can't even really feel the difference between 650b and 29".
  • 2 3
 its a offset-headset with a "fancy" name, so nothing to special these days
  • 1 0
 @quert: it’s nothing like a reach adjusting headset, this adjusts fork offset, actually have a look.
  • 2 0
 @quert: no, offset headsets move the bearing to change reach, this moves the hole in the bearing to change the offset to the steering axis.
  • 14 1
 That stem is impressively light. I think it's even slightly lighter than the 9point8 stem with Ti bolts, which is saying something.
  • 7 14
flag RidleyRijder (Jan 10, 2022 at 7:28) (Below Threshold)
 Yes, but the way it is milled out in the area where the stem meets the fork tube, that will have a negative effect in the long run on that fork tube. Pretty, yes, would i run one, no. I would not want to see what that stem does to a Carbon fork tube...
  • 52 1
 who would ride a carbon fork tube?!
  • 4 1
 Not as light as the We Are One stem though.
  • 3 7
flag RidleyRijder (Jan 10, 2022 at 7:39) (Below Threshold)
 @fracasnoxteam: not on an enduro bike no. But on race bikes you see them all the time and you see similer stem designs where the inside is milled out so much that the fork tube cracks. Check luescher technik vids on youtube and you'll see.
  • 13 1
 @RidleyRijder: why on earth would you pair a 37/50mm stem with a xc race fork anyway? I'd imagine the name DH Sign also gives a bit of a hint about the intended use?
  • 2 0
 @Tmackstab: I had thought that the WAO/77Designz DA package combo was all proprietary, but looking at the 77designz sight, it looks like that stem is indeed universal. I know we went away from lighter stems that didn't have clamp plates in the late 90s because of the annoyance of doing any service work around your bar and stem areas, but with the ease of lock-on grips, these super-light two-bolt stems are pretty tempting.

And before anyone says that lock-ons add back any weight saved by something like this, I'd take lockons and a harder-to-separate bar/stem combo over slide-on grips and an easier-to-manage bar-stem combo.
  • 3 1
 @fracasnoxteam: Maybe someone who wants an impressively light stem.
  • 5 2
 the faceplate is made even especifically for carbon handlebar because the pressure is well distribuited in the area. and is completely removable. so you can installl any kind of risebar you need. The stem is used by best italian enduro riders , in competition and it worked properly
  • 4 0
 @big-red: As far as I know, these all go back to Cornelius' Intend Grace stem, which has been there for many years
  • 6 1
 I like that stem. Not because of the weight but because it makes sense to use the flex in the faceplate to properly distribute the pressure over the handlebar.
  • 1 0
 The HPX stem is top notch..it’s used by enduro and dh racers in Italy from years..
And if it can survive the abuse of Big Jack (DHSign owner), it can survive to pretty much anyone !
  • 1 0
 @bikegreece: Shhhh we don't talk about them
  • 1 0
 I bought a bunch of 31.8 Answer AME stems at a super discounted price. Don't know if these weights are for 31.8, but if they are the AME beats them, at 106 gr. for the 40mm one and 114 gr. for the 50mm. I admit these stems look great but the AME are slightly lighter, much cheaper, and probably wider and stiffer too, at 51mm wide. More utilitarian than bling with their forged construction, but they don't look bad at all and are just as stiff or stiffer than anything else.
  • 1 0
 @big-red: Yup I actually ran a Renthal Fatbar on my wr1 stem while I waited for 35mm rise to be back in stock.
  • 12 0
 @ridefrozen Do you make Lightning McQueen grips? Nothing against Anna and Elsa but I’m more of a Cars then Frozen kind of guy.
  • 12 0
 40 Euros for department store kids grips? I know we're amping up prices, but come on now.
  • 19 0
 And isn't 40 Euros like $200 US? I wish there was a way to know.
  • 19 0
 @dstroud70: Pretty sure that's right. Also, just under $40,000 CAD.
  • 6 0
 @noapathy: you're close but it's actually closer to $50,000 CAD.
  • 6 0
 @Doafty: Sorry, must've changed in the last hour or so. Inflation off the chain these days!
  • 3 0
 @noapathy: yeah no kidding!
  • 11 1
 Can we all agree this is one of the sickest looking enduros of all time!
Or is it just me?
  • 5 1
 I agree, although it loses point for practicality (loads of pivots and no water bottle). Would still happily ride it though.
  • 2 0
 @Carlostheshredder yes. I love that it can put in kill mode or chill mode.
  • 4 0
 I agree, this panzer... sorry this bike is absolutely gorgeous.
  • 2 0
 Yes - it looks great. And no water bottles! Frame design should never be compromised for a sippy-cup mount. Those oldschool headtube gussets with stack-o-dimes welds are rad. Well done!
  • 8 1
 What about Unite components? Making all of their stuff (Stems, Pedals, Chainrings, chainguides, and even plans for a fully CNCed frame) in house. Currently running a set of their pedals and they are up there with the best, while also being a bit cheaper too.
  • 2 1
 It’s a pretty selective small group, it can’t slash as include everyone…. What about… a works components….. what about rideworks…… what about superstar components….. what about Burgtec……. What about, what about
  • 4 0
 Oh and Unites pedal axles are Taiwanese by their own admission, moving to Uk due to supplier issues, their bars are Taiwanese, their chainguide has 3D printed parts outsourced. Unites stuff is, nice stuff, but Pembree is one of the few being genuinely transparent.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: yeah I get this can't include everyone, I was just raising awareness of another company making products within Europe. Yes I know the bars are catalogue items, I think they are pretty transparent about this, it's probably their one product I wouldn't buy, as they are the exact same upsweep/backsweep as pretty much all bars on the market (including the ones already on my bike).

Also wasn't a dig at Pembree at all, they are also nice pedals, however would be better with through pins on the pedals
  • 1 0
 @melonhead1145: what do you think about them saying the axles are made in the Uk when they are made in Taiwan? Probably a different grade of steel too as EN is a British thing.

They still advertise it - uniteco.bike/shop/components/pedals/instinct-pedal-replacement-axles
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: If that's always been there then it is misleading, I know the latest batch of pedals are on new axles made in house (as they didn't have a lathe to machine the axles previously).

Personally I'm not too bothered by small parts made in Asia when most of the machining is done in the UK. I used to run the Superstar pedals that were 100% made in Taiwan, and then moved onto the newer version that were made in the UK.
  • 1 0
 @melonhead1145: it isn’t misleading, it’s directly saying something that isn’t true.

They still don’t have an in house lathe, so that’s not true either - it’s all laid bare on social media.

Superstars pedal axles are also Taiwanese, that’s why you haven’t been able to by them for over a year.

Bullshit is bullshit.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: pretty sure they have just started making the axles themselves? Or possibly outsourced to a local machinist with a lathe. Regardless of parts being made in Taiwan I still like the stuff, Asian doesn't mean bad quality, I imagine most of the parts on most bikes come from asia. My Privateer, Hunt wheels, raceface cockpit, Shimano drivetrain and rockshix suspension all made in Taiwan I expect. Possibly the Schwalbe tyres too
  • 1 0
 @melonhead1145: Taiwanese parts are great, stating things that are not true about the origin of the parts you make isn’t.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Yeah I give it to you, it also says on the handlebar webpage "made in the UK", with no mention to them being made in Taiwan. I'm sure it used to say they were made in Taiwan as they are unable to make their own bars and no one really makes their bars in the UK (Hope, maybe Renthal?)
  • 1 0
 @melonhead1145: yea it says ‘all of our products are made in house’ - it’s bullshit.
  • 4 0
 Matthias, your bike designs are always catching my attention, looking great and well engineered . Jey ( you did lend me a 661 wrist brace at the Master World Champ in Pietermaritzburg when i broke my hand ) I managed to complete the race run , with a broken Ulna and bits , screaming all the way down and finish 9th ! thanks again .
  • 2 0
 Daaamn, good to see / read you!!
If I knew it was broken, I wouldn't have given you my brace haha
  • 3 0
 just waiting on someone to introduce varying grip sizes. So many amazing grip designs/styles but they're clearly designed for the typical petite cyclist. Took me forever to find grips that didn't feel like I was riding a clothes line down the hill.
  • 3 0
 Are you familiar with Sensus Meaty Paw's? Worth a try.
  • 2 0
 @jukka4130: never before but I might have to give them a shot! hopefully my lbs carries it bc buying without trying is rough for grips. my latest finds are the lizardskin north shore grips and the deity super cush. Thanks for the rec!
  • 1 0
 There are multiple companies that make extra fat grips. W hat diameter are you looking for?ESI extra chunky are 34 mm and come in extra wide XXL version too, they have excellent grip, good absorption, downside I find is that they damage easily in a crash. I'm now riding Ergon GE2 fat version. Lizard Skins Northshore were recommended to me as well by a friend.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: well see my issue isn't so much lack of grips that fit me, it's lack of grips that fit me in the styles I want. I have tried extra chunkys and the GE2 Large but am just not a fan of Ergon grips (I've tried a few of their styles and for whatever reason never liked any), and the ESI's just don't last long enough nor are they the tackiest.
I'd love to see ODI adopt the crankbros method of offering 2 size options for their grips and play with "fat" options. idk what my optimal diameter is
  • 1 0
 I’m becoming a big fan of the SQ lab grips. They come in three sizes and have my large hands covered pretty well. I thought they would be uncomfortable considering they looked smaller than the deity super Cush I’m used to, but they’re far more comfortable.
  • 2 0
 Big up Pembree on the sustainability thing! Probably the only UK based company using all UK based components, and cleaning up after themselves. Having run D2A pedals for about a year now I can say they're the best I've ever used too. More companies like this please!!
  • 2 0
 when i see some riders in the EWS are using DH frames and other put DC forks in their bikes, tells me, the enduro will evolve more into the DH. 200 travel are not awkward. And its really time for ONE BIKE FOR ALL! not everyone can afford a enduro and a dh bike same time
  • 7 1
 Thats a cool stem
  • 2 0
 Here's a podcast with Phil Law, talking about Pembree and the ideas behind it!

www.pinkbike.com/news/podcast-talking-about-pembree-transparency-and-sustainability-with-phil-law.html
  • 2 0
 I was a bit harsh on Phil in a previous article, but he actually put me right on a few things - turns out he is literally one of the few companies actually doing what they say. I argued Unites pedal was all UK made for example, turns out it was bullshit, the axles are made in Taiwan even though they still advertise them as being UK made.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: yes, there are many brands that are not quite so transparent around that, despite waving the "made here" flag in the media.

Guess it all boils down to the question what "made here" actually means. Is assembly enough (I think not)? Is "designed in" enough (I think not).

There are a number of brands that get this. Thinking Pembree, We are One or Industry9 from the brands that have gone more "mainstream" recently.
  • 1 0
 @pensamtb: well, unite still advertise their axle as uk made despite stating the contrary on their own is Instagram uniteco.bike/shop/components/pedals/instinct-pedal-replacement-axles
  • 3 0
 That Senduro is the pedal-able dropper equipped DH ive been dreaming of! Now to resist the temptation to buy one and build it up....
  • 1 0
 The bike category that other brands don't want to produce because they wouldn't sell anything else.....
  • 4 0
 I really like the European Bike Project. Excellent way to discover small, niche brands with great products.
  • 3 0
 Thank you very much!
  • 2 0
 I know DH Sign has convinced itself that it has solved some sort of problem or issue with that stem. But have they really? It looks unique, though. I’ll give them that.
  • 4 0
 Senduro looks dope.
  • 3 3
 Sick looking bike!
I wouldn't trust that HPX stem though, especially not for an aggressive rider.
They certainly "stand out" and by that I mean your bars will stand out of the stem when the thin part snaps..
  • 4 1
 You do realise that the thin part is made of steel right? Therefore it's likely to be stronger than the alloy stem it's bolted to.
  • 2 0
 Do a google search for “tensile strength of steel versus aluminum”. You will be shocked.
  • 1 1
 @Mtmw: which grade steel? Which grade aluminium? You would hope on such a safety critical part they would have done due diligence. Notice they have the spigot in the middle so the little stainless button heads dont take the shear loads.
  • 2 0
 the material used in HPX came from aeronauthic sector. this can bend with ultrabig hit but not crack. and a lot of agressive rider use in race way cheers
  • 1 0
 @solidgas: Sorry my comment wasn’t well written I didn’t intend for it to come across as negative, I think the design is excellent and I like the detail and smart material choices.
  • 1 0
 Not sure about the stem, it looks neat. Sceptical of odd stem designs since the Use VYCE.. At least you can adjust steering angle on this one without lossing bar angle.
  • 2 0
 Moar links for teh stiffness
  • 2 0
 2022 new enduro frame without water bottle?
  • 1 0
 The UK left Europe! Good bye! And fix the by and sell to separate them too! Customs and shipping is a nightmare! Thank you!
  • 1 0
 Would love to see the Senduro painted on OG Schwinn HomeGrown bassboat colourway....
  • 1 0
 Senduro the adjustable steed.... bringing back Scott Voltage for 2022 Noice!
  • 1 0
 Those clear grips turn yellow when exposed to UV?
  • 2 0
 I had transparent Pro Grip motorcycle grips on my first MTB back in 1989,they stayed clear for the 3 years that I used them.
  • 11 1
 No! Our grips are fully UV-stable and don't turn yellow.
  • 2 0
 Some good lookin stuff!
  • 4 2
 Love that stem
  • 1 0
 We need a Senduro huck to flat, STAT!
  • 1 2
 Bike is great, stem is scary (so thin), grips will turn yellow some months later, pedals - more of the same and helmet is quite more of the same as well.
  • 1 0
 Literally @ridefrozen ‘s words about if their grips turn yellow

“ No! Our grips are fully UV-stable and don't turn yellow.”
  • 1 0
 Sendurian for the DH bike....
  • 2 0
 Reichmann stole my idea.
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous looking rig that
  • 1 0
 Senduro looks a bit like the olde design linkage of the YT Tues
  • 2 0
 Looks like a...Donut.
  • 1 0
 Why does euro protective gear always look so…dorky.
  • 1 0
 Yes Grim Sendonut Mass Production.
  • 1 2
 4 European products... and an English one Smile

England is once again an island in the middle of the ocean.
  • 1 0
 And France is just a piece of land in the middle of a piece of land.
  • 1 0
 Geometry my dudes
  • 4 4
 Show me the bottle cage
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