The Myotragus Dorothea is a 200mm High Pivot Bike With a Gearbox

Jan 23, 2023
by Matt Beer  
The Dorothea20 in the downhill configuration with a 200mm dual-crown fork and MX wheels.

The Myotragus Dorothea isn’t exactly a name that rolls off the tongue, but luckily the Spanish company's 200mm virtual high-pivot frame has enough other talking points to move past the branding. An idler pulley wheel, complex linkages, and gearbox are clear indicators that this isn’t your average gravity bike. A completely rearward axle path moves in nearly a straight line to maintain momentum and retain a long wheelbase for stability.

The Dorothea can be modified to either a 200mm travel downhill bike, or a 170mm enduro bike by using different shock lengths and linkage components. Either configuration can run on dual 29” or mixed wheels to suit the rider’s preferences. In the 200mm setting, the overall progression is extremely high. The pedal kickback is negligible throughout its travel because the idler wheel is mounted to the rotating lower link.

By tweaking the geometry, the OLS suspension system can be fitted with a shorter shock and enduro components for a pedal friendly version.

In the enduro mode, the seat tube angle of the 170mm travel Dorothea can be as steep as 82 degrees for an upright, seated position with the fork resting at a 65-degree angle. Since Myotragus can weld the Dorothea with custom geometry, the DH mode could be built as slack 61 degrees and has two chainstay length options - 435mm, or 450mm when a 29” wheel is used. Those figures grow to by 20mm once the suspension sags under the rider’s weight.

Myotragus uses a virtual high-pivot layout they call 'OLS Suspension' designed primarily to move the rear axle backwards by 57mm in total. The top link rotates on an eccentric pivot while the lower link moves upwards, compressing the 250x75mm shock from both directions.

Built in the Catalonia region of Spain, the aluminum frame geometry can be tailored for any size of rider using a unique data acquisition system.
An exploded drawing shows that the seemingly complex Dorothea uses about 30 pieces of hardware.
The axle path moves completely rearward through the 200 or 170mm of travel, depending on the frame configuration.

bigquotesThe path of the rear wheel describes practically a backward-sloping straight line, which aligns with the force vectors of impact due to the ground to significantly improve its absorption capacity.Myotragus Bikes

What looks like a prototype is actually the Spanish brand’s finished product. Raw 7020-T6 aluminum is favored over carbon for the frame construction for durability against rock strikes and to allow for custom geometry. Myotragus also prefers the untreated finish to reduce the weight and cost of the Dorothea. A bare frame without a shock weighs 3,800 g or 8.38 lb, which puts it around the same weight as a RAAW Madonna frame. Surprisingly, the scissoring linkage and frame components total just over 30 pieces - much less than Norco’s Range which accounts for nearly one hundred parts.

Adding to their industrial ways, a gearbox lowers the center of gravity for the bike and the unsprung weight, while increasing the ground clearance. Pinion’s C1.9XR 9-speed gearbox spins the gears through an oil bath while providing a 463% range. This transmission style also reduces the change in anti-squat since the chain does not move across gears on the rear axle. Due to the small batch, local production, Myotrgus could build the Dorothea to run on a conventional drivetrain as well.

The anti-squat only moves above 100% once weighted in the 20-40% sag range.
An anti-rise value above 100% compresses the suspension when the rear brake is applied.

The leverage ratio is very progressive on the Dorothea. It starts off supple and ramps up at the end abruptly.
Due to the idler located on the lower link, the pedal kickback is negligible throughout the 200mm of travel.

Like Commencal’s Supreme V4 single high-pivot bike, the Dorothea has an anti-rise value around 130%. Pulling the rear brake will compress the rear suspension, but Myotragus prefers how this characteristic preserves the geometry. In their opinion, this doesn’t have any negative effect on how sensitive the suspension is due to the compressive braking forces.

Does it climb like a mountain goat? Probably not, due to the weight and the associated parts that focus on descending. The anti-squat actually starts low and rises to just over 100% as the suspension settles in the sag point. That’s not the only number to account for when discussing pedalling efficiency though. Geometry has an influence on that too.

Although Myotragus is still testing and finalizing the details on the Dorothea, pricing is estimated to land around the €3,000 mark, which doesn’t include a shock or custom geometry. For more information or to get in touch with Myotragus, check out their detailed website here and follow them on Instagram.


168 Comments

  • 147 5
 High pivot - Check
Gearbox - Check
No headset routed cables - Check
Tubular Aluminum construction - Check
Beautiful raw finish - Check

I'm going to have to do some serious mental Gymnastics (Mental Slopestyle?) to find a reason not to love this bike.

It is bespoke priced.

Time to dust off the ol' dentist comments.
  • 15 0
 Many in the world dont bother with dentist appointments...
  • 48 0
 If the €3000 price includes the gearbox, that's actually pretty cheap.
  • 15 1
 @toast2266: £3000 without the gearbox still is pretty reasonable, comparable to a Nicolai and a lot cheaper than the gamux.
  • 19 0
 "scissoring linkage"
  • 39 2
 No water bottle mount.
  • 12 3
 The issue is that it has an idler and a Pinon. Both of these are already pretty draggy, and you combine them? Thats a tough sell.

The old Zerode design where the high pivot is achieved by moving the gearbox up to the location of the main pivot is potentially as efficient as just a gearbox drivetrain, esp. when you consider that Rohloff and (claimed) Kindernay are more efficient than Pinon already. IDK what it would do to the handling & CoG with the gearbox higher.
  • 6 1
 Only reason I find is the excessive progression of the rear suspension!
  • 3 0
 @SintraFreeride: I would agree if you just look at the overal average, but that curve is interesting. You'll immediately be in the sag position, but once there it will probably be supportive without being wallowy. Reminds me of a trophy truck. I'm witholding judgement until I actually ride it (probably never)
  • 4 0
 I didn't see a weight listed? That may be reason number 1.
  • 1 0
 @alexsin: Sonofagun stole my line.
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: Yeah, but I'm really curious to see how it would feel
  • 2 0
 @powderhoundbrr: 8.38 pounds minus the shock, according to the article
  • 15 0
 “…and then Brage Vestavik came charging into battle riding a Myotragus Dorothea….”

Like something from folklore.
  • 1 0
 @alexsin: Myotragus is still testing and finalizing the details on the Dorothea, maybe they will add one. Looks to be some sort of room
  • 7 3
 @hamncheez: Everyone here complains about drag as if they know what they're talking about, but does anyone actually take this into account when they're buying a bike?

Do they go to the section of the bike stats where it details the drag factor of the drivetrain?

No. Because there isn't one.
  • 2 0
 You forgot named after a goat
  • 4 0
 @excavator666: This bike is clearly aimed at downhill, where pedaling is a minimum. As someone who owns a high pivot gearbox dh bike, the last thing I care about is drag. The suspension capabilities of this type of bike is by far the best aspect.
  • 1 0
 @excavator666: Dude you don't need internet to evaluate drag. Just ride one.
  • 4 1
 @hamncheez: I own one and I can tell you that all of the ignorant hyperbole on here about drag, is exactly that.

@Trevorjones109 100%. I was initially just going to comment "It's a DH bike." I'm just tired of people moaning about gearbox drag, so I decided to moan back.

I assume you own a G1/G2? My dream DH bike. I'm highly jealous.
  • 2 0
 Will someone please explain to me how a travel reducer in a shock changes the ride characteristics? If it doesn’t reduce volume aren’t you just running less sag and bottoming out sooner? Is there more to it?
  • 1 0
 @txcx166: no thats it. Less sag does mean it rides higher in the travel, making all the effective angles slightly less slack. Probably are more subtle change, but then again most flip chips don't change things much either.
  • 1 0
 @excavator666: I've also owned a bike with a pinion gearbox. On a DH bike, sure - no problem. But if you're going to pedal it uphill, the drag is real. There's a good bit more drag than a bike with just an Idler. It's part of the reason I got rid of that bike.
  • 3 0
 @toast2266: hmmm not too sure about that. I own a Zerode Katipo with the 12 speed gearbox and belt drive and I do not feel any more drag than with a regular derailleur setup as I have bikes with both.
  • 2 0
 @road-n-dirt: The data doesn't lie: www.cyclingabout.com/speed-difference-testing-gearbox-systems

TLDR: A pinion gearbox is around 5-6% less efficient than a traditional 1x drivetrain.
  • 1 0
 @toast2266: Add that ilder, losing another 3% with a clean chain.
  • 6 0
 @toast2266: thanks for the link. I watch Cycling About and hadn't seen this particular article.

Firstly I would like to point out that the drag from a gearbox comes from all of the gears being meshed, all of the time.This data is produced using an 18 speed Pinion P18, which has far more gears than you would ever need for MTB riding. and when you consider that, I don't think that a 5% efficiency loss is actually that bad.

I ride a 12 speed, Pinion P12, which has a 600% range and IMO, still too many gears for MTB.

A 9 speed Pinion P9 is the ideal option for MTB IMO. At 568% range, it still blows Eagle out of the water.

It's got half the gears of the tested 18 speed P18, so even if we only half the efficiency loss, that leaves a P9 at 2.5% less efficient than derailleur. That's nothing!

You would think that if anyone was concerned about drag, it would be people like bikepackers, who pedal for exponentially more distance than MTB'ers... and yet, Pinion is a popular option in this discipline.

They're obviously fools though and should take heed of all the drag moaning from the pro marathon riders here on PB.
  • 3 0
 @excavator666: I'm lucky enough to own a Peregrine dh bike. 6 speed pinion, high pivot moto link. It's a riot.
  • 2 0
 @Trevorjones109: Love Peregrines! I always imagine they're a real plough of a bike?

Didn't know Pinion made a 6 speed. I take it that this cursed drag everyone keeps complaining about, must be non-existent? (not that it matters on a DH bike)
  • 2 1
 @toast2266: hahaha yeah on paper but do you really feel 5-6%? if so you probably need to get your fitness up.
  • 2 0
 @road-n-dirt: you can't tell a difference if there's a 5% drag in your drivetrain? You go on a ride with your normal group of friends and all of a sudden you're a minute slower on a 20 minute climb, and you don't notice that? You sound like you're just not very in tune with your bike.
  • 2 0
 @toast2266: so how does that logic work if I climb faster than my friends?
  • 3 0
 @road-n-dirt: same here. If there's any 'more' drag I don't notice it.
  • 2 1
 @toast2266: Nope does not happen. Seems like I'm very in tune with my bike hahaha! Many times I'm one of the first to the top of the climb.
  • 1 0
 Good call - still have a pair of NIC Nucleons I picked up cheap around 15 years ago once the gboxx bubble burst stick rolling and rocking - must have a try on a pinion as they seem to have it nailed and if you legs are up to it you can pedal uphill to a degree
  • 58 2
 Shame that this seems to be everything pinkers want. Oh wait, I don't see bottle cage mounts...
  • 24 3
 Dealbreaker right there
  • 18 4
 Or a place for snacks/weed. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Myotragus is still testing and finalizing the details on the Dorothea, maybe they will add one. Looks to be some sort of room
  • 1 0
 @calcrossland26: 2 and 3rd one for tools please
  • 35 0
 Came for the gearbox, stayed for the scissoring.
  • 22 1
 Jesus Christ, it's Jason Bourne
  • 4 21
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Jan 23, 2023 at 9:31) (Below Threshold)
 Not unless it's an e bike
  • 16 1
 @DoubleCrownAddict: please get banned again
  • 5 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: you already know what's coming....


f*ck off!
  • 20 0
 Please, take my money
  • 2 0
 What a machine!
  • 18 5
 I can't wait for gearboxes to go mainstream on trail bikes (With real shifters, not grip shifters lol). That's when I'll replace my 2018 Intense Primer, and probably not until then.
  • 40 10
 not gonna happen as long as physics apply
  • 19 7
 A grip shifter is a real shifter (SRAM agrees, considering they have a XX1 grip shifter). Not everyone can operate a trigger shifter
  • 16 0
 The year is 2058 and an old man is seen riding a vintage bicycle...
  • 3 0
 @f00bar: I'm sure you're right, but could you elaborate for the less technically knowledgeable amongst us?
  • 7 7
 @Mac1987: weight & drag, inability to shift while pedalling...
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure I see a trigger shifter in that first picture.
  • 6 1
 You can get trigger shifters for the Pinon. However, grip shifters are better than you think. You have to re-learn, but once you do there really isn't much of a disadvantage, and for a gearbox there are a number of advantages, namely you can pretty much shift from your lowest to your highest gear, or vice versa, in a single action and very quickly.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: You probably have to take your finger off the brake to shift though right? Cause that would more or less be a deal breaker for me.
  • 2 0
 @N-60: No, but it does take an adjustment in braking technique. Even with practice you do lose some finesse though. Not really an issue if you're not using a moto setup.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I tried grip shifter for a while because a Niner full sus I bought had it one it. I was constantly accidentally shifting so a dumped it and went to trigger shifting again. Also silly reason I like flanged grips.
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: my biggest issue is i love revgrips haha. probably not compatible.
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: I absolutely loved GS on my XC bike.
  • 4 0
 @f00bar: The unreliablility of conventional derraileurs concerns me much more than any of those.
  • 1 1
 @f00bar: but you reacted to someone that wanted pedal shifters instead of grip shifters on a gearbox bike. What does weight, drag and shifting while pedaling have to do with that?
  • 2 0
 @f00bar: with pedal shifters I meant trigger shifter
  • 5 3
 The Pinion grip shifter is fine, I can shift to an easier gear while braking coming into a corner. Can’t imagine how hard it must be for grip shift whiners to not get their lil pants in a wad when they ride a motorcycle or any other mode of transportation where the transmission is not controlled by thumb a forefinger.
  • 3 0
 @Mac1987: He reacted to someone who wanted gearboxes to go mainstream on trail bikes (as in: bikes that are meant for riding up trails as well as down). This same person also didn't want grip shifters, which confused the issue considerably.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: surely this is what e bikes are for , they have gears in the boxes
  • 2 0
 @mkul7r4 we need to alter your gear shifting method programming.

Grip shifters and gearboxes are an awesome combination. The action is very light and precise and you can change as many gears as you want without pedalling.
  • 1 0
 What it is surprising is they haven't gone for DH bikes ... Could someone explain WHY ?
  • 10 0
 Kudos for regular cable routing and using a gearbox!
  • 8 0
 Apperently my brother in law got one of these from his covid shot or something
  • 5 0
 According to IG pictures you can fit an EFFIGEAR Mimic gearbox there thanks to a "standardized" mounting interface, so you can have better performing 9speed gearbox with trigger shifter.
This is the 1st bike since STRUCTURE.bike that I was looking at for quite a long time studying some interesting details.
  • 1 0
 This is actually an Effigear Gearbox installed on this bike, but with a Pinion crankset
  • 1 0
 @niboreriam: I always thought that Pinion is using their own spline interface on their cranks.
  • 6 0
 Don’t mind a bit of high pivot if sensible, however this looks like a crash would leave you needing some extensive plastic surgery to reattach ball sack
  • 3 1
 You've got a plastic ball sack ?
  • 8 3
 "In their opinion, this doesn’t have any negative effect on how sensitive the suspension is due to the compressive braking forces."
Physics doesn't care about their opinions.
  • 3 1
 Also... that compression curve??? Wtf?!
  • 5 1
 @gabriel-mission9: Love everything about the bike except how insanely progressively it is. Seems it would either be wallowing or impossible to bottom.
  • 11 0
 @gabriel-mission9: yeah who puts mint green text on a black engineering drawing
  • 4 0
 @Jake-Whitehouse: neither. The strong progression at the beginning helps to create an extremely sensitive suspension. The zone from SAG is not that progressive, which should make the suspension travel very well useable, without rushing too quickly through the travel. The steep end progression towards the bottom prevents the suspension from ever bottoming out. Due to the curvy ratio characteristic, however, it can be difficult to quickly tune the shock.
  • 4 0
 @Compositepro: the terrible graphs of the bike industry are so consistent that I’m sure it’s just an inside joke at this point… I really hope it is.
  • 1 0
 @Jake-Whitehouse: then with 200mm you have al in one... Enduro sled plus DH and freeride...
  • 3 0
 If this is where bike design is headed, I'm excited for what I will be riding in a few years time. Sadly I have a feeling it might take a lot long before more mainstream brands head down this road.
  • 2 0
 Love to see the progression of gearbox bikes! If I'm going to spend $10K on a bike I don't want tech from 1895. I absolutely love my Zerode Katipo and won't go back to a traditional drivetrain as long as gearbox bikes are an option.
  • 2 0
 That axle path chart exaggerates the reward movement significantly. Not sure if that was intentional but is misleading at first glance. The horizontal scale is not the same as the vertical.
  • 1 0
 No pedaling in DH? What races have you done where thats whats happening? Maybe turn on the Red Bull TV and watch actual REAL dh reacers and see if they pedal much! Wow, you are in no danger of any podium, unless noone shows up or they dont pedal either!
  • 2 0
 I was just checking out the frame a few months ago, I'd totally buy it. Finally something that checks almost all of my boxes and is not 20 years old (unobtainable).
  • 3 0
 Reminds me of a brooklyn racelink. It doesn't look like something I'd ever want to pedal uphill. Happy to be proven wrong.
  • 2 0
 I want it just for the name. "What kind of bike is that?" Tis the Myotragus Dorothea! Lord of the double black trails!

Like it's straight from Game of Thrones.
  • 4 1
 30 pieces of hardware.... Jesus
  • 3 0
 LOL. it's not even 30! I count 53, and thats just the linkage. simply putting "28" next to the same piece that is used 5 times is not how you get to 30, unless what you actually mean is "30 unique pieces". which is not at all how anyone would logically think about this
  • 3 4
 "Pulling the rear brake will compress the rear suspension, but Myotragus prefers how this characteristic preserves the geometry."

And, not but. "But" implies that you prefer the opposite, that their preference is bad or wrong.
  • 2 3
 The anti-squat is low because the idler is high, exceptionally high even. This made me think though, about something I had not considered before, which is how cool and easy to implement an ajustable idler position would be! Custom anti squat/pedal kickback properties! Hope someone from the bike industry has the same idea!
  • 2 0
 I had thought of an adjustable idler that you could change position like a dropper post. Lower for less pedal kickback/descending and then you push your handlebar switch to raise it (and your anti-squat) for the climb.

You could even route the cable through the headset so PinkBikers could both love it and hate it at the same time!
  • 1 1
 @AJMIAC: I was thinking of custom positioning by screwing in the idler in different mounting points (screw holes), but that idea could be interesting, although complicated, To note though, that an higher idler results in less anti-squat and less pedal kickback. Raising the idler is the equivalent of lowering the main pivot point.
  • 2 0
 @DavidGuerra: don't need anything as complicated as multiple holes - just a couple of different size idlers
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: That can work, but what is less complicated than multiple holes? And needing to have multiple idlers of different sizes, or having to use smaller or larger than optimum idlers is not desirable. That's actually a very convoluted solution. You will still have to disassemble and reassemble the idler... No advantage at all, really.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra - Antisquat at about 100% is exactly as it should be. More and less just makes it wobbly. They've got it spot on.
  • 1 0
 @Namrek: Absolutely not. 130% AS at sag point is about right when the goal is efficient pedalling. Not wobbly at all, just firm. 100% AS is not terrible, but it's not sufficient to compensate for other dynamics. AS needs to be sky high before your pedalling input starts to actually extend the shock and raise your whole body weight. And if you are sitting down that's even less likely to happen.
  • 1 0
 @Namrek: Either way, there is no "spot on" regarding anti-squat, it's a matter of preference between a firm transfer of the pedalling force to the pedals on the one hand, and more traction on rough climbs coupled with less chaingrowth and a more reactive suspension on the other hand. For me 115-120% is about right but plenty of brands are going below 100% at sag for the reasons I mentioned. And then there's a critical factor, which is chainring size. I have used smaller chainrings than I would have preferred to get more AS. Being able to adjust AS through the idler location on a high pivot bike would be awesome.
  • 1 0
 @font style="vertical-align: inherit;">David Guerra /font>: These are all myths imo. Reading technical literature, not bike magazines. Too much antisquat locks up the suspension and other dynamic problems should and can be solved by proper suspension setup, optimized geometry, proper riding style, etc.. I think the suspension should be able to bounce freely and the forementioned dynamic problems should be solved at the cause and not by fighting symptoms in the wrong place.
  • 1 0
 @Namrek: The suspension is able to bounce freely but, unless you are sitting down or manage to pedal very steadily, the movement of the rider's weight will compress the shock and remove a little responsiveness from the pedalling input. That's why it's important for AS to be slightly above 100% for the pedalling to stiffen up the suspension IF the goal is maximum pedalling responsiveness and efficiency. It would be great to experiment with different AS settings on the same bike to come to conclusions about this and totally optimize the riding experience.
  • 1 0
 @Namrek: I can't edit it now, but I must correct my comment about chainring size, which on a bike with an idler makes no difference anyway. Only the idler size and location matters.
  • 1 0
 It looks awesome, looks like I will have to keeps extra idler pulleys and grease on me.
  • 1 1
 if only there was a solution to keep the chain clean?
OR will it come with chain covers to keep it rolling & any need to maintain?
  • 1 0
 Linkage reminds me of the previous generation Yeti Switch, except downside-up.
  • 1 0
 The price performance ratio is also upsidedown compared to the Yeti's and SC's of this world
  • 2 0
 I'll take the Enduro MX, Price and ETA, lol?!
  • 2 0
 MOAT feat. Pliocene welds
  • 2 0
 Looking at closeups on the website and the welds look pretty sloppy especially where the seat stay connects to the linkage. They weld is very ropey and looks ready to fail.
  • 2 0
 Well, this thing's got some 58% progression. What sag are they running?
  • 4 0
 Yea that’s crazy high progression. I thought my RM altitude was progressive
  • 1 0
 Now here's something i'd totally be up for buying if i was in the market for a bike.
  • 4 3
 Dear Gearbox manufactures. Please find another way to shift that does not require a grip shift. Sincerely, Me.
  • 5 0
 This is what I thought until I got on one. The grip shift on my Zerode is awesome, can dump all the gears at once
  • 2 0
 @elitipton: Agreed. The gripshift is really sweet with a pinion. I would much rather have one than a trigger shifter as it would be much harder to dump gears quickly.

With that said, there are after market trigger shifters available.
  • 1 0
 Who need gears on a DH bike?..
If your not racing, its better going singlespeed
  • 1 0
 The gears are very useful if you're not shuttling 100% of the time
  • 1 0
 All the hate unwaranted, I love high pivots and am adicted to double crowns
  • 4 3
 Looks like a…… Zerode G1.
  • 6 7
 PB users: We want gearboxes!
Also PB Users: Errr, I don't like change, it looks weird, I'll stick with a derailleur thanks.
  • 1 0
 So far I see overwhelming praise
  • 9 2
 @Mac1987: Well, I took an early punt (8 comments in) and my gamble did not pay off. I'll take the downvote hit on the chin and cry myself to sleep.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: fair enough. Go big or go home I guess. Unfortunately, today it's home it seems.
  • 2 1
 Trinity mtb is the same, high pivot with a gearbox, just looks nicer imo
  • 1 0
 has that been on the pinkbike yet?
  • 2 0
 @Compositepro: not in its current form.
  • 1 0
 The Trinity makes the Myotragus look like a wheelbarrow @laerz
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: the Gamux Sego is next level
  • 1 0
 @jovesaxa: 4500 CHF without gearbox lol
  • 1 0
 @yoobee: a little out of my price range. $8500 Canadian once I factor duty/taxes, not including shipping. But it's still a beautiful bike.
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: I agree the trinity looks much cleaner.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a gearbox Orange?
  • 1 0
 Which Orange does it look like?
  • 2 0
 @JonnyTheWeasel: rear triangle looks like every Orange as they all look the same..?
  • 2 0
 @wolftwenty1: Some tubes look like some other tubes. Got it.
  • 2 3
 Too bad it it's people powered and will need to be maintained, outside of those two little niggles, it looks like the "perfect" trail bike [heavy sarcasm].
  • 2 1
 the name sounds like some kind of esophageal cancer found only in women...
  • 1 0
 Seems very competitive compared to the Trinity in Australia.
  • 1 0
 Can I make love to the DH version?
  • 2 0
 Isn’t that redundant?
  • 1 0
 Scissoring Linkage - I think I've seen that one
  • 1 0
 why not run it as a 200mm enduro bike? also dam formula nero looks good af
  • 1 1
 Sram will probably sue bc it's not compatible with their universal derail hanger.
  • 1 0
 Whoa. Can I get a regressive spring? haha
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Kavenz VHP 16.
  • 1 0
 What does it weight as shown?
  • 1 0
 Me want
  • 1 1
 We're not in Kansas anymore....
  • 1 1
 SO, its a Capra with diarrhea basically.
  • 1 1
 WOW ! What a innovation .... noooot!
  • 1 1
 Peddles like a (dead) goat
  • 5 6
 just because you can, doesn't mean you should...
  • 4 0
 But sometimes you should
  • 4 3
 @Mac1987: not necessarily if the result looks like this thing
  • 3 4
 Gear boxes are friction boxes
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