The Interview: Troy Brosnan

Mar 15, 2017
by Matt Wragg  


Ask any serious race fan about Troy Brosnan and you're likely to get no shortage of superlatives. Since his debut in 2010 he has always been one of the riders to watch, a little guy who seems to float through impossibly rough sections, carries unbelievable speed and can challenge for the win on any track. His consistency is second-to-none. You have to go back to La Bresse in 2011 to find a World Cup where he finished outside the top 20, and out of the 29 World Cups he has competed in since then, he has had 17 podiums and has only been out of the top 10 four times.

Yet there has only been one win, Fort William 2014 when he defied the pundits to stand atop the podium on a track that was always considered a big man's track. He has been so close, but it hasn't quite come together since. For 2017, in the biggest move of the off-season, he signed for Canyon's newly formed DH team, taking the step from sharing the team pits with some of the sport's greats to becoming a lead rider, with a structure built around him and his needs. We caught up with him at a testing camp in Blausasc, France, to find out more about the move, how he sees his last few seasons and where he is aiming for in the future.






How was last season for you? It seems like you were close all season, but didn't quite get over the top.

Yeah. I guess last season for me was a really good one. I can't complain. I got 3rd overall and 4th at Worlds, so, you know, that's a really good year. In terms for me, personally, I want to win, so I saw it as not the perfect year. It just seems like things didn't quite click perfectly last year with putting everything together on the race day. I always had really good qualifiers and was really fast in practice, then just made a few mistakes and wasn't getting quite the bike set up that I needed, and a few internal things were just not right. These days you really need to be absolutely perfect and go through smoothly. You should pretty much only have to worry about one thing and that's racing and having fun. It just didn't feel like that most of the season. Towards the end, it started getting a lot better and we figured things out, made the bike go a little bit faster here and there. And yeah, got a little bit unlucky in a couple of races; apart from that, it was a good season, but also a little bit of a frustrating season for myself.


For yourself, in your head, do you find it easier to be a bit further back, knowing it didn't go right or to be so close and just like, "Dammit, almost there"?

I guess it's hard when you're so close to winning. Kind of like I was in Cairns, especially with the race being in Australia, and I was only 0.4 off Loic. That one hurt a fair bit, for sure. Just losing it in the sprint was a bit sucky, but at the same time, it was something that kept me motivated and kept me working really hard throughout the season to try and get that win again and come back from it. At the same time, when you've had a bit of a bad race and you're a bit far behind, that probably hurts a bit more because it drops your confidence a little bit. You're wondering, Why wasn't I on the pace? Why wasn't I closer to the top guys?


In your head you know that you should be there, so do you see next season as a case of trying to put those missing few bits in place?

Yeah, for sure. I know that I can be there and I will be there. It's just being there at the time that's the hard bit, I guess. I think with everything that's going on and happened this year, already the testing that we've done and work on the bike, is beyond anything I've ever done before. It's going to be a good year and hopefully, we get a few wins and make it easier for ourselves. There is still a lot to learn, for sure, with the team, seeing as how it's a brand new team. Apart from that, I don't think things could go much better than they're going right now. I'm feeling fast. The other boys, Mark and Ruaridh, are having a great time and feeling fast as well. The bike's working sick and the suspension's good and there are no excuses.

Blausasc France. January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Brosnan and Fabien Barel take a break during a pre-season photo shoot.


How did the Canyon deal come around?

I was up with my Specialized contract and wasn't really fishing around at all, but had a few teams come to me. Specialized kind of wanted to keep me on the factory team just as my own rider with no teammates or send me to the Gravity team with Loic and I didn't really feel like either of those options were going to be right for me to be able to take it to the next level, the next step to win. The Canyon deal came along with Fabien backing it and supporting it big time. They wanted to build the team around me—you can't really ask for more than that in a team. It's been pretty good so far. I'm pretty excited about how the whole team's been going with the riding and even getting a bit mentored by Fabien. It's something that most people would dream of.


How is it for you having a team built around you? Because obviously in the beginning you were with Sam Hill, then there was Aaron Gwin, so it's always ... I don't want to say in the shadows because that's not fair to you, but there has always been a very big other presence on the team with you.

Yeah for sure. I guess coming into the first year I raced in 2010 underneath Sam and Brendan, it was a good thing for me. I learned so much from them. It increased my riding skill and speed ten times more than I could ever imagine. Growing up and being at the same level as them, and being as fast as them was really good. Then for Aaron to come along, I think that was also another key thing. I was getting top tens at World Cups and then he came along. In 2013 we were both having a bit of a struggle that year with bike set up before we went to the 650 wheels. Then in 2014 I won my first World Cup and was beating him, having good races. I guess from my perspective, in 2014 I felt like I was ready to be somewhat of the top rider and number one rider on the team and I thought I'd have some backing to make that happen. A couple of things happened with the Gravity team getting bought and going to Specialized. It didn't really affect me at all because it was completely another team, but I guess just that feeling of having a great team behind me and trying to push me to be number one was what I was striving for. Whatever's been laid out and put in front of me to get to this point in time right now has been good and I've learned a lot. Now that I've finally accomplished what I've been striving for, I think it's going to be something really good going forward.


If you look at the World Cup, most of the top guys came through with an older rider above them. Actually, a lot of the riders that tend to struggle tend to be the ones that came up on their own. How big a deal is it to have someone there—for you, it was obviously Sam in the beginning. You look at Brendan had Steve and so did Josh. Loic had Nico Vouilloz. Aaron's a bit of an anomaly, I guess. How beneficial is that as a young rider coming through?

Obviously Aaron's a totally different case for that. He's just got that raw natural talent from his moto riding. I think myself coming through as a junior and having Sam and Brendan, and even Aaron, at that stage was something that accelerated my riding and made me push and learn so much. You can only learn things from riders that are faster than you on the track. Off the track, obviously, you can have other help at the same time. You can either do it on your own and it's going to take a while or you can fast track that with the riders that are faster than you and who are going to make you push yourself harder to be faster than them and keep up with them at the same time.


How involved were you in choosing Mark and Ruaridh as your teammates for this year?

A little bit involved, I guess. I definitely had a lot of phone calls with Fabien trying to get that all sorted. I really wanted Ruaridh to come along. He's one of my good buddies and he's been there with me racing for a while now. I met him back in 2009 in Whistler. We didn't really have much planned for Mark, to be honest. It was a bit of a late notice that his team folded and when Devinci folded it was a no-brainer to get him on the team. He's a really nice guy and really good rider and his personality and everything fits perfectly and I think him being still so young it's really good for the team to have him. I think we'll be able to see big things out of all three of us.


Blausasc France. January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

How has it been changing bikes? Obviously the internet likes to bag on the Demo a bit and I think Fabien's got a very different philosophy to virtually any rider at his level. He has an openness to changing everything and looking to develop things. How has that been for you?

It's been really good. For sure the Specialized was a great bike. Coming to Canyon it was a lot different with the geometry and everything. For me, riding it for a few months now, it's been really good and the level that I'm feeling that I'm on is really fast and probably the fastest I've ever been. I feel like I can push this bike a little bit further than I could push the other bike. It's something I'm pretty excited to say at the same time. Also, I think that it's definitely helped with Fabien's work beforehand and all the testing that he's done on it and developing the bike. He's been a racer for a long time now and he knows what a rider needs and wants from a bike. We've come through with some younger riders with Ruaridh, I and Mark brought a bit of new school to try and make it faster again, and definitely Fabien's learning from us at the same time. I think with everyone working together right now we're all really stoked for one another and I don't think there's going to be any rivalry at all. I think we're all just going to help as one big team and when someone does a really good race result we're all going to be really happy.


How has the way you set up your bike changed in any particular way, in terms of bike sizing or weight distribution or suspension? Has anything significant changed with the new bike and all the testing?

I've had a lot more testing than I've ever had when I've been on Specialized. That's pretty much all we've done this whole time being on Canyon. It's just been test, test, test. That's the only way you're going to learn and go almost two steps backward and one step forward just trying to make these little changes and also big changes to keep going faster. I think it's really good and it's starting to help out. It's something that was definitely difficult, at the beginning, to get my head around, but now that it's becoming like second nature, it's pretty special.


Have you gone to a bigger bike then, moving to Canyon?

It's still medium, the same as my Specialized bike, but it's a longer reach and definitely we've put the chainstays in a longer position, so it's a bit more raked-out and longer as well. It kind of feels a bit more stable. I kind of tried that a little bit on the Specialized, but for some reason, the geometry didn't quite work the same. It just felt like it was the bike from stock on a Specialized was about all you could get out of it.


Blausasc France. January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg


In Loris Vergier's interview, upon joining the Syndicate, he said there was quite a fine margin for error on the Specialized.

What I found with the Specialized was that it rode really fast, but it was hard to ride fast. You'd have to work so hard to make it go fast, and once you did get there and rode at that level it would go really, really quick down the hill...but it was just a lot of work and a lot of effort to make that happen.


For you, what do you look for in a bike? Obviously you're one of the smaller guys on the circuit, so what do you look for in a race bike?

It's a hard one. I guess what I look for in a bike and a race bike is something that's obviously going to handle well cause the tracks these days, you don't need to pedal too much, it's pretty fast, flat-out and all about cornering and holding speed everywhere. I guess that kind of translates into how well the wheels roll and how light the bike is as well. It's a bit of a balance, I think. Some bikes suit certain people, and other bikes suit others. You probably wouldn't see a really short guy like myself on a large Santa Cruz anytime soon.


One of the big questions for you is going to have to be Cairns, isn't it? Conventional wisdom is that it'd be the bigger guys who can put the power down would have the advantage on the sprinting. But... you were so close last time in Cairns. How do you see that race lining up in your head? It's a home Worlds, so that's probably the most pressurised race any rider's going to face in their career?

For me it's exciting to be able to have a home World Champs at Cairns this year. Going to a new team and everything, it's a little bit different, but for me that track is won or lost more in the technical areas than it is in the bottom sprint. Obviously I lost it at the bottom sprint last year, but Loic definitely was only .1 behind me at the last split anyway. So, it was kind of a sprint to the line and we're both not the biggest guys, tallness-wise. We were kind of a level above everyone else, so I think it's going to be tough one to be able to set the bike up where it can descend the whole top section, mid-section and also be able to sprint. It's going to be definitely one that, obviously, I want to win. If I did win it'd be really amazing, but I'm not trying to put any more pressure on myself or anything. It's just pretty much go and have fun, and if I have fun and ride well, hopefully come out on top.


Do you think we'll see some special bikes coming out? Fox have the X2 with the remote for enduro guys. Do you see something like that coming out of the bag for that race? What do you think?

It's World Champs, I think anything can happen. I'm not sure, or have heard of anything else that people might be testing on, maybe a 29er here or there, but I think the turns at the top and everything else is a bit tight for a 29er to win there, but, for sure if they want to try it, go ahead.

Blausasc France. January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Last time the Worlds were down in Australia, Fabien Barel had that short-travel Mondraker.

I guess Canberra was a little bit of a special track that—that track was pretty fast and actually a bit flat, so a short travel bike could have definitely been a goer there, but at the same time Peaty won on a perfectly normal, downhill bike, so I think it's kind of each to their own. Whatever you feel like you can ride the fastest is going to be the most beneficial for the rider, but you'll definitely be seeing me on the Sender there.


You came up with Sam; he's feeling a little bit over the way the World Cup tracks are going at the moment. But you seem to have adapted quite well to it. How would you see the direction it's going at the moment and where would you like to see it go next? How would you like to see it develop?

I think, with Sam, I see it from his perspective as well. Back in the day, you used to have really natural, loamy tracks with roots and lots of lines and now the tracks are kind of going to more wider open and big jumps, not many turns...kind of straight down the hill. That pretty much is all to do with TV and filming it, you know? It's what Red Bull wanted. It's what they strived for in a track and it sucks a little bit. It's taking away a bit of downhill's background of having real technical and crazy tracks. I guess the more media and the more TV coverage we get the better it is for our support and I have to adapt, really. There's no way around it. I don't really want to change from downhill to enduro or any other sport, so I've got to make things work and go from there.


Fast forward 10 months time to October. Looking back, what in your head would the point where you'd say, "Okay, I'm happy with that season. I feel good about that. "What in your head does that look like?

I definitely want to just have fun this year. It's going to be a big learning curve for sure with the new team and new bike. Results-wise I want to get wins here or there and be up on the podium every race. I'm definitely going to be happy if I do that, but if I can get a few wins and get the rainbows at the home track for World Champs, it'll definitely make me happy.


Will we see you at the EWS again?

I'm going to put all the EWS and all the enduros aside and just really focus on downhill. I feel like they're two completely separate sports and disciplines. You need to be really fit for hours on end for enduro and be able to hit your max zones over and over, where for downhill you just need to be good for about 5 minutes. My training in the past has kind of been split between the two of them, but this year I've gotten a new trainer and we've been working to be exactly on the downhill side of things, so hopefully that shows.

Blausasc France. January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg


Must Read This Week

116 Comments

  • + 307
 Brosnan seems to fly a bit under the radar because he's so consistent and low-key. No off track antics or clowning for the camera; no polarizing beliefs or up-and-down seasons. Just a pure shredder. I tend to root for my countryman Gwin first, but I'd love to see Troy take an overall. He deserves it. Bonus points for always having the best looking custom at Worlds and for breaking the mold with his kits. Good luck in 2017.
  • + 51
 Freakin' dogs with lazer beam eyes!Awesome.
  • + 62
 Kinda like a younger Minaar,if you come to think about it.
  • + 42
 Soft spoken cat who lets his riding do the talking. Always talk about the Gwin or Hill line but Troy takes aggro lines that no one else will take and makes it look buff af. Bruh
  • + 28
 Agreed, just a no nonsense rider who keeps it super smooth on track and isn't afraid to send really rough lines and make them look easy. Looking forward to seeing what he can do aboard the canyon this year, from his results in the national downhills things appear to be going well.
  • - 33
flag Wouldhaveletmego (Mar 15, 2017 at 8:27) (Below Threshold)
 @nozes: because he's also really tall and from South Africa? Ok, sure.
  • + 14
 @Wouldhaveletmego: no because "he's so consistent and low-key. No off track antics or clowning for the camera; no polarizing beliefs or up-and-down seasons. Just a pure shredder..." sheesh man.
  • + 9
 My thoughts exactly this dude doesn't seem to get his due when really there are but a few that can match his consistency in being a top rider for all these years. Hoping to see TB quietly pull those scant tenths this season and stand up top...
  • + 6
 got that quite humble dungey approach. hope ya get those Ws your way, troy!
  • + 1
 @nozes: He'll be the Dungey of MTB
  • + 113
 "His consistency is second-to-none. You have to go back to La Bresse in 2011 to find a World Cup where he finished outside the top 20, and out of the 29 World Cups he has competed in since then, he has had 17 podiums and has only been out of the top 10 four times."

Whoa, I had no idea he had that level of consistency over his WC career. Truly impressive results!
  • + 44
 Interesting comment about the way the tracks are changing, and Red Bull's influence on that; I'm guessing he's not the only one who would have that opinion!
It's a tough spot for the industry and the bigwigs to be in: a potential loss of talent due to the "bike park" tracks being produced round in round out, or a big gain in TV sponsorship and an ever-widening audience...
  • + 29
 Can we all blame Red Bull now? Make DH great again RB! Or let a real sports network take over for a change. Red Cow is like "we got 3 cameras, make the track fit. We gotta pay for a space jump."
  • + 27
 I would have thought making the track more technical would be more in line with RedBull marketing.... With Bikes getting better and more capable, I would have though the track would get more HardCore. A mere mortal shouldn't even be able to ride a WC DH course. Like RedBull Rampage, you don't see plebs riding those courses...
  • - 1
 @Boardlife69: red bull or ---------- nothing
  • + 10
 Good question. I don't know why Red Bull would think bike park tracks would attract a bigger audience, in my opinion it'd do just the opposite. It seems to go against RB's image of "extreme, give you wings" mantra. Or am I way off base here?
  • + 12
 @hetfield1: like I said, they have bigger more expensive fish to fry and MTB is just something they have to complete the "extreme" package. So, they try to save money on our sport to spend it somewhere else. Its still niche, but if Eurosport took over it could rival the FIS ski circus in a few years. They have the buget and enough cameras to make it work regardless of the track. I say give it to Eurosport or someone similar. F%ck bike park races.
  • + 2
 Redbull should resign, oh yeah, and what's the point of reference? UCI, maybe Rocky Roads?
  • + 4
 @hetfield1: those bike park tracks produce very close times, which is what they are after. they only care ab out the suspense of a race.
  • + 29
 @hetfield1: Simple. Technical riding does not translate well to people who are not part of the core audience, whereas high speed is easily understandable to people outside the sport. And that is the nut DH has never cracked. Why do you think all the Grunidg-era money went away? Have you seen a TV broadcast of a 90s DH race, it was boring as hell to watch for anyone who isn't a keen mountain biker - and if the sport is to have any hope of bringing back the big bucks back in, it needs to appeal to people who have a minimal interest in the sport. Think Supercross for the paradigm of taking a gnarly outdoor sport and packaging it for the mainstream.

Also, open tracks are easier to film in a live broadcast - each camera can cover more track compared to a wooded track.

I'm not saying that tech tracks aren't better (to ride, at least), but if you want the sport to grow outside it's core market, I can see why that is the direction it is heading in.
  • + 1
 Thanks for all the replies.
  • + 2
 @hetfield1: You can film more with fewer cameras, and speed looks good on camera.
  • + 2
 @mattwragg: watching DH in the 90s was actually awesome when you factor in what other sports were broadcast around then. It drove a ton of us to the sport. A course can have sections of wild gnar and high speed sections as well. it doesn't need to be 'parky' to suit both viewers and riders, case in point can be St Anne. I've watched it first hand and on live stream since 2000, and the current iterations don't make it any more exciting to watch than it did when it was more technical. SX style courses are very boring to watch, seeing each rider hit the exact same line the same way, all ending up at the finish corral within a second of eachother, this sport needs to appease the core group first and foremost (as with any business, this is critical and keeping your core supporters entertained is #1, NOT the average joe who couldn't be cared to get up at 7am on a sunday to watch) so that point is moot imo, as it will never translate to non-cyclists the same way, so why the heck cater to them? Why cater to people who don't buy these bikes or support the sport? These same non-core people all sent me or posted up Danny Harts winning run in the mud, hardly a 'super fast run' but easily one of the most exciting, and guess what, the average joe "got it" and it went viral. So they can be entertained by slower steeper tracks, and they aren't going to be buying into the sport anyway.

Another case in point in the craptastic XC track at bejing Olympics. it was pathetic for the viewer, but they thought they knew best. I believe this is the same with the current DH tracks. If multiple racers are complaining, and some even leaving the sport because they are bored with the direction (and these are the top guys in this sport), then something is amiss. If we continue to cater to numbing down tracks "because television and joe blow!" then we are going to lose the core group anyway, may as well get the slopestyle guys to just race down them and do tricks while they are at it, maybe judge them on those tricks rather than the clock.....
  • + 2
 @atrokz: I agree with Matt, and add that downhill is boring enough to watch... cycling is fkng boring. Maybe BMX racing and track are worth looking at. My point of reference being basketball game or supercross
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: haha. sure sure. I've been court-side to NBA games (so boring) trackside at the last panam track finals (meh) ! Lacrosse is an arena sport I can get into! Watched the SX here a few times as well as monster jam. fun, but still doesn't beat a day hiking up a mountain to watch racers fly. DH is a sport that suits adventurous spectators. I wish we could stop pretending this is a stadium sport that needs a billion fat viewers to be cool or something.
  • + 3
 @atrokz: to give DH some slack, I think one of the most terrible sports to watch is soccer. It is as exciting in terms of ball games as F1 is for cars. I've been to a so called "folk rally" a kind of derby with wrecks racing on a simple track. No way F1 or Le Mans is better
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: yea I know all about Swedish redneck sports (don't forget I was heavily involved in volvo community making stuff and building cars, you guys know how to have fun)! Best drivers at 12 years old, doing the scandi flick at 9 years old.
  • + 2
 @atrokz: i'm from Poland but live in Sweden. But Volvo 240SL seems more exciting than Audi Sport...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: b23ft ftw.

I think DH would be a better specatator sport for the average person if they live streamed some gopro footage during the race and set up betting.
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: We need more of this - www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RRouba7740
although rb does have Warner, damn.
  • + 2
 @atrokz: exactly...edit that shit in...esp the sections the cameras miss. Pay the riders/team/sponsers more for the footage too.
  • + 28
 Met him personally, super awesome dude. He broke his finger and still spent time signing autographs for the fans despite he could barely hold the pen. His mom and dad are ace as well. And then he has awesome style on the bike. Always sending it, staying off the ground a lot. One of few worth following on social media. All the best of luck Troy!
  • + 2
 I see him on the trails a fair bit. I try to just wave and move on but some of the other riders like to take photos and he has never said no. He is a truly down to earth guy who just likes having fun on his bike.
  • + 19
 One of the nicest, humble and down to earth people on the WC track, great guy, great story, really deserves to do well this year.
  • + 18
 "You should pretty much only have to worry about one thing and that's racing and having fun"

That's two things.
  • + 16
 Surely the question, "why are you running coil and all of Canyons design is around air?" Is a question every sender owner wants the answer to?
  • + 13
 check paul Astons review he switched it up and preferred the coil....check the article here on PB>
  • + 14
 So refreshing to see actual opinions and thoughts coming out of a worldcup rider. In a world where corporate contracts and sponsorship commitments rule their answers. TBH i didn't have Troy on my radar as a great personality before but this interview defo changed that! Go Troy and all the best this season.
  • + 14
 "I'm going to put all the EWS and all the enduros aside and just really focus on downhill."

Good lad.
  • + 13
 "wasn't getting quite the bike set up that I needed, and a few internal things were just not right" shots fired
  • + 10
 So ultimately he moved from specialized so he could be the star rider of a team. I did always feel like specialized didn't treat him as well as their other top tier riders, he said he had little testing at Spesh but look how much testing, technology and customisation you see at the Bruni side of things. Good luck to Troy this year I hope he has great success as the spear head of Canyon!
  • + 7
 "That's the only way you're going to learn and go almost two steps backward and one step forward just trying to make these little changes and also big changes to keep going faster."..... those are clearly some of Barels words.

I think Canyon did an excellent decision by choosing Barel.
  • + 1
 Agreed. My first choice would have been Vouilloz with Fabien a very close second.
  • + 4
 Fabien is a very smart guy as well as crazy fast on a bike... He has an idea of what a change on a bike will do and is very good at giving feedback to the designers and engineers... A good guy to have when developing a new bike...
  • + 2
 @lumpy873: agreed. He takes a very scientific approach to things but also just straight rips. He would be the raddest manager because of his positivity.
  • + 2
 Fabien seems like a decent boss.
  • + 1
 This team will take the mfgs title in 2017 because of Barel imo. Very valuable asset for any team.
  • + 8
 "what do you look for in a bike" - Ahhhhh... Sponsorship?
  • + 7
 Oh boy....Specialized, Canyon... even Walmart-Bike... you do it right, fast and stylish TROY
  • + 6
 Troy's approach to riding; fun = fast ..well, that's what I keep hearing and seeing ..total respect and faith in your ability, go for it man!
  • + 8
 nobody notice the new deemaxs???
  • + 8
 go get some podiums this year!
  • + 4
 I cant wait for Cairns!!!! I'm taking this interview coming out on the same day as the World Champs program is released as a sign. Can't wait to jump the barrier and hoist Troy in the air when that clock goes green.
  • + 3
 Troy first, Sick Mik second and Muddy third!! All Aussie podium!!
  • + 4
 In Australia we have a 'Telco' called Telstra, my better half works for them. Lately they have been running ad featuring MTBing and their new video and live streaming technology. I'm putting together an email suggesting that Telstra becomes a sponsor of the Cairns MTB WC as puts in the infrastructure (Conduit, cable fibre optics etc whatever) up the mountain so that camera can be easily set up all the way along the entire track. If done properly 2017 Cairns MTB WC will have the best coverage of any WC ever.
  • + 3
 Just keep thinking about how on form his season was in 2015, when we was up at the first few splits on several races but would lay it down a bit lower, yet would still end up on the podium. Must have been so frustrating!!
  • + 1
 Seriously wish these were either filmed, or even recorded. At work is the only time I get to just sit down in front of a computer, and I cant spend a load of time reading. A recording or film would be great to listen to while working.
  • + 11
 I prefer reading. Can't use sound while working.
  • + 3
 Lots of interviews are done over email these days.
  • + 1
 Ahh ok yeah that makes sense, never thought about email interviews! I retract my statement. Keep bringing us sweet content PB!
  • + 5
 I'd give my left nut to have Barel coach me for a few months.
  • + 2
 Do you consider you left nut as being less usefull as your right one? Just wondering.....:-)
  • + 3
 @amonas: lefties are always less useful! :-P
  • + 4
 Troy's gonna produce for the next few years with a team focused on him, finally! Go Troy!
  • + 3
 Troy Brosnan and Connor Fearon to battle it out for the 2017 title - Radelaide!
  • + 4
 The white and black colour way makes me want to buy a Sender goddammit!
  • + 1
 Yeah I agree, looks much better than the standard red or blue
  • + 2
 and with the mavic wheels. all it needs is some fox suspension and then wed have a dream bike.
  • + 1
 @jaycubzz: With the new dampeners and redesigned spring the new boxxer is lighter and in my opinion handles better than this gen 40, try one and see!
  • + 4
 Couldn't help but read that in an Aus accent.
  • + 9
 Couldnt stop reading this in a saffa accent
  • + 2
 @wally333: getting on board wally Smile
  • + 3
 Coil shock, that interesting.
  • + 6
 Yes it is a Super Alloy Racing spring on a Rock Shox vivid R2C
  • + 6
 The author of the sender pinkbike review also liked it more with a spring.
  • + 2
 Could be for testing, less variables to set up, repeated runs with consistent feedback.
  • + 1
 @Mirks: Heard about them not convinced Ali not the first material I'd think of for a spring, for that price might as well use titanium. I'm sure they are ok if you get them for Free and can replace them regularly when they take a set or fatigue.
  • + 3
 DH Team has also different MX linkage from the stock..
  • + 1
 @pulDag: so it is.
  • + 6
 @chappers998: I am the director and CEO of super alloy racing. I would stand my product against any spring out there even Ti. Shoot me an email and we can chat info@superalloyracing.com
  • + 1
 @Mirks: Hi sent a mail as requested.
  • + 4
 @Mirks: Hi it was great chatting to your husband and getting the low down seems like a great product, thank you both.
  • + 2
 @Mirks: while I'm no pro like Brosnan, I bought one of your springs and couldn't be happier. It's amazing how light weight it is!
  • + 1
 @Mirks: when do the inconel springs come out? Razz
  • + 1
 cant wait for the season to start!!! DH is the only sport I follow these guys are off the dial . Good luck Troy ! its only a matter of time !
  • + 2
 What is the difference between the Specialized Factory DH team and the Specialized Gravity team?
  • + 2
 Factory is specialized itself.

Gravity is a private team that uses specialized bikes. (Though I think specialized may fork in some cash as well to keep the team running. Pure guessing this part though!)
  • + 1
 Gravity team seems to be run a lot better......
  • + 2
 So the Demo is due for a redesign very soon i'm sure, sounds like Troy and other guys aren't a fan of riding it.
  • + 2
 No it isn't due for a re-design. This seems like obvious fan-boying, considering a bloody ride a demo!!, but seriously what do you expect Troy to say when questioned about the changes between bikes? It's the same with every sportsperson in every single sport.
'Oh my [insert previous sponsor] was okay, but my [insert new sponsor] is a lot better + [insert loads of positive things about new sponsor].

And who are these 'other people'?
Are you referring to Aaron, who won a fecking WC on it chainless?! And didn't actually want to leave Spesh, but just wanted a pay rise?

Sheesh.
  • + 1
 @Jack-McLovin: From the article above:
"What I found with the Specialized was that it rode really fast, but it was hard to ride fast. You'd have to work so hard to make it go fast, and once you did get there and rode at that level it would go really, really quick down the hill...but it was just a lot of work and a lot of effort to make that happen."

I'm taking that as a negative trait about the bike. Also it says that Loris says there is a very fine margin for error. That's two different people with basically the same opinion on the bike.
  • + 1
 @dimetera413:
Obviously I don't ride at a level of Loris or Troy, but I just don't know what they mean by that.
'Hard to ride fast'?? Is he referring to the bikes weight, or is he not massively strong - possibly struggles being a smaller dude? I don't know, but having ridden both demo designs, I can say the previous design is more playful, but the new current design just wants to attack and go quick.

Troy and loris were both running boxxors, and all boxxors I've ridden feel sluggish and a bit shit. But i guess the pro's use different internals anyway so it's probably not that.
As for loris's comment I'm not sure what he means either.

At the end of the day, it's a shit hot bike that is capable. I'm not saying Troy and Loris are lying, it's just they have to say something negative to up their new sponsor a little bit.
  • + 1
 Spec is an interesting one for me. Gwin - unstoppable on Trek, moved to S and took him a few seasons to get back to speed. In that time they changed a lot with the bike. Sam Hill never really got back to speed until moving to Nukeproof. Graves - is still not back to form after moving from Yeti. Maybe this is all coincidence or a result of injuries.

Is it their bikes or team structure? Brosnan will be a good test case as he was in good form last year but couldn't quite get there. I think we will be seeing a lot more of him this year.
  • + 1
 I had the pleasure of meeting and talking with Troy at the northwest cup. He is a total class act and I only wish him the best.
  • + 1
 Troy is on that long list of riders my wife and I always root for. Hopefully this season comes together for him. He's certainly earned it.
  • + 2
 Less enduro more DH!!! What a bright young man.
  • - 1
 Troy is a super rad dude no doubt but I have to defend specialized. The demo is a really good bicycle that has proven itself at the highest level in our sport. canyon may achieve that or perhaps not.
  • + 1
 I love this kid so much and really want him to do well this year on Canyon! Bring it!
  • + 2
 That kit is clean
  • + 0
 Hope you have a good season Troy. Got to admit Im a bit of a fan of both you and Fabian
  • + 1
 Likeable guy. I hope he kills it this year.
  • + 1
 Cant wait to see wich race troy will win first on his new sender..........
  • + 1
 Has anyone noticed how big his forehead is
  • + 1
 Starter brand? Seriously?!?
  • + 1
 Go RAdelaide, keen as for this year Troy.
  • + 1
 I was reading this with an Australian accent.
  • + 1
 Nice guys don't finish last
  • + 1
 Great stuff Troy! All the best from RAdelaide!
  • + 0
 Looks like Fab has helped Troy with his hair styling. By the end of the year he'll be shaven...
  • + 1
 Yeah troy
  • - 3
 That forehead tho.
  • - 2
 Favorite rider...not so sure about the bike brand..
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