Powered by Outside

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: The Real Bike Weights from PB Editors

Feb 24, 2023
by Henry Quinney  
photo

Recently, I've been on something of a burn. I'm well aware that I'm very lucky to be riding some lightweight and wondrous bike parts, as well as getting to review the latest generation of enduro bikes, but I have to say - I wanted all my bikes to be a little bit heavier.

Whether it's the downcountry bike that inexplicably doesn't have the Grip2 damper and bigger brakes, or the $10,000 170 mm enduro bike that comes with tires that aren't fit for purpose, I had a eureka moment - in recent years, all the best things to come into mountain biking have been to make it heavier.

Then, there's Linkglide, which has come in for review. This new family of drivetrains from Shimano says it can offer durability increases of 300%, which is quite the statement. They also claim that when staying within the same tier of componentry, ie XT to XT, it's the best shift that they can offer - not Hyperglide.

So, a better shift, with greater longevity, sounds pretty good. What if I slung a coil shock on - which feels fantastic - and maybe some heavy tires and inserts? Well, certainly I've got a bike that rides like an absolute dream. I only wish now I could get some heavier brakes. More oil, please, and bigger rotors too whilst you're at it. Chop chop.

With that, I asked the other editors at Pinkbike how heavy their bikes are. Not their latest review bike, or something super-secret that they hide in their grandmother's spare bedroom but their daily driver, that they rattle and battle about their local trails.

So here they are. The heavy bikes of Pinkbike's staff.



Henry Quinney's Transition Spire

photo
I, like Prince Harry, have been watching a lot of South Park.

Wheel Size - 29” front / 29” rear
Fork Travel - 170mm
Material - Carbon frame, alloy wheels, titanium cranks
Tyres - Double Down Maxxis DHF / DH casing DHR2, with Rimpact Pro inserts
Extras - Largest bolt-on fender I could find, pump with multi-tool
Pedals - Crankbrother Mallet E
Weight - 38.1 lb / 17.3 kg

photo
I'm a big fan of a small guide and bash.

I've currently got a set of 1500 g Versus tires in for review, which is certainly beefy, and I'll put them back on in the next week or two. The extra mass really does help when you're riding fast and rough trails though. The bike tends to pad through things instead of pranging. You certainly feel it on the climbs though, and typically I would ride tires around the 12 to 1300 gram mark, which is about the ballpark of this Maxxis setup. When graduating to the 1500 g Versus tires, I may well lose the Rimpact Pro inserts.

photo
Gliding links, yo.

I also wouldn't be opposed to some heavier brakes, particularly bigger and thicker rotors. All in all, though, I'm very happy with the weight and it's a strange yet privileged position to be in to be wishing for your bike to be heavier.

photo
Still good in 2023. DD on the front with a DH on the rear, plus Rimpact Pro inserts.



photo

Mike Kazimer's Trek Fuel EX

Wheel Size - 29” front / 27.5” rear
Fork Travel - 160mm
Material - Carbon frame, alloy wheels, alloy cranks
Tyres - DH casing Continental Kryptotal F+R
Extras - Mini-pump, tire lever, Tubolito tube in downtube
Pedals - Hope Union TC pedals
Weight - 34.5 lb / 15.6 kg


The current weight feels just about right to me. I built it up to be a fun, tough trail bike, and there's really nothing I'd immediately change. The quickest way to shave some grams would be to run lighter tires, although I like the peace of mind that the thicker casing provides.

As for where I'd happily add weight, I'll probably play around with a coil shock at some point in this bike's life, and I'm not too worried about the extra weight that'll incur.

Apologies for the zoomed-in shot - there are currently some bits and bobs on this bike that aren't quite out yet. I'll do a full bike check and a more complete rundown once everything has been released.



Prime Thunderflash

Matt Beer's Prime Thunderflash

Wheel Size - 29” front / 29” rear
Fork Travel - 170mm
Material - Carbon frame, carbon wheels, carbon cranks
Tyres - DH casing Continental Argotal/Kyptotal R
Extras - Mini-pump & multi-tool
Pedals - North Shore Billet Daemon
Weight - 36.9 lb / 16.5 kg

All high-performance machines are built to maximize their fuel consumption by shedding weight where they can - it’s the sacred power-to-weight ratio. Human power machines burn energy too. As mountain bikers, we’re always trying to reduce the weight of our bikes. So where is it most important to save grams and how much do those component choices factor into how your bike’s performance?

Tires: Choosing tires and wheels that suit your needs is a battle of compromising traction and rolling resistance. Downhill riders typically search for the most grip and support from heavy casing tires, whereas cross-country racers make up the most time with the help of lightweight, fast-rolling tires. I find that the traction and support that heavier, grippy tires provide can single-handedly boost your descending confidence, more than “over-forking” a bike by 10mm. There’s nothing worse than getting carried away on a new long-travel bike and instantly flatting because of inadequate tire choice. The bike lets you know it’s worthy of more.

That’s where a large crossover exists in the “trail” category of riding for the majority of mountain bikers. Light-duty tires will make that bike feel like a whippet out on the smoother trails, but if you toss it into the deep end, you’ll likely be puckering your way down, or at the very least, holding back. Throw some enduro tires on there and you might think you forgot to release the parking brake.

Seb Stott jumped into the deep hole of weight-saving performance with his Why You Shouldnt Worry About Weight Much article that explained how a 1 kg increase in your bike’s weight would only slow you down by 20 seconds on a 30-minute climb.

If you’re not willing to sacrifice that weight, two certainties exist; coaxing the bike through rocks, or risking a flat. The latter is imminent. So, all that time you just saved uphill can be lost by fixing a flat. It can be a total roll of the dice.

Prime Thunderflash
Everyday essentials: a water bottle, pump, and multi-tool, even with DH tires.
Prime Thunderflash
Big, powerful brakes belong on any bike.

If tires are the best, albeit, the riskiest place to save weight, then what's the worst place to save weight? I’d argue that brakes could be the least effective place. The variance in weight between a 180 and 200mm rotor is about 30g, but the performance gains are massive; more power, more modulation, and better heat dissipation. Would you notice that extra 60 grams were added to your bike? Probably not.

What about the other non-performance components that are bolted to your bike, like tools, water, and other supplies? Tools and water strapped to the bike don’t increase the drag or rolling weight but do add to the overall mass. I can’t say that I notice the weight on the frame nearly as much as slapping on heavier tires would have thought.

There’s no perfect all-encompassing solution though. The use case is dependent on the bike’s nature, terrain, and how aggressively I choose to ride. It’s a process that riders may need to experiment with or research what components others are using in their area. I tend to lean towards “over-tiring” bikes, sacrificing drag and maximizing traction almost all of the time.



Seb Stott's Canyon Strive

photo

Wheel Size - 29” front / 29” rear
Fork Travel - 170mm
Material - Carbon frame, alloy wheels, carbon cranks
Tyres - EXO+ casing Maxxis Assegai/DHII
Extras - Spare tube
Pedals - Crankbrother Mallet E
Weight - 36.2 lb / 16.4 kg

This is the size large canyon Strive I've been running as a long-term test bike since last April. I've changed a few things since the original review. I've upgraded to an MRP SXG upper and lower chain guide, fitted a 240 mm OneUp V2 dropper post, and I'm currently trying out an SDG saddle and TRP drivetrain. I've swapped to a 40 mm rise Rehthal alloy handlebar cut to 760 mm. I've tested out different tires and forks, but I'm back on the stock ones for now, just with a lightweight insert in the rear.

The bike as pictured (with pedals, a tube, and an empty bottle) weighs 16.4 Kg or 36.2 lb. It's striking to me that most enduro bikes with sensible specs weigh about the same.

You could probably get under the 16 Kg mark if you removed the chain guide, insert, and tube, but I'm more likely to go in the other direction. The EXO+ tires are as light as I'd ever want to go on an enduro bike - I usually prefer something wider and tougher, like a Schwalbe Magic Mary and Big Betty combo in 2.6".



Ed Spratt's Privateer 141

photo

Wheel Size - 29” front / 29” rear
Fork Travel - 150mm
Material - Alloy frame, alloy wheels, alloy cranks
Tyres - Super Trail casing Magic Mary/Hans Dampf
Extras - Large fender
Pedals - Nukeproof Horizon Pro Sam Hill
Weight - 37.5 lb / 17.0 kg

This is my P3-sized Privateer 141 built up around this time last year as my personal bike to take on the incredible trails of the Scottish Borders and beyond. While weight can be important for me, the bike was built with parts that I believe to be reliable, long-lasting, and can be mostly serviced at home

I could make it lighter by using a different set of wheels. The Crankbrothers Synthesis E alloy wheels are not the lightest at, I think, around 2,000 grams for the I9 rear hub and Crankbrothers front hub pairing I have on the bike at the moment. I’m not the hardest on wheels so I could get away with something slightly lighter.

photo
Fender-heaven.
photo
Metal. Metal everywhere.

There isn’t any way I would want to make this bike any heavier at the moment but I have already fitted Rimpact Pro inserts front and rear, adding around 300 grams. I like to run low pressures and the extra grip on the often wet trails in the UK is pretty useful.




Author Info:
henryquinney avatar

Member since Jun 3, 2014
341 articles
Report
Must Read This Week
Sign Up for the Pinkbike Newsletter - All the Biggest, Most Interesting Stories in your Inbox
PB Newsletter Signup

372 Comments
  • 243 6
 That Prime Thunderflash is drool inducing. Never even heard of it before this article.
  • 49 1
 Agreed! At first I thought it was an arrival but it didn’t look quite right.
  • 27 0
 Thought it was a WAO Arrival at first glance
  • 28 0
 @fitnj: It's the Arrival of the Thunderflash.
  • 6 0
 Its says its setup as a mullet but from the photo it looks like it's got a 29 in the rear?
  • 3 1
 @kubby It's even better in person, you should treat yourself www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/495326692684608/?mibextid=dXMIcH
  • 16 0
 I was today years old when I heard of the Thunderflash.

What the hell is that thing? Looks awesome
  • 22 1
 So considering my 180 front/170 rear Medium(490mm reach) Geometron G1 with alloy wheels, cushcore and DD/EXO+ tires is just a hair under 37 lbs and costed me 1/3 of these builds? I dont feel too bad
  • 8 1
 A riding buddy cracked 3, and is having a nightmare of a time getting a 4th warranty now.
  • 11 3
 @davidrobinsonphoto: 4? That's on him now... buddy should have bailed at the second failed frame.
  • 3 0
 First I have heard of this bike too (a buddy is getting their DH bike though), cool looking bike...suspension layout is similar to Giant...would be interesting to see how it rides. Hopefully review incoming.
  • 2 1
 Wonder if its made by amazon hehe
  • 3 2
 Every Friday is a Fail now. Pretty lame, hanging that carrot on a string. Using recycled footage too... Bummer.
  • 3 3
 @lord-01: the XL is kinda fugly with the huge seat mast
  • 4 0
 I see reviews of this thing going back to April 2021? how did we all miss this? wrong side of the atlantic I guess...

Pinkbike even reviewed it April 23rd 2021-
www.pinkbike.com/news/prime-bicycles-launches-with-new-downhill-and-enduro-bikes.html
  • 1 0
 @TannerValhouli: i agree!!!
  • 5 0
 @mattbeer how do find the Cura 4's compare to the TRP DH-R EVOs? I'm currently running Cura 4's on both my bikes but have been tempted to try the TRP's.
  • 1 0
 @deiru: 2nd. Please advise.
  • 2 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: @deiru There's a full review coming on the Cura 4s, so I won't spoil that, but the metallic pads give plenty of power and the modulation is easy to manage.
  • 1 0
 pretty sure the privateer was cheaper
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: Will you be reviewing the Prime Thunderflash as well?
  • 156 0
 I just wanna see Levy's 24lb rocket bike.
  • 8 4
 Levy rides a Mini and doesn't care about the rest...
  • 7 0
 @danstonQ: pretty sure he sold it
  • 3 5
 WAREZ FF!!!!!!!! #FRAIDAY FILES SMRJ
  • 1 0
 @jlauteam1: yeah he sold it to a pall, the lad is Irish and living in Whistler now.
  • 2 0
 I haven't seen Levy on a bike in a while, who is to say he even still knows how?
  • 35 1
 @whateverbr0: I only ride bikes online not irl
  • 97 13
 Bike Manufacturers:
Hey Pinkbike, we have a bunch of enduro bikes being released this year with a weight around 35 lbs before proper tires & brake rotors.

Pinkbike:
OK, we’ll show the minions that 35 lbs is light for an enduro bike these days.
  • 17 7
 I feel like 35 lbs is pretty decent for enduro nowadays. Enduro tracks are becoming super demanding and more downhill oriented, so adding burly tires, forks, to be able to get you and your bike down in one piece only adds more weight. I'd take a heavier, cheaper, stronger bike any day over a lighter, expensive, slightly weaker bike.
  • 35 4
 My guess is more like:

"Shit. All the 2023 teams and sponsorships have been fully revealed. The financials from last quarter have been delivered to the arm chair CEOs.There's no product reviews ready for press, and there's no race results to report. So... what the hell are we going to post until something happens?"

Henry: "I could beat the fossilized remains of the 'does weight really matter' dead horse one more time"

"Sure. Can you put it up during the week? We can pretend Banyoles is a real race on the weekend so this just has to fill on friday"
  • 27 1
 @densign1: enduro tracks may be getting more demanding, but my anecdotal experience says most local trails are getting less demanding, and yet my bikes continue to get heavier.
  • 4 2
 @Hayek: My local trails are getting a mix. While some people insist on making every obstacle rideable by their 8 year old kid, others are building new and bigger obstacles.

My 5 year old Enduro is 36 pounds. 5 years old, same weight as these bikes.
  • 10 4
 @Hayek: The weight increase is from wagon wheels and tires. And frame/fork have to be heavier to handle larger wheels. Bike weights were sub 35 with burly builds when 27.5 was still a thing.
  • 3 0
 @emptybe-er: my GF's extra small 27.5 Transition is 37 pounds.
  • 20 1
 @JSTootell: That’s ridiculous. Are you trying to punish her or what?
  • 2 1
 @JSTootell: My large process 153 was 34lb with 2.5 minions. Although I did have a nice light 10sp cassette, saved around 1/2 lb alone.
  • 1 1
 @JSTootell: You must build heavy bikes or stock bikes with tools onboard? Somethings not right
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: I didn't build her bike, or chose it for her. She bought it off a kid (his dad, technically) who out grew it. It was also during COVID and options were slim for a 5' tall girl that wasn't a beginner bike. We are ordering a Stumpy Evo this weekend to try and get to a more reasonable 32 or so pounds.

Transition Patrol frame is a ton of weight, that's most of it. Carbon E13 wheels are heavy too, but held up with only the occasional spoke adjustment. DD tire in the back after a couple flats with EXO.

That bike has no tools or anything stashed. I carry everything on mine. I have a SWAT tool in the head tube, and probably a pound worth of stuff in the SWAT box (pump, sealant, etc). If I took that stuff out it would probably be 34 pounds. But I don't ride it that way, I never take that stuff off the bike. Even still, that is an SWorks frame, so I'm not getting much lighter there. Any lighter of wheels and I start destroying them (currently on carbon DH wheels). Nothing less than DD tires with a rear insert holds up. AXS GX was lighter than the XO1 it replaced. Longest dropper that will fit. Carbon bars. 220/200mm HS2 discs, RF Turbine crank. Ohlins Coil both ends (stock). All of my improvements were from lessons learned riding that bike the past 5 years. I would break something, maybe more than once (way too many wheels and tires), then improve until parts stopped failing.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: My 12 year old's 12 year old small Transition BottleRocket V2 is 35lbs. Was mine, I Bought it new and put a Hussfelt on it. Musta been 39lbs when I got it.
  • 1 5
flag kingbike2 (Feb 25, 2023 at 13:41) (Below Threshold)
 @JSTootell: she needs to lose weight
  • 8 2
 @kingbike2: She ran 100 kilometers a few months ago at the Kodiak 100. One of our first dates was running 40 miles for my 40th birthday. She rode 40 miles on that Transition for her 40th. Her weight is just fine.

I wish you luck trying to match her abilities.
  • 2 1
 @JSTootell: This would be the rare case where poor performance can be attributed to the equipment.
  • 3 0
 @JSTootell: Are the parts failing because they're too light? Or because you need to ride a bit smoother maybe? How did you manage to ride before inserts?
  • 2 0
 @emptybe-er: I rode my bike to my limits on occasion. And on those occasions, I find out sometimes what a weak link is. Not an every ride thing, but it sucks to ruin a trip from it, which has happened.

Before the inserts I was going through a rear rim about every 3 months on this on this bike. It was annoying. Well, until I got some heavy carbon wheels then it was just pinch flatting DD tires even running excessive pressure for my weight.

Now I am hitting the features I want at the speeds I like with pressures low enough that I'm not pinging off every rock.

Sure, it's not for everyone. But after arguing with friends about not needing one, I finally tried it, and here we are.
  • 73 3
 Oh man, you left out Levy's bike. Whatever it is.

Convince customers weight doesn't matter, and you can shorten development times and cost. Bike & tire manufacturers no longer need to resolve the conflicting requirements of weight and durability through breakthrough technology ($), or iterative design cycles to find an ideal balance ($).

To some riders, weight will always be a high priority...they likely expect durability too. Probably mostly in the XC / DC segment.
  • 1 0
 I think he did a bike check on a personal Transition Spur a bit back.
  • 7 0
 @groghunter: that was the other Mike on the Spur
  • 6 0
 @mtmc99: i literally always make this mistake when i see their names in print. in video or audio, i remember who's who, in print, it's a Mike.
  • 88 5
 I'm sure what I'm about to say will be denied by the PB crew, as well it should since it's a sh*t take. But let me don my tinfoil hat and give it a go..

Distribute customer survey asking what the #1 hurdle to buying an emtb is. Answer comes back as a tie between cost and weight. Sell answers to bicycle retailers association, association says hey there's no-f*cking-way we are dropping MSRP on these emtbs, but you know what would be real neato? If you guys could do a few propaganda pieces back to back telling people that bike weight isn't that big of a deal. Better yet, tell them that a heavier bike is actually BETTER, you know, some real up-is-down, down-is-up sort of stuff. Give it a clickbait title, you'll have hundreds of comments.. it's a win-win here. Once you've told the reader base what to think (because they don't have their own legs, lungs, or brains to give them feedback from actually riding trails, right), they will see all these 38lb hogs and think "You know what? I guess that e-bike at 44lbs really isn't so bad.. hmmm...". Tell ya what, you just let us know who we need to make the check out to, ok?

Joking aside, I know they do this stuff just to stir the pot and give us all something to argue about when we should be doing other stuff at work. And for that, hats off to them Big Grin
  • 25 3
 He keeps bringing up that Linkglide cassette and framing the issue as light vs durable but X01 already last at least 200% as long as XT/XTR and it's lighter. Hyperglide shifts great. I'm running an XTR cassette now but I honestly think Shimano is struggling to make a light long lasting cassette and is trying to reframe the problem rather than fix it.
  • 15 0
 @jeremy3220: Yea I dont get that part of his argument. I got 2 years /1500 miles on my XO1 drivetrain and its still going strong.
  • 15 1
 Two XO1 cassettes, with 4000 miles each. No obvious wear.
  • 9 5
 @jeremy3220: i just can't fathom the value proposition of a $400 cassette for any reason given it's a wear and tear item. XTR and the X01 cassettes are $400 vs. $150 for XT and $80 for deore. this is bonkers money, especially considering you're saving only about 200g for the privilege of spending an extra $300. and that $80 deore cassette is bombproof since it's all steel and will last forever.
  • 2 0
 @wolftwenty1: I've got 4031 miles on an nx drive train but it's definitely at it's end. No point in even putting on a new chain. That said it shifts perfectly.
  • 5 2
 Issue here is that they're all just basically riding similar bikes. Do all skill development roads lead to heavy rigs? Or is this just the PB crew? Would be fun to see some more variety.
  • 2 0
 ..
  • 11 5
 @mikealive: Dude, the industry convinced all of you that lighter is always better and worth extra price, it is also less durable, which is a win-win from bike brands standpoint - they sell you more with higher margins. the truth is that for most people weight is not as important as they believe, this is just return to common sense and is really against interest of bike brands.
  • 3 0
 @DylanH93: My dyslexia got your numbers mixed up there for a moment & was going to ask if it was fitted to a bmx. :-)
  • 22 1
 @Mannra: I’d say your bike build has a lot to do with the people and places you ride. The majority of riders don’t have access to trails that you need a 170mm travel Enduro bike to ride. I personally can’t think of many trails where you would need that much bike to ride. I live in Central Colorado. Most of the guys I ride with are on trail bikes. Hard tails to 150mm travel at most. Ranging from 21-30 pounds. My Ibis Ripmo is 28 pounds and is plenty of bike for Colorado and Utah where we ride. We have some pretty rowdy trails here and I can’t say I have felt under biked on any trail I have ridden since I started riding it. Actually I feel over biked most of the time. None of us ride with inserts. None of us are running tires heavier than EXO+ Last fall we did a trip to Gand Junction Lunch loop trails , Palisade Plunge , and Loma Trails. We rode 20-35 miles each day. No flats. I get maybe a flat a year. It one last year and I rode more than I have in years. What are you guys doing that you flat all the time????? Where are you riding that you need essentially a downhill bike????? I just don’t get it.
  • 5 4
 @skyroach: You're looking at up front costs. An X01 cassette is cheaper to own long term than XT and GX. It's a single piece steel cassette except for the largest cog. However the real reason it lasts so long is the coating they use, not because it's steel. It's a better value long term than GX or XT.
  • 4 0
 @mikealive: Man you read my mind. High five and a beer to you. So if there are two of us with this crazy thought pattern maybe there is a pattern, maybe there is a pattern? Going back in my bunker now getting paranoid again.
  • 1 0
 @Bikethrasher: I haven't been as far east as Colorado, but I visit the St George/Hurricane area often. And while those trails can be very chunky and tons of fun (Zen for example), on everything I have ridden so far I wouldn't need more than a trail bike except for the odd extra credit obstacle here and there. Zen is actually part of an XC race courses and I did it with 100mm.

I live in SoCal and ride a mix of trails. Most of the time you only need a trail bike. But since I ride my local systems a lot, I know them virtually by heart, and I almost always hit the extra credit options people have built, and often times I bottom out (or near enough) my 170mm coil suspension. I take the same bike to Mammoth a few times a year and take it down trails where it is definitely under biked, but I'm not going often enough that I want a dedicated DH bike to keep parked most of the time (though, I am getting close to this point).

I can't speak for others, but my local flavor of riding, and how I consume it, definitely requires this much bike.
  • 3 1
 @Bikethrasher: Your absolutely correct. It really comes down to component specs. If you put a slx drivetrain, fox 38, Fox X2, dt xm 1700, 4 piston brakes and double down dhf/dhr combo on most frames with 140-170mm they are all gonna weigh about the same. Agreed not sure why anyone is still using inserts unless they use inserts with lighter tires.
  • 2 0
 @Bikethrasher: I ride a 170/170 and a 120/140 bike both with inserts front and rear in western WA. The weight isn't a deterrent for me, and I didn't get them for rim protection or flats, I use them for lower pressure/better grip and sidewall support on wet slippery roots and rocks. They feel pretty great on off camber stuff and putting a lot of energy into lower psi tires in a corner. I agree, didn't have issues with denting rims or getting flats before having them.
If I lived in CO I might not run them cause the terrain, but here 95 percent of my riding is climb climb climb then bomb all the way back down, so very different priorities for climbing than undulating terrain like CO has. My bikes would feel slow there (though I still might run inserts cause they feel so good).
  • 3 0
 @Bikethrasher: “Central Colorado” could mean a lot of different terrain. I agree that if you’re not racing, the extra travel isn’t really required, but I’ll be happy to die on the hill that heavy tires and inserts are worth it. I HATE having to deal with wheel and tire damage on a ride.
  • 2 1
 @Bikethrasher: after replacing so many octagon rims & bikes being as good as they are these days I prefer buying parts that won't get destroyed when I'm all amped up doing stupid stuff as high speeds. (*36.5# TrailPistol is my "light" bike)
Guess it depends on how hard you shred?
  • 2 0
 @Bikethrasher: agreed. Why people need a bike heavier than a dh bike as their trail bike is a mystery to me
  • 3 0
 @Mannra: If you check out the Bikes from the Staff over at MTB-News.de you will see a far wider variaty of bikes. I think the Pinkbike staff mostly rides those kind of bikes because of the area they are riding in. In my Hometown we are surrounded by Mountains with lots of cablecars and their of so you can see a lot of People on downhill bikes since you really only need to pedal if you want to
  • 1 0
 @chrismac70: if you know, you know…
  • 2 0
 @Mannra: challenging terrain requires a certain type of bike
  • 4 2
 @Bikethrasher: Agreed, it's a little weird that all of the bikes are essentially the same, and that they're so overbuilt/overbiked.

PB is pretty gravity oriented but yeah, these are all full on enduro bikes. The average mountain bike rider is probably not well served by bikes like this, really.

-Walt
  • 2 1
 @waltworks: Depends what you mean by 'average biker'. This type of bike works well for the type of trails the average rider in BC or PNW does, and most run similar components and tires so the weights don't vary much.
  • 2 0
 @Mannra: wanna go fast and not break shit every time you are out? Your bike is gonna have some heft.
  • 1 0
 @Bikethrasher: totally agree with this. I get that if you're riding steep, rough and fast, you will need some heft. Simply pointing out that it's all similar and would've been more interesting if someone's daily driver was a mid travel because they targeted technical climbing, or a short travel because they put in more miles and like the handling challenge over obstacles.

Levy isn't always right on pb, but he is always unique, which makes for a better read.
  • 2 0
 @Chonky13: Living in Moab. You actually live in a place where a having a bigger bike would be nice. But my current set up works extremely well there. Can’t say I feel under biked there on any of the trails you like to ride on your profile. You and anyone else that has easy access to that kind of terrain should consider themselves very fortunate. My point was that most of the people who ride do not or have limited access to the terrain that would require a Super Enduro. Also remember that in the grand scheme of things Pinkbike is a tiny group in Mtn biking. Of that group only a small percentage has properly burly trails near by. So the Pinkbike staff rides probably aren’t the representation or fit for most riders. I’ve been riding Moab since 1995 on everything from a 1992 Trek Antelope Hardtail with 1&1/2” travel fork to a Yeti 303 DH bike.
Most of the rides I do require just as much climbing as descending. Unfortunately some require more climbing than descending. So depending on the people you ride with. This could me a nice leisurely spin to the top this being most people and bombing the Dh. Or the OG XC group of old XC racers and it can easily turn into a day of seemingly endless climbing for a crappy descent. As miserable as this sounds there is a lot to be learned from the OG crowd. Or in my case with my crew of ex endurance racers it’s race to the top then a race back to the bottom.
As far as killing wheels. I used to destroy wheels and tires constantly, well my bike in general. Then as my Friend Frank would say I actually learned how to ride and I stopped destroying my bike. This took a while‍♂️ I was smarter at 20 than I am today.
  • 2 0
 @Bikethrasher: in socal it's really nice to have a 170/170 kind of bike for the rocky trails and the ones with plenty of hucks. Can also be your park bike. Then have something shorter travel for everything else. Yeah, you could probably do everything on a 150 too
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: I have 4k+ miles on an SLX cassette that's still running very well. Replacing chains frequently has helped
  • 2 0
 @Bikethrasher: Rider weight has a lot to do with this. There's a big difference between in force on suspension, wheels and tires between a 120lb person and a 210 lb person. I don't know why this isn't being mentioned more in the argument. They're talking about 5-7 pounds of bike weight with total disregard of the 100+ lb differences in rider weight.
  • 3 0
 @motts: I couldn’t agree more. I’m only 170-175 pounds with full gear and 3 liters of water. When I’m riding a lot that can easily drop down another 10 pounds. Heavier riders will benefit much more from tires with heavier casings and inserts. For a lighter rider those heavy casings and inserts can make the bike feel overly damp and dead. Might be great if you’re racing but not what I’m looking for on my trail bike. Ride style is also a huge factor. Guys who plow down the trail with reckless abandon are definitely going to be much more likely to get flats and break wheels, than guys who seeming flow down the trail. Both styles can be very fast just different. Rider strength also plays a factor as well. For lighter guys muscling a 35 plus pound bike around can be really taxing. At the end of the day they have their opinion and I have mine. I’m just glad we all have a choice and we can ride the bikes and parts we prefer. It’s a great time to be a Mtn biker.
This article will encourage more than a few rich guys to buy burly bikes that they don’t need and won’t ride much then sell them for pennies on the dollar. That’s a win for those people who actually need one.
  • 2 1
 @Bikethrasher: that's not true, it's not only mass that counts, it's also your kinetic energy cause riding is dynamic, you hit obstacles from different angles. Your energy is also related to v^2. So the faster you go, the tougher gear you need. I am not even remotely fast, but I make progress every year and could do with exo few years ago, but now not really. And I am 160lbs. The sad truth is that if you do not need tough tires, you simply ride relatively slow or in a very mellow terrain.
  • 1 1
 @lkubica: Fast is Smooth and smooth is fast. Very much a fact!
  • 2 1
 @Bikethrasher: It does not matter, there are always sections when you simply cannot avoid hitting some random rocks, otherwise suspension would not be so useful. Being smooth does not mean your tires do not take a beating. Please explain why enduro racers tend to run less pressure than DH, do they have smoother tracks? And why DH racers don't use 20psi, they should be smooth to be fast ... And why ENVE have such a bad downhill history? Greg and others don't ride smooth enough? No, they simply ride fast through the god damn rocks.
  • 1 0
 @Bikethrasher: a lot of people like the damped tire feel, it's purely a matter of opinion
  • 40 0
 I don't see how you can post this without including Levy's downcountry machine.
  • 81 0
 I'm currently in between downcountry bikes, but my Mondraker comes in at 25lb and my dumb gravel bike weighs around 21lb, I think.
  • 68 1
 @mikelevy: how much does your intelligent gravel bike weigh?
  • 16 0
 @mikelevy: Looking forward to the next down country build. I don't actually ride bikes like that, but I love reading the meticulous bike nerdiness involved with them.
  • 42 0
 @Will762: 23lb because it has tires that don't go flat every other ride.
  • 26 3
 @mikelevy: an article showing the editors non-mountain bikes would be cool too.
  • 34 0
 @als802: I love that idea, will do it soon. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: What tires are you using on gravel? I'd love to avoid to test 10 different options
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: translation: Levy didn't finish the write up before publishing...will be ready for the 2025 version of the article.
  • 2 0
 @bok-CZ: maxis minion dh
  • 1 0
 @kingbike2: can't really find them in 700c
  • 2 0
 @bok-CZ: 29 inch = 700c.
  • 1 0
 @als802: And their skis/board setups of choice. Cast bindings, or some ATKs? 4 buckle boots or some RX Tours??
  • 38 0
 Kazimer’s fuel EX definitely has the new AXS on it, the flat top chain gives it away. I’ve heard it might be getting officially announced next week
  • 7 0
 Only one shot, zoomed in, non-drive side...even the cranks are perfectly positioned.
  • 1 0
 ditto. Announcement should be soon.
  • 5 6
 But why would you put DH tyres on trail bike? What would he put on a slash or dh bike? Double dh?
  • 5 0
 Probably the new codes as well
  • 12 0
 @chrismac70:

new trend signaling to all that you're enduroAF.

"whaaa? exo on your trail bike? do you even shred, bro?"

Kaz rides harder than me so I'll stick to Dad casing (exo/exo+) on my trail bike with an itty bitty lightweight insert in the rear tire only.
  • 1 0
 Wow, good eye! I haven't heard anything about the flat top chain, curious what the thinking is with it?
  • 8 0
 @mikealive: The thinking is "there are still people with money to spend, lets introduce another pointless gimmick to see if we can get it"
  • 2 0
 @mikealive: Flattop chains are already for a while on current gen road /Gravel AXS group sets, they say it allows for a narrower chain with quieter operation and increased strength and durability
  • 2 0
 @mikealive: The new AXS system in all the photos has had the flat top chains. Once they said there was something unreleased, I immediately noticed the chain. Definitely curious myself as well. They have a similar thing with Sram road having flat topped chains.
  • 6 0
 @mikealive: stop people mixing shimano/sram/whatever. You will be stuck with Sram for all parts of the drivetrain pretty much.
  • 2 0
 @bashhard: They are for sure Hayes Dominions in the photo. Looking at a photo of both codes and Hayes, they much closer match to the Hayes. Rotor also doesn't appear to be sram
  • 7 0
 @Brasher: I switched to Advent X wide-range 10spd stuff and haven't looked back. Not a single complaint with it, so frankly, I haven't even been keeping up with AXS, etc.

I do think you're on the right track there though. Propitiatory parts keep people locked into your whole lineup. Kind of slimy if you ask me.
  • 3 0
 @mikealive: the flat top chains on the road side use slightly larger and therefore more efficient rollers. But that means that everything is a weird slightly off size and getting anything aftermarket or mismatched to work is impossible and you need new tools.

Saw this coming, but bummed still.
  • 1 0
 Thank you. Had to search for this.
  • 23 0
 Where's Levy's gravel bike!?
  • 40 0
 He put too much helium in the tyres and it floated away
  • 22 2
 Summary:
Adding beefy tires and tire inserts it adds about 4-6lb to the regular build weight.
  • 5 3
 I am sure these bikes work great with pinkbike’s expert riding crew, but for me, only my dh bike weighs that much…
  • 2 0
 I reckon, my Glory only weighs about 17kgs
  • 2 0
 29" wheels and tires are heavy.

Its the worst place to put it too- but the rollover is nice.
  • 1 0
 It might be that much total for those parts, but those don't add that much over no inserts and lighter tyres. Maybe 2lbs additional weight.
  • 16 3
 @henryquinney I loved the presentation of the video you did, and I thought it was well thought out, despite everyone getting up in arms and somehow spinning the comments to be angry about E-bikes... again... I am happy to hear I am not the only one who built a bike the way I like, with durable, reliable components that let me smash down trails wide open, and then was surprised to see it weight in at 38.5 lbs, when the internet tells me bikes can only be fun if they're less than: (insert random small XC bike weight here). For me and my trails, a fun bike is one I can get to the top in whatever amount of time, then smash down trails, giggling bc my bike is just soaking up the abuse beneath me, and heavy tires are definitely what make that possible. The flip side is my bike kinda sucks for more pedally trails, but that's the tradeoff.
  • 2 0
 I have a big bike - a Geometron. It can be fun on tamer trails, which surprised me. Only problem is you need to be fitter to get up to the speed where it's engaging again on anything tame.
When I was fit it was a riot. Now that life has got in the way and my fitness has dropped (massively), it's a bit more challenging to extract that fun on the tame stuff...
Heavy bikes are great if you are fit enough. (Reason for me to get back on the fitness as soon as I can...)
  • 1 0
 @slimboyjim: redpill: heavier bikes make you fitter Wink
  • 1 0
 @redrook: When you ride them a lot... Sadly, life isn't allowing that at the moment... I'll get back there though!
  • 13 1
 It would be interested to know what the preference is RE: inserts w/ lighter (DD/SuperTrail) vs. no insert and full on DH casing. It seems from Kaz and Matt's selection that inserts not needed with the new Conti DH tires, even tho they are not too heavy for what they are.
  • 10 7
 Inserts all the time with proper tire weight for riding style is the way to go IMO.
  • 2 0
 @ReformedRoadie I think Cam at NSMB talked about this in his Continental Kryptotal review - he was running the DH Kryptotals without the Tannus insert he'd been previously using and said that it worked fine. As I've been running the same setup as him (ie running Maxxis Exo+ / DD w/ Tannus inserts), I'm going to give the DH Kryptotal SuperSofts a try as well without inserts
  • 18 0
 Personally, I prefer to run a heavier tire without inserts as opposed to a lighter tire with inserts. I like the ride quality better. And if I tear a tire, dealing with the insert kinda sucks.

If I still had a dh bike, I'd run heavy tires + inserts. At least in the rear.
  • 11 0
 Think it depends on where you ride as well as personal preferences. I've settled on the new EXO+ with Tannus inserts and a medium to heavy duty alloy wheel set.

Where I ride, I'm not worried about sidewall slashes as much as I am about ruining rims. This set-up seems to keep weight down while giving me the protection I need and the damping and grip I love. Also haven't had a flat since moving to this set-up.

Am going to play with taking the insert out of my front wheel to shed some weight and see how it affects things. Thinking generally the front wheel doesn't need as much protection... but will I miss the lower PSI/grip of the insert? We'll see.
  • 5 1
 I've never approached inserts as something that lets me get away with a lighter casing. I like Double Down or equivalent for sidewall support, and Cushcore for trail damping and being able to reduce air pressure a bit.
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: After all sorts of combos, I have arrived at the exact same set up on Vancouver Island. New exo plus DHR2 and DHF 2.5 with Tannus front and back. I may take out front insert in summer when i run higher pressures .
  • 1 0
 I agree. This is the real question these days...to insert or not to insert. It seems that there is consensus that the modern day 'gravity oriented' rider should be on Double Downs at a minimum given the added grip...but does that negate the need for the support AND rim protection an insert like Cushcore provides
  • 7 3
 I don't work at PB, but i do ride hard and smash rocks. I used to run trail casing (1000-1050g) with cushcore in the rear and trail casing no cushcore in front on my enduro bike. Switched to continental DH casings with no inserts (1250-1300g, so about the same weight as trail+cushcore out back, heavier up front) and won't be going back. Don't notice the extra weight up front and the damped feeling of the DH casings and not having to worry about dealing with cushcore has sold me.

For reference, i'm 250lbs and ride aggressively in SoCal.
  • 3 0
 In the midwest I find inserts + light trail tires to be an excellent combination. Plenty of traction, great rim protection, and lower rolling resistance for our more constantly pedal-y terrain.
  • 2 0
 I resisted inserts as long as I could, but finally gave in after pinch flatting too many DD tires.

Now I run DD (or equivalent) tires with a rear insert.
  • 12 6
 Inserts are stoopid, koolaid product, no one needs inserts.
  • 5 3
 Inserts aren’t needed at all.
  • 1 0
 @whiteranger3: I read "aggressively" as BMX backround.
  • 1 0
 @dualsuspensiondave: what kinna pressure you run?
  • 2 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: I think you need to focus on the 250lbs part more... anyone who actually rides proper trails at that weight (myself included) is likely going to need the extra support of the thicker casing tires.

Consider the additional forces of an extra 50kg schralping the same corner on an EXO/+ casing...
  • 1 0
 @SonofBovril: Out in Colorado when I was 185lbs, I flatted a front tire on the exact same rock 2 weeks apart. Really trippy the 2nd time.

But still. Very interesting that inserts aren't the end all be all marketers claim.
  • 1 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: no BMX background for me. I do have a moto background though. I prefer chunk over jumps.
  • 12 1
 I’ve been saying this for years: give me heavier brakes that only need bleeding every 2 years and just work without me having to piss around with them every few months to keep them feeling good. Give me big ugly heavy callipers and levers to achieve this, I don’t care, I just want to ride my bike.
  • 5 0
 *Hope has entered the chat*
  • 1 0
 @TimMog: *Hope has left the chat*
  • 11 1
 Would be interesting to see the rider weights, too, to get some ratios. I have like 20+ kgs on most of those guys, but my bike weighs in at 32 lbs, even with a bunch of stuff in the downtube. And it's the most durable and capable/forgiving bike I've ever owned, by a long shot.

By measure of bike mass relative to rider mass, my bike is almost always "lighter" than everyone else's, except for those few riding buddies who share the same penchant for (perhaps excess) beers, and bread, and pasta, and...
  • 3 0
 This
  • 12 3
 Way too much soapbox time these days. I have no idea what is up with this "heavy is great" drum PB is beating right now but it is pointless. These guys have lost their compass and sound full of themselves. They aren't even attempting to reference what sort of trails you ride most frequently. I have several high-end bikes and I enjoy them all as light as possible. Haven't flatted in 2 years and that includes some Enduro racing. I also run 180 rotors even on my big rig, riding steep, chunky terrain. So does Martin Maes. Am I badass? Nope, but I have no problem slowing down...and it's way more than 30g per wheel when you account for the additional caliper hardware and bolts. Weight does matter. Especially for a beginner with minimal fitness. If you are shuttling double blacks all day, sure, pack on the pounds. But that is not most riders.
  • 2 0
 You don't want a 38 lb 140mm bike??
  • 8 1
 I haven't been able to keep up with all of the comments in this article plus the related one, but I don't think I have seen anyone mention that enjoyment of the descent also depends on how much energy I was able to conserve on the way up. If it's a choice between having a heavy, capable bike that saps all my strength on the climb but allows me to cruise down in passenger mode, or a bike that feels spritely on the climb and lets me save some energy to be an active pilot on the descent, I'll take the latter even if it means the bike is less capable.
  • 2 0
 Yes! This.

Are they wanting us to believe that heavy is cool AND that they mostly ride to the top on these heavy bikes?

Or maybe they mostly shuttle or use the lift? Then heavy isn’t a big deal.

Something isn’t adding up here.
  • 12 4
 26 inch wheels. Lighter , stronger much faster turning response . Better for acceleration from pumping .
Cons :
Requires more rider attention and rider input . More skill.
Pros: read above .
  • 4 2
 Smaller wheels also make bikes much more versatile. It’s kind of nice to be able to get through a tight set comfortably and trail ride on the same bike.
  • 5 0
 You know what I love most about 26 on a red trail these days is that it makes it feel so much more challenging and exciting without unnecessary risk.
The biggest let down for 26 is the lack of tyre support, the latest tyres available for 29 are so much better in design/grip/compound.
  • 1 1
 Also in the cons-slower, verified across disciplines. Harsher on rocky terrain.

If we’re bringing back stuff that’s lighter but doesn’t work as well, let’s do chainstay mounted U-Brakes.
  • 10 0
 So where is the good and the bad?
  • 33 1
 Not sure about the good, but I'm betting the bad and the ugly are going to show up in the comments.
  • 5 1
 The good is that these bikes are all likely insanely durable (except for all the alloy rims). The bad is that it seems to take upwards of 35lbs to make a "strong enough" bike nowadays?
  • 9 3
 Honestly not as outlandish as I thought. I kind of figured that the Fuel Ex would be closer to the 30lb mark, though. Although, most of the PB staff lives in areas without much proper XC or trail riding. It's all up a mountain and down a mountain. I'm sure if one of the staff members lived somewhere a bit flatter they'd be rocking a 130/120 trail bike that hits closer to the 28-30lb mark. Buy and ride what suits your terrain, as they say.
  • 10 0
 Comfortably numb isn’t proper xc? Then what is? Fire roads? I think the sea to sky corridor has more xc than most places. Lower ratio and far fewer people choose to ride it when they can ride trails which induce more endorphins and adrenaline, seratonin and dopamine.
  • 12 0
 @Jvisscher: Comfortably Numb has to be my favorite XC trail ever. I love that gongshow.
  • 4 0
 @Jvisscher: Yeah, you can find plenty of XC trails in the PNW and Sea To Sky corridor, but they aren't most riders' or the staff's everyday trails. I spin my 160/150 enduro bike down lots of XC trails during an average ride, but I don't claim the area lends itself to wanting to own or ride a short travel /downcountry/trail bike on a majority of my endeavors.
  • 1 0
 TIL the NIMBY 50 wasn't an XC race, apparently. It couldn't have been without proper XC or trail riding.
  • 4 0
 Most of these seem pretty reasonable, but that 141 seems pretty tankish on paper. That heavy + that little travel kind of has me scratching my head at what it would really be good at. Chairlift/ Jump lines?
  • 6 0
 @Glory831Guy: My 141 is a proper tank. I hadn’t weighed it before and was fully expecting it to be a lot lighter as it doesn’t feel like a 37lb bike when you’re riding it. I just use it as a do anything bike on the trails around me in the Scottish Borders/Tweed Valley and it works perfectly for me.
  • 1 0
 @edspratt: I can definitely relate to that. I just finished building up a 27.5 Reign with a 38 factory, 29er e-bike front wheel(aluminum w/ aluminum rear), and Deore trans/GX cranks. Feels hefty when picking up, but plows much better than the stock setup.

Admitedly, I ride the Reign too often as I like to smash through stuff and pin it through corners. My old 27# 2016 Trance 1 with skinny carbon wheels and non DH tires is much, much faster overall on long rides though.
  • 2 0
 @j-t-g: He's got a point though. What we call XC here could be called trail elsewhere. At least on the technical level.
We call XC up and down here where but it's usually associated with mellower, flatter terrain where local mountains look like oversized nipples.
  • 2 0
 @Glory831Guy: The 141 frame is pretty heavy. My P1 with headset, seat collar, frame protection, rear axle and shock was 4.45kg before fitting the rest of the parts. Complete it weighed 16kg exactly with 100% alu components, Schwalbe Supertrail casings and a insert on the rear. I have since added a steel chainring and a small chainguide. For a size small 150/141mm bike it's rather heavy and it feels like it when you lift it. On the trail it's a different story, very easy to change direction and loves getting air at every opportunity. It loves tech climbs but it's not meant to set PRs on fireroads. Where the weight is felt is on pedally trails that go up and down all the time. Personally I'd happily shed 1kg off the whole bike if there was a reasonable way to do it, but the hefty frame means that it would require fitting questionably light and expensive parts to do so.
  • 12 3
 Wow, I thought my bike was heavy at 33 lbs and have been dreaming about getting a lighter weight trail bike or even an XC.
  • 8 1
 I'm so confused as to how their bikes are so heavy. My Orbea Rallon is 33lb with alu cockpit and wheels, enduro tires, and thinks like bolt on fender and pedals included in weight.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: What year is your Rallon? But yeah thats not bad for alloy and 160r travel.
  • 2 1
 @Leviathandive: I have the 2019 model, so granted it has a fox 36 rather than a larger fork, but still.
  • 3 0
 Lucky enough to have two bikes. One has a Push coil and smashpot, tyre inserts with beefy tyres and I use it mainly for shuttle days and enduro and it’s brilliant for that. The other is a 130 front Fox 34 Grip 2 and 115 rear and this is brilliant for everything else including long stage races. I am toying however with going back to a Fit 4 fork with a fractive tune as the Grip 2 isn’t doing it for me currently on the XC bike. (Or a DSD Runt).
  • 3 0
 @ratedgg13: Isn't orbea known for having lightweight frames?
  • 5 0
 Kazimer has 3lbs of snacks in the downtube
  • 2 0
 Same, my 2015 Reign-AL is just under 33lbs, and I think that's really heavy LOL. My XC-DC (I'm coining that) bike is just under 25lbs. 36-38 seems excessive.
  • 4 0
 I think they should have included what size of bike they're riding. 38lb XL vs a 38lb XS are two entirely different conversations. (Not that I think any of the bikes in the article are XS)
  • 1 0
 @RedIsleFreeride: The OIZ and Alma are definitely light, but I'm on an XL Rallon. So I suppose its light ISH but aI'm still surprised its over a pound lighter than Kaz's Fuel EX.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Short answer is probably "because they add components that are heavier than yours". Whether that's to add component performance or durability, or just extra accessories.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: same with my 2020 Orbea. They're just light bikes!
  • 4 0
 @ratedgg13: My AL Capra weighs 42 lb, mostly cause it's an XXL with a DH casing and cushcore in the rear.
  • 2 0
 This 100%. I haven't flatted in a couple years. Either I'm picking better lines or I'm riding better. I dropped 40lbs off my body as well. I want a fast light bike that I can break. I've never broken a frame, and I attribute that to the bikes I've got are heavy.
  • 7 1
 Why the surprise? Where does Pinkbike live? The weight of MTB has been steadily increasing for the last 15 years. The culprit? Every single part is bigger (not better). 29 wheels, 29 tires happily above 1Kg (each!), carbon frames heavier than aluminum from 20 years ago. Brakes, handlebars, stems, everything ..

Welcome to the 36-38 pound $10,000 bikesi!!!!!! Sure they are more capable, if you have sky lift!
  • 3 0
 I miss sub $4k 27.5 bikes with nice builds from like what, 2017? Seems like a completely different era. The only geo “improvement” since then has been longer reach. My large from 2017 had 475 reach. Plenty long in my opinion.
  • 1 1
 That's where you're wrong, 29 IS better.
  • 6 1
 I love my fairly light short travel bike, but that's solely because I live in Wisconsin and me and my bike can comfortably tackle 99% of trails in the region. If I lived in the PNW, I would probably ride a 35-37lb enduro bike happily down blue trails until I learn how to bomb down steep terrain and hit HUGE gaps... Now I am sad again about where I live.
  • 4 1
 Don't be, the sendy gap shit gets old. One day you show up at work dragging your leg and can barely walk for months because you smashed your foot doing a jump (after doing like 4000 jumps where you were fine, except for that one time you broke your collar bone). And then you kind of heal up but your toes don't bend anymore. But you're friends want to keep pushing it at the sendy gaps and youre like what's the point, it's fun, but it's not worth concussions and losing your ability to walk or have toes that do toe stuff. Like, it's nice to be able to bike AND stay healthy so you can do other stuff in life
  • 1 0
 Gaps are fun, rock gardens and technical descents are fun. Yeah-you'd want more bike out west, can get away with less bike at home. If you REALLY want to move out west, you might be able to.....
  • 1 0
 @Dogl0rd: Fair point, that's probably the reason I haven't taken a serious spill yet, but, I'm very tentative in general.
  • 9 2
 Modern riders: "Weight doesn't matter."
Also modern riders: "I don't have the strength to make this bike go fast. I need a motor."
You're all weak, fat, and own heavy bikes.
  • 4 0
 With experience, I've upgraded my all mountain bike with real brakes and tires. Made a marked improvement in fun category and I don't worry about tire or braking performance on any trial I choose to ride. When I ride with my hard core XC friend group I'm off the back less than a minute when we have extended climbs. But when the wheels are pointed down and the trail gets rowdy I'm up front smirking and waiting for them at the bottom. I used to be an XC weight weenie... not any more.
  • 2 0
 Don’t smirk
  • 4 0
 Definitely all fair points, but good to keep in mind that everything is relative. Not necessarily everyone rides at speeds to tap in to the full benefits of running DH casing tires, and therefore can most likely get along with trail casing tires just fine- especially if they never ride tech trails.
  • 2 0
 In addition, physics dictates that your Force = Mass x Acceleration. I may not be able to tap into that burly DH Sidewall's performance at 130lb, going 30 mph the same as someone who is 190, going 30mph. Further, the ratio of body mass, bike weight, and power/energy output factors into a riders' experience. For 130lb person, that 38lb bike is a much larger coefficient (i.e. piece of the pie) compared to a 38lb bike under someone who is 190lb.
  • 5 0
 I’ve never weighed my bike.
Some one did once. I told them they could weigh it as long as they didn’t tell me. I know it’s under 40lbs and that’s fine with me
  • 2 0
 It’s 39.9 pounds
  • 3 0
 Wasn't there someone with a Raaw as a long-term affair? Who was it and what was the bike like again?

These weights seem fair actually. I think my BMX (Stolen The Goblin, 2003 or so) also weights something like 16kg (35lbs). I once tried a Maxxis DHF 20x2.4 front tire (to keep it from washing out on the loose gravel pumptrack) but the it kept spitting gravel at my face so went back to something more moderate (currently running the Smart Sam 20x2.35 in the front). So even with lightweight tires, I can't get the weight any lower. It is what it is and that's fine like that. As big as their bikes are, as long as they're somewhere below 24kg (53lbs) they shouldn't complain.
  • 1 0
 That was Brian Park. His bike that could survive the apocalypse. Yeah..doent sound very light
  • 5 2
 I don't do shuttles, eBikes or lifts and like a lot of vertical but mainly ride loamy NW trails. No way I'm riding anything over 32ish pounds. But I'm an older XC guy so my 150mm bike is mainly for comfort. I can get away with 750 gram tires without issue due to my weight and the trail conditions.
  • 3 0
 I can’t be the only one who prefers light tires with inserts right? Give me exo or exo plus with cushcores and I’m pretty set. No need for DD or DH. Run a little bit higher pressures and not take terrible lines all the time and they are more than fin for my 170lb ass… i
  • 2 0
 A) do no want to run higher pressures
B) can not help but take crappy lines sometimes
C) wild lines can add variety and be super fun
D) sometimes more actual puncture and slice protection is needed, and burlier casings provide this along with the support
  • 1 0
 I can’t ride anything less than dh tires with cushcore front and rear. I’ve been riding that for the last 3 seasons, I’ve gone from 170 to 200 lbs and consistently and have gone through 2-3 alloy rims a season in that time.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: It is definitely popular to write all of the points. Every PB commenter needs sidewall support and burly casing grr… They have been beaten to death on PB the last few years. I’m just saying I have done the DD with Inserts and a coil shock 39lb enduro thing. I guess if I were actually racing then sure. But daily driver give me lighter tires with inserts. Climbs noticeably better, but then again I never liked climbing, and I’m not in Squamish.
  • 4 2
 You are not the only one. I don’t even go exo + and inserts. Straight exo. No issues.

I don’t get this heavy bike stuff. Two coil bikes size large. 30ish lbs each. Nothing brakes.

Only flat in past 5 years was when i forgot to pump up the rear and pinch flatted.

Marketing

Marketing

Marketing
  • 1 0
 @yourrealdad: Depends what and how you ride, I guess. Friends I ride with only use EXO casings, whereas I use DH. I've never had a puncture - ever - whereas in the last 6 months, they've had multiple punctures each.
  • 1 0
 @thechunderdownunder: I actually said the sidewall support is a side effect, effectively admitting it's not the differentiator. The important thing I was mentioning was puncture/cut protection, which you don't get (as much) with light tire and inserts.

Also super terrain dependent, as we have climbs around here that are decidedly easier/enjoyable with a big soft grabby tire fractioning its way up and over, versus a light one with even a few more psi pinging (relatively) off everything.
  • 2 0
 @yourrealdad: when I first started riding I would go through tires and wheels. Everywhere was “new” so I would hit lots of rocks in bad stuff. I definitely wasn’t good at weighting the bike. But I’m with you on tires at least. Rolling mass is the most noticeable and for me (who hates climbing) give me the lightest set up that can do the job. Definitely agree with the article on not needing to shave every gram of weight off the other parts.
  • 1 0
 Add me to the Exo/insert camp. I don't damage rims and almost never get a flat, even at lower pressure.
  • 2 0
 Light casings still tear, even with an insert if you keep the brakes open on jagged rocky descents. If you don't need them-sure save the weight. I do okay with an EXO up front, DD out back, both with CushCore, both on 30mm internal DT rims. It's the lightest setup that holds up for me.
  • 2 0
 I ride a commencal meta TR 29 as my do it all rig. I run a coil fork and shock. Yes its heavy. The only thing i swap over are wheels and tires for the terrain I'm riding. I can keep up with the lycra crowd when need be and same on shuttle laps. People comment on how heavy my bikes is but that they can't tell when I'm riding it. at 6'3" 200 lbs the bike suits me. Comfort and durability are my goals. The only place I don't ride it is the bike park. I have a DH rig for that, also built like a tank.
  • 5 0
 How quickly we forget about the days of 45lb freeride bike.

But yeah, weight doesn’t matter.
  • 4 1
 Those were awful. Yeah, the friends and fun we had, but I never want to ride a bike that heavy again unless it's an ebike
  • 4 0
 in 2001, I had a 6"/5" freeride bike that was ridiculously short, crazy noisy, and weighed just under 40lbs. I'd take today's wonder-sleds any day.
  • 3 0
 Look at that flat-top chain on Kaz's bike... And the out-of-crop cassette, derailleur, and shifter... I'd bet it's the new SRAM stuff we've already caught glimpses of in numerous places.
  • 5 1
 I don’t get it, I got a full ally enduro bike, 170/150mm, tough everything, Mezzers and DHX coil, 185 dropper, no Carbon anywhere and it’s still under 36 lb.
  • 2 0
 What tires?
  • 2 0
 My "downcountry" 120F/110R Devinci Marshall (carbon) comes in at about 33 pounds. The 2.8 Hans Dampf's add some to the weight but the frame is also pretty chunky.
  • 1 0
 @wolftwenty1: Enduro rated Conti Baron and Kryptotal
  • 2 0
 They must be using Canadian pounds
  • 5 0
 Its so weird, the heavy bike thing has turned into a d*ck measuring contest.
  • 2 0
 1 kg slows you down insignificantly over 30 minutes of an idealized easy climb, sure. But how much does it slow you down after a day of chucking an extra kilo of bike around, over, and through a bunch of gnarly EWS course descents?
  • 10 0
 Probably a decent amount, but alot less than a flat tire.
  • 2 1
 1% slower up a climb per 1kg. I assume that also means it's about 1% faster down hill due to the extra potential energy. So it's about even, regardless of weight.
  • 4 0
 My Jeffsy is 30 pounds in size L with DHF and Agressor, pedals, tools, bottle cage. 38 pounds is too heavy when you are in the Alps
  • 2 0
 Weight doesn't matter to most of us looking for a 160+ travel enduro bike. Most of us in the PNW aren't racing up the hills or even care about uphill performance at all, just make it reasonably peddle-able with no compromises that subtract from downhill performance.

I've found that I prefer my heavier Alloy Patrol to any other enduro bike I've ridden. The weight really helps put traction down and stay planted when needed.
  • 1 1
 Exactly. The industry if selling bikes that have nothing to do with mountain biking. They are just dowwnhill bikes that are good to take on sky lifts.
  • 1 0
 Cadillac ads in the 1955s would boast of road hugging weight.
  • 2 0
 I just have to comment to say that this confirms what I’ve thought for a long time. Anyone who rides gnarly trails regularly usually gravitates toward heavier more reliable parts. All my bikes end up around 35 plus lbs these days for that reason.
  • 3 1
 The only thing slower than a “heavy” bike is pushing a bike back to the trailhead with a ripped tire or folded rim. This isn’t a “ride smoother” issue, it’s the reality of riding fast on rocky terrain.

Light frames, tires and wheels are only good for XC racing, and then only on race day.

Even 5 pounds of bike weight lost won’t make you a whole lot faster. If you want to be fast, you have to ride a lot and lose the weight on your frame.
  • 2 0
 Hi
I think it really depends on where you live and where you ride.
I live in France and I ride in hilly region so I don't need to have DH casing tires for example (Exo casing is ok for me without puncture for 3 years).
I ride with friends who often go to mountains spots. They use DH casing and their bikes are heavier than mine.

It also depends on how you ride. Are or running full speed in rock garden or try to find the right path?
I m as heavy as my mates but sometimes in the same spot they get flat tires when mines stay fonctionnal.

It's a personal choice to make according to your style of riding and your priorities (reliability or ability to ride easily)

My bike weights 15,3 Kg with pedals.
Bikes of my mates weight betwen 15,5 and 16,5 Kg.

Keep riding anyway!
  • 1 0
 I forgot my bike is a Commencal Meta AM 27,5. My mates bikes are a Santa Cruz Nomad and a Canyon Strive 27,5
  • 1 0
 Just to compare 17,3 Kg was the weight of my old Scott Voltage FR (freeride of 2010, 26 inch wheels, 180mm travel front and 170 mm travel rear)...strange to see all these carbon bikes weighing the same as DH/FR bikes (a 2023 Cube two 15 HPC weighs 17 Kg for example...)
  • 1 0
 Horses for courses. Less demanding terrain requires less burly parts.
  • 1 0
 I don't actually know the weight of my bike. I think I'll go do that now just out of curiosity. My S3 Stumpjumper Evo carbon is pretty much stock but with added Cushcore in back. I agree about the brake rotors making a big difference. I want to improve rear brake performance. Tires: I haven't intentionally tested different tires, but I did get a cheap tire for my old bike that was total shit. Low durability, but it was the only 26" tire they had.
  • 1 0
 My current bike, a custom-build, large alloy Transition Sentinel, weighs in around 36+ lbs (16.3+ kg) with Minions, doubledown on the rear and EXO+ on the front. I definitely notice the weight on the climbs, but the bike still climbs fairly well. I just get a little more fatigued if I try to push it on the climbs. Given my interest, like so many others, is the downhill, I've adjusted my riding style to not try and hammer climbs so I have more energy on the downs, which has increased my enjoyment. When I put DH casing tires on, it is even better on the downs naturally, but man those boat anchors really suck out the energy so it is a careful balance when it comes to tires. For me doubledown or equivalent is the sweet spot for where I ride in terms of balancing weight, traction, reliability, and fun.
  • 3 0
 Damn all those bike weigh more than my Zerode Katipo 160mm with Conti DH and enduro casing tires. So much for the extra weight of a gearbox. LOL
  • 2 0
 I love this. I have a specialized enduro with carbon everything and people are blown away by the fact it's 38 lbs. built to take a beating not to be light. Reserve dh wheels are heavy af to be fair lol
  • 4 0
 I would like to see women chime in on this, bikes keep getting bigger and heavier.
  • 3 0
 Assuming most women are, in fact, generally lighter weight than men, then the body mass x bike weight x power/energy output ratio is definitely a bigger piece of the pie. It is a challenge, for instance, for me at 130 pounds to achieve the suspension set up that optimizes a bike's capability (specifically larger forks like ZEB and 38 ). Negative air springs push so much more against my ideal air pressure, that I generally get a little bit of negative-travel (i.e. the stanchion gets sucked down slightly).

Same goes for the spring of a bike all around (tire x wheel x suspension component). Me pushing a bike at 30mph is very different than a 190lb rider pushing a bike at 30mph.
  • 1 0
 @MollyJoyce: Thanks Molly, the industry isnt too kind to non dude bros it seems. Me being a male at 5'6" that sits in between a size S and M have a hard time fitting for a bike size, a lot of size M bikes have a wheelbase of 1200mm these days, that's like the size of my couch. Its frustrating. I know its a slippery slope bringing up gender but I hope people understand where Im coming from.
  • 1 0
 Lighter rider, lighter parts (all else being equal). Most 110 pound riders can run "trail" wheels and 35/36 chassis forks instead of "enduro" rated wheels and forks. That plus maybe lighter tire casings/inserts and the bike is better set up for a lower weight rider (lower weight and more give). Regardless of gender, bike setup for riders off the bell curve often requires some parts swapping.
  • 1 0
 This title should have the word “enduro” in it, but the problem is that 'enduro' is such a broad brush.
It’s chicken and egg: Did they make capable enduro bikes and watch our ambitions and expectations rise, or were we pushing the limits of what’s possible, and companies responded with more capable bikes?
Eitherway we now have bikes that truly 'do anything" and the industry is now challenged with producing frames and components that don’t break (a.k.a law-suit-aversion) no matter the lack of finesse of the gorilla that’s hucking them. That means heavier parts so that the 90Kg/200lb bloke ploughing the boulder field doesn’t find his rig disintegrates half way down. This weight creep (and eMTBs) have driven wider acceptability of heavier bikes across the entire MTB rider spectrum (ok, XC racing aside), whether we all want it or not.

Heavier bikes don’t ride like lighter bikes, we all know that, but you have to find what works for you, where you ride and how you ride. I wont be sweating 17Kgs of muscle bike up a 1000m climb, or shouldering it over a remote 4000m pass, to reach my descent any time soon thanks. Whatever, it does seem like Keith Bontragers’ once poignant mantra “light/strong/cheap: pick any two” is now dead.
  • 3 2
 Bike industry is going in the wrong direction with these heavy bikes that are built up like an eMTB. They're just trying to get riders to transition to eMTB. When your slugging your 38lb bike up hills and eMTBs zoom past you, that's not a pleasurable feeling. It's going to hurt the sport in the long term.
  • 1 0
 I’d love to get some tips on flying with a heavy bike. The few bike trips I’ve been on, I have to pay the over 50 lbs fee. I don’t mind riding a heavier bike, but every time I fly with it, I wish I was on something lighter.
  • 1 0
 Put the tires and some other heavy parts in your other bag
  • 2 0
 @norcalbike: stuff the cranks down your pants.
  • 1 0
 Hehehe so my 2012 Demo 8 aluminum everything with a Fox 40, all coil sprung, DH casing, Saint group that’s sitting in my garage collecting dust at 38 pounds is now “normal” bike weight? I should take it out more often on trail rides
  • 4 0
 This all sounds like another Transition owner justifying why their frame is so heavy.
  • 1 0
 Am an alloy transition owner. Can confirm, I do it all the time.
  • 1 0
 The carbon Spire frame is very light for the category it’s in
  • 1 0
 They don't break. That's worth a pound or 3.
  • 1 0
 my 2021 levo comp alloy weighs 51lbs after all the kit (almost bone stock, except for an X2). far too heavy to feel “nimble”, but still rides incredible. way more capable than i currently am and 160/150 is more bike than most california trails need.

weight definitely matters - came from a 2011 30lb cannondale hardtail. my next bike’s either gonna be a base trek fuel exe (44lbs) or “base” pivot shuttle sl (40lbs). i would’ve started with a light assistance emtb over my levo if i could do it again. 90nm is far too much assistance, but the emtb bug got me riding again.
  • 1 0
 This is so wrong for my area of riding. My bikes have gotten lighter as I have improved over the years. I get much more of a buzz riding xc and downcountry bikes and ride the same stuff I use to use a freeride/park bike for. Now I get to descents with more energy left to push harder than before. If most people are being honest they will likely admit they are overbiked in my opinion but apparently everyone needs minions and tyre inserts these days. I get by without inserts and I'm 95kg but I somehow have some finesse yet one of my old riding buddies who weighed less would be forever smashing wheels up as he rode like a sasquatch with very little concern for stuff as if he didn't even try to roll smoothly over rocks and terrain
  • 1 0
 I really liked Henry Quinney's original video, despite being old and hating videos. Admittedly (by him) it's really oriented towards a rider whose primary concern is what happens when he reaches the top of a climb and points it downhill. In my case, most of my rides are short (a few hours max) but most of that time is spent climbing up. I agree that most of the fun is pointing down, but I really do want a bike that will not make me hate my dad bod the whole way up. I'm willing (and basically guaranteed) to skip some of the big downhill features or airtime to make sure that my whole ride is enjoyable, even if it means having higher lows and lower highs. The big takeaway for me from the original video, though, is that the scale weight is just a small part of the overall picture - a heavier tire that lets me roll better might be worth the weight cost. Having smart kinematics also is really important. Because my rides are short, I can afford a bit more weight but I want it to be smartly distributed.
  • 1 0
 WTF my carbon sight is running at 15kg(33pounds) with only real possible compromise being exo casing with rimpacts..... and I ride a lot of rocks. The weird thing is my downcountry Spark is 14kg..... would like that to be lighter but it is all enduro parts on a alloy frame.
  • 1 0
 So basically you`re defiying phisics? Rotational mass, inertia are all made up terms? Flickable and agile doesnt mean anything anymore in mtb? Sure if you re double black shredder who shuttles days and days, I believe you.
I dare you Pinkbike - go to a finish line of any EWS race with a scale and weight check riders bikes. Im pretty sure no one is on 17+kg bike.
Check this: www.pinkbike.com/news/video-how-much-do-the-ews-pros-bikes-weigh.html
Most of them are 15 ish, even sub 15. If you have to do rapid direction change, do a unexpected hop over an obstacle or do a sprint in a quick climb - weight matters and it matters much. Maybe not that much on a stopwatch but how much it exhausts you.
Also I dont know what you are talking about that stuff constantly breaks? I mean bikes that good that are today - brakes work (Im looking at you, Elixir), suspension (mostly) works, wheels are good and strong... Where is the problem?
  • 1 0
 My Range weighs over 39 lbs. size L , carbon rims , cranks , and bars with maxxis DD tire casings front and back. Tubeless front and cushcore XC in the rear. I like the weight for the descents. It feels very planted and solid. It is more work on the climbs but you just get fitter and the body get’s used to it . IMO some extra weight is worth it for the added security on the descents. Especially with tires. If the bike is too light you’re getting thrown around more when things get rough.
  • 5 2
 I do believe in heavier tires now and run DD. Mostly because I bought a e-bike as a second one to my regular one.
  • 2 0
 Wow. I thought it was just me riding a mid 30Lb bike I spent thousands to keep “light”.
So much carbon, so not sub 30Lbs, like I was hoping.
  • 2 0
 You dudes don't ride where the hike-a-bikes can be so long that slinging the frame across your shoulders like a steampunk Passion of the Christ is your best bet.
  • 1 0
 To be honest, I shocked how heavy builds based on top of the line components;
I have all aluminum gx level build within 35.3 lbs.

'DH casing with insert and gallon of Stans per wheel seems to be overkill'
  • 2 0
 I find it shocking that these bikes aren't that much lighter than my Steel hardtail with a coil fork. Couple of pounds at most and these bikes are like fancy dandy carbon.
  • 1 1
 I go the opposite of pretty much all these bikes: Higher pressures, light wheels and light 2.4 tyres on a long travel enduro bike with slack DH geo. This is the most fun combination. People really overeatimate how rough the trails they ride actually are. Use the slacker Geo to learn how to pick lines, gap rough stuff, and ride light. You'll go way faster with this combo than overloading with sluggish wheels and heavy soft tyres.
  • 1 0
 Meanwhile my "heavy" steel Starling w/ coil and i9 wheels is just 33lbs. Alloy cranks and cockpit, chromag contact pedals, probably lighter casings on the DHF's though. ::shrug::
  • 1 0
 Is it assumed that these weights are with everything pictured and nothing more or less? Specifically with the tools and accessories, and empty bottles?
  • 1 0
 All but Kaz's bike appear to be trailhead-ready. You can see tubes strapped on, bottle (empty or not), and likely the computer is on all of them. That would be the only way to get the that heavy. As for @ratedgg13 being confused, as mentioned, heavy duty tires and inserts add a lot of weight.

I think a lot of people (especially roadies) go by bike weight, not system weight. If you calculate pressures for you and the bike, that's different than you and bike kitted out. I don't even worry about my road bike's weight anymore because I need to take a boatload of water with me and I always have at least one bag of tools or whatever bolted to it plus a crapload of snacks. My expensive carbon wonder machine's weight is just average after all that.

If I lost 5 kg then we'd be talking. But after I eat some more delicious bread.
  • 1 0
 @iammarkstewart: I'm just genuinely curious how my XL Rallon with similar build kit (similar tires, but I don't run inserts) weighs less than Kaz's Fuel EX. System weight wise, I'm over 200lb myself, so its pretty irrelevant.
  • 4 4
 How many hours a week are they pedaling these 35# bikes? The only thing in my garage above 30# is an ebike, I generally hate pushing heavy bikes around so much that I couldn't ride more than 4-5hrs a week on one I think.
  • 1 1
 Haha believe it or not it’s not that bad. Still a bike, still rolls. The was I see it the uphill is always a bit of a grunt anyways, and the weight doesn’t really hurt you on the downhill.
  • 7 0
 Probably more than you would think. Over the summer I was riding around 30 miles and climbing 5-8k feet of elevation on a 37 lb analog bike with dh tires and inserts. All the people I ride with do more miles and more elevation on similar weight bikes with similar wheel and tire setups.
  • 4 0
 I’m pedaling my 40lb bike 20+ hrs a week in February. No complaints-
  • 6 2
 Last Thursday: 56 miles, 8500', 8 hours moving time. I took the day off.
Saturday: 46 miles and 6500', 6 hours moving time.
Sunday: 5 mile trail run with the GF. 16 miles and 1600' in the afternoon with the GF.
Monday: 43 miles, 4500', and 7 hours (most of it with my GF).

All of those rides were on my 36+ pound enduro bike. That was above average for me for purely MTB riding, but not by a lot.
  • 5 2
 Henry trying to justify his article from yesterday.
  • 3 1
 I’m down with his explanation, and if he thinks it’s worth it, good on him. But damn. 38 pounds. That’s a lot of bike to be pedaling around.
  • 4 1
 No wonder Quinney says weight doesn’t matter. His bike is 38 pounds
  • 3 1
 My dh bike doesn’t weigh that much
  • 2 0
 This makes me feel all warm and fuzzy on the inside. Now, I don't feel so bad now pedaling a boat anchor uphill.
  • 3 2
 How are these acceptable weights for 'normal' bikes? The most of them have air shocks as well?! That Trek is already on the beefy side it seems.
  • 1 0
 Wow, I guess I shouldn't feel too bad about my entry level Genius 960 weighing 32lbs with a rear wheel and tire change. Yet to me it still feels heavy!
  • 1 0
 Woah. I thought my dual coil, DH tyred, alloy everything Geometron was chunky, but it seems it's positively lightweight compared to some of these!
  • 2 0
 I never thought my bike felt heavy until I weighed it. Worst decision I ever made.
  • 2 0
 Hooray to no more fat shaming bikes, my bike weighs 37 pounds and I proudly admit it.
  • 1 0
 For shuttles and park or even winch and plummet style riding with gnarly terrain, yeah heavy is good. Love my 1300-1400g tires with tannus for park and shuttling!
  • 2 2
 Worst bike I ever owned was the lightest, a Bronson at 30lb. Great on smooth trails but pinballed me around in the rough. I now like my bikes like I like my women, with some heft.
  • 3 0
 Cane Creek Ti Wings cranks, and weight doesn't matter?
  • 1 1
 If you don’t ride an enduro, gtfo I guess…

Seems like a blanket article about weight with this being the narrow supporting argument. I’d be more compelled to add weight if a wider variety of bikes were included.
  • 1 0
 Solid set-ups boyz! Performance/reliability trumps lighter weight all day, especially when pushing bikes hard on descents. Dig it!
  • 1 0
 My alloy 120/110 bike from 2011 is 32+lbs and so is my hardtail. Would gladly pedal a proper burly 35lb 150mm bike. Weight no matter. Fun matter.
  • 1 0
 i finally weighed my 26" SC Nomad the other night and about had a heart attack when the scale read 36 lbs.
fast forward to me reading this article, now i dont feel so bad.
  • 4 2
 Love this type of article. Cannot believe that the EX weights that much.
  • 2 1
 Fuel Ex frame seems very strong for a trail bike. Even the older 130mm frame is chunky.
  • 2 0
 It does when you put over 3kg of dh tyres on it
  • 3 0
 @chrismac70: Fair enough!
  • 1 0
 EX and Stumpy Evo aren't light-so they won't shatter on a high stakes line. Or a mellow blue trail.........
  • 3 1
 Pretty eye-opening. Refreshing to see some honest bike weights.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, yeah, yeah. What about Friday Fails?
  • 2 0
 Damn, we need a review of that Prime Thunderflash! ASAP!!
  • 2 0
 Would be helpful to know the frame sizes too
  • 1 0
 @SebStott - "just with a lightweight insert in the rear." Tubolito insert?
  • 2 0
 Damn. My Spire weighs significantly less with a coil and fox 40
  • 5 4
 You should at least remove tool kits and pumps and water bottles full of water. We're interested in bike weights.
  • 5 7
 greatest tripe hits from pinkbike again, guzzling as much kool-aid as their sponsors will pour on them

- classified bike parts like it's a top secret spy plane or something
- full carbon bike that weighs as much as my full alloy rig
- as someone else already said "lets flog the dead horse about bike weights again"
  • 9 1
 - It's called an embargo, but I wish they were top-secret spy plane parts. That would be way cooler. Kaz just wanted to show his personal bike and that's what's on it right now for testing. - I agree, these bikes are crazy heavy IMO - Gotchu to comment eh
  • 3 1
 If you're riding hard your bike will be heavier. That's as easy as is it.
  • 1 0
 I can see the flat chain on Kaz's bike. That means the new Sram system is on the way!
  • 2 0
 The realest post on pinkbike I could've ever hoped for.
  • 5 7
 As a 55 yo who coaches NICA and rips (by old man, US midwest standards), I call bullshit. Nonsense. Weight matters here where we like to get as sendy as terrain allows and have to earn every turn. The whole premise here is just nonsense for a giant swath of riders. Look in to your readership Pinkbike.
  • 3 0
 By the sounds of it the green trails here in the north east make your blacks in the Midwest look like pavement.
  • 1 0
 @TheSlayer99: Upstate NY blue XC trail is a little tougher than lower Michigan black trail if that gives you a reference.

Unless you're talking about a metroparks trail, in which case anything beyond two-track/gravel is rated black.

The bikes in this article would be miserable for most of the Midwest, where XC bikes rule and EXO+ qualifies a downhill casing. It's all about low rolling resistance to keep speeds up and nimble bikes to make the flat terrain interesting.
  • 1 0
 You "sendy" in a region where there are no sustained climbs, you aren't at altitude, and land managers have a chronic aversion to anything resembling a technical/consequential feature.

Suspension setup matters more for technical climbing. If you can sustain 4-5 w/kg and surge to over 1000 to clear technical up-moves you'll get up tricky moves. On the down-try riding Jacksons, or Hangover, or any other testpiece descent on a light bike!!
  • 1 0
 @TheSlayer99: Aside from Duluth, MN, there's just about nothing but laaaaaame riding in the Midwest. Like-I'd just ride my gravel bike with a 27.5 wheelset and a dropper to keep from falling asleep from the boredom of riding there. And I grew up riding and racing in the Midwest.
  • 1 0
 Mike Kazmers bike looks like it may have a flat-top sram road chain, maybe the prototype AXS
  • 1 0
 I never considered my 30ish pound bike as light, but this article makes me feel like I’m pedaling around a lightweight!
  • 1 0
 I feel so ahead of the times reading this. My Marino hardtail arrived in October and it's well north of 16 kg.
  • 1 0
 myl old yeti sb6c -> 13,43kg...
My old sc v10.3 ->15,7kg
My yeti sb100 14,1kg
  • 1 0
 So if enduro bikes are about 16-17kg, light weight ebikes are actually 20 kg in reality
  • 1 0
 Matt's Prime is one hell of a sexy bike.
  • 2 2
 Really surprised to see all the alloy wheels. Ya'll don't prefer carbon wheels?
  • 4 1
 I prefer carbon
  • 4 1
 For most riders I think alloy wheels are good enough
  • 2 1
 MIKES BIKE HAS THE NEW SRAM DRIVETRAIN ON IT! LOOK AT THE CHAIN!
  • 1 0
 Only one bike with a Fox X2 !!! Just throwin that in there!
  • 2 0
 Needs frame sizes
  • 1 0
 What do these riders consider to be a "big climb"?
  • 1 0
 This kind of article is great!
  • 11 14
 More click bait. Bunch of bikes paid to ride... Prob bunch of bikes in fleet, parts always being changed. Don't pay for anything so cant be choosy. Prob ride mostly self shuttle Enduro trails not trail riding.... Posting a bunch of over-bike porky - free - reviewer bikes and saying weight doesn't matter is the stupidest MTB online content thing this year. People with one or maybe 2 bikes that using their own hard cash and ride more than one self shuttle trail system or not going to want to pedal around 170mm 40 pound Enduro race bikes. So yes, weight most definitely matters and can easily define a bikes intentions and performance in those arenas.
  • 7 5
 yep, pinkbike guzzling the kool-aid like a bucket of cum
  • 1 0
 I think they can be choosey but they also have to go with status quo heavy 29’ers. Versatility of a more playful bike has no value for mellow trail riders. That’s why 29’ers weren’t immediately rejected, because most people suck at bikes and just want a watered- down, smooth ride.
  • 1 0
 So mile is running the new sram axs groupset and new brakelevers?
  • 1 0
 Now tell me something about Commencal Meta
  • 2 0
 35 lbs in the minions
  • 1 0
 Those weights are close to the newer lighter ebike weights.
  • 1 0
 Unreleased campagnolo eskar mtb drivetrain on tje fuel ex
  • 1 0
 Some nice bikes and big $$$ for them boots
  • 1 1
 Is it the pic angle or does Mike ride saddle nose down?
  • 1 0
 Good ol' Henry Kenny...
  • 1 1
 Yeah the grim Dunkin'try sled.
  • 1 0
 So no advent contest?
  • 1 0
 Nope,
  • 1 1
 It's off season, eh?
  • 1 2
 The photographer should be ashamed of that photo of Mike's bike.
  • 4 1
 Don't blame him, blame the SRAM embargo.
  • 4 0
 "Apologies for the zoomed-in shot - there are currently some bits and bobs on this bike that aren't quite out yet"
  • 1 0
 Dang them embargo's suck! Better?
  • 1 0
 @PhillipJ: Sorry bout that I only looked at the stats and photos
  • 1 3
 "Recently, I've been on something of a burn." How about some coherent English, not your illiterate hillbilly word salad?
  • 2 0
 It's not hillbilly-speak, unless it's Notting Hill-billy. That said, I'm pretty good with British slang and I had no idea what he meant by that.
  • 2 4
 So..nobody is talking about the elefant in the room? Emtb?
  • 1 0
 it has an engine, they don't care about weight
  • 2 0
 Broped isn't a bicycle. Different conversation.
  • 3 6
 Everywhere I go I see riders walking 35 pound bikes up hill. What a long day.
  • 7 0
 Do you think they'd still be walking if their bike weighed 2-3lbs less? My guess is it's not the bike.
  • 1 0
 You probably don't see those riding their 35lb bikes because they grew some legs and beat you to the top.
  • 1 0
 Everywhere I go I see gapers pushing "light" bikes on trails they lack the skill to ride, often with at least one grenaded tire. I've never had issues climbing on a bike over 30 pounds.
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.063585
Mobile Version of Website