The Hammerhead 360 is a Vibration Damping Stem

Mar 2, 2021
by James Smurthwaite  

XC Gear was founded in 2015 by dirt bike enthusiast and inventor Lance Smith who was fed up with vibration-induced injuries to his hands and wrists while riding motocross. He set about trying to find a solution and the result was the Mako 360, a bar mount that uses 'engineered polymers' to remove the metal-to-metal contact of a traditional system and reduce vibrations in all directions. The brand is now branching out into mountain bikes and has brought the same technology to a stem with the Hammerhead 360.

But just how important is vibration damping? Well, studies suggest it could actually make a serious difference to performance. We've previously spoken to Lewis Kirkwood, a Norco Factory Team mechanic and Ph.D student at Edinburgh Napier University, who published a study that showed the vibrations experienced by mountain bikers regularly exceed safe levels set by ISO standards.

Lewis is quick to point out that this doesn't necessarily mean it's inherently dangerous to be exposed to this level of vibration for short periods of time while mountain biking, but it almost certainly has an impact on performance. He says, "The more vibration you expose yourself to, eventually it's going to limit your grip strength. Vibration stimulates muscle and it makes the muscle tense, which is why you get arm pump because your muscle doesn't relax and it cuts off the blood flow. My director of studies, Professor Geraint Florida-James, did a study at Fort William and you can lose around about 30% grip strength in one run top to bottom." And it's these same vibrations that the Hammerhead 360 is trying to limit.


The stem is slightly different from the often tried (and more often mocked) suspension stem as it doesn't add any travel to the front of your bike but instead uses polymers to absorb the vibrations that come from riding in a similar fashion to Revolution grips or Spank's Vibrocore products. XC Gear claims from its own in-house testing that its products can reduce vibrations from an idling engine by 18% and vibrations from bumps by 38%.

This data is based on a motocross bike and the brand hasn't released any data about mountain biking but it's probably safe to say that the stem will reduce vibrations to some degree. XC Gear says, "With the Hammerhead 360 engineered polymers absorbing the vibration, riders will have substantially less grip issues, arm pump issues and overall fatigue. The result is higher energy levels on all rides, whether they are long or short. The added comfort will allow you to hit obstacles harder and faster, which means you can adjust your suspension more aggressively to get more out of your bike and yourself."

The stem itself is made in the USA from 6061 T6 aluminum and can be fitted with two different polymers for different levels of damping. Trail riders are advised to use a red polymer and more aggressive riders a green polymer. The stem is 45mm in length and fits 31.8mm diameter bars.

The stem is available now for $399.99, which probably makes it one of the most expensive MTB stems money can buy, but if arm pump regularly ruins your rides it could be a solution worth shelling out for if it works as claimed. More info, here.


340 Comments

  • 263 5
 $100 Rev grips are starting to look like a bargain
  • 70 6
 Hahaha 60$-90$ now! I actually really like mine though.
  • 67 11
 @mrfrench2013: this place is harsh who the hell downvotes for liking a set of grips
  • 125 2
 @Compositepro: Pick a set of grips and be a dick about it.
  • 25 6
 @mrfrench2013: I really like mine too Smile
  • 12 1
 @smokingtires: upvoted for being the second ball in a sack to admit their love of a grip
  • 11 2
 I bought a pair on a whim and have since added them to all my bikes
  • 35 1
 Working on grip strength and building core stability are starting to look like a waste of time.
  • 20 38
flag mark4444 (Mar 2, 2021 at 14:16) (Below Threshold)
 Lowering your front tire pressure is free and makes the biggest difference. Next is back off the high speed compression all the way. ...Second, you really don't need this stuff until you get to the bike park, and start doing 10 to 30k of rough descending a day.. even then most people can take one day... it's when you're getting every penny out of your 5 day pass, is when a softer ride really helps.
  • 5 24
flag boozed (Mar 2, 2021 at 14:33) (Below Threshold)
 @Compositepro: If one downvote is harsh, I'd hate to see two
  • 9 1
 What's next? $650 vibration dampening saddle?
  • 5 1
 @thustlewhumber: Now we can all buy vibration damping stems, bars and grips.
  • 123 0
 @mountainfishy: I want a vibration adding saddle.
  • 8 1
 My rev grips have lasted over twice as long as normal grips. They aren't super hard rubber, but on the softer side, so it must be the damping qualities they have that reduce friction with your hands. Its not a night an day difference, but it is a difference and with the longer wear life I'd say they really aren't a premium over "normal" lock on grips.
  • 36 1
 @mark4444: After correct tire pressure, I think the next biggest solution is a regularly serviced fork. How many of us complain about arm pump but haven't touched our fork since we bought it used and are the third owner and its 5 years old?
  • 59 0
 @thustlewhumber:

flex stem + flex bar + flex grips = $800 & you're still slow
  • 13 0
 @fabwizard: Mac from always sunny already has you covered

imgur.com/gallery/EeOPBUl
  • 3 0
 @mark4444: www.hsc doesn't work like that.com
A wheel/tire being round means that it accelerates up and over an obststscle. This means that the LSC is engaged before the HSC. And the lsc is often the culprit for harshness.
  • 4 1
 Rev grips are AWESOME, have put them on all my bikes, definitely worth the $$$
  • 2 0
 @boozed: Ha, there you go!
  • 3 0
 Yeah especially since you can buy Revgrips risk free with their 30 day satisfaction guarantee. The fact that that can be rebuilt is awesome and makes them much more affordable that they first appear.
  • 16 0
 @mountainfishy: what about vibration dampening forks?
  • 11 0
 @hamncheez: Underrated comment of the day. Service intervals are provided by the manufacturer for a valid reason.
  • 1 0
 @BillT999: grips, bar or stem?
  • 1 0
 @mountainfishy: Cane Creek Thud Buster is only $164!
  • 3 0
 @mark4444: super slow rebound up front and wide open out back for optimal success
  • 4 1
 Compliant aluminum wheels, high volume 2.6 tires with inserts run at lower psi, supple off the top fork and ODI rogue grips.
  • 1 3
 If you about to throw all this money on Parkinson’s prevention, Titanium bars is a very good choice.
  • 3 0
 ESI grips. Are reasonably priced good all day ride anti vibration
  • 1 0
 @mountainfishy: ...or a $60 vibration increasing saddle?
  • 1 0
 @mountainfishy: actually BikeYoke’s Sagma saddle does this. But way cheaper luckily
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: tyre pressure and suspension tube definitely helps with trail control and bigger hits. But this era of vibration dampening products irons out micro vibrations which are a major cause of hand pain and arm pump. Suspension forks and tyre pressures can’t assist to that level. And anyway, there’s a point where you’ve got no air left in your tyre and you’re still sore.
  • 4 0
 @BikeDibley: honestly i think what make the rev grips work is more so the rotation than the vibration dampening, everytime your rear wheel takes a hit it moves the bars which twists your wrists (on a hardtail this is blatantly obvious, less so on downhill bikes), instead of your wrists twisting back and forth all day the grips do which reduces arm pump and makes you feel like your more connected to the bike.
  • 2 1
 @mark4444: not sure what you got downvoted for. Tough crowd (PB makes us all feel like a rodney dangerfield set)
  • 6 0
 So who is gonna be first to go with Vibracore bars, REV grips and Hammerhead stem combo and HOPEY steering damper?

I need this to happen.
  • 5 3
 Seems like this is trying to take the physicality out of a physically demanding sport.
  • 2 0
 @mountainfishy: or just become roadies
  • 5 0
 @cuban-b-can-blow-me: I'm upvoting everything you say from now on based solely on your user name.
  • 2 0
 @garrisond5: he had gotten a bit obsessed for a bit there.
  • 1 0
 @mountainfishy:
yep, but not $650,.. it's only €129 and been available since last year. Bike Yoke Sagma.
www.bikeyoke.de/en/sagma.html
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: you could call it the “Climb Max Seat”.
  • 1 0
 @shanea5000: omg you win the internet today
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b-can-blow-me: My current setup:
- Fasst Flexx bars (aluminum), softest elastomers
- REV Grips w/ the softer elastomers
- 7/8" closed cell foam backer rod filling the inside of the bars

Could tell a noticeable difference in the really small vibrations riding on pavement after adding the backer rod, so I'm sure there's probably more improvement to be had.

Would be curious about adding one of these into the mix, but the price is pretty high and I'm not sure that the width will work -- the wider Fasst bars only have a 70mm wide clamping area and I've been unable to get details on the exact width for these.
  • 3 0
 @TimTucker: this is getting out of hand
  • 1 0
 @Grosey: because his suggestion was to ruin your suspension setup, which is f*cking stupid. Go to the gym, drink more water, and eat healthier to combat arm pump and fatigue. Don't "back your hsc all the way out" because your hands hurt.
  • 139 0
 Step 1: Create new standards that are stiffer.
Step 2: Produce extremely expensive plastic parts to get it less stiff.

Why not using a normal alu bar like syntace. Costs way less, weighs less, not to stiff, no problems at all.
  • 117 1
 Your formula is lacking drama.
  • 30 1
 I don't understand the MTB worlds addiction to stiffness. It's certainly difficult to engineer the right amount but a more organic ride feel is the way to go imho. And not Fox 38 with 35mm stem and 30psi in your minions.
  • 7 38
flag DavidGuerra (Mar 2, 2021 at 13:08) (Below Threshold)
 @SickEdit: You don't? I don't want jello stuff. My arms, legs and suspension (if I even have it in either end) do very well together in dealing with vibration, thank you very much. And to hell with frame manufacturers weakening the rear stays for more "compliance/traction". Bullshit! Control comes from stiff parts that only give in where air is involved, not from handling spaggheti tubes.
  • 58 5
 @kanasasa: reminds me of the canadian version of Breaking Bad:

- You got cancer Mr. White. We'll start the treatment next week.

-THE END.
  • 41 5
 @SickEdit: This is the nail in the coffin for carbon rims imo. "Carbon rims are lighter and stiffer" followed by: "carbon rims are breaking, so we will make them more heavily built" (now same weight as the aluminum ones they replaced) , followed by: "carbon rims are too stiff, so we will engineer compliance into them"...what you are left with is a rim which costs 4-5x the aluminum one it replaces, and performs very similarly...
  • 13 1
 @DGWW: You're quite right with that. However, if you want a stiff rim and don't buy into the compliance bullshit (which can also be optimized through spoke gauge and number), a carbon rim is an attractive option. I for one love that they never bend permanently, unlike aluminum. So they are always as good as new, unless they break of course.
  • 16 0
 @DGWW: MTB in a nutshell. The riding in the woods is fun, if you can stay away from the industry BS.
  • 2 0
 @DavidGuerra: Yeah, I don’t want to dampen my feel of the rest of my bike. Sure, I ride full suspension but that’s different. This is taking away my feel of *the bike* which seems dangerous. Plus that design is horrible. It looks like it came off a Walmart bike from 20 years ago.
  • 2 4
 @gnarlysipes: Even a relatively stiff carbon handlebar can flex almost an inch in certain low speed situations (or at least feel like it), and I don't like that. This is an extreme version of that, it's crazy. But whatever, if there's demand, here's the offer, enjoy it.
  • 9 0
 Yes! I am stoked to buy this for $900 in 2026 for my 40mm diameter bars.
  • 6 0
 @SickEdit: we have to remember that we are only one or two decades removed from the so called industrial revolution of mtb. ie, bikes were shit just 15 years ago, and we have ptsd from riding noodle rims and 28mm stanchion forks. Give it some time and mtb will settle into equilibrium.
  • 7 2
 Love my Spank Vibrocore bars
  • 4 0
 @mkul7r4: me too. And rims.
  • 3 0
 @mkul7r4: me three, and the rims Smile
  • 1 0
 Vibrations and stiffness are not at all the same thing. Everything will vibrate at a certain frequency depending on stiffness, mass and damping. A stiffer setup will have higher eigenfrequencies, which typically would be in a frequency band that is felt less by the rider.
  • 1 0
 @DGWW: all my carbon rims have had big holes punched through because of rocks 700c x28s im thinking of running rim strips
  • 1 0
 @JarrodB: SO surprised by the rims (I sought its was BS but got a deal on a "vibrocore" wheelset), just awesome. I don't have the bars, but maybe I should.
  • 138 0
 Surely absorbs a ton of cash
  • 12 0
 The design just isn't vibing with my style.
  • 9 0
 @H2o1199: It looks like it came out of a time machine from 2002.
  • 9 0
 @gnarlysipes: It makes a Girvin flex stem look pretty
  • 76 0
 Lol 10 bolts on a stem that says xc on it
  • 14 0
 bicyclepubes will have a field day with all the zits on this thing. Dangerholm is furious.
  • 3 0
 Add Ti bolts and save 2.6grams the stem is probably Only 400+gm too funny.
April 1st is still far away.
  • 4 1
 Dirt roadies will just remove every other both like they do with rotor bolts.
  • 76 5
 Cut and wrap an old inner tube between stem and bars. There you go. I just saved you $399.99. You're welcome.
  • 3 0
 Preach!
  • 52 2
 Or if they want to make a business out of it, just make the rubber/silicone insert to put between a 35mm stem and a 31.8mm bar. Could be used with any existing combo of those.
  • 13 0
 35mm stem + a buncha tubes + 31.8mm bars
  • 6 0
 @mtb-jeremy: One can actually find 35 to 31.8mm spacer converters on AliExpress that are made of carbon fiber and claim vibration-reducing properties..
  • 14 2
 @m1dg3t: hey that's my line ;-)
  • 3 1
 A DH inner tube? all mountain? down country? or maybe latex!!!!
  • 12 1
 @mtb-jeremy: But I want this for 35mm bars so that my stem is so large I can write my racing number on it directly without needing a plate
  • 2 0
 @mtb-jeremy: RooX used to make a plastic spacer when the MTB industry increased bar diameter the first time. My RooX bars had no taper.
  • 2 0
 Do it, report back.
  • 1 1
 @iamamodel: yeah club roost lol
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: i rember selling a load of these at a shop and the alloy ones all cracked at the edge of the shim , titanium ones were fine,
  • 1 0
 Love it!!!!!????????????????????????
  • 3 0
 @preach: Who's line is it anyways? Smile
  • 32 2
 Stoked to see more vibration-dampening products out there, but I think I'll stick with my OneUp carbon bars at a fraction of the price!
  • 8 9
 One up only deal with certain vibrations and I’m guessing they will be if the larger frequencies. I like my oneup bar but it isn’t the same as my vibriocore one.
  • 91 1
 I'll stick with my anti vibration stickers
  • 16 4
 I will stick with my OneUps and riding so fucking fast that I touch no part of the trail!!!!!!
  • 21 4
 I have the 35mm OneUp bars on my custom dream bike and they're my least favorite part of the build. The 31.8 Renthal they replaced were noticeably smoother.
My personal take:
Beefed up parts for ebikes are being sold as stiffness upgrades to regular bikes as trickle down supply chain
The stiffness is now so harsh that we're adding even more weight to dampen the vibrations they transmit
My next bike will have 31.8 bars and boost hubs and superboost/35mm can stay on motorized rigs

Just my 2c, maybe someone is sending it hard enough for these things to matter but it's not me.
  • 6 2
 Slightly different purpose.

Carbon bars reduce vibration from single hits, since their natural frequency is way higher than metal due to higher Elastic modulus (ratio of deformation for a given stress load). The raw force still gets transmitted to your hands, but just once instead of the residual vibrations that are present in metal bars.

The softer elastomers in this stem reduce the overall amplitude of the vibration since the bar can move about some within the stem. This yields an overall softer ride. Same concept as the ShockStop Suspension stem for road/gravel bikes, which works very well.
  • 16 5
 @phops: Cycling is hard on the hands. It's no wonder people keep trying to add more comfort, but there are different levels of "quality" of movement. We shouldn't seek to add flex everywhere and in every way. Moving grips, flexing bars, flexing stems, suspension forks, flexing rims, big tires ... it's not a case of "more is more" and therefore all flex is beneficial.

In the case of this stem, the main type of movement it permits is a "see-saw" motion of the bar. Unfortunately, this is the worst kind of flex. It does more to disconnect the control inputs of your hands from the orientation of the bike on the pitch and yaw axes than it does to allow movement in the plane of the bike, especially if both hands experience the same force. There is probably in the range of a millimeter of movement available in-plane, yet many millimeters of see-saw movement. As I said, this is a terrible ratio of control-reducing movement to comfort-increasing movement.

At least the ShockStop stem and the Trans-X AntiShock stem maximize in-plane movement and minimize roll and yaw axes, although the do create movement on the pitch axis. Still, it's the lesser of two evils.

A better solution is to just use larger tires. The vibrations are cut off at the source (the ground) before they can disturb the chassis, the ratio of good movement to bad movement is better, and it's $400 cheaper - likely lighter, too - to add a couple millimeters of size to a tire than to add a big, squishy stem.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: I'm tempted to go up to some 2.6's and possibly a 2.8 on the front but all the tyres that interest me and with good damping seem to be in smaller sizes, such as the Shorty and DH22. But more to the point, many report the larger tyres have too much undamped rebound and feel skitish on loose terrain, almost like riding on basketballs. I'm all for grip but not if it's momentary and the tyres are bouncing all over the show. Will have to try a set and see I guess.
  • 4 0
 @Danzzz88: Yes, the current tire situation leaves a lot to be desired. This doesn't disprove the concept, though.

Also, I'm not necessarily talking about jumping all the way to 2.8". The point is that this particular stem is not the most effective way to add comfort. At least the Fasst Flexx bar, for example, can accommodate in-plane movement. If we use tires as one - among many - examples of an alternate solution, if a rider is currently on 2.4" tires, stepping up to 2.5" would be an improvement on the scale of a slightly flexible stem with less downside.
  • 1 0
 @Mtmw:

you sure your oneup bars aren't rotated 90 degrees the wrong way?
  • 13 0
 Three words:
Push on grips...

Silicone ones like ESI in particular. They cost f*ck all and have all but eradicated arm pump for me. I'll happily do 2 weeks of daily lift assisted big mountain DH with barely more than a twinge.
*edit* I should add that I run coil suspension front and rear. but honestly, just a £10 set of silicone grips made an immediate and noticable difference. No see-sawing handle bars. No overcomplicated lock-ons with built in suspension. Just 2 bits of plain silicone rubber. Try it.
  • 5 0
 @gabriel-mission9: Totally agree about push-ons. Can double or even triple the amount of soft material in contact with the hands, compared to lock-ons.

My experience has been that thick rubber grips have worked better than silicone foam. The latter is softer in the radial direction, but the former allows more shear deformation, which I find more valuable. In any case, soft grips are definitely one of the good places to add compliance - cheap, too!
  • 1 0
 @phops: I ran a carbon bar/stem combo on my rigid SS, and it made an absolute world of difference on how that bike rode compared to alu bar/stem combo. It went from being extremely harsh to very little harshness (again, RIGID) and was my most comfortable bike for longer rides because everything worked so well. The aches and pains I got riding it with alu were gone in the carbon set up. So yeah, the right carbon parts can really help with trail vibration, not just big hits.
  • 2 0
 @gabriel-mission9: Grips do make a huge difference, though I'm running super thick Meaty Paws not push-ons. I'll happily ride DH tracks on my trail bike all day without (serious) hand fatigue, they're so much better than any thinner grips I've tried
  • 1 0
 I'm just using ODI Dreadlock foam grips atm and they are so much more comfortable than regular silicone lock on grips like Ergon etc, better grip on them too, none of that slippy when wet nonsense and they are super lightweight not like that really matters. Only issue is they look like they will wear faster than normal grips but comfort wise they are a big improvement, surprised not many more people like foams, I think they outperform other grips in every way except durability and aesthetics if your fussed about funky colours.
  • 1 1
 @WasatchEnduro: unsure if asked in jest but yes I'm sure. They're just very harsh (by comparison).
  • 1 2
 @WasatchEnduro: they just don’t work for high frequency vibrations. Never has a handlebar had so much hype and so little benefit.
  • 5 1
 @R-M-R: A better solution would be for 90% of the "gotta ride 800 mm because they 'feel' better" crowd, who are less than 6'4" tall, to trim their bars down so that their hands (little fingers) are naturally aligned inside the pocket of the elbow, as a rough guide, so that their arms could actually flex properly and absorb some of the that vibration they are complaining about.
  • 2 0
 @andrewbikeguide: shoulder pain too
  • 2 0
 I'll stick with my sore wrists.
  • 3 1
 @andrewbikeguide: and here I am at 173cm (sorry I come from the civilized world so I don't understand "), went from my 820 bar back to 800 and I certainly prefer the handling and feel of 820. It may not be the best for me according to the Internet, maybe I'd be faster without it but it feels really good, I definitely had less fatigue with the 820 than I do now with 800 but that 820 wasn't as stiff of a bar. These generalisations are just silly.
  • 2 0
 @R-M-R: Couldn't agree with you more. Tyres will make the biggest difference- if you do as i do and switch out winter wheels and tyres on the car. going from a 20" wheel and low profile for summer and 17" wheel with higher profile for winter gives the car two very different riding and handling characteristics. 17" is soft, quiet and more compliant while the 20" is more "stiff" but noisier.

For MTB think of the difference even just tyre pressure makes; just a few psi takes us from tyres rolling off rims and sketchy to perfect then onto too hard and bouncing off of things.
  • 2 0
 @MrDuck: Dude I agree, was telling R-M-R in the forum only the other day, I'm the same height, went from 760 up to 800mm and it is so much better for me, 820mm I don't know. With the longer bars, I find at our height even, that is where my hands want to actually rest, but more to the point the handling is so much better with 800s, it's a lot easier to get larger lean angles and weight the bike over with little steering input to the degree that I can actually turn harder and faster one direction to another with longer bars than I can with supposedly more twitchey shorter bars and not clip my knees with my hands...it was a very profound difference. Only negative is clipping stuff in narrow spaces, you can definitely tell that can happen a lot more with the longer bars but at least most places where I would be riding mach chicken are wide enough trails that it doesn't become a concern most of the time. But in terms of handling and confidence just fitting wider bars has made a bigger difference than fiddling around with a multitude of other settings and parts on the bike. Went from 760mm 15mm rise to 800mm 36mm rise, can now turn harder, lift the front easier, drop the nose off lips with more confidence amd weight the front with more control than I ever could just by changing a bar for £30. But stupidly everyone even the pros seem to all want to run narrow bars and low rise, god knows why...only advantage to low bars is it keeps your weight constantly on the front wheel for grip without thinking about weighting it, but everywhere else they are far worse. One thing I will say though is I have also more to 9 degree backsweep, with all the talk of more backsweep being more comfortable especially on climbs and seated I thought they would feel better but I prefer 8 degree or less, feel like the 9 degree are twisting my wrists outwards and putting pressure more on the outer part of my hand rather than spread evenly across the whole hand...surprised the 1 degree had that affect considering some bars are touted as having 15 degree backsweep for comfort.
  • 2 0
 @cjm330: We're on the same page about tires, though my point wasn't really about tires. The bigger picture is that not all types of compliance are of equal virtue and it's not necessarily helpful to increase compliance via every possible method.

For example, if a frame company wants to increase the travel of a model, they don't bolt a Shockster onto an existing frame, they design a frame with more travel because the result will work better.

Similarly, the stem is not the best place to add compliance, and definitely not via a system that produces more roll axis rotation than in-plane translation.
  • 2 0
 @Danzzz88: try the Magic Mary 2.6. Similar grip to Shorty in loose conditions and it's big and supple. Great front tire IMO
  • 2 0
 @Mtmw:
@DHhack

I hear you. Yeah the OneUp bar didn’t change my life. Compared to my old 35mm Atlas alu bar they’re noticeably better as is the Chromag BZA carbon on my last bike but that’s expected as that bar is stiffAF. I can feel a lot of flex in the Ibis 31.8 carbon bar too fwiw.

I don’t know why 35mm happened.

I am curious about the fasst flex bar but not quite ready to try it yet.
  • 2 0
 @WasatchEnduro: i actually have a set of BZA on my hardtail and Oneups on my full suspension. going back and forth, I find the Oneup to be less fatiguing by a little bit but I dig both the bars. I think the Chromag wins on how damped they feel, but the OneUp does it in a way that also makes you feel ultra connected to the bike.
  • 1 0
 @PullMyBrakeLever: Currently on a Magic Mary 2.35 Soft, can't say it's a grippy as a Short 3C.. maybe the Ultrasoft is, dunni how much bigger the 2.6 is either, as I saw a review that said the 2.6 comes up at am actual 2.35. Feel like a drastic change rather than buying pretty much the same tyre again, though maybe going to 2.6 Ultra soft dh casing will be noticeably better than 2.35 Soft Snakeskin. Don't see many people using ultra softs online, zero reviews on that compound too.
  • 23 0
 Just as a PSA, but HYDRATE HYDRATE HYDRATE!!!!!! This has a massive effect on arm pump reduction and there is plenty of science around this. It's probably been 8 years since I've started being more careful with ensuring that I'm properly hydrating and drinking plenty of fluids during DH days and arm pump has become a thing of the past since.
  • 21 0
 Yes, I drink at least a gallon of Red Bull every day, keeps the arm pump away! Sucks having kidney stones though. That’s the real problem, isn’t it?
  • 25 0
 @7hhuman: the extra vibration through the bars help break up the kidney stones.
  • 1 0
 Bar roll and your levers are probably pointed down too much.
  • 6 0
 Yeah, but can you brag about drinking $399.99 worth of water?
  • 24 2
 Is there not the scope for someone to invent a 31.8mm-35mm bit of polymer that uses existing standards and costs barely anything?
  • 12 1
 Shhh
  • 3 0
 That is a good solution. Nobody thought of it until now.
  • 18 2
 please don't ruin these gentlemen's avenue towards the fuckton of coke money they so obviously need.
  • 17 0
 Totally agree that vibration takes a lot out of you. Especially the first day or two back in the bike park, my recovery day I usually feel like I was in a car accident the day before. Not sure this is the solution I'm looking for though!
  • 8 0
 Hand transplant?
  • 2 0
 Doesn't this say more about a problem with front suspension not being supple enough?
  • 1 2
 @trillot: Front suspension isn't supposed to be supple. I'm 1-2 clicks softer than the recommended compression setting and a better rider would be riding a stiffer setup than mine. Being on a 150mm trail bike doesn't help, but even when I've rented a DH bike I've still felt beat to hell the next day. Bike parks are just rough AF if you're riding reasonably fast.
  • 18 1
 it's mountain biking.... not rolling down a hill in a lazy boy..
  • 10 1
 Easy now. Don't want to offend anybody.

Wink
  • 16 0
 That’s why I only ride rigid bikes and put 60 psi in my minions. Hell yeah.
  • 13 2
 My biggest question is where is all the cost coming from? Unless these some kind of ridiculously expensive polymers, its really just a stem with polymer inserts around the clamping surface. Where does $400 come from? The machining of the stem doesn't seem any more involved than any other stem on the market, which cost maybe $150 on the high end. Do these little Polymer sleeves cost $250?
  • 6 0
 R&D and markup
  • 15 0
 All those extra bolts.
  • 3 0
 In fact the machining on high end stems out there is WAY more involved than on these. Look at Deity and I-9 stems.
  • 13 2
 The amount of sharp edges and bolts to injure yourself on is about as dangerous as "vibration induced injuries" and the fact that it will probaly mess up your bike build budget.
  • 10 0
 I love all these companies thinking outside of the box. Obviously this is more of a "first run" and expensive as shit but in the future I could see things like this becoming standard on nicer bikes. Reminds me of those handlebars a couple weeks ago that had polymer inserts in the joints to reduce vibrations. Definitely seems like an idea that's catching on overall. There were multiple people too who had tried those handlebars and said it was worth the money if you have arm pump issues.
  • 6 0
 You mean these, which came out a couple years ago?
m.pinkbike.com/news/fasst-company-announces-flexx-handlebar.html
  • 2 0
 @erikkellison: yes! Those are the ones. I just remember seeing the article a couple weeks ago advertising them here. Seems like a cool idea.
  • 3 0
 @DylanH93: indeed, lots of cool tech in this realm to reduce harshness, like We Are One bars, OneUp bars, Rev Grips, ESI grips, softer initial travel in forks thanks to some companies aftermarket options (DSD Runt, Vorsprung Luftkappe, Secus) and some companies actually implementing good tech in their forks to begin with (Mezzer, Era, Ohlins), coil conversions from Vorsprung, Avalanche, PUSH), CushCore... frankly, I want it all. I love a sporty Cadillac.
  • 1 0
 @erikkellison: Both these companies had the moto product out for a while and heard mountainbike people like to spend lots of money too. It doesn't seem like they did anything different for the bike product except scale it to a bike.
  • 12 0
 I'd say that product has industry crossover potential if you make it vibrate instead of dampening vibrations, just saying.
  • 1 0
 Gives new meaning to "keep yer dick in a vise!" Eh? LoL
  • 13 0
 It needs at least 6 more bolts
  • 8 0
 And 9 more washers
  • 9 0
 Can PB please build up a super anti Vibe bike with this, those flexx bars, vibrocore rims, etc, etc, maybe those grips that move too, and put someone with arthritis on it and them make them ride down Neds Atomic Dustbin and see if they still have the strength to remove a DH Bead Minion at the bottom of the run.
  • 8 0
 Ahh I see what’s going on here.. pain distraction technique. Pain induced from kneeing the steerer clamp, its sheer heft, and looking at this stem will more than offset all other pain in your life.
  • 7 0
 I need one of these with a vibracore bar and Rev Grips, held on with my memory foam padded gloves. I think I could rock Rampage with all of it.

Jokes aside, the reason main components are getting stiffer is to avoid uncontrolled rebound effects associated with flexing metal. If you have a perfectly rigid metallic component (bars) you can control more vibration while damping the effects on your body. Not that I consider any of this when buying components. Chromag = Pretty = Buy
  • 7 0
 They had my attention until I saw the price: WTF?!

Yeah, good luck with that sale, I'd sooner buy one of those fancy flex bars before I'd shell for a $400 stem.

Honestly, as much as I appreciate the work that some folks put into designing a product, there is just no way in hell that it costs that much to design and produce that stem.

Nope, no way.
  • 8 0
 Hmmm
>buy any 35mm wide stem and any 31.8 bars
>order custom plastic sleeve for 10 bucks
>vibration damping setup ready
  • 8 0
 Wait a second...the bike industry has been marketing "STIFFER" for years now...have we been lied to?!
  • 2 0
 LOL. Right? Just after everybody "upgrades" to 35mm bars!
  • 5 0
 It's cool to see innovative products but a much more cost-effective way to reduce arm pump and vibration-related fatigue is to relax your grip on your bike. It does take some practice but it's huge for fending off the dreaded claw.
  • 8 2
 I've been looking for a way to reduce the vibrations from the idling engine on my mountain bike by up to 18%. How perfect is this?
  • 9 1
 Shocking price
  • 9 0
 Dampens the mood
  • 1 0
 We got stiffed, oh wait..
  • 3 0
 Not the most elegant looking piece but it makes sense. I've wondered for awhile why no one ran something like this. I love that people are looking for ways to reduce vibration. My exploded hand appreciates all the help it can get.
  • 4 0
 I think there is a reason there isnt a photo of this one a bike with a bar in it...look at the scale of the steer tube hole compared to the bar clamp area. Unless something is wonky with the photos, that thing is MASSIVE.
  • 6 0
 399.99 What a steal! I could get a whole cockpit for that price jeez
  • 8 2
 I'll take the arm pump option.
  • 5 0
 20 year old BMX riders are laughing at MTBers whose arms get sore riding full suspension MTBs.
  • 1 0
 An then suffering all the joint pain in their 40's....
That is literally my real life experience Smile f*cked from a long life of BMX
  • 3 0
 Tire pressure and fork tune should be looked at before dropping $400 on a stem. And then after that, a few more hours viewing free porn should solve the arm pump issues.. or vice-versa
  • 2 0
 Do they price it so high because they dont think they could meet demand if it was priced at what its worth? Not wanting to sell very many is the only reason I can think of for charging so much, it doesnt seem possible that it would cost that much to make even for a small facility. At $400 they might sell a handful a month, maybe thats all theyre capable of making.
  • 1 1
 @DGWW: Everyone with an idea thinks that idea should make them rich by more. The bike industry caters to that philosophy perfectly. Most things for MTB are expensive (from a working class perspective) so why not put out a $400 35mm stem with a sleeve that adapts to 31.8mm and call it "dampening?" I mean, some riders will buy ANYTHING if it makes their bike look the most expensive at the trailhead.
  • 5 0
 Is this better than a set of Fat Paw grips?
  • 1 0
 Imagine a super-thin 10k USD xc bike with this mammoth. I would be surprised if anyone would buy it, only desperate that can't hold bars but nonetheless, I still appreciate a product that at least has some scientific evidence behind it.
  • 1 0
 Kudos for putting yourself out there and trying new things. That's always admirable. This is going to need to be a lot cheeper and a lot better looking before I consider putting it on my bike. To the degree that my grip strength reduces the quality fo my bike rides, I just assume I need to do some more work in the gym.
  • 2 0
 Plan:

1. Buy a new 35mm standard stem
2. Cut butter into thin 1.5mm strip
3. wrap around my current31.8 bars
4. install bar in new 35mm stem

Result:

Buttery smooth....not for use in hot climates....
  • 1 0
 Not sure if they will take off on MTB. But these are hot shit on motos, see them on tons of bikes riding and racing woods bikes. That's where the XC name comes from also not XC mountain biking but cross country motorcycle racing.
  • 1 0
 Need a direct mount version for DH bikes. I dont see this being worth much for trail riding but I think it would be amazing for bike park. RevGrips are great but they are not enough for bike park and I would imagine this could make a week at whistler or trestle way way better
  • 1 0
 Ok dudes, now we have vibration dampening stems, vibration dampening bars, shock absorbing bars, vibration dampening grips, vibration dampening rims, inherently vibration dampening tires, and inherently shock absorbing shocks/forks. I'd love to see a bike with all of these equipped together ROFL. Would probably feel like riding a wet noodle.

Anyways, I'm actually curious to see where the ideal place to actually damp vibration and absorb shock really is. If I had to bet my money on it, I'd go with proper tire pressure, proper fork/shock pressure, and MAYBE some Spank Vibrocore bars ???? Everything else is pretty damn overkill I think...
  • 1 0
 I have to say, since riding 2.6 wide tyres and rimpact tyre inserts, I get next to no arm pump any more - feel like there’s a lot of options for a lot less than $400!
Although I can see this going down well in the more serious long distance gravel community
  • 1 0
 Not sold on the idea of needing something like this to reduce fatigue on a MTB. Different story on a mx bike as they are much heavier and are motorised meaning that you actually need to grip to hold on, turn the throttle and stop yourself falling off the back. Mtbs are light, suspensions fairly supple and it's more about controlling the rider weight rather than the weight of the MTB. Gripping the bars hard during successive hits and prolonged rough terrain is what is going to limit grip strength (along with general fatigue). Fort Bill is a prime example prolonged rough terrain, however you'd probably be better off saving your money, trying to keep a looser grip on the bars, and focus on being as smooth as possible.
  • 1 0
 Not sure why all the hate here - if your wrists are knackered from previous injuries or RSI or carpal tunnel then anything that lets you get in more or longer runs before the pain gets too much is a bonus. If you don't like it, don't buy it.
  • 1 0
 Stiffness and vibration damping are not the same thing. I'm not defending this particular product, but just because something is flexible doesn't mean it has good vibration damping. Vibrations are very high frequency/low amplitude. Tennis racquets of the same stiffness, for example, can have different vibration damping effects. So, the same should be true with handlebars.

Compliance is best handled by suspension and tires. Too much flex can cause all kinds of unwanted things going on. Nothing is going to be perfectly stiff, but I want my fork legs as still as possibly, fore to aft especially, so it works without binding and does feel like the bike is bending backward when I hit a big compression, which I find unsettling especially at speed. For wheels, I want lateral stiffness, or I'm liking to get frame rub and it transfers power better. Vertical compliance again, I'm not that concerned about if I set my tire pressure and suspension correctly. If you can build a little in without sacrificing lateral stiffness then fine, but floppy feeling wheels are the worst especially when your on the heavier range for a mountain bike rider.
  • 4 0
 did I miss March? Is it April 1 already?
  • 2 0
 ‘Hmm, looks expensive....’ click... ‘HOLY SH...GO BACK, GO BACK!’
Can’t un-see the price tag for a stem... a bloody s t e m. -palm to face-
  • 2 0
 I was like "cant be more than 250.........whaaaat?!"
  • 4 0
 Rebound two clicks faster = $free.99.
  • 2 0
 Just imagine this stem, those flex bars and some Rev grips. The only finger cramps you'd experience would be when you were opening your wallet.
  • 1 0
 I was getting really excited about adding this between the ENVE MTN fork and ENVE DH Bar on my rigid SS, but at that $$$$ price line, I'll deal with the arm pump issues instead...
  • 1 0
 I can tell you're lying about your fork and bars, enve fanbois will fight you over the enve stem, its their favorite non wheel part.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Running a thompson stem - time to upgrade to the ENVE stem for some good vibes which just might be the key to everything :-)
  • 4 0
 31.8 bars and properly tuned fork damping surely achieved this??
  • 1 0
 Alright PB!!!! I want to see a Hammerhead 360 is a Vibration Damping Stem pared with Rev grips and a Flexx handlebar!!! On a fully rigid fat bike. Might as well throw a thudbuster seat post on it for good measure.
  • 3 0
 I was totally sold until I saw $400... just gonna get a coil conversion, or maybe a new fork
  • 3 0
 This XC Gear stem certainly isn't damping the harsh feedback of the PB comments section at $400
  • 3 0
 Perfect timing with everyone going to 35mm bars.... Now I remember why I stayed with 31.8mm.
  • 1 0
 thats a lot of mula for a product that looks like identifying it as an afterthought. Yo. at least you coulda just lazer etched a logo on the faceplate. what even is that? A stem headbadge?
  • 2 0
 yes vibrations are probably as unhealthy as they say... but i have a hard time understanding how it it isn't better solved with actual suspension tuning???
  • 3 0
 Do you have to use that 200 dollar handlebar square to make sure the stem and bars are 90 to each other?
  • 2 0
 I never did understand having vibracore in a 35mm stiffer bar...industry creates solution to their own engineered problem...slow clap.
  • 2 0
 How's the bar not spinning? Or how is it precisely dampening anything if the middle bolt stiffly block things into place? Enlight me please.
  • 1 0
 Just use a quality set of alu bars, problem solved. Carbon is silly and bars made with low grade alu use more of it to get strength but end up being too stiff vs a quality alu bar with thinner wall tube. Easy.
  • 2 0
 I’ll just modify a shake weight and stick it on my bike because I rather be ridiculed for owning a shake weight than that stem
  • 1 0
 There's more information in this article than on the company's own webpage. Makes me very skeptical of any testing claims, and of their engineering prowess, when they can't even provide proper information on either.
  • 1 0
 No one talking about the fact that there is only one picture angle and you can't see into the middle clamp peice where there is no polymer so no damping. I couldn't find another angle..
  • 1 0
 So this stem, Fasst flexx bars and Rev grips! together it'll feel as if you're steering your bike with a wet fish. But at least there won't be arm pump. You'll also be rocking a $825 cockpit.
  • 1 1
 I race enduro on dirt bikes and I use the mako 360 and I say it was a extremely noticeable difference after I put it on. It takes the harsh edge off of bumps and I feel better after bumps in quick succession. even though it is rubber I can still make quick movements and I can't feel the rubber in the bars so the only time I notice it is when it is working. At the end of the there is not any suspension that is plush enough to take out those extremely small harsh hits that the mako can take out, and I would expect the hammerhead to feel the same.
  • 1 0
 Arm pump is caused by improper positioning on a bike. Usually stemming from incorrect cockpit and suspension set up. This stem won't make a difference. The air in your tires does the same thing, but much better.
  • 1 0
 so the guy who cannot set up propperly his suspension and tire pressures invented stem which decreases handling precision? maybe this is reason why nobody sees this stem in real life?
  • 5 1
 oh no oh no oh no
  • 1 0
 GET OUT!!!!
  • 4 1
 Flesh tight for your bike....

#Biketight
  • 3 0
 Could this be the solution to harsh feedback induced by linkage forks?
  • 1 0
 The better solution is to design linkage forks that don't have a ridiculous axle path or motion ratio. Just as 1990s telescoping forks were horrible and modern ones work well, please don't let your perception of all linkage forks be tarnished by a couple of recent, dodgy products!
  • 2 0
 Wow that's quite the study findings... I'll be sure to make the point of ": )" when someone talks down vibration dampening
  • 2 0
 *damping
  • 2 0
 This along with my one-up carbon bar, and rev grips should make it feel like I'm floating on a cloud.
  • 3 0
 I can't ride faster when my eyes are bleeding.
  • 3 0
 Guys, this is only $39.99 per bolt. Seems reasonable enough to me.
  • 3 0
 Look like a piece of weapon from Warhammer...
  • 1 1
 It looks good! I use a soft suspension. It acts suprisenly good as shock absorbers. I know crazy ,no stiff suspension for pop and platform just a nice soft ground hugging experience.
  • 2 0
 Gonna get a hammerhead stem along with rev grips and fasst bars. Sure I'll be poor but my wrists are gonna love me.
  • 1 0
 Don't forget the suspension stem riser too
  • 2 0
 Looks good, it's light weight and it's super affordable, oh wait, no, what are opposites of those words again?
  • 1 0
 I was getting excited to try these for my rigid gravel bike until I got the bottom and saw the price! Holy balls, I’ll pass at $399.
  • 1 0
 I guess I just didn't know I needed to buy a 400 buck stem to doe the work my fork and CF bar should be doing. Now I know. Thank you.
  • 2 0
 Did someone tell these guys that some pranksters wrote "XC Gear" on their stems?
  • 1 0
 Step 1: buy this and a intend stiffmaster and test if the bike is stiffer or more flexible
Step 2:
Step 3: Profit (for the companies)
  • 1 0
 Who was it that did the hubs with the bearings sat in elastomer cups , revolver or something , it was the same era as the flexstem
  • 1 0
 I'm gonna say this quietly in case its a good idea, but someone could start selling vibro material shims to take a 31.8mm stem onto 25.4mm bars.
  • 2 0
 This is going to reduce steering precision just as much as it damps vibration since the clamp is still in the center.
  • 2 0
 I've been running a Girvin and a Hite Rite for years on my full rigid Nishiki. All I need.
  • 1 0
 I'd love to see this + rev grips + flexxbars + suspension stem + plus tires + super plush suspension setup. Then huck it to flat
  • 1 1
 for that price im going to buy a carbon stem and bar that has a the perfect amount of flex. something that looks good too. enve is on top of the list if I'm spending that amount.
  • 3 0
 lol...
  • 2 0
 The comment section is going to savage this one.
  • 1 0
 This thing better work like a magic carpet! Nothing else can justify its looks and heft.
  • 1 0
 $400 for a stem? I guess only sponsored riders will buy that. That's like buying a V1 Tesla Roadster back in the days
  • 2 0
 I don't think they used enough screws on this.
  • 4 1
 More bolts please.
  • 2 0
 Vibrations are the key to an enjoyable ride.
  • 1 0
 Sine waves of love
  • 1 0
 @Monsterman156: Love's more parabolic.
  • 3 0
 Girvin, where are you?
  • 2 0
 Seriously needs to show up and flex right now.
  • 3 0
 That stuff worked well for what it was. Bob Girvin was a hoot, their facility was in my small state and up the road from my old shop... lucky enough to have been drafted to do a lot of testing of all the iterations of the girvin vector fork and it’s successor, cross link...think of this if you can imagine it or were not riding back in The early days....Girvin flex stem (titanium bar stem combo if you were factory enough) we would change the elastomer durometers to get dial out the small bumps on the flexstem and usually being on rock shox mag 20s/21s back then, I had those pressured to take the medium to bigger hits. Looking back it was a trip being in the early days of suspension. And seeing and riding what have now...life is good brother!!
  • 1 0
 @jgottya1: had a Proflex 852 full suspension with a nice Girvin flex stem on top. Would have loved to ride some Girvin forks, but these were so damn expensive back in the days...
  • 2 0
 @singlespeedman: those were such great bikes for what was around back then. They were a little on the expensive side for the vector forks and surely out of the states they were more due to whatever economic unevenness had been levied by my and or your government. The cool thing about those if I recall was reverse J shaped axle path, so when you hit a bump it didn’t want to deflect material like a regular telescopic fork. Rather moved slightly back and then gently curved upwards. Bob Girvin was quite the engineer back in the day. The flexstem was certainly cool, rugged and affective for what it was designed for.
Ahhh the good old days.
Cheers!
  • 1 0
 Can't believe they don't make it in a 35mm which is starting to become a standard on most newer trail/Enduro bikes
  • 5 0
 I cant believe 35mm is becoming standard on 120mm bikes too.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: stand by, it is about to get worse...
  • 2 0
 Great for those new E-bikes, with the vibrating motors.
  • 1 0
 They'd want it to last better than the 'hammerhead' brand gear shifters for enduro motorbikes... absolute junk.
  • 1 0
 Anyone tried Spank Vibrocore bars? Be interested to know how well they've worked for them.
  • 1 0
 I tried a vibrocore bar on my FS bike and felt noticeably less fatigued after rides. Then got a new hardtail for trail riding for the first time in a few decades and initially it felt pretty harsh. Learned to ride it smoother, added vibrocore bars and rev grips (went extreme on the damping since I have some nerve issues) and now the bike feels awesome and very comfy.
  • 1 0
 They are decent, I can only compare them to other aluminum though. As much as I feel a difference I've had more success adjusting my suspension and tires to damp vibration. Comparing spank to vibrocore is a night and day difference though.
  • 1 0
 @OldDert: I am a huge fan of vibration damping stuff and love my spank vibrocore for its shape, but i honestly cant tell the difference to a regular bar vibrationwise. On the other hand my vittoria airliners make a ton of a difference in that regard, even compared to cushcore.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: I still haven’t pulled the trigger on tire inserts. I am interested but don’t have problems with flats and am satisfied with the PSI I run, but always looking towards the next possible improvement.
  • 1 0
 @OldDert: IIf you get a good deal on Vittorias go for them: not heavy ,easy to install, can be run flat and offer a great amount of damping. Running these, i always wonder why someone would want to run a mostly undamped tire. Especially on my hardtail it makes a huge difference; you can also smash as hard as you dare into things without breaking stuff.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: cool, I am most interested in inserts for run flat ability so I can finally leave the spare tube behind, but Cush core seems like overkill for my needs.
  • 1 2
 Id be interested in a bottom bracket that uses this technology. There's already plenty of options for handlebars, but feet undergo the same vibration, even with good shoes and suspension.
  • 3 0
 Dr. Scholls makes a BB elastomer the slides in between your foot and shoes.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: lol I actually take my insoles our because I like to feel my spikes through my shoes...
  • 1 0
 He does also make pegs so maybe he'll make peddles
  • 1 0
 I'll just be over hear wrapping my 31.8 mm bar with old inner tube and clamping it into a 35 mm stem. Boom!
  • 1 0
 Pretty happy with the damping characteristics of the Vibrocore bars & rims, they take the edge off for sure.
  • 2 0
 Put down the purse nannies. More unneeded industry garbage
  • 3 0
 Pricey fleshlight
  • 1 0
 Never been a better time to come out with useless gadgets. Take a bike skills lesson instead.
  • 1 0
 This is the kind of thing that people who drive with oven mittens would buy.
  • 2 0
 Maybe you should set up your suspension so it isn't garbage.
  • 2 0
 looks good to stop water leaks
  • 2 0
 This makes us feel better about selling a $69 tube plate.
  • 2 0
 This article was clearly posted to mine for Pinkbike comment gold
  • 1 0
 Get rid of the death grip hold on your bars and stand on the d***n pedals!!!
  • 1 0
 I think these are well intentioned although an afterthought to their true moto design.
  • 2 0
 More gimmicks from the bike industry. Just ride people.
  • 1 0
 This will definitely get people to loosen their grip and not support too much weight on the bars.
  • 1 0
 I’d like to try one for the performance benefit, but with this price and looks there’s just no way
  • 1 0
 Oh. We are back in the bullshit-gear area.
I am waiting for a revival of disk-wheels.
@tioga it may be the right time....
  • 1 0
 Or just work on your grip and forearm strength/endurance. A good manual job will sort this out ;o
0
  • 1 0
 I like the sound of it improving performance and comfort. Bit it's v.ugly and looks heavy and v.expensive.
  • 3 0
 It needs more bolts
  • 2 0
 Just buy an oversized stem and line it with old inner tubes, job done!
  • 1 0
 Buy a used MX bike, ride it at least once a week. Arm pump on a bicycle will go away and you'll get faster.
  • 1 0
 I feel like they just started off with a price and then made a product to fit.
  • 1 0
 Cool Idea, If it helps some folks ride more comfortably then why the heck not.
  • 1 0
 I showed this to my girlfriend and she said "meh", whatever that means.
  • 1 2
 People with sur ron bikes swear by these. I haven't used and wouldn't spend that much but they come recommended by that crew.
  • 1 0
 oh yeah, and a 12 pack of PBR.
  • 1 0
 And when the polymer inserts wear down or compress?
  • 1 0
 1980 called, it wants it XC Gear back.
  • 1 0
 Dirt bikes have been using rubber mounts on the top yoke for YEARS.
  • 2 1
 can i put it on my penis so my watch won't detect i'm masturbating?
  • 1 0
 Only comes in 31.8mm Just sayin.
  • 1 0
 no direct mount? what is this 2000?
  • 1 0
 Least this is more of an exclusive that the TLD A3 helmet exclusive.
  • 1 0
 What an ugly looking stem.
  • 1 0
 It must be April, seriously.
  • 1 0
 Great now I have a stem to go with my one up bars and rev grips
  • 1 0
 I'm just glad they didn't say, "dampening".
  • 1 0
 Did they say when the "NOT ugly AF" ones come out?
  • 1 0
 Vibration dampening brake levers
  • 1 0
 FINALLY... the idling vibrations on my MTB were driving me nuts!
  • 1 0
 it makes "boost" or "super boost" standards looks not that that bad
  • 1 0
 Also a great option for those with poor vision.
  • 1 0
 I'm clutching my imaginary pearls looking at this price.
  • 1 0
 One Up bars is all you need
  • 1 0
 $400!?!...Thanks but No Thanks
  • 1 0
 hello manitou elastomer syndrom 22
  • 2 1
 This is like gel saddle for sore pussy.
  • 1 0
 Looks like this weird spiders with loads of eyes
  • 1 0
 That's it, no more pinkbike needed today. Had my roasting comment fix.
  • 1 0
 *Charlie Brown voice* Good grief....
  • 1 0
 1990 called, said it wants its tech back.......
  • 1 0
 399 for a lost clamp from Doc's Delorean. Bargain!
  • 1 0
 Bring back the flexstem from girvin !
  • 1 0
 sure if we want to bring back scary
  • 1 0
 I think this got posted a month early...
  • 1 0
 Everything old is new again #Girvin
  • 1 0
 Am I the only one remembering those shocked stems from 1993?
  • 1 0
 Hmm... maby just get a longer travel fork?????
  • 1 0
 Vibration dampening on a bicycle? LOL! Riding dirt bikes cures this.
  • 1 0
 people bikes are too big. Dont put so much weight in your hands!
  • 1 0
 Hopefully it performs better then it looks
  • 1 0
 When you pour water on a shock, it's called dampening.
  • 1 0
 So, no direct mount for DH forks. The ones that would really need it?
  • 1 0
 Had to check the date, not April yet. Must be for real.
  • 1 0
 It's vibrating in my pants....eh just my money running out of my wallet!!
  • 1 0
 For a stem that's supposed to absorb shock, its ugliness is quite shocking
  • 2 2
 Give it a few weeks and this will be acceptable as a good April fools.
  • 2 1
 What a load of crap
  • 4 3
 LOOKS LIKE A SESSION
  • 2 1
 So pretty.....
  • 2 1
 It's not 1991.
  • 2 1
 Waki called it...
  • 1 0
 What a total pile.
  • 1 0
 I’d hit that
  • 1 0
 All kinds of nope
  • 1 0
 LOL that head badge.
  • 2 0
 On brand comment
  • 1 0
 Fugly. No, thank you
  • 1 0
 399$$ lolol
  • 3 6
 Expensive and ugly... like most useful things before they become mainstream and nice

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