Dangerholm's Back With Another Wild Build - The Hyper Spark Project

Feb 9, 2021
by Gustav Gullholm  
Hyper Spark

What a time to be alive.

Incredible suspension, 1x drivetrains, dropper seat posts and carbon everything. Not to speak of how capable modern bikes are, or how many options there are to choose from. You can get yourself a great value trail bike that actually rips, or you can get yourself pretty much the same bike that's being used for World Cup XC racing if you have the wallet for it.

Sure I've had some great times on old bikes, and you can still have a ton of fun on one. The same can be said about budget friendly bikes. A hefty price tag doesn't have to mean more fun. But either way there's no denying that most bikes today are quite amazing, and especially so the tech and looks we see on the top level ones.

So with the bar set so high, how do you level up?

Hyper Spark

Background and Inspiration

From the very start there were two goals with this project: to try and build the best and fastest XC/XCM mountain bike possible while also making it the cleanest looking ever. It would be no small task to just aim for one of these, and not surprisingly it was quite the undertaking to go for both.

The first was quite straightforward though, since it mostly comes down to chassis and component choice. No stone was left unturned and in the end I bet that most would be hard pressed to find room for improvement in that spec list. Of course some things come down to personal preference, but there's no denying that this will be one fast bike. I've done some drool worthy builds in the last few years but this one pretty much has me shaking my head in disbelief, in the best possible way.

The second goal is a longer and more complex story. I really wanted to push the boundaries for how a mountain bike is supposed to look. How a mountain bike can look even. And at the heart of it all was the idea to build it with fully integrated cable routing while still keeping all functions of a modern XC/XCM race bike. This proved to be a big challenge and we have to go back five years to get to where it all started.

For me personally my interest for clean cockpits comes from brakeless BMX bikes and coaster brake café racers. There can be a lot of beauty in simplicity, and while they're far from simple that clean look is now a common sight on road bikes. There will always be a place for classic looking road bikes with external cable routing, but these new spaceship looking creations have set a new standard. Now we're so used to not seeing cables on top level road bikes that it can almost look a bit off when you see one with them.
So in 2016 I set out to build a hardtail trying to mimic the concept. I had a custom one piece handlebar combo made especially for internal cable routing, but that was pretty much how far I got. I never managed to sort out a custom steering stop needed to protect the cables and I had to give up on the project.

Fast forward to autumn 2018 and I still had the idea stuck in my head. I could envision a bike with this futuristic look and knew that I was onto something good, so I decided to give it another go, this time with a full suspension bike. A Scott Spark RC SL frame was ordered and that was the start of me spending an unreasonable amount of thought on the new project. My initial idea had been to make an internally routed Shimano Di2 shifting system, and see if I could convert a Fox iCD manual electronic suspension system to fit the new Spark frame. Are you also shuddering just thinking of the amount of cables? So was I, but luckily there was new tech on the horizon.

SRAM would soon release its wireless AXS system and Fox had their new sensor based automatic electronic suspension system LiveValve coming up. Not only promising when it came to performance but they would make my life a lot easier too. By now I was an avid Trickstuff fan (pun intended) and I got word that they were working on a prototype brake lever coupling for internal cable routing. Things were starting to fall into place.

Like so many times before, the car world was also a source of inspiration to me. Now, I'm very well aware that a bicycle can't be compared to a multimillion dollar hypercar that's the very height of engineering, design and performance. I mean I'm pretty sure that this bike costs "just" around a third of what a set of Koenigsegg carbon wheels will set you back. Without tires.

Still, I wanted to capture a bit of the same air with this bike. I wanted it to be one step above other bikes when it came to performance and just look more than what you're used to seeing, with a bit of luxury on top.

Hyper Spark

Custom Solutions

Cable integration has been done to various extent by others too in recent years. Most notably by Trickstuff who built a trail bike in collaboration with Stoll Bikes and Bike Ahead Composites, then there's Magura with their MCi system. Very interesting and well executed concepts, but especially for XC use they both left things to wish for since none of them took suspension (lock-out) into consideration. And suspension itself is one of the biggest challenges when it comes to fully integrated cable routing on mountain bikes. On a road bike you can just run the front brake hose straight through the fork and let it exit just above the brake caliper, but no such luck on a mountain bike.

For my own Hyper Spark project the idea all along was to truly make the concept complete. Not only would the brake hoses be hidden as well as possible, it would also have race ready suspension while keeping that handlebar clean. All while being 100% functional and ready to ride.

Steering Stop
When running cables internally you don't want them to get pinched and damaged from turning your handlebars too much. To counter that you need a steering stop, something that the Scott Spark frame doesn't have. So I had to figure out how to custom make one. With the head tube area being quite complex carbon layup wise, I decided not to mess with it more than necessary and instead add one on top of the frame. It was also important that it was really robust, so that in case of a hard crash I could just replace the stop pin and the system would be good as new.

I brought out the hacksaw and metal file to make a base plate out of aluminum. Resting on the top tube it was made so that it goes all the way around the head tube, adding some stack height but keeping things bomb proof. The next step was to have it bonded to the frame by wrapping it all in carbon fiber. The corresponding headset part that clamps onto the steerer tube and actually stops against the stop pin had a cover made by hand to keep things looking clean. On production bikes these are always made round to keep knees safe, but since this was my very own bike I decided to risk it a little and go for a look that better matched the frame.

What felt like countless hours was spent on getting the fit right for that cover as well as getting a perfect finish on the "new" front end of the frame. While I was at it I also modified and covered the cable ports, so by now I was way past the point of no return.

Hyper Spark
From a rough cut out...
Hyper Spark
...to its final shape.

Handlebars
First of all - drilling your handlebars is generally a very bad idea. You don't want to faceplant just because of some fancy cable routing. But to make the concept here work it had to be done and all while still being perfectly safe to ride. So the handlebars were drilled and then externally reinforced, which I had professional help with. The position of the holes was chosen so that there is a little slack in the brake hose that makes it easier to work on them. It also will allow for the brake levers to move in a crash without ripping anything apart.
After a lot of finishing work you can hardly tell the difference. Another hole had to be made on the stem section, where it rests against the steerer tube, to allow for the brake hoses to exit. Luckily this is an area with lower stress, many stems don't even have any material there to start with.

Now, you can't be sure to keep the exact properties of the stock handlebar with modifications like these since it's no longer the original intended and engineered carbon layup. I do however fully trust them for my own weight and riding. But it can't be stressed enough that one shouldn't just wing it and drill handlebars.

Finally the ends of the handlebars had to be modified as well. The SRAM AXS printed circuits boards (PCB's) and batteries, used to control the shifter and dropper post, are hidden inside the handlebars. The problem is that the PCB's are a tiny bit too wide to fit inside right away, so a very small amount of carbon was removed inside the handlebar ends. To be on the safe side, the paint and clear coat was removed on the outside and replaced with another external carbon reinforcement.

Hyper Spark
Good prep is crucial for a good finish.
Hyper Spark
Not your average shifter installation.

Fork
Starting at the top of the steerer, here the brake hoses enter from the handlebars. To make installation a lot easier, there is a slit so that you can route the hoses inside the handlebars first and then slide them onto the steerer tube. With a big slit it can of course no longer take the clamping force from the stem, so instead of a traditional star nut you thread an insert in. Not only does it work to fasten your top cap, but being almost solid it also becomes a load bearing part of the steerer tube.

Move down a few centimeters and the rear brake hose has to exit the steerer tube and go into the frame. The same goes for the two cables that connect the Fox LiveValve system to the fork, one to the front sensor and one to open and close the damper.
Two separate holes were made, of course as small as possible, and the steerer tube was then heavily reinforced with carbon fiber.

Routing the front brake hose was a bigger obstacle than one may think. When exiting the steerer tube it can't go to the fork arch and use the existing guide, so it had to be run at the back, which was the plan all along anyway since it will make for a much cleaner looking front end. Zip-ties were out of the question so custom guides were molded in carbon and glued to the fork crown and lowers.

When the fork is compressed the hose bends in an arch to the side and slightly backwards. So while it might look like it can rub the stanchion it actually gets further away the deeper you go into the travel.

Hyper Spark
First tests of front sensor placement.
Hyper Spark
The "starnut" threads in and sits almost flush with the handlebars.

Suspension
The Fox LiveValve system is surprisingly easy to set up and truly plug-and-play. But for this special application there was one problem. The front end sensor, that detects any bumps and tells the system to open the fork, normally sits at the back of the fork arch. While perfectly functional it simply didn't look good enough and cluttered the otherwise very clean looks. So the cable was extended and I placed the sensor right next to the brake caliper instead, so that its cable could run along the front brake hose.

Hyper Spark
The sensor is mounted via the top caliper bolt.

Paint and Finishing
The pearl white paint is called Oryx White and it's not a color taken from a hypercar but from the Volkswagen color palette actually. For being a pearl it's quite subtle and cool in its shimmering, compared to other pearl whites that have a more yellow hue. To go with the Kashima coating there are a few select logos in metallic gold.

By now you might be wondering why I do these single colors full on paint jobs with matching parts, and it's simply to bring a homogeneous look that I personally like very much. Bikes tend to be a bit all over the place, almost looking like a collection of parts. This can look great and of course gives room for endless creativity, but by painting more than just the frame it all becomes more like the bodywork of a car. It gives for a clean and sleek look that creates a whole. So to take that concept even further is the reason I even fully painted one of the seat post combos this time.

While I do love Maxxis tires I do not love the yellow tire logos. So when a friend was unboxing his new bike with white OEM Maxxis logo tires you bet I was quick to trade him. A final finishing touch was to sharpie out the orange letters under EXO and TR - the devil is in the details.

Black might have been the obvious choice for components but I decided to bring in a bit of silver too with the brakes and drive train. Silver parts can give a kind of "light" and fresh look compared to black, and it's always my favorite for drivetrain parts since down the road they won't look worn in the same way as their colored counterparts.

Hyper Spark
Hyper Spark

Components

Frame
Okay you know this one by now - the tried and tested Scott Spark RC. Here in SL version, which means it features their best carbon fiber layup (in Scott acronym language called HMX SL) and is one of the very lightest frames on the market. Going into its fifth production year it keeps the 100mm rear travel but the stock models comes with a 110mm fork, and I'm over-forking it a bit more with a 120mm front end. I'm also on a size Large this time so the 40mm longer seat tube means you won't be able to talk so much smack about my 1 meter long looking seat posts, sorry.

For chain stay protection I'm running the Scott Ransom specific ribbed rubber protector, which is a lot more quiet than the stock Spark version. You simply need to trim it a little with a pair of scissors and it sticks right on. A small but great upgrade tip for any Spark owners out there, or anyone with a bike running a similarly shaped chain stay.

Hyper Spark

Suspension
As mentioned above the Fox LiveValve system was a crucial component to make the clean looking cockpit happen. But I also chose it because of its performance. The version on this bike is based on the Nude rear shock and 34 Step Cast 120mm fork.

LiveValve is an electronic automatic suspension system. You set up sag, rebound and so on just like on a regular bike and when you switch the system on it locks your suspension. Sensors sit on each end of the bike and will detect bumps and the main unit then open the fork or rear shock individually. The amazing thing is that this whole process happens in just 3 milliseconds, which is around 100 times faster than you blink your eyes.

On the main unit, which also is the battery, you can choose from five different settings. These determine how sensitive the system will be, so you either have the fastest setting for maximum efficiency or you can go step by step to the more relaxed setting that will keep your suspension open for longer. It also detects for example free fall, so if you go off a drop your suspension will already be open when you hit the landing.

Hyper Spark

We've mostly seen the system on longer travel trail bikes so far, but personally I think that XC/XCM and snappy short travel trail bikes might be the very best application for it. Here the focus lies more on pedaling efficiency which of course is where LiveValve really shines. Perfect for racing too since you don't have to think about your suspension remote when your heart rate has been in the red zone for way too long.

Sure you might prioritize having the tuning options of a GRIP2 damper fork up front if descending is what it's all about, but I really think we've just seen the beginning of this technology. The LiveValve system opens up for many possibilities. Since it also senses the angle of the bike, it could for example be programmed to be in the most efficient setting when going uphill and vice versa on the downhills. Imagine you incorporate a GPS and you could have speed as a variable too, or even program it for a specific race course. A little bit like how if you go to certain race tracks with a Koenigsegg you can download the perfect car settings for that very track.

It's easy to shun upon new technology and tell people how you don't need it. But even in this very first version LiveValve is sure to be great for many riders and their riding style (I'd say a ton of riders if only more people could afford it), even if it doesn't 100% suit your own personal needs. But give it a few years and it might be a great thing for you too.

Hyper Spark
The Fox LiveValve main unit.
Hyper Spark
External open mode compression adjustment.

Cockpit
At the front you have a Syncros Fraser iC SL one piece handlebar combo. This is the "Nino Limited Edition" which is 90mm long and features a -25 degrees angle, which I'm using to counter the added stack height from the steering stop system. I'm running it at 730mm width and on top sits a neat little Garmin mount. The Grips are the new Syncros foam grips, which are not the lightest but feel a bit like a mix between traditional foam and modern silicone grips.
At the heart of it all is two CeramicSpeed headset bearings.

Hyper Spark

Brakes
Trickstuff Piccola Carbon is on braking duty. Not only the lightest brakes on the market they're also probably the most powerful in their category. The latest version features carbon brake levers as the name suggests and also has an updated caliper design.

Already from the start these brakes are promising for internal cable routing. Contrary to most other brakes, the hose exits very close to the handlebar. So for their own Stoll concept bike they developed a special banjo coupling that changes the angle of the hose. The first version was 3D printed but the current one is CNC machined. So if some sort of standard develops for brake hoses running inside the handlebars, these brakes are ready to go. You can also simply switch the coupling to a regular one if you wanted to use your brakes in a traditional setup.

I'm running 160mm Trickstuff Dächle UL discs with the option of going 180mm up front. They are fastened with Bike Ahead Composites center lock adapters which are not just the lightest ones out there but also maybe the best looking.

Hyper Spark
Maybe the nicest looking brakes out there?
Hyper Spark
The rear LiveValve sensor bolts on to the brake adapter.

Controllers
Normally the SRAM AXS components are controlled via their corresponding triggers. They work very well but are quite bulky looking hanging down below the handlebars, and personally I'm not a fan of the shifter ergonomics and eagerly (eagel-y?) awaits the next generation. Luckily there is an incredibly neat alternative out there - Zirbel.

Zirbel is a Swiss company who primarily makes electronic shifting controllers. Their Twister model can be described as a mix between a trigger and gripshift. There is a trigger that's integrated into a ring that sits around the handlebars. You have one click in either direction and instead of return springs it runs with small magnets, giving it a surprisingly tactile and distinct feeling. So press down for one direction and up with the back of your thumb for the other.
They are intended to be used with a SRAM BlipBox which makes it all plug-and-play to integrate seamlessly with the AXS system. My problem was that there was already so much going on that there was no room to run more cables in order to hide a BlipBox inside the frame.

The solution became to disassemble the AXS controllers and attach the Zirbel Twister cables directly to the circuit boards. As briefly explained earlier the setup is not an easy task to accomplish for many reasons, but now the cables run under the foam grips and the PCB's and batteries sit hidden inside the handlebar.

Think those shifter ring triggers are way too small for your meaty paws or winter gloves? No worries, they can 3D print plastic shifter rings in any size or shape you want and even encourage you to do it yourself if you have your own printer.

Hyper Spark

Drivetrain
Paired to the Zirbel shifter is of course a SRAM Eagle AXS derailleur, that has been upgraded with a CeramicSpeed OSPW system. Not only do the pulley wheels spin from just looking at them hard enough, but their bigger size also means slightly less chain friction since the links don't have to rotate as much. Marginal gains for sure, but no stranger really than things like Kashima coating or the carbon outer derailleur cage that sits there in the first place.

On the topic of friction the bike has a CeramicSpeed UFO chain. They don't actually make the chain but it's all about the treatment. The chain is first perfectly cleaned and then the white low friction powder is applied. Of course how many watts you save will vary depending on what chain lube you compare it to, but it can be several watts. The coating is intended for dry conditions and will last up to 600km, essentially making this a race day chain. After that you simply continue to use it with their UFO Drip lube or any other lube of your choice. Overkill for most mortals including myself? Sure, but remember we're trying to build the best bike possible here.

The cassette is a 12-speed 10-50T Garbaruk and it's matched to a quadzilla worthy 40T Garbaruk chainring up front. The crankset is my beloved old Tune Blackfoot which looks amazing and is still going strong into its fifth riding season, while weighing just 334g. It spins on a CeramicSpeed bottom bracket and the pedals are Xpedo M-Force 8-Ti.

Hyper Spark
Marginal gains are better than no gains.
Hyper Spark
A 40T chainring might give you some quad gains too.

Seat Combos
Quite the luxury to say the least, there are three different seat combos to choose from for this bike.

First there is the dropper combo, which is based on a RockShox Reverb AXS 170mm post and a Syncros Belcarra R SL seat. By now most are familiar with the Reverb post but the Syncros seat brings some new things. Traditionally all seats are made with rails attached to a seat shell by various techniques. But on the new Belcarra the rails and shell are molded as a single piece of carbon. This is done by using special molds and a technique called resin transfer molding. Dry carbon fiber is laid up in the mold and the resin is then injected under high pressure before curing the whole piece.

Hyper Spark

Then there is the white one-piece carbon combo, a very unique collaboration between Schmolke Carbon and Berk Composites. The latter is a Slovenian brand who among many lightweight things have carbon seats as a specialty. Not yet a common site on mountain bikes, you can see their parts and shoes being used by Pro Tour road guys. German Schmolke has provided the seat tube, based on their TLO seat posts, and Berk has then made it into a full combo with one of their seat shells. What's special about this one is that it still features rails, so there's a lot of flex in the shell offering great comfort. The entire combo weighs 183g.

Finally there is the black/raw one-piece carbon combo, also made at Berk Composites. This masterpiece weighs just 133g for the whole thing, and sure looks the part too. One of the reasons it could be made so light is that it has no rails, so while there is some "wing flex" it is more rigid and offers slightly less comfort.

Why even bother with rigid combos? There's no denying that droppers are great but in many cases they're also boat anchors. Losing that much weight at the highest point of your bike actually makes it feel a lot lighter and nicer when out of the seat pedaling. So if you have some easy terrain riding or racing planned you can run a rigid one. And of course - they look super clean.

Hyper Spark

Wheels
There are many cool and great wheels out there today, but the these Syncros Silverton SL wheels that have the most incredible mix of engineering, design and performance. They are one-piece carbon wheels, so the rim, spokes and hub flanges are molded as one unit. That means that you don't really have separate spokes, but the carbon fibers go from one end of the wheel all the way over to the other. The hub flanges are then pulled apart and have the center hub piece installed, creating tension in the wheel. Weight is a 1290g claimed (this pair is 1307g) and the inner rim width is 26mm, spinning on CeramicSpeed bearings in this case.

The benefits is the low weight, of course, but it also makes for an extremely responsive wheel set. They are incredibly stiff for acceleration while offering good compliance. Perfect characteristics for a XC wheel set. What if you break a spoke? As long as the wheel isn't completely destroyed or too much out of true, they can actually be repaired by mending the broken spoke back together.

Hyper Spark
These wheels are simply design masterpieces.
Hyper Spark
CushCore XC for a bit of protection and more control.

Tires and Inserts
Tires are the Maxxis Rekon Race in 2.35" width and with EXO protection. A great allrounder for most conditions while still keeping rolling resistance pretty low.

For inserts I'm running the CushCore XC version. At 150g each these aren't the lightest, but the good ride characteristics makes the weight easy to justify. Not only do they help protect the rim and tire, they also help keep the tire stable by pressing out on the tire walls. The low profile lets the tire otherwise act as it normally would. For some tracks and riding the bike will be fine in an old-school setup with no inserts but they sure help make it even more capable.


Scott Hyper Spark - Weight from 9.78kg / 21.56lbs

Hyper Spark

Hyper Spark
Hyper Spark

Hyper Spark
Hyper Spark

Hyper Spark

Summary
So isn't this just a fancy looking nightmare for mechanics? Sure it complicates things and it isn't for everyone. One can jokingly say that back in the day you could step inside the engine bay of a car when you had to replace a headlight light bulb, and now you can barely fit your hands inside just to get the light fixed. Still most of us prefer to have a modern car if we can afford it, with all their technology, comforts, design and performance. Not to speak of how many would like to have a hypercar even if you literally will have to fly technicians out to have your car serviced.

Luckily I myself am the mechanic for this very bike, so no need to worry. Will we see similar things in the coming years? I'm 100% sure of it. But hopefully everyone has learned a lot from the evolution of road bikes by then and the solutions for internal routing will be relatively easy to work on. I'm also 100% sure that this style won't become a general standard any time soon if ever. Long travel forks complicate things, it will be more expensive and many riders will want their bikes as simple and user friendly as possible. So my take is to simply enjoy both ways, and look forward to what the coming years will bring across all types of bikes.
Hyper Spark
A dream spec list if there ever was one.

Either way, after so many years of work and effort I'm of course very happy about the bike being finished and it turned out even better than I could imagine. There's still room for improvement but I managed to prove the concept and show both new looks and possibilities.

But most of all I look forward to riding the shit out of it, and hopefully have a speedy mental recovery from when I first scratch it. So keep your eyes peeled for a proper bike check video here on PInkbike in spring and maybe some riding content as well.

What's next? Take the same concept to a hardtail with rigid fork, which should make for even cleaner looks. Feel free to keep up with that one and future builds via my Instagram.

Hyper Spark

Warning and disclaimer:
Please keep in mind that any modifications such as paint stripping, repainting, sanding or in any way modify frames, components or safety equipment is potentially dangerous and can lead to crashes and injuries. It will always void any and all warranties, and is strongly advised against by SCOTT Sports and all other manufacturers, who take no responsibility. It is not recommended to put any travel fork on any frame, if unsure of the fork travel limit for your frame always consult a dealer or the brand directly first. If you choose to modify your bike anyway, always make sure to do so with safety in mind and remember the points above.


278 Comments

  • 809 11
 Please never stop.
  • 91 8
 The Ferrari of the bike game.
Don’t ever send this bike to @mikelevy, he’s not worthy!
  • 11 2
 @Waldon83: Thats one hell of an understatement!
  • 113 3
 @Waldon83: not Ferrari, more like koenigsegg......
  • 13 2
 @Waldon83: Is anyone?
  • 29 2
 @Dav82 - Mind blown; indeed.

If anyone hasn't listened to the PB podcast with Dangerholm, I strongly, strongly suggest you do.
  • 13 2
 I need a cold shower after reading that....
  • 41 1
 This is thigh praise!
  • 305 3
 @mikelevy At least not until I've built a Danger Donut.
  • 18 13
 No room for water bottle tho,..
  • 4 4
 @dangerholm: I unbelievably missed the upvote button and hit downvote. Unlimited upvotes for this comment.
  • 4 2
 @dangerholm: gauntlet thrown? That's a build I want to see!!
  • 7 1
 @Spiral23: don't you read has a german electronic system that melds the snow from the tires and inserts it into the "waterpost"?
  • 8 1
 @Spiral23: ...then when you push dropper down expands water directly to your mouth through the headset system.
  • 1 0
 @dangerholm: please do!!!!
  • 1 0
 Best bike builds in the biz!
  • 7 0
 I like the white. What do you call the opposite of murdered out?
  • 5 0
 Crafty, Clever and Curious - Pick all 3
  • 2 0
 @dangerholm: I'd say it'd last about two pedal strokes under Yoann.
  • 3 0
 Next build needs to be in Vantablack paint. Whitest of white bike and Blackest of Black bike
  • 3 0
 @Dav82: I would actually say if we are getting specific its more of a Maybach as it is based on a mainstream bike, but is improved by a third party.
  • 6 1
 @southoftheborder: Considering that the head tube didn't even snap the last time I think he'd be fine on a Dangerduro Donut!
  • 2 0
 @Dav82: the prancing horses haven't won in years.
  • 2 0
 @Spiral23: comes with water service....
  • 2 0
 @taprider: it’s heavenly.
  • 1 0
 Ruf@dookiehill:
  • 1 0
 @Spiral23: Its and internally routed water bottle, a bit like he did with he axs shifters....
  • 1 0
 @Waldon83: Also, we don’t want to see him in Lycra! Plus this bike isn’t downcountry certified so I doubt he would be interested Wink
  • 1 0
 Would love to see cost breakdown and hours on custom work, with total cost for custom work at average rates for trades involved. Did you not go with the fully integrated magura brakes bc then you'd have to use a dirty stem and standard bar?
  • 185 4
 No danger thigh photos ? :'(
  • 44 1
 Normaly coming for the bike and staying for his thighs. Frown
  • 26 0
 i expected at least some sexy flanders in ski gear equivalent
  • 89 1
 @pinegrove The quads send their regards, humbly not wanting to steal the show this time around. They've just recovered from a muscle tear sustained from heavy squats during winter training and will be back better than ever.
  • 4 2
 @dangerholm: nightmare! Give those quads the R&R they need to come back strong.
  • 18 1
 @dangerholm: Do they have names? Asking for a friend.
  • 7 0
 @jaame: Haha cheers man!

@kungfupanda: No names yet so open for suggestions.
  • 27 0
 @kungfupanda: Hammer and Schmidt?
  • 4 1
 @kungfupanda: Anavar and Winstrol?
  • 10 0
 @dangerholm: Wallace and Grommit
  • 4 0
 Des and Troy?
  • 3 0
 @dangerholm: How about Blue Steel and Magnum?
  • 4 0
 Does he have an onlyfans?
  • 99 3
 Maxxis really needs to make the White logo tires available to aftermarket consumers.
  • 4 14
flag neoides (Feb 9, 2021 at 4:10) (Below Threshold)
 I think Gustav sharpie-ed these white!
  • 6 0
 @neoides: they are OEM with all the info blacked out.
  • 1 3
 they do...just check the website. Bought some Minion DHF's for my Son.
  • 1 0
 the commencal shop in squamish also sells white label maxxis tires, great prices too
  • 9 1
 While I agree, if logo colour is your criteria you've got options: Michelin (white), Schwalbe or WTB (grey), or even Kenda (grey and red).

And on a similar topic, I've never known why Maxxis uses yellow on their bike tires when their logo is orange.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: Hence the reason I use Vitoria or WTB tires now.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: beware! schwalbe has different color logos, and some tires even have a stripe of color down the tread.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: true! Though the compound patch is easy to sharpie and the stripe is pretty subtle once dirty.
  • 1 0
 @Unrealityshow: I hope it's not your only reason, but we all have our vices.
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: Bontrager too.
  • 68 1
 You fitted the handle bars upside down. Everyone makes mistakes!
  • 54 0
 @MattP76 God damnit!
  • 3 0
 @dangerholm: Haha!!
  • 6 0
 @dangerholm: This your first day rookie?? Amazing bike and amazing article my man!! Great work brother!!!
  • 47 1
 Huck. To. Flat.
  • 8 0
 that, and the impossible climb under @mikelevy Smile
on topic: what a masterpiece, really like the innovative ideas like the live valve sensor on the brake caliper. no compromises Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @skimons: If you want to see this bike make it up the impossible climb, you’d need to give it to Wade....let him pick a part his way up and down.
  • 2 0
 @skimons: not sure how Mike will be dealing with that 40T chainring tho,...
  • 22 0
 I actually hope to be able to shoot a huck to flat with all my bikes this summer! Just need a ramp and a good camera for it. Having once dropped 3 meters to dead flat on a trials bike this should be a walk in the park.
  • 2 0
 @dangerholm: that would be epic
  • 29 5
 It's time for wireless brakes, because as the whole project is fantastic, the front brake hose looks simply awful.
But I have an Idea, just make a custom linkage fork with internal routing, problem solved Wink
  • 11 0
 Chris king or someone needs to make a coaster brake for the ultimate clean cockpit.
  • 5 1
 Nothing a bit of Tippex won't fix...
  • 4 2
 i'd say its the black fox box slapped on the frame that ruins the looks. come on, fox, make that this smaller.
  • 5 0
 Maybe you could have a fork with a lefty cartridge in one side and the brake hose in the other.
  • 1 1
 @dingus: the brake hose has to run to the fork though. how's it going to do that?
  • 1 0
 @vemegen: or have Scott create their own burrito box so it can be hidden!
  • 1 0
 right, because a linkage fork would look so much better...
  • 2 0
 @mllachance: Never underestimate Gustav, he would design a beautiful linkage fork for sure.
And it was a joke btw. Tried with Wink emocji, but I guess it was too subtle ;p
  • 1 0
 Waiting for those servo-powered brakes!
  • 3 2
 Yes, because having your brake batteries die at high speed or while you're stuck way out in the wilderness sounds like a fantastic plan.

#darwinism
  • 1 0
 @Lanebobane: instead of popping out the bottom of the steerertube it can go through a hole into a hollow crown then down into the stanchion.
  • 1 0
 @pbuser2299: I have a friend who rides pretty aggressive stuff with a coaster brake single speed hardtail, it looks super clean but I have to wonder how much service it needs.
  • 1 0
 @jwestenhoff: I know, let's make a coaster brake for the front wheel
  • 26 1
 The Supreme Leader of Turkministan would very much approve of this bike!
  • 20 2
 Where are the quads?!
  • 13 0
 Loving everything about this bike! Especially the brakes. Haha,
Reading these comments one might get the feeling that should start a second career to present you thighs. #Dangerthighs
  • 13 0
 Christ alive, what are bike shop wages like in Sweden???

Also is it easy to learn Swedish?
  • 1 0
 Seriously.

(nice bike!)
  • 2 0
 If you speak English, Norwegian, Danish and Swedish are probably the easiest languages to learn. I used Duolingo when I was commuting on a train to work 3-4 years ago to start learning Norwegian and I still remember a ton of it, with no practice for the last two years. A nice reinforcing tool is listening to NRK radio.
  • 12 0
 There should be a claimer saying, its so clean i can only ride it in the snow
  • 2 21
flag yupstate (Feb 9, 2021 at 5:47) (Below Threshold)
 Believe me, you can't ride that bike in the snow. Don't let the photos fool you. Cool bike though nonetheless.
  • 10 1
 pfff the kamma shammama coating only matches the decals and not the dropper or any of the seatposts 1.5/10 would not ride or make love to.
  • 25 0
 @bicyclepubes: There are kamma shammammma logos on the white seat post, so I'd say it's a solid 2/10 would use as commuter and crap weather bike.
  • 6 1
 Amazing. The best for me are those Zirbel controllers, they look just perfect! Way to go. Next time Iam expecting you to bring chain stay protector working as a self recharging battery using the chain slap to power the system
  • 8 1
 I appreciate the frequent referrals to Koenigseggs, it keeps the whole thing relateable for those of us who will never be able to build such a bike...
  • 6 1
 Are you being sarcastic? I genuinely agree with you. Sometimes you need to see passion projects thats take experts years to develop and really show how much work goes into it.

Projects like these are my reason for living. I dont need to pile them in my garage to appreciate them anymore than I need to own DaVinci
paintings to appreciate them. Im happy some goofball in tights invested thousands of hours and dollars into this for me to enjoy.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: I was just having a bit of fun! I love these projects too - they can appear wild and unattainable, but in many ways, they challenge the status quo and push the industry forwards.
  • 7 1
 I'm scrolling up and down and huck to flat video is nowhere to be found!

Also, may I suggest a "Zebra" printed tights to go with this one?
  • 35 0
 @pakleni Carful what you wish for, I do have a pair of zebra short shorts!
  • 5 0
 ok, this is too amazing. How much you want for it? I'm an ok person most of the time, how bout my soul? fair trade?
Jokes aside, excellent work. absolutely beautiful.
cheers
  • 8 0
 Dangerholm has done more for Scott brand advertising than Scott.
  • 5 0
 that live valve battery in the middle of the frame must be annoying you to no end! great build, I'm sure cockpit integration will move towards this in the coming years
  • 6 0
 @ShortJeffsyOwner Thanks! As for the battery it bothered me a bit at first (as in yes, I was looking at ways to chop up the frame and somehow hide it inside) but now I'm used to it and don't mind. Luckily it will probably "disappear" a bit more when there's a bottle cage on there too.
  • 6 1
 You have seven weeks to make the ugliest, heaviest bike done up in clunker black in time for 4/1, go!
  • 5 0
 What a masterpiece, again! Really like the Zirbel Twister thingies, so clean!
  • 5 0
 @mogg76 Really cool tech, and also how they encourage people to make their own Twister ring designs (or make them for you). They supply the magnets needed as well as the data, and you're free to design and print.
  • 5 0
 So nice to see ex-road racer Jure Berk being a part of such a rad MTB project! Proud to know Jure in real!
  • 4 0
 @cebe Jure is awesome! I'm very happy to see Berk Composites evolve and also for the work he's done for me.
  • 3 0
 Though I love external routing on my bikes I really dig this! The Zirbel stuff, the steering block, the drilled cockpit. What a work of art. Plus a thumbs up for Scott for making a 40t possible to fit.
  • 4 0
 Hit it with some more gold and there is a certain oligarch who is tight with the UCI who would likely pay handsomely for it!

But seriously, that’s incredible!
  • 3 1
 Beautiful build, love the "outside of the box" thinking and customization.

I had a K2 Proflex in 1998 that had an electronic suspension system. I think the idea is good, but realistically Noleen wasn't good enough to pull it off and neither is Fox.
  • 2 0
 This looks like an exercise in bicycle purity. So much effort has gone into aesthetics on this bike that I would never want to ride it. It's too pure, too easily ruined or damaged. Once ridden it would be tainted. Cool but seemingly useless at the same time. But then I tend to carry that opinion of most things that are porcelain white (too pure for real use). Perfect bike for a surgeon Wink
  • 8 2
 The F1 of MTBs.
  • 6 0
 Much prefer the Rally Cars of MTBs
  • 3 16
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Feb 9, 2021 at 5:52) (Below Threshold)
 The F1 of mtb's in reality are long travel e bikes that will blow the doors off this on any climb, flat, or downhill. This is more like a custom Prius in comparison, light and efficient.
  • 5 0
 When your chainring is larger than your brake rotors...
  • 2 0
 Amazing! Reminds me of when I first saw this bike and immediately wanted to swap my all black Ninja 1000 for it: mototribu.com/constructeur/honda/1986/vfr800a/wallpaper/originalimages/honda_vfr_800_1986_1.jpg
  • 2 0
 That sweet, sweet V4 sound.
  • 2 0
 The thighs have it! (where are they!?!)

I always love the amount of work and attention to detail that goes into these. At the same time, I must admit to getting a little tired of seeing *just* another Scott Spark.
  • 2 0
 dang this build would probably be under 20lbs if you dropped the cushcore and live valve and went with a stepcast fork and lighter tires. Of course it wouldn't ride as well, and it's already light as hell so who cares.
  • 1 0
 Holy crap that thing has more travel than my bike but is half the weight. That's insane that he can get a 120 fork and still be under 21 pounds. After the last bike I thought he wouldn't be able to top that, but boy was I wrong. All of these bikes deserve to be on display in a museum or some rich guys living room.
  • 2 1
 I'm glad there are non-AXS post photos. I just can't get used to the look of that dropper, with the huge battery and the contrasting bare metal collar. I hate routing internal droppers as much as the next guy, but I'll do it to avoid looking at that 800 g bank-busting monstrosity.
  • 2 1
 Agree- the AXS dropper is the MTB counterpart of truck balls
  • 1 0
 for the fastest and cleanest looking XC bike ever why not grab the biggest Specialized Hotwalk scoot bike you can find and slap on a jet engine? Rocket Baby!

Also, how do you afford thewse builds, Mr. Dangerholm? it looks ridiculously fun.
  • 1 0
 All the tech is available to create a bike with central wireless control of shifting, geometry(flip chip), dropper post, suspension, and tire pressure. It could have many combinations of automated or manually operated modes. For example as the bike starts climbing, bike auto shifts, flip chip goes into climbing mode, seat raises, tire pressure up, and suspension locks. Turn the bike downhill, seat drops, geo adjust, tire pressure adjusts, suspension opens.
  • 4 0
 I was surprised by the 40T... then I remembered your thighs.
  • 3 0
 so clean. it almost looks like a 3d render with missing details like cables. very cool.
  • 5 1
 So the cocaine goes on the chain. Man, I been doing this all wrong...
  • 3 0
 Work. Of. Art. The technical work is equally impressive, but damn, that's a beautiful machine.
  • 3 0
 Scott Spark Vatican edition, if the pope were a mountain biker that's what he would ride!
  • 2 0
 Popecycle
  • 2 0
 Nobody does what this guy does. One hundred props. Just wish that LiveValve wire going to the front caliper area was white, or invisible.
  • 1 0
 Amazing build and super insightful write-up as well. My only complaint is that there aren't more pics of the process and the unfinished bits, would have been interesting! Smile

Already stoked for the next build!
  • 3 0
 @dangerholm as always, another insane good build. Props to you for taking that next step with every build dude!
  • 3 0
 All hail the new King!! Heavy is the head that wears the crown but light is the bike that he rides. Cheers and bravo.
  • 1 0
 Can you make an all "non-wireless" a.k.a. wired (old-school) bike as clean as this one?
Really like the idea of running the brake-cable for the front-disc through the tube in the front! Keep it up ;-)
  • 4 2
 Welly golly gosh. I'm a little bit giddy.

"While I do love Maxxis tires I do not love the yellow tire logos". Amazing
  • 5 1
 loving the 40t ring
  • 1 0
 does someone buy these bikes to ride them, or they are going to some Scott museums or so? I am really curious, cant think of putting this beauty to the mud and dust.
  • 11 0
 @tajtigabor They are only built for myself to ride and enjoy on the trails and possible races!
  • 2 0
 And yet here I am not bothering to trim my brake hoses because I’m that lazy... call me Safetyholm?
  • 2 0
 Incredibly beautiful, and especially with all the white (so what do you call the opposite of murdered out?)
  • 3 0
 Ok now make tricked out fat kid bikes !!!!!!
  • 3 4
 It seems like it could/should(?) be lighter. Nicely done build though, very clean overall. I think something like an Epic Evo (or regular Epic) could be just as clean or cleaner (without the livevalve stuff) and at least as light.

The white seat combo is nice (particularly looks-wise) but since even a stock Tune Komm-Vor saddle and Darimo t1 seatpost can meet that weight (183g) I would think a one-piece one could be lighter...?

Why not use native center-lock rotors instead of messing with adapters? I get that Trickstuff doens't make centerlock rotors and maybe that comes into play but still, the adapter solution is not so great.

The wheels seem to be the answer to the question no one was asking... locked into a 1-piece hub/rim/spoke combo and the risk of catastrophic breakage where the whole thing gets thrown away, and on top of that not even really saving any weight? 1300g is not that light, regular spoked/hub wheels can easily get to that point and for less cost and probably equally as strong. Granted you got these free I suppose so that plays a role too of course.

Anyway, well done, thanks for sharing it with us.
  • 3 0
 Suddenly my ED has been cured
  • 2 0
 what a bike ! the internal-cockpit cable routing (so a long name lmao) is incredible, good job dude !
  • 3 0
 Would love to know how much it all cost!
  • 2 0
 Stunning. The only thing I would have loved to see is white cable and brake hosing.
  • 2 0
 My 8yr old looked at the full bike pic for a good 30 seconds and said, "cool".
  • 6 0
 @dorkbike Haha that's the highest praise I could ever hope for!
  • 2 0
 Trickstuff: How many brakesets do you need for your current builds?
Dangerholm: Yes

Trickstuff closes its webshop
  • 1 0
 Wow, incredible effort has gone in to the build and the results are stunning.

Just wondering if the front brake line would look better shrink wrapped in white though?
  • 2 0
 Still waiting for your fatbike build. World’s lightest with advanced tech lol
  • 1 0
 A Fatbike under 18lbs and I'd be impressed. Mine is currently 18.4lb
  • 1 0
 I don't get what's the big deal... My '21 Epic Pro is 22.5 lbs with a pretty basic off the shelf build. No faffing with custom shifters or internal routing.
  • 1 0
 The cleanliness is the point of this build, not the weight. He’s got lighter bikes if you want to look at those.
  • 2 1
 I would rather save weight on the inserts than on the dropper. gorgeous bike, too beautiful to ride in the mud...
  • 3 1
 what are the "ride impressions" ? Big Grin
  • 3 1
 But the real question is: Does this bike allow barspins?
  • 1 0
 Quite the opposite
  • 1 0
 @maxxx: Yeah but would be funny. It is probably worse than the old Trek Knock Block
  • 1 0
 @jonasstadler: I used to ride a Rocky Mountain soul hardtail with Marzocchi bombers with extra long cables so I could go from the XC track to the skatepark and barspin. And for the downhill runs meant the seat went all the way down
  • 1 0
 @giantwhip: Same on my Norco 125 circa ~2004. The Aheadset top cap/starnut with a cable pass through for your front brake was pretty key. I eventually went single speed with a just a long rear brake cable.
  • 1 0
 Great work definitely....I was a bit dissapointed though he didnt upgrade the AXS with some of those Titanium Cables
  • 1 0
 Why not the Magura brakes where the master cylinder itself sits inside the bars?
  • 3 1
 heavy! spark nino weighs 9.5kg
  • 3 0
 Vacker!
  • 1 0
 Nice bike but they need to figure out a solution to run the front brake cable completely internal too
  • 3 0
 Gorgeous build
  • 2 0
 I am missing the 7 dwarfs -maybe they weigh too much
  • 2 0
 I really enjoy the details put into this. It's like a hot rod'd F1 car.
  • 1 1
 this explains why those bikes made my luxury car Marques like BMW, or Ferrari, always cost so much. That's what this looks like to me. Needs a Mercedes badge
  • 3 0
 Funny, because when they make a MTB it looks like total gash.
  • 1 0
 Would be cool to see how beaten up a dangerholm bike gets after a season or more of riding. Every scrarch tells a story
  • 2 0
 This is what I want to do with my life.
  • 2 0
 So pumped to see it complete finally!
  • 2 1
 Sick bike, but my back hurts just looking at the seat height vs the bar height.
  • 1 0
 Pretty...now show me a picture of it covered in mud and loam following a day spent bouncing off rocks and climbing hills.
  • 2 0
 This is what Storm Troopers ride when they are not blasting Ewoks.
  • 2 0
 That should be hung on a wall, STUNNING.
  • 2 0
 These bikes you're building are great keep it up!
  • 1 0
 Super work.
Did you use a layer of fibreglass in between the carbon & aluminium for galvanic corrosion protection?
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the great write up. Is the steerer tube insert anodised to prevent corrosion?? Or is it grade2 Ti ? Or will you just sell it on pinkbike from “one careful owner “
  • 1 0
 every time I consider buying a carbon part I hear Dangerholm's voice telling me "do it…"
  • 2 0
 THESE BUILDS DO NOT EVER DISAPPOINT
  • 1 0
 This shit is awesome and cool and lots of other words that start with different letters.
  • 1 0
 This is why I love cycling. Damn Dude your work is mind blowing! Please build up a Scalpel Lefty project Smile
  • 1 0
 What an outrageously rad bike. One thing though... it needs skinwall tires, to be honest.
  • 1 0
 @dangerholm : does the total weight shown include all the components in the table? Including pedals? Thanks
  • 2 0
 White is Tight!
  • 2 0
 No tights no story...
  • 2 0
 Yoga pants?
  • 3 0
 The torso armor of a stormtrooper paired with some lulu lemons wold have been the look for this one.
  • 1 0
 @dingus: that is some alarmingly specific kink, my friend.
  • 1 1
 Unridablu bike bruh. But ridablu each other?
  • 2 0
 Proper sized chainring
  • 1 0
 The Gemballa of mountain bikes.
  • 1 0
 If it can be dreamed...Dangerholm will build it!!! I have spoken...
  • 1 0
 no photo of the quads?? Frown
  • 2 0
 Does it come in red?
  • 2 3
 just imagine spending +14k on bike build.
and foxturds again disappointed with mismatched cashima on their "top line" product..
  • 3 3
 I’d rather see him make any trail bike less than 32lbs with stock components
  • 6 0
 Like take the reflectors off?
  • 1 0
 Wondering why the Cushcores instead of the new Tubolights?
  • 2 0
 Another masterpiece!
  • 2 4
 Bit of an uphill battle trying to make the bike look the cleanest with that fox live valve system on there. I've always wondered who pays for these builds ? Is everything free ?
  • 1 0
 YAY! bike pubes will have new material!
  • 1 0
 WOW!!!!! Frame it and hang it on a wall!
  • 1 0
 Came for some Christmas Hams.
  • 1 0
 Beautiful....almost NSFW beautiful.
  • 1 0
 nude bike and no nude body. Thank God!
  • 1 0
 I just came to see a leg update. Disappointed.
  • 1 0
 PB we need a feature on the BikePubes co-lab - now that was a build!
  • 1 0
 Really pretty looks like Fabio's XC bike
  • 1 0
 Somewhere, a dentist is having an orgasm after reading this piece.
  • 1 0
 This build is sponsored by shredded quads and really short shorts
  • 1 0
 huck to flat in jean shorts please
  • 2 0
 The Ultimate Dream.
  • 1 1
 If beauty is pain, then a level stem is worth the lost watts: that -25' stem is just brutally ugly.
  • 1 0
 can't wait to see this in Friday Fails
  • 1 0
 That's a work of art. What is Dangerholm's job? Is it bikes? so impressive
  • 2 0
 I'm nursing a semi
  • 1 0
 Cyclophilia... sexual intercourse with or attraction towards bicycles.
  • 5 5
 Fox ain’t going warranty those forks. Steer is hacked
  • 10 1
 None of the projects are warranty safe. That is part of the beauty
  • 1 14
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Feb 9, 2021 at 5:47) (Below Threshold)
 @neoides: Until a crucial part breaks and you smash your beautiful face.
  • 7 1
 @DoubleCrownAddict: don't worry his quads will cushion the fall
  • 1 0
 Wow.
  • 2 2
 Shame on that front rotor. Small and ugly.
  • 2 2
 No room for water bottle? Because of the life valve? Hmmm
  • 1 1
 Unclear how the steerer stop works.
  • 2 3
 He calls himself "quadzilla"? When does his trust-fund run out so he has to get a job?
  • 1 0
 Crikey.
  • 1 2
 Wow! On that bike the Reverb AXS is a real eye-sore, though. Maybe the Magura Vyron would look better?
  • 1 0
 Santa's bike ?
  • 2 3
 Not the lightest Julian absalon had 19 or 20 lber his buddy from Norway had a 19 lber
  • 1 1
 The saddle is not aligned ????‍♂️
  • 1 1
 Dear maxxis, ditch the gold lettering.
  • 1 0
 Well done!
  • 1 0
 God... is your bike?
  • 1 2
 All that work and then add in cushcore? Seems stupid. I would rather have a dropper post.
  • 1 0
 also the stack height
  • 1 0
 What is XCM?
  • 1 0
 clean set up
  • 1 4
 White stem, handlebars,seat-post or seat is an absolute ,,no go,, I thought everyone knows that already.
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