The Pinkbike Podcast: Episode 44 - Mountain Bike Suspension Decoded

Jan 29, 2021
by Mike Levy  
Art by Taj Mihelich.


Mountain bike suspension can offer impressive performance and adjustability, and you can even get it in a package that's been optimized to within a few grams of its life. In other words, things are pretty damn good... But we still have questions. So many questions. Good thing we have Chris Mandell from RockShox in to answer some of them. Like, why the heck do service intervals seem so short? Do we really need all those dials and knobs? Why are creaky CSUs still a thing? Who's faster: Kazimer or Levy? And once and for all, should you do air or coil?

If you have questions about suspension, today's podcast might have some answers for you.




THE PINKBIKE PODCAST // EPISODE 44 - MOUNTAIN BIKE SUSPENSION DECODED
January 28, 2021

Moar shimz, please.


Hosted by Mike Levy (usually) and featuring a rotating cast of the editorial team and other guests, the Pinkbike Podcast is a weekly update on all the latest stories from around the world of mountain biking, as well as some frank discussion about tech, racing, and everything in between.





Previous Pinkbike Podcasts
Episode 1 - Why Are Bikes So Expensive?
Episode 2 - Where the Hell is the Grim Donut?
Episode 3 - Pond Beaver Tech
Episode 4 - Why is Every Bike a Trail Bike?
Episode 5 - Can You Trust Bike Reviews?
Episode 6 - Over Biked Or Under Biked?
Episode 7 - Wild Project Bikes
Episode 8 - Do We Need an Even Larger Wheel Size?
Episode 9 - Why Are We Doing a Cross-Country Field Test?
Episode 10 - Getting Nerdy About Bike Setup
Episode 11 - Are We Going Racing This Year?
Episode 12 - What's the Future of Bike Shops?
Episode 13 - Are Bikes Too Regular Now?
Episode 14 - What Bikes Would Pinkbike Editors Buy?
Episode 15 - What's Holding Mountain Biking Back?
Episode 16 - Who's Your Mountain Biking Hero?
Episode 17 - XC Field Test Insider
Episode 18 - Electronics on your Mountain Bike: Good or Bad?
Episode 19 - The Hardtail Episode
Episode 20 - MTB Conspiracy Theories
Episode 21 - Stuff We Were Wrong About
Episode 22 - Does Your Riding Style Match Your Personality?
Episode 23 - Grim Donut 2 is Live!
Episode 24 - Why Even Buy a DH Bike?
Episode 25 - Fall Field Test Preview
Episode 26 - The Three Most Important Mountain Bikes
Episode 27 - The World Champs Special
Episode 28 - All About Women's Bikes
Episode 29 - Freeride or Die
Episode 30 - Would You Rather?
Episode 31 - Wet Weather Riding Tips & Tricks
Episode 32 - What Needs to Change in the Bike Industry?
Episode 33 - Behind the Scenes at Pinkbike Academy
Episode 34 - Grilling Levy About Field Test Trail Bikes (and His Bonspiel)
Episode 35 - Story Time - Stranger Than Fiction
Episode 36 - Grilling Kazimer about Field Test Enduro Bikes
Episode 37 - The 2020 Privateer Season with Ben Cathro
Episode 38 - Editors Defend Their 2020 Best-Of Picks
Episode 39 - Predicting the Future of Mountain Biking
Episode 41 - The Pinkbike Awards!
Episode 42 - Racing Rumours and Team Changes
Episode 43 - Dangerholm's Wildest Custom Mountain Bikes


136 Comments

  • 45 2
 Just me .02 but I feel bike shops should be more responsible for setting up bikes correctly for customers. People walk into a shop and drop 3-6k on a full suspension bike and the shop sends it out the door and says “enjoy” with no suspension set up. This is not every shop but most shops. Only a seasoned rider has the knowledge to set there bike up properly and like me enjoy it do it. (I am a suspension nerd) With all the new riders entering the sport with a high end bike, and now these e-bike things, there is a lot of preventable negative experiences with a simple suspension set up. At the very least, the shop needs to set sag and put them in a decent damper adjustment to get them going. Thought?
  • 5 1
 Read this comment and then watched the fails. Always seems like people never setup the rear suspension correctly, which leads to crashing.
  • 5 10
flag DAN-ROCKS (Jan 29, 2021 at 7:28) (Below Threshold)
 I always set sag to my weight with my builds, i weigh like 150, so its a good starting point. I set rebound too so they don't get bucked. But really, beyond those adjustments, it's one of the responsibilities they are taking on with that price point. If they come in with a dirty poorly maintained drivetrain and they are upset they have to spend a bunch to replace it, thats just as bad as not doing anything to your suspension and being upset that it wasn't set up perfectly.
  • 20 1
 @schlockinz: I think its more rider error. They don't get bucked because they're suspension isn't tuned properly. They get bucked because they suck.
  • 3 1
 Totally agree, I'm not a beginner but sometimes I still struggle and don't want to spend hours and hours of ride time setting up suspension. The fork on my new 4k bike was setup by a shop employee and was so far off it was dangerous, super high pogo rebound, tons of compression damping. A person new to the sport might've ridden it that way for a long time, and just thought mtb sucks with sore hands, or gotten flung over the bars on their first jump. I think if shops want to compete with the direct to consumer brands, going the extra mile will keep customers loyal and smiling.
  • 18 5
 First of all, there is an excellent chance that the hack that happens to work at shop part time, who sold you that bike has no more knowledge about suspension than I do about quantum mechanics.

Second, do you want them to be responsible for you knowing how to ride it too?

Google gets 4 million plus hits when you type "mountain bike suspension setup". The info is out there, in as simplified terms as you want.
If someone is dumb enough to shell out big bucks to get high end suspension with a lot of adjustment, but are not inclined to use it properly...that's on them.
  • 2 0
 red bike In edmonton does this. Mud sweat and gears in west end edmonton does this. They are great shops!!
  • 5 0
 @ReformedRoadie: I disagree, partly. I think the issue is a lot of people who are completely new to biking don't necessarily understand that they need to setup their suspension. I mean if they know nothing about biking, they might just assume it's like a car or similar, it comes setup from the factory. I think if they buy it from a shop the shop should, at the very least, tell them they to go the manufacturers website and follow the instructions. Maybe pointing out the where to add air, some of the dial locations and such would help too.
  • 8 0
 Couple schools of thought here.
1. Most new riders, do not have the experience, and are fairly overwhelmed by riding off road upright, changing gears, etc, and most of the time spent on suspension setup is lost time in the excitement of a new bike purchase.

2. Without that knowledge and experience, a base setup is really all that you’re going to be able to accomplish.

3. My belief is that experience is the best teacher, and the quickest, teach a man to fish and all that. futzing with your own stuff helps you learn how these things work, and the effect they have. On top of, riding style changes, different terrain, different bikes, all require new and different changes to your setup to get the most out it.

4. In my experience (obviously antidotal) at all the shops I worked at we did a basic suspension setup to all bikes at time of build. It’s a one size fits all approach obviously, but it helps sell bikes. More advanced setup/tuning was a value added service, that we sold as a package (could be thrown in to make a sale). Again, I’m not sure how valuable this is to new riders, without that experience.

5. I honestly believe most people aren’t really interested, I’d wager that most people are “set and forget”, they could, and most of the time do, have all the settings in the world, and either dont notice, or cant be bothered to worry about it.

Good shops will provide good service, there is a cost associated to it, and not everyone wants to pay for that, direct to market bikes a real good example of that.
  • 1 0
 Most bike companies have a suspension set up guide and all the shops in my area to the best of my knowledge will ask you your weight and set the suspension to whatever the guide spits out. I don't think I've seen a shop in a long time that won't do that minimum amount. Those guides are all pretty close these days too from my experience.
  • 1 0
 @kcy4130: setting it up for them and directing them to Rockshox,com or RideFox.com are two different things.
I don't see how the shop could really do more than maybe set sag, or pump the shock/fork to recommended pressures for their weight.
  • 17 0
 A lot of suspension and bike brands have online setup guides that help, but I think that comes down more to bike shop culture than anything else. Yes, there are plenty of great shops who know the things and can teach people, but it seems to me like a lot of LBS employees aren't prepared to supply that kind of advice, be it due to lack of knowledge (seasonal employees, most not sticking around for years and years, etc) or lack of time.
  • 2 1
 @m33pm33p: yeah true, but theres no doubt that having rebound too fast bucks you. Basically if ur rebound is set right and you're getting bucked you can't blame me at the shop.
  • 7 3
 When I spend 60k on a new suv the dealership never offers to set my seat the correct distance from the steering wheel and peddles.
  • 1 3
 @schlockinz: I agree 100%. Watching the fail videos I always feel like it’s a lot to do with set up. Skill plays a huge factor but if the suspension set up is wrong, the bike won’t take impacts or track and cause crashes.
  • 7 3
 @king-joe: dumb comparison. The car leaves the factory set up properly. A bike does not. Nice try.
  • 3 0
 As a tech at a high end MTB shop, I agree. We always do this.
  • 4 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: if a brick and mortar bike shop isn’t offering some suspension set up personalization and making sure a new rider knows how to clean a drivetrain, what value is being offered above just ordering online?

That’s your value advantage not a hindrance to picking the shop Spotify playlist.
  • 5 0
 @king-joe: false equivalency the car manufacturer have the suspension already set up for you. Steering wheel to pedals (peddles?) is akin to setting seat height.

However, the dealership better show you where all the bells and whistles are and where the switches for those bells and whistles are. This is quite literally the only value a dealership could offer over just ordering cars direct from the manufacturer.
  • 1 1
 Bike shops should be more responsible. Full stop.
  • 17 0
 @49thbiker: We definitely need to do a bike shop podcast. Kaz and I have two decades working in shops between us, so it's something that's close to our hearts.
  • 1 0
 @Starsky686: yeah my analogy was trash. I mean I do tell ppl how to clean the drivetrain with every sale but explaining suspension takes a long time and I can't really do that in the time they are in the shop. If they come in and want me to change something I will help them, but after the baseline setup they have to ride it and figure it out any other changes they want.
  • 1 0
 @king-joe: Most people don't have a clue how to set that up properly either.
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: You touch on this in comment above. Seems to come down to lack of knowledge or lack of communication or both. I would say the number one factor is the shitty pay.
  • 2 1
 @mikelevy: LBS have the potential to win back some of the online/direct shoppers if they were to capitalize on this issue. Provide something direct sales and net can not. Exceptional service. I’m sure a lot of dentists would be happy to buy their Yeti bikes from a LBS if they were shown how to set up sag, rebound and load it onto their Porsche, BMW and/or Tesla. Again, just my .02
  • 1 0
 100% Agree. To their credit, I'll send a shout-out to Spokesman Bicycles in Santa Cruz, CA. I just picked up a new Ripmo a week or so ago, they took a few measurements from me and the benchmark suspension set up on my bike was nearly flawless, a bit less air pressure and some rebound tweaks was all I really needed to dial it all in.
  • 1 0
 @m33pm33p: they all remind me of people trying seat bounce on dirt bikes when they have no idea what they are doing.
  • 2 0
 @gorideyourbikeman: eff yes! I'm a big MSG fan.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: this is why you buy a bike in the winter. You get the good guys! And you already did a bike shop podcast
  • 1 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: I wouldn’t expect a two day course on leverage curves and kinematics. Just proper psi based on the customer weight and a quick mention of rebound or compression. You’re probably doing that, I’ve never had a bike shop that didn’t. I think the tone of your comment just sounded fed up and wasn’t actually representative of your services.
  • 2 0
 @arsnic360: That guy's Ibis would have totally done the work if his suspension was set up properly.
  • 27 0
 The relationship I have with my suspension has its ups and downs. Things get pressured when we hit rock bottom.
  • 7 1
 wow. sounds like you have an extra volume of problems with your relationship. Maybe you just need to flip the switch and be firm.
  • 2 0
 Just need to ramp up your true feelings.
  • 15 0
 What is "cerviss inturvle"?

Also, patenting graduations on a shaft? Isn't that just a tube-shaped ruler? I can't see how that's ok.
  • 4 0
 its also not useful and like come on its practical just be nice and let others do it
@rockshox plz fix
  • 1 0
 @timotheysski: every company needs money
  • 1 0
 service interval is the amount of time between each maintenance of the shock.
  • 1 0
 service interval, like the guy above me said, the amount of time (interval) between services
  • 6 3
 @DAN-ROCKS: How much did they make from this patent? Zero, because no sane people would pay licence for a ruler and no customer will choose their products because they have one. They are simply dicks.
  • 1 1
 @lkubica: i agree but then again business is business and i get that they did that
  • 3 3
 @lkubica: no. They pay to have a patent. It is like paying to have an advantage over other companies. They don't want other companies stealing their good idea so they put a patent on it. It's just business, its not being a jerk.
  • 3 2
 I know what a frigging service interval is, l just don't adhere to them and have never had a shock serviced in 24 years of full sus action despite being on my current RP2 for the last 12 years. Christ, I have just had to explain a joke Frown
  • 16 0
 This guy fairly successfully evaded nearly every question.
  • 6 0
 The spin is strong in him!
  • 3 0
 Mandela is NOT from Bellingham either!
  • 1 0
 I would love to hear Hambini's comments on this podcast.
  • 11 0
 A few days ago I watched 21 Jump Street, and I can't get over the Jonah Hill - Mike Levy resemblance. I have only love for both guys, but every time I see this scene I can't help but think, is Levy the real Grim Shady?https://images.app.goo.gl/iDJoYmbP39TzYb1u7
  • 1 1
 Would the real grim shady please stand up?
  • 7 0
 I should find a photo from the early 2000s when I have bleached blonde hair like Jonah does in that photo haha
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: Come on Mr. Levy, you know us Pinkers need to see that!
  • 27 0
 They're definitely related. www.pinkbike.com/photo/4813746
  • 15 0
 @mikekazimer: That's worth banning you
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Whoa...who is that guy???
  • 11 0
 I love the Pinkbike podcast, it keeps me happy at work. If you could make an 8 hour long episode and release it everyday that'd be great, thanksssssss
  • 2 0
 I was just going to say something similar. 2 hours into my day and it’s been an absolute shit show. Seeing this episode pop up in my notifications helped a bunch and I’m excited to take a listen! Keep doing what you guys are doing
  • 12 0
 Should I just live stream from my shop all day? Probably not a good idea tbh
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: no, I can definitely see it. 8 hour livestreams every day of Levy on his Zwift training to beat Kaz in Mike vs Mike.
  • 8 0
 Way to dodge the creaky CSU question: "Yeah, we don't have a problem with that...but if we did we'll take care of you".

To be fair, RS has taken care of my creaky CSUs, but they certainly still have issues with that (as do others I suppose).
  • 2 0
 Yup - My lyrik developed a creaky CSU 2 weeks into ownership this year. The time frame to get it fixed (not really RS problem due to supply chain) - 6 months. 6 months where if I hadn't just bought a new fork I would be without a bike.
  • 1 0
 @skiandmtbdirtbag: Yeah, it's insane. A couple of years back I waited 3 months for a creaky 36 to come back, during peak riding season! It was insane. Ended up buying a new fork and selling the 36 when it came back.
  • 6 1
 Hhmm, I wouldn't call that dodging. In my experience, RockShox has a very good track record when it comes to CSU noise. The question for Chris was intended to be more general, as in: Why is it challenging to make CSUs in general Smile
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: but he didn't answer the question...

Levy: why is it hard to make CSUs that don't creak?

Chris (paraphrasing): it's not, we have it locked down.

In my experience (3 RS forks in the last 3 years) this simply isn't the case. Maybe I'm unlucky, but I don't think so.
  • 2 0
 @aribr: We touched on it a bit; there's a lot of leverage going on there, and two different joints to deal with. Going to a one-piece crown-steerer could present some new alignment issues, too.
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: Very true.

However, regarding the one-piece CSU, Chris clearly states that their current paradigm results in a "light-weight, affordable, cost-effective product"...basically, fancy words used to say it is too expensive, which is a shame, because I also believe that this would solve a lot of issues.
  • 1 0
 @aribr: I'm not sure it's only down to it being too expensive. I mean, X-Fusion used to do one-piece crown and steerers...
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: Man if x-fusion can get those tolerances tight enough...then surely RS can too? I still think it has to do with the margins. Speaking of X-fusion, what happened to the REVEL-X?
  • 3 0
 @aribr: I don't think I've ever had a creaky RockShox CSU, to be honest, not that they don't ever but I think RockShox is pretty good on this front. But definitely had creaky CSUs from others. Not sure if one-piece CSUs kept X-Fusion foks from creaking at the crown/stanchions, though. Or if that's more common than creaking at the crown/steerer.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: Well me being 220 lbs might have something to do with those damn creaks! Good point regarding the interface, most of my creaky forks have creaked at the crown stanchion interface something that no one-piece crown will fix. There is a rumor that all major guys press stanchions in dry (again, saving money), which surely can't be optimal.
  • 1 0
 @aribr: Ohlins is the answer to all your problems.
  • 8 1
 Conclusion: Rockshox not willing to challenge the status quo or push things forward.
Chris Mandell is a master of spin up he has a career in Politics whenever he leaves Rockshox.
  • 5 0
 Have an upvote for your excellent summary. Pet peeve: going on about how "geeky" a discussion is, particularly when there is almost no technical detail beyond the basic user-level stuff.
  • 3 0
 @dirtyburger: So many w@nk words and no technical substance. Pure marketering w@nkery.
  • 5 0
 Darren Murphy of Push did a great podcast on Vital and he said the concept of setting up to "get full travel" is old school and you should NOT do that. In fact, he said, "if you're getting full travel you're probably not set up correctly". He said set your sag and from there just set your susp up to "feel the way you want it to feel" and for the "bike to ride/handle the way you want it to". Super interesting IMO.
  • 2 0
 Similar to Chris Porters take on setting up the bike to suit the rider rather than the other way around.
  • 5 0
 This was another great episode. BUT industry types are always better once they are out of the industry. Most of what this guy said can be found in press releases. You never get the good info until they have moved onto something else.
  • 4 0
 1) the most important setting is sag 2) set sag in a super-repeatable method *** except with the amount of stiction on even some high-end forks, the error in making this measurement can be very large. That's without taking into account bushing break-in through the first weeks and months of getting a new fork. All the marketing and social/peer messages tell people single clicks on the damper adjustments are something that will change your ride, when these sometimes tiny adjustments are riding on top of a giant source of possible variability/error.
  • 4 0
 Pinkbike guys asks: What is up with Metric?
Suspension Marketing: Goes on about Trunnion
Pinkbike guys: goes on to the next question, not even trying to address the awkward issue.

Trunnion mount makes sense. Converting from one type of units to another does not make that much sense. It is essentially a standard change which causes irritation just like the different axle diameters on Shimano and SRAM Cranksets. I mean, even in the sensible metric(sorry, but not sorry!) world we still buy our car rims in inch measurements.
  • 7 0
 He dodged the 20mm axle question pretty spectacularly.
  • 2 1
 Holding on to my 36 with bolt on (floating?) axle for the foreseeable future
  • 7 0
 He did a lot of spinastics in this interview. Great PR guy!
  • 2 0
 IIRC RockShox would have stuck with 20mm but had their hand forced by Fox and Shimano pushing 15mm?
  • 3 0
 The answer to the Sprindex question was a total bs. For once, RS have the most basic springs out there. They are also pretty random when it comes to claimed force. Not to mention the coating which looks like a cheap paint from a store. And springs with 50lb steps are a joke really. So to sum up - Sprindex is miles better. I have 2 RS springs, a Sprindex and Ext spring.
  • 8 0
 /ˈstan(t)SH(ə)n/
  • 12 0
 Stank-shun.
  • 3 0
 One thing I would have asked is, what's the difference in damping quality between entry-level, mid-range and top-end versions of the same rear shock?
In years past it seemed you'd get a better shim-stack in the higher end models, as well as a 3-pos switch.
I wonder if it's still the same now? Or is it just more external adjustments on the better models?
  • 6 0
 Yall should talk to steve from vorsprung suspension. He is a tuning god.
  • 4 0
 I think Vital did something with them. I would love to see more from the good, but not common OEM supplier suspensions like DVO, Manitou, MRP, CC, etc...
  • 3 0
 Inside line podcast had a great one with Darren Murphy from Push
  • 2 0
 @BamaBiscuits: Yeah that one was fun.
  • 3 0
 @BamaBiscuits: Yes, I listened to that! It was super interesting. Darren from Push says you should NOT worry about full travel. Just set up and ride to desired feel.
  • 2 0
 @mybaben: The tip about setting your bike upside for a few minutes before you ride is something I do every time now. Just makes sense when you think about it
  • 1 0
 @jmhills: That's a great tip. I actually hang my bikes from the wall on hooks, so the front wheel is up for long periods of time anyway. Because of that I don't worry about it too much at the trail, but if I stored my bikes flat on the ground, I would def flip it upside down at the trail for a few!
  • 3 0
 @mybaben: Haha I do the same thing. As a bonus I know I need a lower leg service when oil is leaking down the stanchions!
  • 2 0
 I think the recommended fork sag % is usally too much and I think the saying 'use all the travel'is wrong too. I'd say sag should be set with the rear wheel up on a brick and the rider is in the lean forward attack position which puts alot more weight on the fork, adjust spring/air sag % in this position. People are blowing through fork travel at high sag %.
  • 1 0
 technically it should be set up with the fork at a 90 degree angle to the ground, but really it is hard to replicate this. Technically sag should be measured from the wheel too, but it doesn't really matter as long as the way youre setting ur spring is consistent.
  • 5 1
 Thanks a lot for patenting the travel indicators on your stanchions, so no one else can do something which is super helpful to riders Rockshox. Jerks.
  • 2 0
 Not jerks at all. The reality is it was novel and really gives the fork an advantage over the competition when setting up. This is exactly why its a great and worthy patent.
  • 2 1
 @IMeasureStuff: Yes, but that is from the RS point of view. From the MTB community POV, it would be super helpful if others could employ such a simple and useful tool/feature. So in that way it's somewhat punitive. Frown
  • 3 0
 @mybaben: perhaps those markers have some blame for how RS backstepped from high negative air volume because people were concerned about not getting the full advertised travel amount.

Speaking of patents, is Knolly keeping other brands from connecting the seat tube to the down tube? Never really understood that lawsuit against Intense.
  • 4 0
 I appreciate the effort put into this podcast but he practically avoided every question to the point of annoyance, wasn't really worth putting out in an unedited form
  • 2 0
 Mikes; *asks question people might want to know an answer to*
Chris; "That's an excellent question, please allow me to ignore it and talk about something else".
Chris is clearly an experienced PR guy Wink
Super interesting talk though.
  • 4 0
 If anyone needs help making their suspension feel worse, I seem to be really good at it and I can help you out.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy @mikekazimer haven't yet listened to the latest podcast but clicking on one of Dave Rome's links regarding Wireless Dura-ace on CT led me to stumbling across this... fccid.io/C9O-FSMB2 wireless suspension now?! argh!?!?!?!
  • 1 0
 just listened, seems like he was holding back..... built in ShockWiz. When something retrofitty just looks fitty.
  • 2 0
 I’ll gladly take the “incremental” changes that improve a pre-existing chassis over the course of 5-10 years over a whole new fork.
  • 3 0
 I always been curious if a "M" tune from Rockfox is the same as an "M" tune from Foxrocks
  • 5 0
 It isn't Smile
  • 3 0
 Steve from Vorsprung would be amazing to have on. Or the avalanche guy
  • 1 0
 fccid.io/C9O-RSMB1 rear shocks too...*fist pounding desk whilst shouting WWWHHHHHYYYYYYYYYY*. But actually crying because I won't be able to afford it.
  • 1 0
 Loving these episodes that have guests! Episodes 8, 35, and 44 have been the best by far!
  • 2 0
 More to come! Anyone you want to hear specifically?
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: Tippie and Rob Warner!!
  • 8 1
 @mikelevy: Dave weagle ????????‍♂️
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy:
Remy. All the Remy. I want a coupon code that lets me ride steep slabs.

How about industry folks from Rocky, Banshee or Norco to talk geo and if they’re going to give you royalties when they copy the Grim Donut?

Vorsprung for some more suspension talk?
  • 6 1
 @mikelevy: jordie cortes
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: Martin Whiteley to talk DH racing and the economics thereof.
Nico Vouilloz to recall his racing career and geek out on bike geo / setup (that might need a few instalments).
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy IMBA. Should give 'em a chance to explain themselves. Perhaps get comments from mtn bike associations/chapters, like CORBA, Evergreen MTB Alliance, etc.
  • 1 0
 Adding names to the list!
  • 2 0
 Just make sure the audio for guests sorted
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: Chris Porter
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: Anne Caroline Chausson, Missy Giove, John Tomac
  • 1 0
 @Varaxis: Great idea! I'd be psyched to see more advocacy focused content on the podcast. Just to be crystal clear, Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance is NOT an IMBA chapter. @mikelevy hit is up if you want to have Evergreen on!
  • 1 0
 Never get too attached to one style of suspension design; most of them are on the rebound.
  • 1 0
 ... and submitted literally 2 days after release of this podcast.... hrrrmmmm suspicious.
  • 1 0
 Excellent episode, kudos to the presenters. No beating around the bush, just solid information.
  • 4 2
 Truly shocking episode
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy Pinkers.... lol
  • 2 2
 MY favorite pick for suspension would have to be Ohlins
  • 3 0
 or Chris Porter.
  • 2 1
 @fartymarty: there are many Chris Porter interviews online, mainly British
  • 1 2
 yo
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