Cane Creek's New DBinline Shock - First Ride

May 19, 2014
by Mike Levy  
Cane Creek DBair Inline

An air-sprung inline shock makes me think of the three Ls: low weight, a lockout switch, and maybe some lycra as well. Sure, that isn't always the case, especially now that more and more hard charging riders seem to be seeing how much fun it is to ride mid-travel bikes, but it's not too far fetched to say that the current crop of inline shocks seem to put more emphasis on dropping grams than actual suspension performance when you want to drop into a hairball section of singletrack. Cane Creek is looking to change that perception, though, with their new $495 USD DBinline shock that, as its name suggests, forgoes using a piggyback as found on their standard DBair CS and Coil shocks. However, what the DBinline doesn't renounce is the twin-tube layout and four-way adjustable damping that Cane Creek's shocks have become widely known for. It also features the company's novel Climb Switch pedalling aid that firms up both the low-speed rebound and compression instead of a traditional lock-out feature as is common on other inline offerings.



This last point raises the question - what type of rider the DBinline is intended for? After all, it'd be fair to assume that most riders who are interested in an inline shock are the types who might want to lock out their bike's suspension for the climbs. ''We want to make little bikes ride big, so it was more important to have it feel like it does than to hit a weight target,'' Cane Creek's Josh Coaplen, VP of Engineering, explained to Pinkbike. He readily admits that the DBinline is 80 - 100 grams heavier than some of the competition when comparing shocks of the similar length, but that relatively small penalty is one that Cane Creek seems okay with. ''We're looking for the person who is going to put a set of real tires on their bike, and they're probably going to do something like put a 140mm fork on their 120mm travel bike. That's probably going to be the person who buys an Inline, not the guy who's stripping his bike down to put titanium bolts on it,'' he says. Weight is really only a small part of the story, though, because the real challenge facing Cane Creek during the DBinline's development was how they were going to shoehorn their complicated damper layout into a shock that needed to have a similar silhouette to the diminutive inline shocks already on the market, something that was considered a necessity in order for it to be compatible with as many bikes as possible.

bigquotesWe want to make little bikes ride big, so it was more important to have it feel like it does than to hit a weight target.- Josh Coaplen, VP of Engineering









Cane Creek DBair Inline


Development of the DBinline

The DBinline has been in development for about two years now, and it was actually well along in its evolution when Cane Creek debuted their DBair CS shock in early July of last year, although Coaplen did confess to Pinkbike that the Inline took about six months longer than they expected when the project was initiated. ''We started working in earnest on the new shock in mid-2012, and we were riding prototypes in early 2013, although these were a little bit different looking than what you're seeing now,'' he said of the process. ''It took longer than it was supposed to, and it was really tough. We're trying to do a lot of things in a really small package. Right when we started, I didn't know how we were going to do it. One of the criteria at the time was that it needed to fit within the same shadow as a Float CTD shock. We didn't know how to do this at first, and it took a lot of trial and error to get that concept right.'' The effort began by obtaining 3D models of the bikes that the shock might be used on, which, as you might expect, makes for quite a long list - remember that Cane Creek couldn't only consider bikes that the Inline might come on from the manufacturer, but also those that might see the shock bolted on as an upgrade. These clearance concerns were especially relevant when talking about small sized frames with tighter confines than medium and larges.

Cane Creek DBair Inline
  Rapid prototypes allowed Cane Creek to better see how the production DBinline shock would look, as well as to check clearance on some bikes.


Producing rapid prototyped models was the next step, with Cane Creek able to fabricate non-functioning plastic models of the shock and its vital parts that allowed them to physically check the shock's clearance throughout its stroke. The models also have a second purpose - they gave the engineers at Cane Creek an opportunity to see their ideas take shape without having to machine what would be very expensive one-off prototypes. That's not to say that the DBinline went straight from the computer to what you see here, however, as they still had to assemble functioning proof of concept examples that would let them test their theories. And one of those theories that needed to be investigated was the bladder, although, given its gently domed shape, referring to it as a diaphragm makes more sense. The DBinline's diaphragm takes the place of the internal floating piston (IFP) that you'll find in Cane Creek's and other company's piggyback shocks, and it's what compensates for the oil displacement as the shock is compressed - the oil sits on one side and a nitrogen charge on the other.

Cane Creek DBair Inline
  A diaphragm at the adjuster end of the DBinline compensates for fluid displacement.


This idea of using a diaphragm is far from a new concept, but the layout did represent some challenges for the team behind the DBinline: ''Getting the bladder right was tough, and we through seven different versions. Its shape, material, and even figuring out its installation was really hard,'' said Coaplen about taking the idea from sketches to working prototypes. ''The way ours works, it's not like a traditional bladder that clips into something. It's basically a diaphragm, so we had to get it to seal well enough that we could install the end-eye without deforming it. We also didn't want any way for the nitrogen to be able to bypass it and get into the oil. There's industry guidelines for things like o-rings and stuff, and there are programs that can tell you exactly what you need given your dimensions, but that doesn't exist for a diaphragm. We have a vendor in the U.S. that makes them custom for us.

A handful of prototype DBinline shocks were assembled during development, but two important versions stood out: one to test the bladder system using a conventional DBair CS shock, and another to test the new Inline shock's damping circuits with the standard piggyback and IFP arrangement, with the idea being to either prove or disprove the two major design theories behind the DBinline separately. The first involved taking a conventional DBair CS shock, completely gutting its piggyback so that it could fill with oil, and then installing a Schrader valve at its end. A one-off unit that contained the diaphragm was then threaded onto it and pressurized from the opposite side, thereby letting them evaluate the diaphragm setup apart from the DBinline shock itself. The second experiment saw Cane Creek take a functioning DBinline shock that was still in the prototype phase and attach the piggyback from one of their production shocks, thereby eliminating the diaphragm from the test. Clever stuff.

Cane Creek DBair Inline
Cane Creek DBair Inline
  These two test shocks allowed Cane Creek to test both the diaphragm and the DBinline's damping circuits separately from one another.


While all of the above might sound like a tricky task, the real challenge came when it was time to stuff all of the damping capability and adjustment of Cane Creek's standard DBair CS into the new Inline shock. Exactly how hard was this? Just to give you an idea of the space constraints, Coaplen and his team had to figure out a way to squeeze all of the functions found in the piggyback, shock bridge, and end-eye of the DBair CS into a space just 13mm high. That's just barely over half of one inch, by the way, or about the height of your thumb. I imagine that this would be roughly akin to telling the inventors of the cellphone, back in the mid 1970s, that they now had to come up with the same thing but to keep it at the dimensions of an iPhone 5. ''Because it has to be so small, we had to get a lot of channels in a really small volume, which made the layout of the oil circuits really tough. There's a lot happening in there.'' In fact, manufacturing the oil circuits was so difficult that Cane Creek had to try a few different methods before they settled on one that would allow them to manufacture a consistent product. Early attempts saw them try to come up with an oil circuit unit that was machined out of a single piece of aluminum, an unbelievably complex and expensive approach that required the CNC machine to mill away material so precisely that it ended up not being a feasible approach when they considered the number of units they needed to produce. The alternative, while weighing a few grams more, was to take a simpler approach and then blank-off the sections via plugs that are installed after machining, a method that Cane Creek says is much more reliable.

Cane Creek DBair Inline
  The example on the far left was machined entirely from a single piece, but it proved to not be reliable enough to make production. Instead, Cane Creek went with a simpler layout that uses plugs installed after it's machined in order to complete the oil circuits, shown on the far right.


You likely get the picture by now: Cane Creek is aiming to make the DBair smaller, lighter, and more compatible than their current offerings. But what about the damping functions that the North Carolina company is so well known for? After all, it wouldn't really be a Double Barrel shock if if didn't employ a twin-tube layout and offer independent low- and high-speed compression and rebound, right? Exactly. Cane Creek felt the same, and although the DBinline makes their older shocks look a little bloated, it still has all of the same adjustments on tap. Things have been simplified inside, though, with Coaplen telling us that the new shock doesn't have a single piece in common with the DBair CS. ''It doesn't share a part. We tried to do it similar to our DBair CS, and our early prototypes were very much like that, but it was a pain in the ass - it's so small in there.'' But it's not just initial assembly time that has to be taken into consideration, either, because whoever rebuilds the shock down the road has to be able to do the job without any major hassles. ''A service center needs to be able to work on it with a pretty standard set of tools, and we can't require them to have stuff like a journal bearing press with a force gauge on it,'' he adds.

bigquotesFor the same length shock, ours weighs roughly 80 - 90 grams more, and we have about 40% more oil than the next nearest competitor. That helps a lot. You don't have to have that extra oil, but we chose to have the extra oil. We could have made a lower oil volume shock, but we wanted a certain size of main piston, so we consciously said that we're going to be okay with being heavier. However, the added oil isn't what differentiates that DBinline's feel; it's the valving.- Josh Coaplen, VP of Engineering


Cane Creek DBair Inline
Cane Creek DBair Inline
  The DBinline doesn't share a single piece with Cane Creeks previous shocks, and while it looks complicated, the poppets and check valves are actually simpler than what they've used in the past.


The philosophy behind a Double Barrel shock and something more traditional, say a FOX Float CTD, is inherently different, and anyone who has spent time on both offerings will know that the different approaches result in a very different feel on the trail. Is one method clearly better than the other? That depends on who you ask, but I've always been of the opinion that, depending on the setup, Cane Creek is able to offer a shock that can be both more forgiving and more controlled on rough ground, something that could be traced back to Cane Creek controlling more of the oil flow in their layout. ''Most of the damping control on a shock like a Float CTD is through the main piston shims, whereas on the DBinline, on compression only, we have the main stack on the piston, we have the high-speed poppet, and we have the low-speed poppet that's able to be turned on and off with the Climb Switch.' On rebound we just have the poppet and the low-speed orifice; there's no shims on the rebound side of the piston, just like in the DBair CS. There's no way you could get the curves of a CTD and a Inline to fall on top of each other on a dyno - they're fundamentally different.'' The question is, then, do other suspension companies want their inline shocks, or any of their shocks, to emulate that feel? ''I don't think that they want to,'' Coaplen says when we posed that exact question to him. ''To be honest, we get feedback from guys like you that tell us whether or not it's doing what it should do, and I'm assuming they do as well. So, depending on what group or type of rider you prioritize the most, you'll end up with a different result. If you look at damping values on a dyno, most inline shocks follow the same "style" of damping characteristics, except our new Inline that follows the style of a DBair CS.''

Cane Creek DBair Inline
Cane Creek DBair Inline
  There's no shims on the rebound side of the DBinline's main piston, with that task being controlled by the poppet assembly and low-speed orifice.


The exact same thing could be said of Cane Creek's Climb Switch function that, rather then simply adding a bucket load of compression damping or even completely locking the shock out, applies a more subtle amount of damping to both the low-speed compression and rebound circuits. We've spent plenty of time using the system on their DBair CS shock and can attest to its traction-adding abilities, but that's on a piggyback shock, not a relatively lightweight inline model that might be found on a lighter duty bike that could see much more pure cross-country use. Might a rider using an inline shock still prefer a traditionally firm lockout? ''That's a legitimate concern. I don't know how this happened, but it's been really positive, in that the engineering section of Cane Creek has been given a lot of the product management responsibility, and so it's kind of like what we want as riders is what gets translated into the product.'' That doesn't mean that it's what everyone wants, obviously, but Cane Creek is hedging their bets that their Climb Switch system will find traction with more and more riders. European riders in particular, and especially the sometimes conservative European product managers that decide what to spec on their bikes, might prefer a stiffer CS function, and Coaplen did divulge that exact thing may come to be. He also admitted that they do have prototype DBinline shocks that have a three-position CS switch, although all production models with continue with the standard two-position setup due to none of the testers taking advantage of the lever's extra position. Plans are afoot for a handlebar mounted remote as well, with Cane Creek working on two options: one for bikes with a single chain ring that will be designed to mount on the left side of the handlebar in place of a shifter, and another that will work better on bikes equipped with both a front and rear shifter. Either will be able to be added to any DBinline that came stock with the shock-mounted lever.




Riding the DBinline

Rather than flying in to North Carolina to ride unfamiliar trails on an even more unfamiliar bike, which is the usual routine when being introduced to new product, I was lucky enough to be able to bring my 2015 Knolly Warden test bike (similar to the one pictured below), a machine that I was able to put loads of miles on before visiting Cane Creek. The benefit to this was two fold in that not only was I well acquainted with the bike, but also with how it performed with the DBair CS shock that it comes from Knolly with. We also flew in about a month before the official press camp took place, a tactic that gave us some exclusive one-on-one time with the engineers and testers responsible for the shock going from sketches to working prototypes to production units. In other words, it wasn't your typical in and out media junket.

Is this a test? No, no it isn't, so don't take it as one. I am, however, pretty confident in my assessment of Cane Creek's new shock. Enough techno-talk rambling, right? Let's get on with how the DBinline felt on the trail...

Cane Creek DBair Inline
  Knolly's 150mm travel Warden served as an ideal test platform for the DBinline.


We stopped to install the DBinline after spending the first part of the first ride on the Warden's stock DBair CS, and then continued on what I can only describe as one of the rougher and difficult trails that I've spent time on recently. Anyone who's ridden a Double Barrel shock is familiar with their fluid yet very controlled feel, and the new DBinline continues with that same theme. In fact, it's just as responsive at the top of its stroke as its predecessor, and it offers the same range of adjustment via its dials, although the fact that Cane Creek has reduced the number of clicks to twelve for both low-speed ranges will come as a welcome fact for knob turners. We made a few minor tweaks after the first ride - a touch more low-speed rebound and compression control - and found that the new shock's dials are very effective, just as those on the DBair CS.

bigquotesThe DBinline felt mightily impressive, enough so that, for a rider who spends his or her time on a mid-travel bike, we really do think that it's a game changer.- Mike Levy

One other fact quickly became apparent as well: the DBinline feels very much like Cane Creek's other air-sprung shock throughout its stroke. This is in contrast to other inline offerings on the market that all tend to feel as if they are heavier damped than their piggyback counterparts, although this is something that Cane Creek's competitors could be designing-in on purpose. It is certainly not the case with the DBinline, with it providing a deep feel that no other inline shock we've ever spent time on can compare to, and there is none of the slightly harsh sensation that most inline shocks seem to pass through to the rider on high-speed trail chatter. As you might have guessed, this translates to what feels like added traction during times when you might be happy to trade just about anything for some extra grip - picture fast, rough corners that would otherwise upset a short-travel bike that's being pushed hard. The stroke also felt progressive enough to keep our Warden from bottoming out harshly, although we certainly touched the end of the stroke on one or two occasions. Cane Creek's decision to only offer the shock with a single, high-volume air can and then allow riders to tune the ramp-up via volume reducing shims does make sense, but it will require riders to take the time make any necessary changes in order to get the most from the diminutive shock.

The DBinline felt mightily impressive, enough so that for a rider who spends his or her time on a mid-travel bike, we really do think that it's a game changer. This isn't the shock for a rider who's going to be spending time in a bike park or doing lift-accessed runs, however, as we do believe that that type of rider is going to benefit from the higher oil volume of a piggyback shock. That said, Cane Creek designed the $495 USD DBinline to be used on bikes sporting 120 - 150mm of travel, and the bottom line is that it's going to increase the capabilities of any mid-travel bike that it's bolted to.


www.canecreek.com


190 Comments

  • 113 11
 Wow I just spent twenty minutes reading this and still have no clue what they are talking about...Just put a section/paragraph entitled QUICK TIP and write "buy" or "don't buy" and who it's meant for...I still love you pink bike
  • 30 28
 Buy: If you ride Enduro, XC (not racing), Trails, Tech trails. (Or have a bike that doesn't fit the regular DBAir)

Don't buy: If you ride Enduro, All Mountain, DH, XC racing.

(I think)
  • 41 0
 It will be like all the other cane creek shocks. Once you figure out the right tune its probably gonna be the best shock you've ridden...
  • 77 8
 Buy if you ride Enduro.....

Don't buy if you ride Enduro....

Thanks Smile
  • 6 4
 just judging by the diameter of the shock i could see it being alright for some light freeriding and aggressive trail rides. air shocks are becoming increasingly plush and I could see it accommodating some more aggressive riding
  • 9 2
 It's more of a, "Shut up and take my money!" sort of deal.
  • 2 0
 I just had to look first on what the 1st comment is so I can have an idea.
  • 10 0
 Cane Creek dudes are the best dudes, and DBair on all my bikes. They need to just hurry up and make dual crown forks already so i dont have to buy any other brand's version of anything.
  • 1 0
 Chamber extravaganza on this shock.
  • 50 2
 Typically I ride my bike up a hill, quickly at first untill I get tired then slowly. Once a the top I try to ride back down as fast as I can. I also like to bring sandwidges.

Should I buy this shock?
  • 11 0
 @jungleT It depends on what sort of sandwiches I guess.
  • 3 1
 Enduro if you buy
  • 2 0
 where can i buy one??? its been a few months now and i can't find sellers
  • 1 1
 They'll have a new Enduro version soon, for Enduro riders who need an Enduro shock for, yeah, Enduro.
  • 3 0
 @JungleT that's exactly how I ride... except I bring bacon instead of sandwiches
  • 51 5
 Came for the shock, stayed for the Knolly. Dear Satan, I mean Santa... Actually I don't care which of you respond, as long as you bring me one of those. One of you wants me to be good, one of you wants me to be bad, either way I'm going to get what I want. Yummy bike. Great article.
  • 8 0
 Satn is here. What is it my son?
  • 17 0
 You know it's the 'real' Satan when he puts 69 after his name.......
  • 2 0
 saw a sweet yellow knolly on the weekend... delayed my ride as I was caught staring at it leaning against a wall. Decided to wait for the rider, sat behind him the whole ride, great view, but a little slow Wink
  • 5 0
 Typically the best bikes get ridden by a sponsored rider or a slow one Wink
Sad story...
  • 49 2
 is there any component that doesn't look sweet as f*ck when installed on a Knolly?
  • 4 0
 Love my SC, but I do miss the Knolly. Those things have so much character.
  • 2 0
 I went from SC to a Knolly (a few other makes in between) and wont look back.
  • 10 0
 Triple cranksets?
  • 3 1
 Nope, all Knolly bikes are dialed :-)

I really want to put a DB air on mine
  • 2 6
flag wakaba (May 19, 2014 at 10:08) (Below Threshold)
 Sweet bike with a rear shock that is a little less crappy than a Fox Float ? This Knolly needs more oil, piggyback and coil.
  • 1 0
 OK, OK. Stop rubbing it in.
  • 38 2
 This is shocking!
  • 17 1
 Really sprung to front page.
  • 18 1
 I hope it didn't damp-en your spirits!
  • 14 1
 It does have an Air of superiority
  • 5 2
 "Cane Creek is hedging their bets that their Climb Switch system will find traction with more and more riders"
  • 2 2
 Bladder.
  • 4 1
 I was sad that this was coming out but now I'm on the rebound
  • 2 1
 luv your sag
  • 31 0
 RockShox and Fox just shitted their pants again. The price is very close to what Fox and RS are charging currently. And from what Mike said...This is on a whole different level. Imagine if CC started making forks......I would stake that it would be a game changer like the Pike is currently.
  • 4 34
flag chyu (May 19, 2014 at 0:24) (Below Threshold)
 Already did, called the PIKE.
  • 12 4
 The monarch plus ain't bad at all.
  • 15 0
 Nah, imagine if Öhlins started making forks..
  • 10 1
 Well, Cane Creek shocks are designed in collaboration with Öhlins (at least original DB was) so CC forks would basically be Öhlins forks.
  • 8 0
 From what I understand the tech(twin tube) is Öhlins, CC has refined it.
  • 4 0
 @MendelMu

Twin Tube tech is certainly licensed from Öhlins, CC has made it functional in a mountain bike sized shock package, which is impressive engineering in itself Smile
  • 4 0
 Can anyone elaborate on the differences (if any) between CC and Ohlins use of a Twin Tube design and the old Twin Tube design that Romic used for years before they left the MTB game?
  • 1 0
 hampsteadbandit. For sure, anyone bringing quality products to the table gets my gratitude.
  • 1 0
 Isn't Ohlins making proto internals for Ropaletos pike?
  • 3 0
 So when are we going to see a bladder or diaphragm in place of the IFP on the CCDB coil and air?
I have to wonder if the CCDB inline has better performance than the air, because of the diaphragm, even with less oil volume. Very interesting shock.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez
yes, thats the current rumour. There have been pics of the fork... but I couldn't see through and into the internals...
  • 13 0
 Hope this fits commencal frames as the am, sx and sl not compatable with piggy back shocks, unless you pay £400 for a rear swing arm upgrade. This could be a option!!!
  • 1 0
 Amen to that!
  • 2 3
 Don't see why not. Doesn't strictly have a piggy back.
  • 1 0
 Unfortunately probably not. I tried to bastardize a few different shocks to fit on my SX, but the rear shock mount eyelet is so close to the chainstay weldment that a big air can (or coil spring for that matter) doesn't clear the frame. I think the new chainstay piece from Commencal is a must for any serious hardware, but even then, this big air can may not fit.
  • 1 0
 replied too false issue
  • 7 0
 Why wont anyone make these shocks as shown on the picture where the piggy is seoarated from the shock through a tube anymore?
would solve all the fitting issues a.everybody could take advantage of more oil and adjustments.so the companies would not be forced to reduce By expensive developing and producing methods the volume of a shock and or it's functions :-/
  • 2 4
 For the sake of conversation- Where then, would the remote reservoir be mounted?
  • 5 0
 And the remote reservoir setup is a substantially heavier package than this little guy, which is intended for shorter travel, more trail oriented bikes.
  • 3 0
 How abound a mount for the remote resvoir where the bottle cage goes
  • 2 0
 I think what bansaiman is getting at is that he wants the functionality of a standard DBAIR with the fit of the this inline shock. Hence, a remote reservoir.
  • 1 0
 yes, that was the word I was looking for! I´d like to have a shock for bikes +150mm on shuttle missions whose performance is above monarch rc3 plus or fox float. Cause my "Enduro" (love this word ^^) frame does only have space for monarch plus and no larger shock. So if the reservoir was as on some avi shocks wiht a steelflex housing it could be postitioned "everywhere".
No doubt that with the technology of the CCDBA this Inline will be the best in it´s class. But on the other hand it won´t be as good as a full reservoir shock as vivid, vector Air, Void or CCDBA.
hmmm.... if I´m unlucky I´ll juts have to wait for DVO Enduro Air shock or hope the best for the Zocchi Enduro Shock. BOS Kirk is too expensive ;-)
  • 8 0
 This is great news for anyone who rides a Mondraker Foxy. Piggy back shocks won't fit, and this is gonna be awesome! Take my money, I mean...the bank's money...from my overdraft...
  • 2 0
 I positive propped you cuz that was funny, but overdraft ain't free here in the US and is just plain evil.
  • 8 0
 Amazing bit of engineering here! It reminds me of something, couldn't think what and then it hit me......
img1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20110318002930/starwars/images/c/c6/ProbeDroid-TSWA.jpg
  • 3 0
 I prefer to think of it as Johnny 5
www.theoldrobots.com/images27/Johnny5-5.JPG
  • 6 0
 I guess this is the first inline shock that have high speed comp and high speed rebound. If it works as it says, it won't be surprised if this shock will be placed by many DHer AM bike.
  • 5 0
 I ride an XL Yeti SB95C and seriously considered a CCDBA as I have ridden them in the past. I called CC to ask how much my specific sized shock would weigh and it was .7lbs heavier than my 2nd best choice which was the RS Monrach plus. I do 30+ mile XC rides, steep, loose, rutted, trails, and just yesterday I was up at big bear mountain using the lifts and shredding the trails. My Monarch plus seals actually crapped out on me. But this shock is perfect for me and it is what I have been waiting for. My other bike is a Mojo HD and I would happily slap this on it as well. I used to run the CCDBA on this bike and I currently run a custom tuned RS Monarch Plus on it (Courtesy of Suspension Experts) and it is damn fine shock but not as good as the CCDBA. I am very excited for this shock. I am just going to have to try and hold off. I hate dealing with first production run units. But I am 235 geared up and I hope that this shock is the answer to my dreams. the Fox units do not flow enough oil for my weight, and cannot keep up with me on the downhills. This is what I have been hoping for from CC. Not the lightest nor the heaviest, but absolutely amazing. Able to go from the trails to the lifts and giving up nothing in-between.
  • 2 0
 I go about 210-220 and ride a medium SB 95c. I rode the alloy frame all last year with the float CTD and a DBAir. I'm currently on the monarch plus rc3 and I like it quite a bit, but I still keep the DBAir for some races and rides where I want no-compromise outright performance for the downs. I don't mind the extra weight because the performance is unbeatable. I will probably buy one of these once my fave shop can get me one and I see it getting much more ride time than the DBAir because the climb switch will mitigate the one downside I see for the DBAir. Saving a little weight just ices the cake IMO.
  • 1 0
 On my Mojo HD I hollowed out a hobby wrench and put it on the LSR. It effectively gave me four different climbing/descending positions. I highly recommend trying that. I talked with CC about the function of their climb switch and after using it like this I was truly blown away by the performance. Still for my HD I will wait for a few more reports on this shock and stick with my custom tuned Monarch Plus. But for the SB95 I am itching for this shock and will probably be selling my New Monarch Plus Debonair. The only thing that truly saddens me and this is vanity is the Debonair is all black and my back looks pretty sick in murdered out black set-up right now.
  • 9 2
 Just bought a new db air... Thought id have the latest and greatest but oh well that's the way she goes..
  • 3 0
 Either that or after you buy #1, option #2 is suddenly half price.
  • 5 0
 I think the two products (air, inline) solve different "problems".
  • 3 0
 Yeah the inline mainly solves the problem of fitting on certain frames.
  • 4 1
 That's the way she goes, boys. Sometimes she goes, sometimes she doesn't, cause that's the way she fuckin goes.
  • 1 0
 Same boat my friend. Dbair cs on my allow Sight feels amazing but this looks to be perhaps more appropriate. It runs great but at over half a kilo it's legit overkill on the trail rig.
  • 9 1
 Nice to see a compagny like Cane Creek always developping new stuff
  • 4 0
 I'm very excited about suspension improvements that have been coming out in the last year or so. The Pike/charger damper, DH capable air shocks, Debonair, etc.

I feel like the suspension on my 2010 Enduro is DIALED with a 2010 Lyrik and a 2011 RS Monarch RT3 (both with semi-custom internals). My plan is to ride it until I have to replace it, since any noticeable upgrade will pretty much require starting with a new frame, plus its a 26.

I can't imagine how great my next bike will be!
  • 6 0
 Awesome, looks like the perfect shock to turn my Meta SX into even more of a hooligan!!!
  • 4 5
 Doesn't Meta SX deserve a piggy back?
  • 7 0
 Can't take one.
  • 7 4
 Hahahahahahahha!!!
  • 2 0
 the meta Sx already has a very sweet factory shock tune. Its part of the reason that they ride so well. My understanding is that it's the meta Am shock that needs work.
  • 4 0
 The Meta AM has an RP23 shock which is way to fast trough its travel. I hope the Cane Creek is going to be a solution to set it up for plush travel and hard hits because both is not working together with the factory shock and tune!
  • 2 2
 Sell meta AM/SX, buy Meta 5/6, fit dhx air. Works for me. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Lame. Their website says it wont fit Frown
  • 1 0
 Thema, how do you go accessing the air valve on the bottom of the piggy back. It looks like it would be sitting really close to the rocker assembly? I've often looked at my Meta 55 and thought that surely there are some piggy back shocks that would fit. That said, a DHX air would appear to be more $$ and less adjustment/tunability than the CS Inline, assuming that it is actually possible to find one for the stated price.
  • 1 0
 You need to detach the top of the shock and lean it forward, it's not that big of a deal since you don't need to do it often. If I were to buy a new dhx air or cs inline it would be a no brainer. On the other hand a 2nd hand dhx air is as cheap as dirt since there is so many everywhere.
  • 1 0
 Can anyone confirm if a 2011 meta 55 will fit a db inline? CC fit guide says yes but call them. Emails from CC say no. But the dimensions pdf and the measured space between suspension linkages suggest it will. Waiting to hear from Commencal directly but has anyone done it? I can see why a piggy back won't work as it will hit the linkages under compression. But I can't see any issues for the inline? Can anyone else?
  • 2 0
 About the Ohlins/CC thing, just look up the Ohlins TTX25 MkII shock, look familiar? Im sure its valved differently for its intended purpose, but the platform is the same. Oh and they actually sell replacement parts for it to the public.
  • 2 0
 I love that Pinkbike's starting to check out the engineering side of things more, especially when it's on the techy side with shock/brake design. Great article, wonder if they need engineers that work in hydraulics at all ;].
  • 3 0
 SRAM needs engineers that work in hydraulics....give 'em a call.
  • 5 0
 This looks stupendous! Good work!
  • 1 0
 Regarding the intended purpose i would likely learn more about heat managing. All those settings filled in this little 13mm's piece and what seems to be half-less oil than in a DBair probably made them struggling with fading alot. Looking by far the best option to trash the bike down a Mega or Mountain Of Hell, i'm pretty sure this point was on their manager's main list!
  • 2 0
 Haven't spent any money on my bike in ages.................this could be the perfect shock for my LTc.................although I fear that the UK price will be disproportionate.
  • 2 0
 There are ways around that for the dedicated buyer.
  • 2 1
 Finally been released. Now when do they hit the stores because this is the one product I have been waiting to come out in the mtb world for a very long time. This monarch sucks. On my 5th one from RS because they keep blowing up
  • 2 0
 Ok, so lets say I just purchased a bike with the Monarch Debonair, why would I replace it with the CC Inline? Or why would I replace the Monarch Plus Debonair with the CC DBA-CS?
  • 3 0
 You would buy it to have more tunabilty over the damping on the shock. With the monarch you only have control over low speed rebound. The base tune that comes with fox and rock shox rear shocks is a base tune that will work for most riders and terrain. Where the double barrel shocks can be fine tuned the weight riding style and different terrain via damping circuits. This is that you pay places like Push and Avy to take apart and adjust the shim stacks. What makes this shock that much better is they are completely separate circuits so there isn't compromise in tuning.
  • 2 0
 Good to know! Might just sell that Debonair I've got and get one of these instead.
  • 2 0
 Also the inline is more space friendly rear shock and a little lighter duty then the DBAIR CS for guys like me that have the new carbon Sight's that will not except a piggy back shock, but well are in that trail type bike that might want a little more heavy duty shock with tenability.
  • 4 0
 On my Mojo HD there is a night and day difference in performance between my Custom tuned 2014 Monarch Plus and the CCDBA. If it wasn't for the weight issue I would stick with the DBair hands down. If I wasn't 6'2 235ish and do 15-305 mile rides regularly I would have stuck with the DBair. But when I would swap shocks I could feel the difference on the steep climbs in weight. The Monarch plus is good. the DBair is better. I do not know if I will put this on the HD. but on y SB95 it is a no brainer. If anyone wants a new 2014 Monarch Plus Debonair in 7.5 x 2.0 with 8 miles on it it will be up for sale soon
  • 1 0
 How do the climb platforms on the DBair compare with those on the Monarch Plus? I like how dramatic a differences there is in low speed compression on the Monarchs with the switch flipped, and I've heard that the DBair aren't quite as dramatic.
  • 1 0
 I have never used a DBair climb switch. I ended up making a ghetto climb switch with a hobby wrench. I ran it on the LSC for a while but really wasn't feeling a discernible difference with it on the long pavement/fire road climbs I do. I switched it over to the LSR and it was amazing. It gave me four different climb modes which for my area & trails that I do my weekly grinds on was amazing. I called CC t talk with them about what their climb switch does and it made me feel like for my bike & my application I had the better switch.

On my Monarch plus when I had the M/L tune I had to use the firmest setting often and rarely used open. With the M/M tune I rarely use the firmest setting, & do the majority of my climbing in the middle and my descents in open. Also I run quite a few mixed areas in open as well.

Again all of these impressions are on My Mojo HD.
  • 1 0
 Darkstar187, what do you think about the fox ctd on the new carbon sight? I can't wait to replace mine with a new shock.
  • 1 0
 I don't mind it. Performs just fine. I need more from the shock. I ride my bike like a stole it everytime. But I think for most it would be just fine. I cannot wait to see how much better this shock could make an already amazing bike.
  • 5 0
 Is it skinny enough to fit a rocky mountain altitude?
  • 4 0
 I need one. No word on availability?
  • 3 0
 Wow. This came out of left field (Murican saying). Pretty exciting. It has everything you could want.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy which trail(s) did you ride? what'd you think, besides "I can only describe as one of the rougher and difficult trails that I've spent time on recently", which sounds promising...
  • 7 0
 Mike was blindfolded until he arrived at the trail. He has no idea what was ridden or any knowledge of where he was taken.
  • 1 0
 good answer.
  • 1 0
 Those of us who know and ride WNC but don't actually live there could well benefit from hearing what the trail was so that we can get a sense of how the reviewers experience relates to "home turf". e.g. Pilot rocks relatively slow bike speed with square edge chunk vs Bennet or Averys higher bike speed drops and such if you follow my meaning.
  • 3 0
 Remember how bad was the first air rear shocks? That one looks amazing. I love the future
  • 1 0
 About the Ohlins/CC thing, check out the ohlins TTX25 MkII shock, for a different application, but same shock platform, and much more detailed information and spare parts available.
  • 1 0
 If the C Creek guys read this: I have a '08 cannondale scalpel w/ the flexible carbon chain stays and my RP23 measures 6.5x1.5. Would there be any considerable benefit to adding this shock to the scalpel?
  • 1 0
 If you re unhappy with your suspension, I would say yes there would be. If yo are above or below the average weight and cannot get your suspension tuned correctly yes it would help. if you do not like to tinker for a while before arriving at nirvana I would consider calling CC first to talk with them.
  • 2 0
 I know a lot of people are saying this is reasonably priced, but does anyone else out there think bike suspensions in general are just stupidly priced overall to being with?
  • 3 0
 Love my knolly's with their db airs. One day my endo will have a dbair inline and all will be balanced with the world again.
  • 2 0
 have a CCDB coil on my Operator and it transformed it, so I guess the DBInline will be goin on my Dune rr Smile
  • 1 0
 It think this shock is for me. I don't care at all about weight. The bike I ride to school up some really big hills is 48 lbs.
  • 1 1
 I thought the BD air had great reviews. Now they are making drastic changes. Change for the sake of change?
Now they have to stock more inventory, keep inventory of old parts ect.
  • 5 0
 This isn't a replacement for the DBA. Its so that people who couldn't fit a DBA on their bike can have the same tech. The DBA is available in larger stroke/length sizes than the DBInline and is still the better choice in terms of heat dissipation due to the separate oil chamber and larger oil volume. The DBI fits in smaller spaces and is lighter.
  • 1 0
 Larger oil volume works for me. And you are keeping the DBA in production. Sweet. I have ridden the coil and the air versions. I find CC shocks work great on small frequencies yet can be set up to take big fast hits with authority.
  • 1 0
 I probably the only one who got a response directly from Cane CreekSmile CC is cool.
  • 1 2
 I just bought THIS item ie ..DB INLINE for my new CARBON C Bronson ...its sitting waiting for me at Marty's MOUNTAIN CYCLE in Victoria for some NEW 2015 fox 27.5 talas shocks !! IT'S going to be one sick sick dank ass race ready RIDE !! #AWESOME #RECKLESS Ricky
  • 1 0
 Fitted one of these to my 140mm ghost asx - 190x50 shock and I'm pretty impressed so far after one ride.

wrote a small blog article on it wp.me/p4HYH0-1t
  • 2 0
 Big fan of DB shocks yeiw!
  • 3 3
 Looks nice...and juicy. Says that this shocks does not share any parts with their predecessor models - wondering what if any Ohlins technology is carried over.
  • 12 1
 it's a twin-tube layout and function on the very same principles as the previous Double Barrel shocks, but its parts have all been refined compared to the older offerings. It's Cane Creek through and through.
  • 10 3
 There are some gnomes and trolls wandering Swedish woods who see yellow things mounted to passing mountain bikes, I may not remember right by one of them was reporting yellow air shock.
  • 3 0
 I've heard the same. If you pass Mt Hagakullen or Hellas at dusk you might see some of these rare creatures passing in the corner of the eyes. Whizzing by in überhuman speed.
  • 1 0
 "They were responsible for the Cane Creek Double Barrel, which is widely recognised as the shock that all others are measured against today. At the time, the Double Barrel was the best shock that Öhlins could make, and we are sure that if they felt it wasn't up to scratch, it would have never seen the light of day with the Öhlins name associated to it. The Double Barrel, however, was designed seven years ago, and Öhlins has learned a lot more about suspension since..."

So the technology comes from Öhlin then..
  • 2 0
 "The Twin Tube layout means that some damper adjustments that would require a more traditional shock to be disassembled and re-shimmed can be performed on the Double Barrel by simply turning one of the external adjusters to attain similar results. The technology, which originated with the suspension gurus at Ohlins, is so effective that versions of the Double Barrel are used in some forms of auto racing."
  • 3 0
 Uh oh, next on Wakileaks: the Rohllins endurbro shock
  • 1 0
 Wonder if this shock is 'underbuilt' for a Nicolai Helius AM (with some rocky singletrack - 2-3 ft drops)
  • 2 0
 If you want a rear shock that promises you traction get a twin tube Cane Creek or a Roco. If you want platform cause it upsets you when your shock is too active get one of them new platform shocks. Fox, Rock Shocks..ect.
  • 1 0
 Sshreder - or just send your Float or Monarch to PUSH... much cheaper than buying CC
  • 1 0
 Push still won't work on Monarchs, or at least they still don't mention them on their website.
  • 3 1
 I think need one of these. Price isn't to bad.
  • 4 0
 Compared to a Float CTD, one could even say it's cheap Big Grin
  • 4 3
 Mby I just missed it. But price? I need to know how hard my wallet is going to get hit! Exactly what I want In a shock!
  • 13 0
 First paragraph. $495 USD.
  • 1 0
 Haha wow I feel smert. Thanks!
  • 2 0
 Being cheaper than a Float X, I wonder if this baby can actually be a better alternative.
  • 1 0
 Any idea when it will be available?
  • 1 0
 Not the cleanest design, slightly cluttered looking, but looks purposeful, functional, and utilitarian... I like it..
  • 1 0
 Any idea if this will fit the ride 9 Rocky's? The website doesn't show any Rocky's past 2011.
  • 1 0
 Great option for bikes that don't fit a piggy back reservoir.
Still, another ~100 grams and you could have the CCDB air.
  • 2 0
 For 100 grams I'd take the CCDB air CS. Best shock ever.
  • 2 0
 The Cane Creek guys said the Inline was 200 - 250 grams lighter than the DB Air CS. Both shocks perform equally well on the trail damping wise, however the DB Air CS is bigger, heavier and has much more oil so will resistant fade better on bigger descents on bikes with longer travel.
  • 3 4
 My 2013 Float CTD feels pretty damn good on my V2 Spitfire, I can't complain at all and it feels bottomless.
I am not changing my bolts out for titanium ones but but I do care about overall bike weight, and shaving 1/4 pounds off of components is how you keep it reasonable. Even if this shock does feel much nicer than a Fox that is set up properly (this is key, how many people are riding around on improperly set up shocks and forks, alot I am sure) the fact that it is about 40% heavier than the Fox makes this a no starter for riders like me.
  • 3 0
 I'm waiting on my V2 Spitfire to come in any day now with a CCDBA...and now this comes out! ahhhhhhhh

Personally, I never got along with my Fox air suspension - the "proper" setup just didn't feel good to me.

And I find it hard to believe you would notice 1/4 lb from the middle of your frame (sprung weight has the least impact on what you "feel" on the trail). However, you will really notice the change in spring curves and damping characteristics. You are much better off trying to save weight in your wheels, which are unsprung rotational weight, than you would elsewhere. That's where you will really feel it!

Save weight where you can, but suspension feel and brake feel take priority in my books.
  • 2 0
 I wonder if this would fit my Rip 9? Smile
  • 2 0
 Fit Finder says no... but I did email them asking if this was generic because of the DB Air.
  • 1 0
 Oh, thank you very much! The bottom shock mount on the Rip 9 is very tightly spaced. I'm not sure if the width of the shock would fit Frown
  • 2 0
 Knolly Warden looks awesome, btw
  • 1 0
 Now that is a proper first ride write up! The other Mike should take notes.
  • 1 0
 Is there a trail mode for this shock, like day fox's shitty CTD? Or is the shock fully open or closed?
  • 1 0
 i have a rose uncle jimbo 2014, with 165mm of rear travel, its will works fine?
  • 1 0
 Just got mine for my NUKEPROOF TR WOW it's transformed my ride ..nice one CC
  • 2 0
 Neat
  • 3 1
 This looks sick!
  • 3 2
 Shut up and take my money!
  • 1 0
 can i compare this to a float x?
  • 1 0
 ya. thats the competition
  • 1 0
 Would that fit in my Giant Reign 2011? Awhhhrrrrrrr...
  • 1 0
 Could be a chance to get a higher volume in my Commencal Meta :-)
  • 2 0
 No binliner jokes? Frown
  • 2 0
 ummmmm what?
  • 1 0
 Mike can I trade you my slightly abused kidney for your Knolly
  • 1 1
 I'm going to Slap this Bad Boy on my Trance X3!!!! 26'er of COARSE!!!!! ;p) lol
  • 3 2
 Why ? That bike has such a steep head angle it's useless going downhill, appalling front end fork and geo. Save your money and get a new frame. The new ones are a different story
  • 1 0
 WTF are u talking about?? The rear Shock is what im replacing and it is not going to affect the head angle in any way??? Soo why? kuz I LOVE my Bike and there's not a single thing bad about it!!! Shy off with the badass comments if u don't kno how I ride-! hah
  • 1 0
 Please come on the range.. Ill do bad things!!
  • 1 0
 But would it fit my 2011 Enduro...that's the question
  • 1 0
 Of course not. It's a propriety shock that specialized uses
  • 1 0
 I like Try...I like Buy...
  • 2 3
 Why does Knolly even bother? Knollys (or is it Knollies?) are so stupid. How many more unnecessary swing links do you plan to cram in there in future models you twits?
  • 1 0
 Is there a release date yet?
  • 1 0
 That would look great on my SX.
  • 1 0
 Can't wait to try this out Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Soooo, which mode do I put it in for trail riding?
  • 1 0
 looks awesome.
  • 2 1
 Fork please!
  • 1 0
 Soo trick
  • 2 4
 If only it came in a larger size... It would be awesome weight savings for DH sled.
  • 2 0
 Db air, x-fusion vector air and vivid air shocks are light enough too
  • 1 1
 those are all double barrel though, not single barrels
  • 1 3
 Wow...nice shock but the bike his hideous! Never liked Knollys....they look like their name sounds:P
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