The European Bike Project: A Steel Gearbox Bike & 4 Other Exciting Products from Swiss Manufacturers - May 2022

May 23, 2022
by TEBP  
The European Bike Project is one of our favorite Instagram accounts and his feed is constantly updated with everything from interesting curios from tiny manufacturers to inside looks at European manufacturing to analyses of the environmental impact of our sport. He's going to be doing a new regular column for us here at Pinkbike that will be mainly focussed on bringing you exciting products from small European manufacturers.

Last week, the Cycleweek show took place in Zurich. Many Swiss companies had interesting products on display, so this article will be a one-time Swiss Special.




Scar Cycles LFS Pinion


Stefan, the person behind Scar Cycles, really is a jack of all trades. He works as a chef during the day, heads the local pump track club, works as a distributor for Lilienthal rims and Pirope wheels in Switzerland - and when he finds time, he brazes frames in his garage.

This is Scar Cycles frame no. 15 and it's a really interesting one. The goal was to build a proper downcountry bike with light wheels, a Pinion C1.12 gearbox, and adjustable travel. Currently, the bike is set to 120 mm travel at the front and 105 mm rear travel, but it can also be used with a 140 mm fork. A shock with a longer stroke would provide up to 125 mm rear travel. With a steeper seat angle, even more travel would be possible. The leverage ratio is fairly progressive - it starts at 2.8 and ends just a bit above 2.0.

The geometry is fully custom and tailored to the riders' needs. On this frame, Stefan went for an aggressive 64° head angle and a rather moderate 73.8° seat angle. Unlike me, he's not a fan of steep seat angles and he argues that moderate seat angles are better in terms of ergonomics. To make sure the rider is in an upright position, the frame has a long head tube. We're looking at a 615 mm stack and a reach of 446 mm. The chainstays are 440 mm long and the wheelbase is 1234 mm. The tubing comes from Dedacciai and Columbus.

Despite the steel frame and gearbox, the whole bike weighs in at 15.2 kg (33.5 lbs). The frame itself weighs roughly 4 kg (8.8 lbs). For a different customer, Stefan built a 12 (26.4 lbs) kg version of the LFS, showing that steel bikes don't necessarily need to be heavy. As you can see, the frame was bronzed and oiled rather than painted. That means that some extra care is required to maintain the finish, but it makes for a very unique look.

To make sure the uphills are not too painful, Stefan specced this bike with the new Lilienthal XT rims, which are laced to Newmen hubs with textile spokes from Pirope. The Enduro-rated wheelset weighs just 1400 g.

Scar Cycles LFS Pinion



Scar Cycles LFS Pinion


Details
- Frame made in Switzerland
- Custom geometry (64° head angle / 73.8° seat angle / 446 mm reach / 440 mm chainstays)
- Pinion gearbox optional
- Travel: 120 mm front / 105 mm rear
- 29" wheels
- Price: from 3,600 CHF ($3,692 USD)
- Website: https://scarcycles.ch/
- Instagram: @scarcycles



QWSTION + MOVER hip pack


Swiss bag company QWSTION has joined forces with their friends at outdoor sports brand MOVER to create this neat plastic-free hip pack.

The brands say that it’s time to rethink our relationship with plastic. While QWSTION is well known for making bags from Bananatex and other natural materials for over a decade, outdoor sports brand MOVER has developed a collection of plastic-free garments.

The QWSTION + MOVER Hip Pack is a lightweight bag for outdoor use with a focus on functionality, timeless design, and minimal use of resources.

Thanks to the expandable rolltop compartment, the volume can be adjusted between 1 and 5 l. The hip pack features a front compression flap, two side bottle pockets, one front pocket, and one front zipper pocket with a key loop. The belt and the side compression straps are adjustable.

Certified organic plant fibers (cotton ripstop main compartment) are combined with wool (belt) and aluminium (trims), a first in a field where goods are normally made of 100% plastic.

Crafted in Switzerland from QWSTION’s Cradle to Cradle Certified Bananatex material, this product is made-to-order, in a limited quantity of 100 pieces.


QWSTION MOVER hip pack
Photos by Gianni Camporata


Details
- Made in Switzerland
- 350 g
- Colume: 1-5 l (expandable main compartment with roll-top closure)
- 26 x 10 x 14 cm
- Suitable for hiking, biking and trail running
- Two water bottle pockets
- Price: 180 CHF ($184 USD)
- Website: https://www.qwstion.com and https://mover.eu/
- Instagram: @qwstion_official and @mover.sportswear



milKit Tubeless System


The milKit tubeless system offers a wide range of advantages - so many that I didn't know all of them until Pius, the founder of milKit, invited me for a personal instruction session.

At the heart of the milKit system are the valves that have unique rubber flaps. They make sure that no air is lost when the valve core is removed and sealant does not block the valves. At the same time, adjusting the tire pressure works as with any other Presta valve. The valves also let you add or remove sealant with the milKit syringe while the tire is partly inflated.

Thanks to the milKit valves and syringe, the tubeless setup is a clean process: You can seat the tire using the booster and add sealant with the syringe later on when the tire is already partly inflated. The syringe also lets you check the old sealant and replace it with new one without having to release air from the tire. Did you know that regularly adding new sealant on top of the old is not a good idea and your tubeless system will not work as well as it could?

To inflate and seat your tires, the milKit booster is a great choice. Because the booster head uses no additional hose, the full airflow will go straight into the valve. Using it is easy: Inflate the booster, press it on the valve - done. It works with all Presta tubeless valves and can be used as a water bottle, as it comes with a booster head and a drinking bottle cap. The booster head weighs just 21 g, so it adds hardly any weight to your backpack in case you're taking the bottle with you anyway. Just make sure to empty the bottle before you use it as a booster, unless you want to top up your sealant with your drink of choice.

When it comes to sealant, too, milKit offers an interesting option. It can seal holes up to 6 mm and will stay liquid for 6 to 9 months (even years as long as it's stored in the bottle). The fibres that actually take over the sealing do not sink to the bottom of the bottle, so there is no need to shake the bottle before use and there are no guessing games regarding particles when filling it into the tire. It works from -20°C to +50°C / - 4°F to 122°F and it's compatible with CO2 cartridges. As it is water-based, it can also be topped up with water in case it gets too sticky. The sealant also does not turn into rubbery balls over time.

The rubber flaps on the valves and the syringe work together very well.


The booster head is put directly onto the valve. As soon as you've pushed the head onto the valve, the airflow will start. The silver button does not activate the airflow, it's just there so you can get a good grip.


Details
- Valves and syringe made in Germany
- Sealant made in UK
- Booster made in Spain
- Website: https://milkit.bike/
- Instagram: @milkit_bike



Daysaver Multitools

Original9 & Coworking5 extension & Cradle3 mount


Daysaver was founded in 2020 and has been tirelessly working on new multitools ever since, with its first products being the Original9 and Carrier1. The Original9 is a 8 mm hex key that stores 4 smaller bits (6 / 5 / 4 / 3 / 2.5 / 2 mm Hex / Torx 25 / Philips #1). Each bit can be used on both sides of the 8 mm hex key. The bits are held in place by magnets and the tool comes with rubber caps to protect you and your jersey in case you're carrying it in a back pocket. The Original9 weighs just 39 g and the Carrier1 frame mount adds another 17 g. It will raise your bottle cage by just 12.5 mm and will safely hold the 8 mm hex. Tool enthusiasts will have spotted the "plasma" coating of the bits and yes, you guessed it: the Original9 is made in Switzerland by PB Swiss Tools.

In a few weeks, the Coworking5 extension will become available. The base is a tire lever that will hold two chain links and a chain breaker. The chain breaker doubles as a spoke wrench and a valve core tool. It adds another 35 g to the Original 9.

If you want to mount the Original9 and the Coworking5 onto your frame, you'll need the Cradle3 mount. The tool itself is held in place with magnets, but the mount also comes with a strap, so you can strap a tube, a small pump or something else to your frame.


Daysaver Original9 tool
Original9 & Carrier1

Daysaver Multitools
Original9 & Coworking5 & Cradle3 mount plus tube



Details
- Partly made in Switzerland
- Original9: 79 CHF ($81 USD)
- Original9 & Coworking5: 104 CHF ($107 USD)
- Original9 & Coworking5 & Cradle3: 123 CHF ($126 USD)
- Website: https://daysaver.fun/
- Instagram: @daysaver.fun



ILEVE DISTRICT Sunglasses


Just a few days ago I was lucky enough to meet the friendly ILEVE DISTRICT crew at the Cycleweek show in Zurich.

ILEVE DISTRICT is a new company from Bern that offers 3D printed sunglasses. While the N°1 has one large lens, the N°2 has two lenses and an air vent in the middle. Both the N°1 and the N°2 come in two sizes.

The frame is 3D printed in Switzerland and the lenses are made in Northern Italy. According to the manufacturer, they are durable and impact resistant. The tint is called "vibrant violet solid" and it offers a high contrast for sunny, cloudy and rainy days. The lenses provide 100% UV and high glare protection, they have a hydrophobic and dirt-repellent coating on the outside and an anti-reflective coating on the inner side.

Instead of using silicone or other materials for the nose pad and ear sleeves, the team says that they engineered the frame in such a way that they can use just one main material. I tried the glasses at their show booth and I can confirm that the fit felt very secure. Each pair of glasses has a unique serial number.

The frame is held together with four pins, which means that you can take it apart and replace damaged parts, in case something should happen. However, they say that the frame and the glasses are very tough. In an attempt to create circular products, the company is currently experimenting new materials that can be recycled several times.

N°2 is also compatible with prescriptions lenses, selected partners will be able to fit lenses with -3 to +3 dioptres.

By the way, my made-to-measure 3D printed HEXR helmet arrived last week for testing. Now I wonder: When will we see custom-fit 3D printed sunglasses?

ILEVE District N 2 sunglasses

ILEVE DISTRICT sunglasses
ILEVE DISTRICT sunglasses

Details
- Made in Switzerland
- 3D printed frame
- 2 sizes
- 26 g
- Unique serial number
- Comes with hard case and bag
- Price: 287 CHF ($294 USD)
- Website: https://ileve-district.com/
- Instagram: @ileve_district



That's all for now! Tune in next month for another batch of exciting products.

Transparency Note: Milkit and Daysaver have provided parts for my current builds.


120 Comments

  • 54 2
 Not sure where to post this, so here is maybe a good place
cyclingindustry.news/outside-to-chop-staff-beta-and-peloton-cycling-print-mags
  • 28 4
 Before you grab your dropper pitchforks, let's first acknowledge that shuttering print media in favor of digital has been a trend of the magazine industry for decades now. Each time a mag stops printing, it get incrementally harder to operate as another print magazine because the economy/ecosystem around your business is deteriorating.

The real news will be if they retain all their staff through this transition. In theory the only jobs that should be at risk are those directly related to printing the magazine, but my guess is they outsourced that so it'll be more like not renewing a contract rather than laying off staff.
  • 32 1
 @Lanebobane: I'm shocked that there are 800,000 people that actually pay the $49-$99 fee.
  • 7 0
 I just thought this was interesting factual PB related news to share, without adding an opinion (very un-PB, I know).
I personally like print magazines and actually would have bought / subscribed to Beta if it had been available in Canada (I was a long time Bikes and Powder subscriber and was sad to see those go).
But, times and media industry are changing, nothing to do about that.
  • 6 1
 Egon Spengler said it best 38 years ago...
"print is dead."
  • 3 0
 This makes me sad, both as a reader of Bike/Beta, and a person that works in print media (we are still printing for now although I think the end is near). But it can't be denied that print (especially special interest print) is dying and probably won't come back. And especially with Beta, the articles were already online before the issue arrived anyway.

I probably won't try to subscribe to any other bike magazines.
  • 3 0
 @Three6ty: Me too, but then again $50 is, inflation adjusted (let's use 3%), what a magazine subscription used to cost 20 years ago ($2/issue subribed-reader-rate x 12 issues per year x 1.03 inflation ^ 20 years).
  • 2 0
 @Lanebobane: Divide by 3 and carry the 2. I have not purchased a magazine in 15 years. So for me, I frequent the Pinkbike website for content and the classifieds section. If everything goes under a paywall, then I will just find another website. It is not a necessity for me. I know it's a absolute necessity for some people so I get why they pay for it. But for now, it's not for me.
  • 1 1
 high quality video!!! wheeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!
  • 4 1
 @BEERandSPOKES: coming from a 14h workday in a printshop that has to reject orders i dare say - print aint dead
  • 1 0
 @Three6ty: I think their # is a bit misleading. I'm sure me paying 20$/year for trailforks is included in that count, and I'm nowhere near the 50-100 dollar/year claim. I'm sure there are a lot of other users in that category.
  • 1 0
 @Kyleponga: Maybe. I also pay for trailforks, as I use that all the time when I am riding in new Areas.
  • 2 0
 @Three6ty: I'm just pointing out that, price-wise, its inline with a magazine subscription. Our generation is used to not having to pay for digital content. Not sure if that trend will continue in the future or not. Also, we weren't talking about you. We were talking about people who DO pay for magazine subscriptions.
  • 2 0
 @pirati: the one print format that still seems viable is the high-end stuff like UK-based Cranked. It's quarterly and expensive but I'm so glad I picked up a copy, I'll continue to do so.

It's similar to the idea that physical music formats were doomed, but vinyl bucked the trend because of its quality.
  • 2 0
 "“The goal is really to create more immersive, high-quality storytelling,” chief executive Robin Thurston told the business journal last week."

Sure it is. I believe that 100%
  • 1 0
 I knew it wasn't good news once Outside purchased Peloton magazine. I have subscribed to Peloton since 2013 (I know it's not a MTB), but I like its content and style. Not too juvenile, a bit of race, history,bike and product reviews, but also profiling the small independent frame builders and parts makers. They also provided maps for the spring classic races, and profiles for each stage of the Grand Tours.
They piss me off even with Pink Bike where they want you to take out a subscription to read some of the daily news.
  • 2 0
 I find this very sad...And I'm sure the BETA staff is all freakin' pissed after the BIKE mag closing, how they managed to keep the team together, and the promises that were made. I'm going to miss the beautiful coffee table mag and the high quality production of the videos. It seems they could have retained them just for video piece. Thanks for sharing the info with us.
  • 2 0
 @gunbirk: yep sucks for the employees, but lets be real, does anybody really think Print mags have a real future in a digital age? If so, I would like to sell you some Blockbuster stock.
  • 4 0
 The problem isn't that they are cutting print, its that they are focusing more on "high quality video". Are people just too f*cking dumb and have no attention span anymore to read? Why is everything videos and pictures?
  • 25 0
 I have these Milkit valves and syringe. While the syringe works very well the valves clog super quickly and it makes it a pain to inflate the tires, I have removed them from my bike after a couple of weeks and I would not recommend them.
  • 7 0
 I had the same experience and I'll remove them asap.
  • 2 0
 They look identical to some DT swiss valve I had. I removed them quickly as well.
  • 5 0
 @Red-October: It's like they do not test their products before they sell it
  • 2 0
 Which part of the valve got clogged? I've been using Milkit valves for 2 years now without any issues.
  • 1 0
 @TEBP:
The rubber flaps, very difficult to pump air in after that even without the valve core
  • 5 0
 Schrader compatible rims for schrader big valves please (I know I can drill my rims to fit them, but no :-)
  • 3 2
 I can’t believe how many companies are trying to faff with valves siringe and so on.. I have never found that difficult put some sealant inside a tire, put some air in with a compressor, seat in the bead and screw in a valve core....
  • 1 0
 I've been using them for about 9 months now, and my only complaint is that I have problems checking my tire pressure, since they do tend to clog. Most of the times I do not get a reading, or one that is clearly wrong. I then have to connect my pump, pump once or twice and then check the pressure. Quite annoying.
  • 1 0
 I have exactly the same experience and opinon. Got them on my propain. Wouldn't recommand for sure.
  • 2 0
 I’ve never put sealant in through a valve, just tip some in when one side is mounted and enjoy not messing around with shit syringes and clogged valves!
  • 1 0
 I got around it by using an air duster to clean out the residual sealant from the valve before reinstalling the core. Seems to be working so far but research is ongoing.
  • 7 0
 @Alexh1983: Obviously youve never had a tire blow off the rim while trying to get it to seat with sealant in it, lol. I always seat the tire first, then pull the valve core and add sealant.
  • 1 0
 Same here. I still use the syringe to add sealant but have switched back to regular tubeless valves.
  • 1 0
 @dirtyburger: nor have I, but I still get clogged valves!
  • 14 0
 And then they wonder why people are buying cheep Chinese replicas Smile
184 $ for a slim multitool, and some plastic to attach to the frame
  • 10 8
 They are made for the Swiss and they give a f*k about $200 here and there.
  • 16 2
 @lkubica: not quite right, but we give a f**k about your comment.
  • 16 18
 @lkubica: how much nazi-gold do the Swiss still have?
  • 21 4
 @unrooted: I bet all nazi valuables went either to the USSR or to the USA Wink
  • 7 0
 @lkubica: while you are right, that there is a lot of really rich people, most of us MTBers really care about cost.. as it is insanely expensive these days...
  • 7 1
 @saladdodger: I was just kidding. The CEO of my company lives in Switzerland but I know there are normal people there also. Nevertheless Switzerland is a very rich country. Looking at the average wage ... I almost get the average swiss wage being in like the 2% of best paid people in Poland (I mean official wages, becausue there are lot;s of people who earn much more an pay no taxes etc.).
  • 8 0
 @saladdodger: True story..

This morning I went to Jumbo (yes, I know) because I discovered that they have IXS knee pads in kids medium (km) size which is unobtainable on all web shops.

The price on German web shops is around 38 Euros and in Jumbo it was 82 Chf. A neat double price.

However, a lady on the checkout wanted me to pay 164 Chf because I took 2 pieces, one for left and one for right knee.

No wonder everything is expensive here..
  • 3 0
 @lkubica: I live in Domodossola, Just at piedmont Borders with Switzerland, you can't imagine how many people from Switzerland come here every Saturday to buy food, clothes, and eventually go to the restaurant. Now I find a lot of them also at the swimming pool (just 6 euro all day long here). Everything is insanely expensive in Swiss also for much of them. And sometimes they like make full nonsense expensive object (3d printed glasses frame where injection it's incredibly less expensive).
  • 4 1
 @lkubica: please compare wages and cost of living. Takes a lot of air out of this topic.
  • 2 4
 @lkubica: We lived in Swiss for many years. Comparing wages is usual non sense. Try to find out how much health insurance cost there or car registration. Yes, Swiss might look wealthy but its far away from the truth unless you are top 1%.
  • 1 2
 @lkubica: Remember that cost of living in Poland has nothing to do with cost of living in Switzerland. You can be actually quite poor living on average wage in Switzerland. You won't own your own house for example. In Poland when you are in too 2% you can afford much more. Maybe not useless stuff like BMW and other gadgets but important stuff like housing are much more affordable for you. Germany is the same BTW. It's super hard to own something when you are on average wage.
  • 3 0
 @goroncy: I don't think you are up to date with cost of living in Poland. It may be of course less expensive then in Switzerland, but we earn 4x less and the prices are like maybe 2x less and only for certain stuff. I have just build a 130 m^2 house for like $200k! 50m^2 flat in Cracow is minimum $150k ... What are we talking about, the standards of living in Switzerland is much better in general. Especially that we are talking about goods that have exactly the same price in Poland and Switzerland. Cars, bikes, electronics, in general all maybe except food and houses/flats (yet). In Poland people earning an officially average wage practically cannot own a house or a flat, especially in a city where they could actually find a good job.
  • 5 0
 @lkubica: Ok, I won't lie, we feel rich as soon as we cross the border, but in Ch the expenses are building up pretty quick.
In bigger cities in Ch only 20% of people can afford their own house/apartment. In rural areas this percentage is around 35 to 40.
If you have kids, the cost of everything becomes unbelievable. For a nice family apartment the price is from 3k Chf / month
Daycare for just one child is 2.5k Chf / month. You want two kids?
Sport? From 90/ month
Music lessons? From 45/ 1 school hour
Babysitter? From 35/ hour

Once again, we do feel wealthy once we cross the border but in our everyday life most of us have just a normal and boring central European life. I would say that stability and security are the two things that Swiss people can enjoy much more then the rest of European people.

However, the people in southern counties enjoy their everyday life much more even if they earn just a fragment of money compared to a Swiss people. Just observe the food..
  • 4 0
 @pakleni: that cracked me up... can't believe she tried that!!!!
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: buying houses is impossible everywhere in EU for normal people. Here 90sqm flat cost >700k€. I've a good salary, my wife has a good salary but we have kinda given up on hoping to ever own any decently sized house in this city or the surroundings.
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: 200k $ is not much mate. Where I live I had to pay 1 mil for a small house. And I am more than sure I don't earn 5 times more than you do.
  • 2 0
 Like $200 flat pedals. Ridiculous
  • 2 0
 All of it is overpriced but the bike
  • 14 0
 Is that Blue Milk to celebrate Kenobi on the 27?
  • 11 0
 3D printing for sungalsses only makes sense if they are custom-fit, no? They're pimp as hell but I'm not spending that on sunglasses
  • 4 0
 Yah, instead of using different materials, with appropriate properties, in the relevant locations, we made sunglass frames that are the same material everywhere to save a lot of cost, and then passed that savings on to the consumer. Wait, no, we decided to charge more and try to convince the consumer it is better that way. But we do give each pair a unique serial number!
  • 4 0
 @SJP: the word you are looking for is “bespoke”
  • 2 0
 @somebody-else: Its not bespoke, just 'spoke' that are in a wheel wait what were we talking about
  • 5 2
 So I'm trying to weld up my own frame, and here on my desk I have the heaviest steel downtube from bikefabsupply. Its shockingly light. When you hold it in your hand its like the first time you pick up a carbon road bike, you can't believe how little it weighs (about a pound). Its somewhat of a myth that steel frames are heavy. They can be heavy, but so can aluminum. The steel Cotic enduro frame, for instance, is about the same as a megatower frame.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez you sure you got the heaviest one? The heaviest one I spotted is 790g, which, while isn’t exactly heavy by itself, isn’t far off some entire carbon frames (albeit they tend to leave out things like derailluer hangers, cable stop, etc. with those weights). But I’m not trying to start a fight on the internet, just being pedantic, and recalling the first time I held a 44mm True Temper Supertherm tube and thinking it felt more like a weapon from Clue than a bicycle part: @waltworks in the garage with the downtube.

And totally with you in steel frames not being that heavy. Everything is heavy now. The last steel FS frame I made weighs ~9 pounds with shock and that isn’t far off the weight of many aluminum (or some carbon, for that matter) mid-longish travel frames.
  • 1 0
 @feldybikes: the 44mm 660mm tube was the largest and heaviest they had in stock when I ordered, about 450 grams I believe
  • 1 0
 Ah. I was referring to the (I think) 850mm one.
  • 3 1
 It's not too hard to do a single pivot frame that can handle fairly rough stuff and have it weigh ~7 pounds with an air shock. If you really geeked out, are super skinny, or are willing to risk your teeth you might be able to get down to 6.5 or even 6. I did a 5.5 pound one last year - for a 50 pound kid though.

It's fun to see more steel FS bikes being made again. This particular builder, I think, is going to see a lot of broken bikes (a lot of sketchy looking stuff happening that I won't get into here, has only built 15 frames, very interested in light weight, etc) but you never know.
  • 1 0
 @waltworks: Whats it going to take to convince you to come out of retirement
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: Eh, I still build some bikes. Just really slow.

I'd bet once the 2 year old/youngest little monster is in school full time I'll get bored and build more. Maybe.
  • 2 0
 The Scar looks great, except the seatstay pivot at the dropouts. I would be worried about it breaking or at least deforming. Would love to hear from Stefan if there is long term testing or analysis to show it is strong enough.
  • 8 0
 I hate to be that guy, but those fillets are… not the prettiest.
  • 2 0
 @dirtyburger: came here to say the same. I've seen better work from people on their first day holding a brazing torch...
  • 4 0
 a round of beer in switzerland ;-)
  • 17 3
 stop being poor!
  • 4 0
 @Sethimus: classic swiss reply
cheers from the black forest :-D
  • 3 1
 ...but it has a unique serial number
  • 6 0
 @dtheio: I remember stopping Switzerland for lunch once 10 or 12 years ago. Small Omelette, fries and a coke, £35 (or £45 roughly in todays money - about $57US) Never spent anything there after that.
  • 5 0
 wat the f
  • 7 0
 @Daver27: You went all the way for Switzerland for lunch? was Greggs closed or something?
  • 3 0
 @browner: Greggs is missing out by not doing rosti and raclette pastry.
  • 2 0
 For Swiss Dentists
  • 7 2
 well written and researched as always!
  • 5 2
 Ha ha Jokes
  • 2 0
 I know my eyes must be playing tricks on me, but the closeup of the non-driveside of the gearbox looks like the crank would hit the part where the cables go in before it could make a full rotation.
  • 2 0
 Serious question, are pinion and effigear the end all of mtb gearboxes? Can they improve? Is anyone trying to iterate or make a new design?
  • 7 0
 Gear boxes are fighting for the same space as e-bike motors. I think the next iteration of gearboxes will be ones integrated with e-bike motors as an all in one system.
  • 11 1
 @noleschmidt: All other motor bikes use an integrated motor/gearbox. It's only a matter of time before e-bikes return to their dirtbike roots.
  • 1 0
 There are several brands which are working on gearboxes that come with a battery and motor ;-)
  • 2 0
 @noleschmidt: makes me sad
  • 4 0
 @gaberoc: maybe they'll come with a foot gear shift too Wink .
  • 3 1
 Please don't ever use that derailleure hanger ever! It twists under load and makes your shifting impossible to set. Thank God that thing is a gearbox bike.
  • 3 0
 Anyone other than I care about the watts you will lose due to an ineffective drivetrain?
  • 1 0
 Honestly, I haven't tried a gearbox bike. But have tried internal Gears with belt,not my cup of tea.
  • 3 0
 I don't. My Pinion w/ belt is definitely more inefficient than a clean, straight chain but my chain is never actually clean or straight. The difference is noticeable on a work stand but actual riding feels basically no different.
  • 2 0
 @crsn: that’s what I heard too. A clean chain is faster but a gearbox won’t need service for 10000km. The only drawbacks I can see are the extra weight and that the selection of bikes is smaller.
  • 3 0
 That hop pack from QWSTION and MOVER is very well thought out and designed. Tempting.
  • 2 1
 Looks cool but are you sure? Looks like a user experience nightmare. Like you’re ready to ride and then realize you left your phone in the car and spend the next 10 minutes unrolling the bag to get your keys and repacking.
  • 1 0
 Am I missing something? Its kinda odd that,they call this stuff milk, but who in their right mind would drink anything from a canister that was previously filled with tire sealant??? Blank Stare Confused Eek
  • 1 0
 if you are talking about the milkit bottle, it is filled with air and used as a tubeless booster to inflate the tire.
  • 1 0
 Yea but it also says
“it can also be used as a water bottle as it comes with a booster head and a drinking bottle cap” idk if it’d be my first choice but i guess if ya wash it out good enough and your really thirsty w/o a cup Beer @cluuu:
  • 2 0
 I'm just saying that there is a good reason pros don't have the belt-driven drivetrains.
  • 1 0
 Yep. The fail rate on belt drive is very high,in my experience. The damn things disintegrate like dry cheese,if not maintained. I'll stick to derailleur and steel chain
  • 1 0
 Can someone tell me who makes those cable routing clips? I've been trying to find something exactly like that for about a year and am obviously using the wrong term.
  • 2 0
 Ow, and someone else here made cable routing from the shims that you get with Shimano 6-bolt Discs - you know the ones no one actually puts under the screws in real life Big Grin
  • 4 1
 Great looking scar!!
  • 3 2
 That scar is great. Just toughen up and the extra drag will disappear, pussies.
  • 1 0
 How is this called the European Bike Project, and yet there are no prices in Euros?
  • 1 0
 Nha it's a noticeable difference. Belts are just really sluggish. It's like pedaling a rubber baned.
  • 1 0
 some people are very easily excited.
  • 3 1
 $284 for sunglasses? Lol
  • 2 3
 Compared to what Ray-Ban charges for a decades old design it's a steal.
  • 2 1
 Lol, that's the normal price for top-end glasses.
  • 1 0
 Why does a bike built for a gearbox have a dr hanger?
  • 2 0
 using existing tubesets and dropouts instead of machining new ones. Also allows the tensioner to be rear-mounted, should you prefer
  • 1 0
 Those Wolfpack tyres on the Scar are just brilliant.
  • 1 0
 I enjoy the multitool
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