The New Craftworks ENR v1.1 High Pivot 160mm Enduro Bike

May 9, 2019
by Craftworks Cycles  
A longer reach with slacker 65deg head angle removable cable ports and tough satin anodised finish make the Craftworks ENR v1.1 an even better bike that it already was

PRESS RELEASE: Craftworks Cycles

When we introduced the Craftworks ENR in 2016, we changed what you could expect from your bike's suspension. Now, in 2019 we're back with the Craftworks ENR V1.1, offering a longer and slacker geometry for more stability, control and speed, without compromising on the most efficient suspension system on the market.

The Craftworks ENR is the world's first accessible all-mountain, 160mm travel enduro bike built on a substantial rearward axle trajectory, with an optimised dynamic stable pedaling platform. What does that even mean?

Well, since it emerged, rear suspension has been designed to let your bike's rear wheel move vertically, allowing it to travel over obstacles. But bikes hit obstacles in a way that actually requires a rearward trajectory of the wheel to achieve the best suspension performance, something that hasn't been available until now for a whole host of reasons.

Featuring our patented i-track suspension, the ENR V1.1 brings you the most planted, responsive, compliant and playful suspension ever produced.

Climb with more confidence, descend with more traction. Have your cake, and eat it too!

Imagine a long travel design that feels just as soft and plush on big hits, as it does on small bumps. A design that allows for a stable pedal platform, without compromising on suspension performance when it really counts, in the rough stuff. These aspects have always been considered mutually exclusive, no one bike could offer good performance across small bump compliance, big hit performance, and pedal efficiency. That is, until now.

The ENR V1.1 offers GREAT performance across all three - we call this "The Trifecta".

But don't just take our word for it, organise a test ride and make up your own mind.

A longer reach with slacker 65deg head angle removable cable ports and tough satin anodised finish make the Craftworks ENR v1.1 an even better bike that it already was


Available in three epic build specifications, or frame-only!

We've taken our build options to the next level, selecting three high-quality build specs to not only perfectly suit the ENR, but also to suit a range of wallet thicknesses.

Spec-I brings incredible value, without compromising on SRAM and Rockshox quality, even coming with NX Eagle 12speed.

Spec-II takes things to a whole new level with a super slick Cane Creek suspension fit out, Formula Cura brakes and GX Eagle.

Spec-III, for those, die-hard Rockshox fans, offers upgraded Rockshox suspension, GX Eagle and SRAM Guide RS brakes.

All our bikes are fitted with Spank cockpit and wheelsets to finish them off because it's the little things that make all the difference to how you feel on your bike!


Not everyone wants their bike built the way we like it, though. That's why we offer Frame-Only options too. Buy the frame and build it up yourself, the way you want it. But just make sure you send us a photo, it kinda makes our day!

Find out more here.


83 Comments

  • + 18
 What a hidden gem! Amped to see this thing on pinkbike, time for it to get the recognition it deserves. That I-Track suspension is something else...
  • + 1
 It wasn't really hidden. I mentioned the Craftworks ENR in the comment section of every article about high pivot trail bikes. Wasn't aware of v1.1 at the time though but v1.0 was already cool enough.
  • - 3
 I can only imagine the drag (and weight) of something like this. Good for Shuttle runs!
  • + 5
 @duzzi: I'm curious how many PB readers have actually pedaled one of these super high pivot bikes. I'm no sprocket scientist, but that chain has gotta go around a lot of corners. There is no way pedaling that thing up a hill isn't sort of a drag....pun intended.
  • + 3
 @WhiteroomGuardian:

I've spent a bit of time on the 1.0 for the review in NZ Mountain Biker Mag. I didn't really notice any drag in the drivetrain over any other trail bike with a full guide, and the performance of the suspension when pedalling is so dialled that I'd be choosing it for climbing big technical climbs over any other bike north of 130mm, personally.

I've got the 1.1 arriving in the post in the next few days. My biggest gripe about the 1.0 is that it wasn't long or slack enough. The 1.1 in large looks perfect. I'm excited.
  • + 3
 @WhiteroomGuardian: @Jenk0s seems to go alright on his. Hardly any drag.
  • + 14
 I went to the Craftworks website and learned that they’re in Australia. I read the article again, this time with the Ozzy Man Reviews voice. Fantastic!
  • + 13
 Not a single non drive side pic? I want to figure out how this linkage works without a chainring blocking all the guts to it.
  • + 1
 Follow the link to their website
  • + 5
 Probably the shortest chainstay I´ve ever seen. Miles of chain...stopped to believe just after that MKT sentence "performance across small bump compliance, big hit performance, and pedal efficiency"
  • + 10
 The chainstay length should grow a bit when sagged in and will get longer as the suspension compresses further.
  • + 1
 @SonofBovril: yep I am aware of that. It just looks to me like it is about to flip back when you sit and spin the cranks
  • + 3
 @SonofBovril: sorry. Down voted you by accident. It will grow. This is the nature of this design. So 418mm is not a very meaningful number here as the axle path is much different from the usual one.
  • + 2
 Looks like it's not fit a rear muddy tyre
  • + 2
 @zede: Fits Minion DHR II. So it's fine for me.
  • + 3
 @zede: It'll fit the tyre, just not the mud.
  • + 1
 @glasvagas: True Frown . Ausies didn't figure that one out.
  • + 3
 Yo riders I was lucky enough to ride one a few weeks
Ago in Adelaide and what a bike! It’s not a pig at all pedals really well and almost zero bob when peddling out of the saddle! Check out my review here

youtu.be/6_TVEFwOAvQ
  • + 1
 I’ve ridden one too - Evolution Cycles bring them into the U.K. really good machines and you don’t really notice any drag. No more than the addition from a clutch mech anyway!
  • + 6
 Thats very cool but I wonder about friction. An idler and a lower chain guide...
  • + 1
 Friction is a non issue. The noise is. I wander just how much in this case.
  • - 1
 Well the issue I see is more with the lower chain guide... Would'nt it strech the derailleur beyond it's capacity at full travel if the chain is on one of the larger cogs?
  • + 1
 @jrouellet: thats called sizing your chain properly. if anything itll reduce the effect of chain growth as the suspension cycles through the travel, so its better to have it than not, plus you wouldnt get enough chain wrap round the chainring without it.
  • + 11
 if it's making noise then there's friction
  • + 3
 The friction isn't noticeable and it's pretty quiet. I rode one for a week or so, that had already had a good amount of miles through the drivetrain. The lower guide reduces the chain growth on the bottom side of the drivetrain and helps save your derailleur clutch. Derailleur works fine over the full cassette, just like any other bike.
  • + 5
 The big 'S' is going to sue them for using "works" in their name. Better get this bike while you still can.
  • + 1
 Crafty has been around since the mid 90’s with the same name, hasn’t been an issue yet.
  • + 3
 Yeah, cool to something new from you again! It is good for people to realize that you were doing a high pivot trail/enduro bike well before that Druid bike came around. Cheers!
  • + 4
 Sick bike. Just finished building mine up. Way less fatigued at the end of runs. Beating prs with much less effort up and down. One of my favourite bikes.
  • + 1
 "Well since it emerged, rear suspension has been designed to allow the bikes rear wheel to move vertically, allowing it to go over obstacles. But bikes hit obstacles in a way that actually requires a rearward trajectory of the wheel to achieve the best suspension performance, something that hasn't been available until now...." Seems to me I read the same pitch 20 years ago in MBA about the original VPP suspension. RC, what say you?
  • + 1
 Not to rain on their parade but my diamondback and every santa cruz with VPP are doing this already. Unless their goal is some really extreme rearward axle path, then they may have something unique on their hands.
  • + 1
 Don't worry, you're not raining on anyone's parade. VPP bikes don't do that. Here's a quote from Santa Cruz's website:

"unfortunately, describing an axle path as "vertical", the classic "near-vertical", "s-shaped", or "rearward", is an over-simplification of the suspension system.

It's also dead wrong. Santa Cruz once published a postcard showing the axle path of the original V10 as being "S-shaped". It was misleading and technically incorrect, and we apologize."



Bikes with a normal drivetrain all have a very similar wheel path - they have to, they're limited by where the chain is. They're very very slightly rearward for the first bit of travel (think 2mm total over maybe 50mm of travel), then the wheel starts to move forward. At bottom out, the wheel is invariably in front of where it started. This includes VPP.

The Craftworks is substantially different, with a very rearward wheel path. Almost 50mm total. It rides very differently to a standard drivetrain bike.
  • + 1
 @AgrAde: Oh ok. Sounds like these guys have something special then.
  • + 4
 Looks like they hired that Atherton graphic's team.
  • + 1
 Funny these bikes were around well before the Athertons...
  • + 1
 These are really well priced in Aus. I’ve got no idea what it adds up to in the Northern hemisphere. But it’s a very cool bike from a small company that have been doing high pivots longer than most!
  • + 1
 Comes out really well. $1,700 ish in USD . For comparison, a Trek slash al frame with shock is 2199 usd.
  • + 1
 @usedbikestuff:
$1700?? When you go to their site it says $2500 for frame only in usd. And the cheapest built is $5300.
  • + 1
 Never mind. I'm a mo mo. I thought because I had the US flag selected it was showing the price in usd. It is $1700 usd for the frame. Why even give the choice of country selection if it's not changing anything on the site?
  • + 2
 @Fishonshawn: I mean the bike design and suspension is pretty cool so i'll give em a pass on web design.
  • + 2
 Question. How deep the seat post may go? Is it another frame for 125mm only?
  • + 1
 one of the most important and unanswered questions in the bike geometry table!
  • + 1
 I'm 180cm tall with normal proportions and a 150mm KS slammed against the bottom of the insertion depth in the large 1.0 frame was the right height for me. Definitely worth paying attention to if you want a large drop or if you have short legs.
  • + 1
 Zerode ??? 'something that hasn't been available until now for a whole host of reasons'.
  • + 1
 I can't get used to the look of the high idler. I think it is the lack of chain wrap on the chain ring.
  • + 1
 serious question - what's the point of the high pivot if it is not really on the pivot?
  • + 2
 It doesn't have to be directly on the pivot to make a difference.
  • + 1
 It's off the pivot cause to allow the anti-squat to remain high as the suspension compresses. On other high pivot designs the anti-squat falls as the suspension compresses.
  • + 2
 That QR lever on the fork! I can't look away!
  • + 1
 C'mon, using the same hash tags is one thing, but another "trifecta"? A little creativity, plz!
  • + 2
 of you live anywhere where theres mud, count this out
  • + 2
 Was this photo taken at ohalloran hill?
  • + 1
 yep
  • + 0
 I wonder now that Sam Hill is on a 29er if all the AU bike companies going to begin pimping the wagon wheelers thus making this rig outdated already?
  • + 1
 I heard that a good scoop of "The Trifecta" 3x a day helps a lot with diarrhea.
  • + 1
 Never mind. I see its 27.5
  • + 1
 Aint nobody gonna say anything about the front QR?!
  • + 1
 Where is Chris Wildman Dimbill?
  • + 2
 Hardtail rules
  • + 2
 no xl?
  • + 2
 A tiny reach and a low stack rules me out until they get XL into their game.
  • + 1
 I was looking at their website a few months ago wondering if they were still around, a friend had a rail hardtail and a frm and 208 way back in the day before they disappeared for a while. Would be nice to see an xl but like a lot of small companies out there, it would be hard to have a lot of stock on the shelves.. I don't think I could ever go back to a large frame now
  • + 1
 @jazzawil: yeah I need a 500mm reach before I'd even contemplate it.
  • + 1
 We’ll see if it can dethrone the mighty Canfield Balance...
  • + 0
 Only baby sizes, I would be interested if they had a real XL with 29er wheels, could live with less travel.
  • + 1
 Sounds like the druid is more your style, but I don't think they have an XL out yet either...
  • + 1
 too high
  • - 2
 Frame looks so damn good, never seen a short travel high pivot before. The name need to be in smaller graphics or do something with design of name on frame or something.
  • + 4
 160mm is short travel now? If you want it short go and see:

pinkbike.com/news/review-forbiddens-druid-high-pivot-trail-bike.html
  • + 1
 @goroncy:
While it does have 160mm of travel it pedals better than bikes with far less travel and is by far the best pedaling bike I have ridden.
  • - 1
 Not entirely convinced a Sram GX/NX build can be accurately described as 'epic'
  • + 1
 holy chain growth batman
  • + 1
 Not much upper
  • + 1
 I think as the upper pivot aligns the chainline gets more direct, compensating for any chainring without influencing pedaling. I look forward to seeing a video of the suspension compressing.
  • + 1
 @taletotell: its on their website hence my comment
  • + 1
 @poah: and the pedal kickback...holy pedal kickback or something, batman, or any other bat type you wish to identify as...
  • + 1
 @handynzl: the bike is in a bigger gear and rolling backwards in the video
  • + 0
 @kleinblake: Um, it's not moving backwards. The BB returns to the same spot. The rear wheel moves backwards as this is how the suspension works. Meanwhile the crank rotates upwards, known as pedal kick back, because of the chain needing to grow and the distance between the crank ring and idler grows considerably. Now, it has to be said that all FS bikes have kick back, some more than others, but this is one of the most kick backs I've seen. Once you put a person on those pedals and their weight counters the kick back, the suspension action is then compromised. This is why kick back is tried to be designed out for the most part. That said, several people above have said that the bike rides rather well, so it could be a case that it could ride even better. It is a novel approach and I appreciate the engineers efforts. I would imagine that in the coming future that the system will be further refined.
  • + 1
 @handynzl: I know what pedal kick is, Ive ridden a banshee legend. you can literally see the rear wheel rolling backwards in the video during compression because they’re holding the front brake.
  • + 1
 Is this a 29er or 27.5?
  • + 0
 They tryna snag a tree with all that extra cable hanging out the front?

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