Kali Releases Multiple Impact Helmet: The MacDuff - Interbike 2016

Sep 19, 2016
by Kali Protectives  
Press Release

The Future of Protectives Is Here


The future of protectives is coming in hot! Kali Protectives arrives at Interbike 2016 with some next level technology including the release of the Macduff, the world’s first multiple impact bicycle helmet. Available only in Matt black, the Macduff is a dirt/street half shell that utilizes Kali’s new Nano Core technology, the product of an exclusive partnership with Italian materials manufacturer Alia Mentis. Nano Core combines Kali’s proprietary Composite Fusion technology with Casidion - self-healing acrylic foam that incorporates carbon Nano-tubes, effectively replacing the EPS foam found in traditionally constructed helmets.


The Future of Protectives Is Here
The Future of Protectives Is Here

Nano Core dissipates impact energy more efficiently than traditional EPS and can do so in a much smaller volume producing a lighter helmet. After an impact, a helmet using a traditional EPS foam liner will dent as it absorbs impact energy. EPS foam does not rebound; it stays impacted even though the helmet shell may return to its original shape and should be replaced. The Macduff however, equipped with Nano Core, will rebound without any loss in protection, and can continue to be used. No more crash and trash, the Macduff can withstand up to 8 impacts before needing to be replaced.

Coming soon.
A sneak peek. Come by the Kali booth for a full demo and to meet the man himself, Matt Macduff.



COMPOSITE FUSION

Over a decade ago Kali founder and lead engineer, Brad Waldron developed the tooling and technology to completely in-mold a full-face helmet, something that has yet to be replicated. This breakthrough in safety technology is called Composite Fusion™, a process that eliminates the need to tape or glue foam into helmet shells. Instead, Kali bonds the shell and foam liner allowing the use of a thinner shell, producing a lighter and ultimately stronger helmet. Lighter means less mass attached to your head. In a crash, less mass on your head reduces the resultant impact g-forces acting on your grey matter.

Composite Fusion™ - Better impact energy management, increased dynamic range - smaller, lighter and stronger. It's a no-brainer.

The Future of Protectives Is Here

SHIVA 2.0

In 2014 Kali released Composite Fusion™ Squared, launched the Shiva and changed what was possible for a full-face helmet. The revolutionary Shiva delivered DOT protection in a full carbon fiber helmet that weighed 1050 grams, and was an unprecedented 30% smaller than other DOT helmets. After extensive research, lab testing and some unprecedented real-world testing including Nicholi Rogatkin's 2015 Red Bull Rampage 30 ft crash and Matt Macduff's Loop Of Doom, Kali is pleased to release the Shiva 2.0 for 2017.

The Future of Protectives Is Here

The Shiva 2.0 features the same strong and lightweight full carbon fiber shell as its predecessor, but with an entirely new interior. Kali uses Composite Fusion™ Squared to in-mold Nano Core and EPS into geometric cone shapes, allowing for exceptional interior and exterior energy management.


The Future of Protectives Is Here


The 2.0 incorporates Kali's LDL (Low-Density Layer) rotational impact technology. LDL is a proprietary padding system placed throughout the helmet, reduces rotational impact forces up to 25% and low-g linear forces by up to 30%.

These advanced technologies were put to the test in 2015 when Nicholi Rogatkin, wearing an LDL equipped Shiva prototype, crashed at Red Bull Rampage falling over 30ft before coming to a stop. Luckily, he survived the crash without losing consciousness or sustaining significant injury.




A team of concussion researchers from the London Imperial College recreated Rogatkin's crash in laboratory conditions. They were able to calculate the linear and rotational g-forces Nicholi experienced. They found that the addition of LDL to his Shiva reduced Nicholi's chance of experiencing MTBI (Mild Traumatic Brain Injury) from 60% down to 10%.

The Shiva 2.0 - Engineered to help you be unstoppable.

The Future of Protectives Is Here

CHECK US OUT

If you're at Interbike, make sure to drop in to see the booth to experience Kali's approach to innovation in safety technology. Team riders, Nicholi Rogatkin and Matt Macduff will also be on hand to sign posters and answer questions between 11am - noon on each day of the indoor expo.

photo juliengrimard
photo aledilullo

Dates: 9/28-30
Times: 11am - noon daily
Location: Kali Booth #11044
See you at Interbike. Booth 11044

For more info contact: marketing@kaliprotectives.com


MENTIONS: @KaliProtectives / @nicholirogatkin / @mattmacduff / @sterlinglorence / @aledilullo / @coldsalt / @the-rise / @redbullbike




84 Comments

  • + 66
 I wonder how helmet manufacturers decide who to sponsor, whether they go for the best riders, or the riders quick enough to still be in the spotlight, but also fall a lot.

"Look! he lands on his head all the time and hes fine!"
  • + 17
 Shivakamini Somakandarkram!
  • + 29
 Matt Macduff does crash pretty damn hard. He's insane.
  • + 3
 @gdnorm: 100 bucks says macduff is gonna shiva blast the loop
  • + 3
 @gdnorm: Ruxin's number one, its true you can't stop him, meet the rest of my team. Pete top, Kevin bottom.
  • + 56
 Macduff surviving coming off the Loop of Death is the best advertising ever
  • + 25
 And Nicholi.
  • + 10
 Just like 6D, this makes lots of sense TO ME, by separating the outer shell from the foam layer. Cones seem to deform providing shifting and crumple zone. Unlike a sheet of plastic tied to 50$ helmet... :I @KaliProtectives - would increasing size of the layer between outer shell and head, let's say making cones bigger, make the helmet even safer? Is there some threshold of effectivity?
  • + 5
 Increasing the size of the layer increases the size of the shell, which is two fold negative (at least that I can think of maybe there are other negatives), it increases weight, which increases all forces across the board on your neck. It increases the length of the moment arm that reacts against your neck, thereby increasing force on your neck, albeit it as a lesser distance and slower rate, idk maybe it is a win or a wash. With the randomness of every crash it's probably impossible to say.

The whole idea could be a load of BS marketing, but at least this has a real crash behind it on video, too bad they don't have controlled crash video and results comparing a "normal" helmet. Show us some real data!
  • + 8
 I would not say it's BS marketing. Not by a tiniest margin. It's an attempt to solve the problem. I believe an honest one. We have to wait for future research to see how good attempt is it. hat's the crux. Gooey, compressing, shifting stuff makes sense to me. If such thing existed in helmets for kids, I'd buy it for mine. But I don't trust MIPS enough to pay extra. All I can say is that I thank MIPS hell of a lot for getting the ball rolling.

For me no1 issue is fall prevention. Educating myself and getting my kids to learn how to ride (bikes, rollerblades, skateboard) in a good way, and telling them how to approach risks. If a kid or old dude contamplates jumping a 6ft drop while having no clue about riding in balance, then well... All in all accidents happen, always, but many can be prevented through skill. There is a reason why most accidents happen on A-Line kind of trails. Lots of travel + lots of body armor + little skill + big jumps = BANG!!!

I cringe at the thought that Nicholi wasn't stopped. I don't blame anyone, everything happened quickly and head injury awareness still seems quite small. But for the future record situation like his shouldn't be happening again. You took a serous digger: you're out. Just like puncture or almostany other mechanical takes you out of the competition, so should a serious banger.
  • + 24
 @Rasterman: I just spent a day doing research for my senior thesis at Kali. I was challenging Brad and every design decision he has ever made. I ride for Kali and depend on them to stay safe, but I constantly provide skepticism to EVERY helmet. He was extremely open to sharing data, his opinions, the opinions of others, research, what he wants to improve, etc. He said EVERYONE has to step up their game, and that we ALL have a long way to go before we truly solve some of these problems. It was a great experience. Brad doesnt care about marketing. He doesnt care about style and whats cool (which drives me nut sometimes, because I like being flashy) ALL brad cares about is research, outdoing himself, and making the safest helmet possible. He even said that he would never hesitate to license someone else's technology if they could prove that it was safer than his. Id love to share my research when its all done.
  • + 3
 @livehardrideharder: it's awesome to have a guy like you here. Can you tell how do you guys determine the friction between real human head and the helmet? How do you apply it to the test dummy? Is it complicated or easy to see how hair and sweat influence the friction?

Then the friction between helmet and the ground is a very interesting one.

Finally I failed to find much info in youtube vids and articles I found googling on how rotational stress happens in the brain. It seems we know more about black holes than that.

Sorry for this bombing but I am genuinely interested in the subject. And BTW I don't believe cool form design goes in the way of safety and ergonomics. It does cost extra design work, one must make many real size models and three times as much drawings, but it may be worth a kid saying: DROOOOOL! Smile
  • + 17
 @WAKIdesigns: That was one of my first questions. I am highly critical of many of the current systems. As you indicated, 6d makes for a massive helmet, creating more leverage. For MIPS to engage you would have to have your liner extremely tight or glued to your bald head. The Leatt turbine looks fancy, but its really the "squish" of the rubber that seems to do anything (in my testing) which makes it similar to the Kali LDL, but with a fancy aesthetic. Some people say that just your hair and scalp movement is enough. There is even a product that is just a really slick sticker on the outside o a helmet to prevent friction and grabbing that would cause rotation. I find that even shape, like the stylish lines on TLD helmets, create grab points that create risky leverage. They all are aiming to improve our helmets, but the testing is highly controlled and not always realistic. I cant wait to question Kali on the multiple impact system in this article. CONCUSSIONS ARE NOT FROM IMPACT... they are from rapid directional changes of the brain from REBOUND of impact (forward, then back) or ROTATION. So that poses the question... is the "bounce / rebound" of this new material going to increase concussion risks?
When looking into Kali's LDL I asked why they werent bigger or smaller. 5mm? According to my interviews, it was found that taller LDL pieces(such as an 8mm tall one that was tested) made the helmet need to be bigger, which created more leverage and mass, negating the effectiveness.
Then the golden question came up... Brad asked me "how much is enough?" From my research it looks like we really dont know. No matter how safe of a helmet we make, there is always the potential of fatal impact. In regards to concussions, there is no magic number that will show whether an impact will cause a concussion or not. Every person and brain is different. All we can do is keep improving.
There is a widely accepted graph that shows what will knock someone unconscious. On one axis we have force (Gs) and on the other we have rotation. I takes about 75 gs to get knocked out. But a violent rotation with NO IMPACT, can also knock you out. Of course, most cycling accidents are a combination of both. So why are the current safety standards only focused on IMPACT?! Looks like we need to update the standards. Helmet standards also require super hard foam, to save you life from a FATAL FORCE impact, but they are so dense of material that they can do a lot of damage at lower speed impacts.
The bigger issue is EDUCATION. We all follow what the marketing campaigns of these companies tell us, but so few of us really do the hard research. I am stoked to see that people are asking the hard questions and challenging what we are told by some of these companies. It goes back to the previous article about when it is (or isnt) time to replace a helmet. Ill admit that I was FORCED by Kali to replace a helmet recently after a crash. Custom graphics on a proto helmet that was broken in and super comfortable. Even without the financial burden, (which nobody should worry about with the Kali crash replacement program) it was hard to let go of my favorite helmet.
So where do we go from here? Keep asking questions, take everything with a grain of salt. Before you make a decision, do the research. ASK COMPANIES for data. CHALLENGE the current safety standards. THINK about the products you buy, and PLAY IT SAFE when it comes time to decide whether or not to replace a crashed helmet.
I have a lot more to learn, but I hope this at least makes a few people think critically for a moment.
  • + 13
 @WAKIdesigns: And AGAIN... FULL DISCLAIMER... I ride for Kali. I have for 8 years. This does, however, not create a bias. I question Kali more than any other company because I value my life. I choose Kali because I believe they are the safest. I believe this because of my research, as well as many many many crashes through my racing career. So dont give me any of that "oh of course you prefer them because they give you free sh*t" argument. I dont give a flying f***k how much a company wants to pay me to use their gear. I ride for the companies I do because I truly believe they are the best.
  • + 2
 @livehardrideharder: thank you for your first comment and I greatly appreciate your second one. I understand your frustration. To me personally bias is an issue with amount of the hype being generated by a biased party. You and Kali are far from that. As to eliminating fatal or long term effect injury, it's a no brainier to me personally. No car fully protects against a crash at 70Mph on a highway. Nothing would save Martyn Ashtons spine from cracking.

What do you think about Hövding airbag for commuters?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I don't know enough about that system yet. I feel like it might fail to deploy if not sensitive enough, or it may be too sensitive and deploy unexpectedly. Also, it could be compromised on impact and deflate. In that situation you would be down and vulnerable to a vehicle, another cyclist, etc. Also there's a lot of space between the head and the deployed bag. Seems like your face would just hit the ground.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: So it's b.s. marketing when it's MIPS but not for any other companies technology? Interesting.
  • + 4
 @livehardrideharder: Brad is a very very smart dude. It's always been very clear that safety and the improvement of head and brain safety was at the core of why he does what he does. Very impressive person based on my minimal experience with him.
  • + 5
 @livehardrideharder: Pleasure reading your posts.
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Sep 19, 2016 at 13:23) (Below Threshold)
 @onemanarmy: MIPS relies solely on head to helmet friction. Any helmet. I rest my case.

I'm not saying it doesn't work. I have a big dose of health scepticism I think. It surely helps. Just like Starbucks gives 1% to Rain Forest. Or my favorite Ethiopian coffee is fair trade. You know... the land where people starve to death but grow coffee... for fair money... Fancy sticker and a bit of help for sure, makes me feel better about my consumption. I mean, in 2 years all helmets will have MIPS. 5$ purchase price for the plastic bit, adds 15$ of margin to the helmet. why not use it when it surely helps a bit. What is there to talk about when everyone will have it? It's like InMold tech back in 2001 when I bought my first helmet
  • + 0
 100% Agree. I have a 6D ATB and it is literally a helmet inside of a helmet. The thin helmet attached to your head is isolated from the outer helmet by small flexible rubber knobs. This way the outer hemet can take the hit and less of that energy is transferred to your scull. It's a great idea for low and high speed impacts. This video sold me: www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkGZXAplj5U
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Next waki article.... Boy in a bubble.... 360D body protection annnnd FWIPS hair glue....
  • + 3
 @dirtdiggler: Totally a great concept. The concern is how big it is. More leverage against your head in a rotational impact and more mass equates to more force in a crash. I actually asked them if they had compared the numbers... weight and size/leverage compared to the impact absorption and rotational slowing. Does one negate the other? Their response: " We have top pros riding our helmets, so obviously we are the best." nice one, 6D....
I wish I had received a real answer. All respect... gone.
  • + 0
 @livehardrideharder: Quite frankly I am concerned hell of a lot about it, since I have experienced myself symptoms of brain trauma and haven't got to the doctor at all. I learned about them 3 months afterwards and have been lucky to get away with a few bruises in total (not sure if my sudden depressive states aren't and effect of it... hard to say). I also remember occasions when someone ate sht hard and kept riding. Hearing about second shot the the head after a concussion being the worst really makes me think a lot. That's why I wrote about Nicholi, next time something like that hapens, the guy should be out. There's no way to write guidelines on that, but dude bails hard - he's off whether he likes it or not. I don't giev a slightest fk about 15-30yr olds getting their pants wet cuz he kept going. They'd be first ones to shout that Redbull should pay and post #Iridefornicholi. I have kids and care for them, which involves helmets for them and for myself and my wife. As you say eduction is the key, because it's not only about bike riding, people get head trauma in lots of different sports, helmets is one thing, what you do after the head banger is another. I'll be defo careful is any sort of person bangs his/hers head into the ground/tree /something falls on their head. They should walk
home and observe their heads for next few days, if not weeks.

It's been great to hear your stuff. Thank you.
  • + 11
 @Rasterman: Great summary and yes you are correct on both points. If you increase the size you increase the mass. If you remember from your physics class, force equals mass times acceleration so if you increase the mass of the helmet you also increase the force at which your head impacts the ground. On top of that when you increase the outer dimension of the helmet you increase the rotational forces applied to your neck when you crash.

We do in fact have a "controlled crash video" for you. The Imperial College of London was able to take Nicholi Rogatkin's Rampage crash and recreate it on a test rig in their lab. From there we were able to compare the data with the real life crash in order find out exactly what the Shiva 2.0 can do. Check out the link below:

www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FPlusSizeBMX%2Fvideos%2F10153605182681685%2F&show_text=0&width=400


@WAKIdesigns: We are constantly testing different sizes, shapes and materials in an effort to find out the best possible solution to protect you when you need it most. Its all a balance and we learn more and more every do so our products will only get better and better.

Thanks for the great dialog guys, we here at Kali love it!
  • + 3
 @KaliProtectives: thank you! Awesome work!
  • + 4
 @KaliProtectives: #WHYILOVEKALI Awesome video!
  • + 4
 It's great to see this and a number of other options become available as an alternative to the old EPS style helmest and also good to see them engaging with independent researchers. Keep up the good work!
  • - 5
flag stikmanglaspell (Sep 19, 2016 at 15:47) (Below Threshold)
 @livehardrideharder: I would love to see this data you have that proves your claim: "Stylish lines on TLD helmets create Grab points and risky leverage"? You make it sound like there is a giant shark fin on a TLD helmet.
  • + 7
 It doesnt take a "giant shark fin" to pose a concern. If the 5mm LDL significantly reduces rotational impact in Nikoli's helmet, what does a rigid 12mm raised line on a TLD do? Would you use a square helmet? What worries me even more is visors. They are a massive leverage point. My maya (half shell) has a super flexible visor and I wish my Shiva did too. Havent done visor testing yet, but id love to see how much they effect rotational impacts. Have you noticed a lot of companies testing videos are without visors? I think the testing actually requires the visor to be removed (I have yet to confirm that) .
  • + 4
 I do like the break away visor feature on my Shiva, which I'm sure helps. But as Brad says, we can always do better.
  • + 0
 @livehardrideharder: ekhem... small tip in PR: do not whine on other companies when supporting argument for own company... it can go wrong very quickly on the internet. Like it recently went for Urge...
  • + 1
 @livehardrideharder: On the ATB-1T helmet I don't notice the extra weight at all. I'm about 6' 200#'s. It's just slightly heavier than my old Fox Flux helmet but on the trail it disapears. It's actually a good looking helmet IMO. If you are coming from a full on XC helmet you will notice a little more weight at first, but after 1-2 runs you forget about it. Very comfortable. The re-assurance I have knowing that I have more protection gives me much more confidence riding. I actually cringe now when I forget my 6D in the wrong car and have to use my old Fox helmet. The Flux gave me a bad concussion during a very low speed crash. I'm positive if I had my 6D I wouldn't have been dizzy for the next 2 weeks. That said, I don't know how their Motorcycle helmets compare weight wise. You could have a valid point if their helmets are significantly heavier. Bottom line, if you can afford it, get a helmet that isolates your noggin from the outer shell. The Kali stuff is nice too. The 6D feels like you have 'suspension' for your head. It's pretty awesome how well it's engineered in a tight little package.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: no whining g at all. I also ride for TLD. I have questioned every company in my arguments here, including Kali. This isn't about PR, it's about asking the right questions and being open to learning. TLD makes kickass helmets and they are as sexy as they come.
  • + 1
 @dirtdiggler: it's not about whether you notice the weight or not, it's a matter of that weight contributing to added force to your brain in a crash. It might be small, all of the factors we are discussing here are small, maybe even TINY factors, but they all add up. If we can make a 2% difference, that is very significant. I still think we are a long way away from the best solutions, but we will get there eventually, even if its 2% at a time.
  • + 1
 @livehardrideharder: I think you're splitting hairs. A 2% difference (as an example) is likely gong to be crossed out by the huge design advantage you have isolating the head during a crash. Again, you might have a point if the helmet we're significantly heavier but I don't think some additional ounces are enough to make an impact worse. What if you have a large head vs a small head? Do you factor that weight difference as well? I don't think the extra ounces will have any effect at this amount. In the real world, riding your bike down a trail and falling OTB your own body weight/mass and trajectory are going to be greater than what this helmet can influence. Remember, we're talking ounces here, not pounds. Probably very hard to measure in real world circumstanes. Again, the ATB-1T helmet is not that much heavier than a standard helmet so I doubt it makes any measurable difference in terms of crashing. I only addressed weight and comfort b/c I think it's worth it for the added protection which becomes evident as soon as you own and use one.
  • + 1
 @dirtdiggler: I do think that the leverage of a larger helmet is a greater concern than weight. Either way, we are talking about the most sensitive and fragile part of your being. That being said, I think every single factor is significant. The larger helmet could be better for all we know. Still have to do more tests, and even those cant replicate every scenario in the real world.
  • + 1
 @livehardrideharder: I can't argue with some of that logic. That's why I use a helmet that can theoretically absorb impact far better at low and high speeds vs a traditional eps helmet. I just don't think the negatives (if there are any here) outweigh the benefits of this technology. The weight and size aren't that much more than a traditional helmet. This like worrying or arguing that knee pads will cause a harder fall due to the weight added to your knees.
As far as width, I actually view wider as a better thing here. If I go down hard my helmet is likely to hit the ground before my neck or face does vs a low profile helmet. You should try one of these helmets out for a day if you can. You will quickly find out the weight and size are insignificant. It's definitely worth every penny when you see how well they are designed and how effective the tech is.
  • + 1
 @dirtdiggler: Ive worn one. I personally wasnt a huge fan, but I dont have anything bad to say about it. You are absolutely right, a heavy knee pad will create more force, and yes, in would have close to no significance in damaging your knee. But we are talking about your brain, where even undetectable damage adds up over time and can result in CTE or other health risks. I like where you are going with your argument, a larger helmet could help your neck or face. That makes sense in a fall on flat ground, but I think it would be worse in catching things like exposed rocks, trees, etc. Either way, im glad we both use products that are at least attempting to solve this issue. I have more questions so I just booked a flight to interbike. @WAKIdesigns are you going to be there?
  • + 1
 @KaliProtectives: Thanks for the info and I watched all of the video. I suggest making a short video with the simulated crash with and without the LDL. Front and center on your page, it speaks more than any marketing or review would ever say to me. People are used to marketing lying and bending the truth, most reviews are glorified ads and many are paid for. But show a video like this and there is no questioning it, there is no debate, it's safer, done.

Do you plan on using LDL in trail or enduro helmets?
  • + 3
 @Rasterman: Great suggestion - thanks! We plan on adding LDL to all new helmets we release moving forward.
  • + 1
 @KaliProtectives:

Talk to check out the helmet a couple times this week. After looking at it and after talking with you guys about it I'm really excited to see where the technology goes. Thanks for not kicking me out of the booth for asking too many questions. LOL! And thanks for having a couple nut jobs signing posters. LOL!
  • + 8
 I would love a helmet with a more soft almost memory form or gel type padding because I must have a strange head shape I get helmets the right size but they never fit. Every time I put my ixs full face on I can hear the plastics creaking as the helmet gets pulled open wider
  • + 6
 Its worth trying on some of their helmets, as i have also had problems with getting helmets to fit properly and theirs have the best fit i have come across.
  • + 10
 I love the fit of my Maya. Now if they can just abandon the "stoner core" graphics, the appeal will likely broaden.
  • + 6
 They dropped that last year for 2016, the current ones have no graphics. I've had the black one since January, agreed, great fitting helmet.
  • + 6
 Love my kali helmet. These guys are awesome and their warranty is top notch. I'll definately be buying one of the new enduro helmets
  • + 5
 Same. I'm on my second Kali Avatar full face after knocking the first one around in a crash this year. Soooo glad I wasn't wearing a half shell...

Lightweight, comfy, solid protection and good value. I agree that their graphics can be a bit "marmite" but at least there's loads of options.
  • + 6
 Let's hope the graphic designers step their game up, as I like what Kali is doing otherwise.
  • + 4
 My Kali lid keeps my melon intact. The light weight keeps neck from getting stiff n sore after all-day downhill runs. My full face lid of choice.
  • + 4
 Looks like I found my eventual next helmet.
  • + 3
 these lids rule! hands down best lids on the market!
  • + 2
 Please put that tech into a half shell with removable chin strap, and then take my money
  • + 1
 Are they gonna make a 'rogatkin' which is the same but without a visor and twice as expensive??
  • - 1
 Downhill and Motocross are very different sports, specifically in relation to the speeds that impacts take place. As a result, I don't see how one helmet is suitable for both?
  • + 1
 did kali make rogatkin wear the visor?
  • - 2
 I heard the stylish lines of a visor create a grab point???
  • + 0
 Specifically talking about helmet safety...
  • + 0
 I'm not sure if "It's a no-brainer" is the best used here...
  • + 0
 Enduro version please.
  • - 2
 I wonder if they will will certify if for ASTM F1492, a safety standard for multiple impact (skate) helmets.
  • - 2
 Matt black is a person, matte black a finish.
  • + 3
 depends if you use proper English or not lol
  • + 1
 @poah: I learned the correct spelling of matte from the labels on Krylon spray paint as a youth. Why would I care about Proper English? I'm an American. Keep your 'aluninium' I'll have fibre de carbone, merci.
  • + 0
 @endlessblockades: wtf is aluninium. Are you really that much of a moron??
  • + 1
 @poah: I might be a moron but I spelt the English pronunciation Aluminium wrong. Gimme a break -I'm on Oxys from the plate and screws I got in my arm the other day.
  • + 1
 @endlessblockades: see my cheap ass RS pike and monarch plus keep my bike planted to the ground so I don't fall off (actually I'm shit and go slow lol )
  • + 2
 @endlessblockades - Sorry man, we were trying to be punny. Matt Macduff. Matt black...
  • + 1
 @KaliProtectives: Haha no worries - it's obvious now that you mention it - I was literally in a fog. Pun duly noted and approved!
  • - 2
 Now Kali just needs to design a decent looking shell
  • - 3
 Would anyone ride in a football helmet, heard those things are 100% concussion proof
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