The UCI Expands Controls for Mechanical Doping at Tour de France

Jun 30, 2022
by Alicia Leggett  
An image generated by the UCI's mobile x-ray cabinet. Photo: UCI

The UCI has announced its new strategy to address the threat of "technological fraud," or the use of any hidden propulsion devices at the upcoming Tour de France, which starts tomorrow, July 1.

Using magnetic tablets - introduced in 2016 - with new software, officials will examine every bike being ridden in that day's stage at the start of each day. After each stage, officials will also check the bikes ridden by the stage winner, any rider wearing one of the yellow, green, polka dot, or white leaders' jerseys, three or four random riders, and any rider who raises suspicion, for whatever reason, according to a press release yesterday. The post-race examinations will use a mobile x-ray cabinet, introduced in 2018, which can generate a high-quality image of a complete bike in five minutes, as well as newly-introduced handheld devices that use backscatter technology and instantaneously generate images that can be transmitted to the UCI Commissaires for further analysis.

It's clear that the UCI takes the threat of mechanical doping quite seriously. "Our range of tools to fight against any form of such cheating enables us to carry out checks that are rapid and effective," said the UCI's Head of Road and Innovation, Michael Rogers. "This is essential to be sure that cycling competitions are fair and to protect the integrity of the sport and its athletes."

At last year's Tour de France, the UCI conducted 1,008 bike checks and detected no cases of technological fraud, the organization said. While allegations of mechanical doping have been tossed around since at least 2010, the only confirmed use of a bike with a hidden motor in elite competition happened in 2016 at the UCI Cyclocross World Championships, when U23 favorite Femke Van den Driessche of Belgium was banned from the sport for six years and fined 20,000 CHF.

An image generated by a handheld backscatter device. Photo: UCI

Checks have become commonplace at all UCI WorldTour events, the UCI Road World Championships, UCI Para-cycling Road World Championships, UCI Para-cycling Road World Cup, UCI Women’s WorldTour events, the Olympic Games, the UCI Track World Championships, and the UCI Cyclocross World Cup. In mountain biking, mechanical doping controls are only carried out at the UCI Mountain Bike World Championships.

In the context of the UCI's clear concern about technological fraud, it will be interesting to see whether mountain biking follows suit. In Pinkbike's 2021 State of the Sport Survey, we polled 198 professional riders on their opinions on a wide range of topics within the sport, we discovered that most mountain bike racers feel fairly unconcerned toward the threat of mechanical doping.

When given the prompt "'Mechanical doping,' using a hidden electric motor, is a problem in XC racing," 52.8% of cross country racers responded "Neutral," while 36.1% answered "Disagree" or "Strongly Disagree," and just 11.1% chose "Agree" or "Strongly Agree." For the same prompt applied to enduro racing, a strong majority of 75.4% disagreed, even though there's arguably the most to gain from using a motor in enduro racing, compared to cross country or downhill. 20.3% were neutral, and 4.3% agreed. Downhill racers appear the least concerned, with 85.6% disagreeing that mechanical doping is a problem in downhill racing. 8.4% answered neutrally, and 6% agreed.

No cases of technological fraud have been discovered in mountain biking, but it will likely remain a focal point as bike motor technology becomes more sophisticated.


171 Comments

  • 113 1
 I'd like to request the TSA pat-down instead...
  • 15 0
 How many times can we send it back for another x-ray before being escorted to the back room for the "real" inspection by the TSA agent?
  • 34 3
 I don't know, I feel the method of "falling off the bike while pedaling and seeing the pedals still going causing the bike to spin in circles" was a pretty solid test. No reason to fix what's not broken.
  • 71 1
 TSA: Sir, we appreciate your request to be pat-down, but you are wearing Spandex in an airport and we can already see everything.
  • 13 0
 @WRCDH: Wear white spandex and get a TSA hose down. Nothing will be left to the imagination
  • 4 0
 Man, busy very obnoxious day at work. Popped this open, saw the comment and lol’d.
  • 14 0
 A very large, stoic TSA agent in the Portland airport suddenly leaned in towards me and told me that the purple basket I was carrying "really brings out the blue in your eyes." I laughed nervously and kept moving. Still not sure if it was a disarming tactic or if he was just overly aggressive with his rudimentary grasp of social skills.
  • 2 0
 @scott-townes: That is a crazy video.
  • 23 26
 @JonSwansonVNz:
@dan23dan23:
LOL, yes, that might work quite well for me, considering my experience(s) with TSA...

I frequently catch TSA’s attention for myriad reasons...the worst experience being spotted from 30 feet away and pulled out of line for an “enhanced” (read, “in-hands”) security check. If I can give you one word of advice from that experience, it is to not wear semi-skinny French jeans when going through TSA security...they were utterly mystified by their initial pat-down, subsequently interrogating me about “why it is to the side.” I tried to explain “they’re skinny jeans, and it’s called ‘side pipe’ man, that’s part of my body.” They claimed they were unconvinced and then proceeded to take turns running the backs of their hands back and forth and back and forth on me...then also thinking that “side pipe” referred to some sort of incendiary device or something...so much for American slang. 15 minutes of fondling later, they opened the door to the private screening room, as they then appeared to finally be “satisfied”...at which point I was still in the room and started writing down those two Filipino-American TSA agents names — but their last names on their badges were about 12 letters long and mostly vowels, so I was struggling to type the name into my phone. The TSA guy then asked what I was doing, and I told him I was writing down his name so I could file a complaint because they hadn’t followed protocol in about 5 ways, which I rattled off. He then grabbed an official-looking paper form and told me it was a police report form and that he’d file a police report stating that I was uncooperative, if I didn’t erase his name (all while covering his badge, while standing in my way of leaving the room). I considered just blasting my way through him to get out of the room (and size wise, I easily could have steam-rolled over him), but I erased his last name (which I couldn’t pronounce nor remember), as I had to catch up to my work colleagues for our flight. I was “off” in numerous ways for about 3 days after that — with some symptoms and manifestations being similar to when two different gal-friends I know were sexually assaulted. My work colleagues noticed it too...super withdrawn and distant, lack of joy and engagement, distracted, dazed, agitated at times, not hungry, couldn’t sleep well, etc. Plus, I then repeatedly replayed it in my head — considering all the ways I could have grabbed his head and bashed it with my knee, thrown the other guy into the wall, then escaped the room and reported them. After returning from our work trip to Europe, I talked to a friend of the family who I learned is a manager in TSA at that airport — and he said they don’t have police report forms and that the TSA agent was bluffing, and that what those TSA agents had done was illegal in several ways...and that there was no way to identify them, as there were many Filipino-American men who work in their TSA department, of similar description and long last name.

And unfortunately about a year after that, I was put on a TSA watch list, after being flagged for another enhanced (“in-hands”) security screening and then subjected to about 30 minutes of interrogation by their in-house high-level TSA chemical security specialist who they had to call down from his upstairs office — apparently my shoes had trace amounts of incendiary chemicals from a concert I had gone to a few days prior, I had walked across my recently-fertilized lawn when getting into the car to drive to the airport (also a chemical of concern), and the Crest White Strips in my bag had hydrogen peroxide in them (used as rocket fuel, among other things of concern)...but they and I didn’t know that at the time...TSA just saw I had traces of 3 chemicals of concern on my clothing and bag. I wish I’d realized what had caused those things at the time, as I could’ve explained where they came from...but the exact same thing happened at London Gatwick on a subsequent leg of the trip. It took Gatwick’s team of 3 high-level security specialists talking extensively with me to figure it out...fortunately, just before they were going to put me on the UK / EU watch list!
  • 1 0
 The Chester doing the pat-down will love the tights!
  • 4 1
 @WRCDH: Dang! Thank you for sharing this so the rest of us know how avoid/handle a similar situation in the future. I'm not sure how easy it was for you to open up about this, but I certainly appreciate it.
  • 2 0
 @WRCDH: Good grief that would be traumatizing. Look up how they confiscate peoples personal cash of sometimes life savings never to get it back. Investigators scare tactic making people sign a document forfeiting their cash to them.
  • 1 1
 Gonna have to start wearing lead lined chamois...

But for real aren't they kinda microwaving your carbon frame? I'm assuming it's at really low levels, but seems like that wouldn't be the best thing for glues and resins over time?? But IDK...
  • 2 0
 @WRCDH: TL;DR. Cliffs?
  • 3 0
 @scott-townes: How does one find this video?
  • 3 0
 Iz just needs to checks inside your assholes
  • 2 0
 @WRCDH: Sheesh - crazy stuff.
  • 1 2
 @87vr6: internet
  • 2 0
 @stiingya:

Well if anything they would be x raying it not microwaving, but anyway as far as I know frames don’t get cancer so you should be ok
  • 1 0
 @Lloydmeister: oh man. Good one. You got me soooo good
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: Nah it should be just fine. Backscatter x-ray like this is commonly used for non-destructive testing and conformity inspection in many industries.
  • 1 0
 Starts June 1st and this is posted on June 30th? Brilliant Alicia lol!!
  • 2 0
 @thinkbike: That is freaking awesome! hahaha
  • 7 8
 @WRCDH: you somehow managed to talk about how big your ding dong is, be slightly racist, AND sound like a bit of a crazy conspiracy theorist all in one post. Bravo sir!
  • 4 1
 @snowwcold55: Take it easy, man. This actually happened to him. If he has big ding ding, so be it. Who cares. It was relevant to the event. He was not being racist at all. Their nationality and language were pertinent to the story because it relates to how hard it was for him to recall the lengthy names. He is no conspiracy theorist because he experienced this first hand and had a reliable source inform him no police reports exist.
Respectfully, you might take a look in the mirror and assess how you have conditioned to have such an excessive reaction to a story like this, then make an effort chill out a bit.
  • 1 0
 @JonSwansonVNz: I can only assume you were the person giving the down votes above
  • 91 0
 Hopefully this works better than the hard line the UCI has/had where actual doping is concerned.
  • 8 0
 zing
  • 7 0
 Will teams with Belgian directors connected to Belgian gambling/mob ties miraculously avoid any motor doping positives like they do with the injectable stuff???
  • 10 0
 6 years ban for mechanical doping - was there ever a comparable ban for regular doping?
  • 7 0
 @JohSch: They’re clamping down on mechanical doping that hard, because that they can finally prove. The motor will not have got in your frame by drinking from someone else’s bottle, or taking a vitamin pill you thought was totally harmless… and the “this isn’t even my bike” approach didn’t even work the first time someone tried.

So they have severe punishments for this kind of doping, because like every other sport they will never get on top of the other kind (and at least cycling has tried much harder that any other sport to stop it).
  • 2 0
 @JohSch: nope, more like 6 months for doping. And if you're lukcy you get your 6 months during winter where there's no racing
  • 5 0
 I can believe you're insinuating roadies use performance inhancing "supplements"....
  • 62 7
 Road bikers: “How am I supposed to win without an advantage?”

DH racers: “Dope? We talking flower or vape?”
  • 10 1
 TBH...A good sativa would give you a 'creative advantage' in line selection.
  • 6 0
 It's about safety and safety meetings. Got to keep 'er safe.
  • 2 3
 @thomasjkenney1024: well you'll just wna start jibn everything in site-not necessarily faster lol
  • 87 52
 Quit with all this anti e-bike stuff. Just get over it. They are here to stay. They greatly improve the ability of the old and disabled to get out there and win races
  • 33 35
 This is not anti e-bike. This is anti-cheating in a "normal" bike race.
  • 36 0
 @wpplayer18: This is definitely a tongue-in-cheek comment lol.
  • 20 4
 @cgreaseman: Is this a "whoosh" moment for me? Did I just miss an obvious joke?
  • 24 0
 MY BAD, BROWNER.
  • 9 0
 @wpplayer18: If you read all 3 sentences of this comment it's pretty obvious that it's satire... sarcasm... aka, a joke.
  • 16 0
 @robw515: The grumpy old man in me came out pretty strong here.
  • 8 0
 Too subtle for PB
  • 9 16
flag nozes (Jun 30, 2022 at 11:52) (Below Threshold)
 If by disabled you mean lazy fatass,then yeah.
  • 6 0
 @wpplayer18: it takes a big person to own their mistake. Good job!
  • 36 1
 UCI should check waterbottles as well
  • 5 14
flag Nilsson84 (Jun 30, 2022 at 11:02) (Below Threshold)
 why water bottles? you dont drink EPO and testosterone
  • 76 3
 @Nilsson84: you must be new here
  • 14 0
 @Nilsson84: unless you're an enduro racer........
  • 54 2
 That's a Rude suggestion!
  • 22 1
 @vikb: doping is a very grave issue
  • 20 0
 Doping will also make your armstrong.
  • 16 0
 I hope we can landis plane safely
  • 5 3
 Maest of the time dopers don’t get caught, unfortunately
  • 35 1
 Tomorrow is July 1st, not June 1st.
  • 10 0
 What kind dolt decided to place the most similar sounding names next to each other anyway?
  • 19 1
 @Nygaard: Some regular guy named Julius Caesar
  • 15 0
 @bashhard: yeah and look where that got’em.
  • 5 0
 @daugherd: He was just a citizen is all...
  • 8 0
 Or January 7th as its called in America
  • 7 1
 @Nygaard: I don't know but he deserves to be stabbed
  • 6 0
 @bashhard: I think you mean Junius Caesar.
  • 23 0
 If it comes to mtb, the Vital tech thread will be awash with leaked blurry x-ray images a wild speculation! We'll finally find out what's under Loic's mystery shock cover! It'll be great!
  • 54 2
 do these images come with a BMX-ray background?
  • 18 4
 Whatever. Cheaters gonna cheat.

When I was racing cars, one race shop told me "your job is to cheat, our job is to do the work so you don't get caught." Same ethos seems to underlie just about every major competitive sport.
  • 11 0
 If you are interested, check out a guy named "Smokey Yunik" He was an inventive cheater in nascar. it's kind of impressive. And to a point you gotta hand it to him.
  • 5 0
 "if you're not cheating, you're not trying" was what I heard in the pits. I'm a former super late model/Arca driver
  • 6 0
 @jayracer7474: My great uncle is a retired NASCAR official. We got to hear stories he didn't disclose in podcasts and interviews after he retired.

It's way harder to cheat in NASCAR now, but they still do every race. Just in fractions.

Metal pellets hidden in the lower frame rails was always the secret sauce rumor. A thin plug to keep them in place during the first few laps of the race that would break at speed and drizzle pellets out the bottom and the car would get faster.

Uncle says it was a crazy dangerous tactic for safety reasons but never was officially proven.
  • 21 0
 back then, TDF 1904. when half the field (including the later winner maurice garin) just boarded a train.... those were the days.

motors, pah. rookie stuff.
  • 2 2
 @jayracer7474: It's all part of the game! Gotta love short track racing. Asphalt and Dirt
  • 2 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: hadn't heard of him but will check him out - sounds like a hell of a character
  • 4 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: I feel old. I thought that was a household name
  • 7 1
 I think equating the corner-cutting/rule-pushing that's normal in car racing to adding a secret motor to a human-powered machine is kind of a stretch.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: Haha I think we're the same age, I just was never into Nascar...
  • 2 0
 Things are different in motor sports
  • 4 0
 I have to agree when in the prime of my youth and working in F1 the job was to legally interpret the rules to engineer anadvantage for the team, this was not called cheating , to be fair this really got more interpretive when they took the massive pots of money away and the big teams could afford to interpret the rules more expensively than the little teams
  • 3 0
 @blowmyfuse:

Then there were the people who used the hollow roll cage tubes as fluid storage, either more engine coolant, or oil, or fuel. Or my personal favourite, the gas tank was limited to a certain capacity by the rules, but they hadn't thought to specify the fuel line diameter, so one team used the biggest lines they could make and started the race with several gallons extra in their fuel system. This meant they could push their first pitstop to refill further. There was also a limit on the size of the fuel filler neck for the gas tank, which was supposed to limit how quickly the car could be filled. Now at the time the teams were using these portable fuel bottles, that looked like the cans used to deliver milk to homes in the mid-century. Nothing in the rules at the time that the tank couldn't be 10 feet in the air above the pit and flexible hose used to reach the gas tank door on the cars. Gravity does wonders to accelerate the falling liquid and increase its flow rate. There's a famous example in the movie Ford vs Ferrari, when the Ford team built the entire brake system as a sub assembly for each wheel that could be quickly disconnected and reconnected in a matter of seconds instead of the time consuming process all the other teams were using at LeMans at the time.
  • 1 0
 @c-radicallis: it is going to be more interesting when we are allowed to find ways of cheating sham I mean interpreting the rules in e-bike racink
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: Just wait. Cyborgs are coming. Won't need mopeds. Can just strap on quadriceps
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: its a household name to me too. We should sit on the porch sometime.
  • 18 1
 Somewhere Dick Pound is smiling.
  • 13 0
 cheating with hidden motors is impossible anyway, due to component shortage.
  • 7 0
 It grinds my gears that the powers that be have apparently settled on naming this "mechanical doping".

I'd call the respective phenomena: "mechanical cheating" and "medical cheating" (or perhaps "drug cheating"). Stop with the obfuscation.
  • 7 0
 "..... to protect the integrity of the sport and the athletes" HA!! Good one
  • 9 0
 #allyourheroesarejuiced
  • 5 0
 *scans thru the comments in search of cheater device for my mountain bike...none to be found.

Vendors, stop with the fancy valve caps. What I really want is a subtle cheater device I can add to my existing bike.
  • 5 1
 Yeah, what ever. Cheaters gonna cheat. Because they don't understand what sport is about. They'll always find a way and if caught, just claim that they had taken a sip from someone else's waterbottle or something like that.
  • 3 0
 I love that Mountain bikers are not bothered about mechanical doping in the sport.

A sport with a "Blackbox" programme amongst others specialist, secret programmes where sponsors develop a new technology to try and mechanically give their athletes an advantage that is not available to other athletes using their products.

Maybe 100% of riders should have answered that there is mechanical doping in MTB, its just so in your face and the norm that you don't see it! Its not a motor in a hub to give you an assist for the legs, but how important would that be in Dh (apart from the first stroke of the line)
  • 6 0
 We want more photos of that x-rays!!! Please no video, photos!!!
  • 6 0
 I want every article picture in a x-ray picture and all the words written in Morse code
  • 4 0
 Ohhhhh, so that's why the UCI charges venues so much money to host a World Cup....so they can afford their fancy x-ray machines.
  • 2 0
 They should bring it to downhill and double up offering dental x-rays to all the privateers.
  • 6 0
 Meanwhile, my electric bike shorts escape scrutiny.
  • 5 0
 Could we please see an x-ray that shows a hidden motor? Or do these? I'm not seeing one.
  • 7 2
 Bropeds-they aren't just for fat/old/unfit "mountain bikers"??
  • 2 1
 What constitutes mechanical doping in DH? It seems like there's a lot of leeway on what teams can do to get an advantage. I think about all the black boxes and suspension remotes (like the one on loic's rig - www.pinkbike.com/news/what-was-loic-bruni-adjusting-on-his-fork-in-lousa.html) that have been used recently. I guess that's all fair game?
  • 15 0
 I think adding a secret motor to a human powered machine is a pretty easy-to-define bright line.
  • 5 0
 @gtill9000: the ebike crew had me fooled.
  • 4 1
 I think if you can win without a chain, all the mechanical doping in the world ain't gonna help.
  • 2 0
 All the fancy suspension stuff (so far) is fine; it's just adjusting the settings of the damper - mostly compression damping for pedalling efficiency. None of it is actually adding energy to the system, it's just getting the suspension to subtract less energy than it would normally. And if anything, electronic remotes are safer as the riders don't have to compromise their grip as much as they would have to to press a lever or turn a dial for a mechanical remote (i.e. they don't have to do what Loic did in Lousa).

If you had something with e.g. an electric motor rigged up to a hydraulic pump that could actively pull the wheels up and out of the way of small bumps, or extend on the takeoff of a jump to give you extra air or something like that, that would enter into a different category. Idk if it's technically against the rules now but if anyone did it I imagine they would make a rule against it very quickly. It might not even work very well with the relatively low sprung:unsprung mass ratio of a bike but it would be hilarious to see someone try.
  • 2 0
 What does Loic's little black box do? It makes lots of people take photos of his bike and publish them and talk about Loic's bike.

"It's a little light bulb that blinks!" Woody, Toy Story.
  • 1 0
 The UCI banned skin suits for DH racing sometime in the 90s as I recall, but before they did we used to see the top riders with skinsuits over body armor looking like darth vader trying to eek out every last aerodynamic advantage.
  • 4 0
 I want the hidden motor setup. Don't really care who cheats or not, I just want the technology.
  • 1 0
 The funny thing is the technology to hide a battery and motor inside the regular frame tubes that turned a geared BB axle, has existed for decades in France and there is an old video on youtube, from some news piece done on the bike and its inventor. He didn't invent it for cheating at races but to make a clean looking electric assist for himself to still be able to go on club rides with younger members. Now the battery technology at the time the video was made was limited in comparison to where we are with lithium cells today but it would still give a useful amount of extra power for certain situations (like the steepest parts of a hill climb). The UCI may be cracking down on it now but they're likely never going to tell us what they knew was going on in the 80 and 90s I'll try and find the original news report video, but here's one from 2013 with Greg Lemond demonstrating a hidden motor on one of his road bikes with a 250 watt motor and 30 minute runtime.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKgJ_Uhwfno

.
  • 2 0
 Maybe just blast all bikes with an emp device before stage. Fry any kind of electrical devices. No watt meter or anything electric. Electricity should be banned, in sport and else where in society.
  • 10 6
 Tour de Cheaters is continuing it's descent into the absurd.
  • 4 12
flag Tmackstab (Jun 30, 2022 at 10:39) (Below Threshold)
 I dont get why they don't just open it all up to doping. Bodybuilders are all on roids, they have to be to get that unnaturally big. Sams goes for TDF racers no? Its insanely unhealthy to race the TDF clean, why not just let them realize their max human potential, they're going to anyway.
  • 8 1
 @Tmackstab: there is tested and untested bodybuilding federations just saying "bodybuilders" doesn't mean anything. Same goes for Olympic lifting and powerlifting. If you want to use drugs there are untested comps and if you want to compete "clean" they are tested and PEDs are considered cheating.

Their are plenty of untested bike races that you can technically take whatever drugs you want without cheating already.
  • 2 1
 @RonSauce: would be fun to watch though hey...
  • 4 1
 @Tmackstab: PEDs give an unfair advantage, they don't turn you into a superhero. There are plenty of people on PEDs in the lower middle of the pack in every sport getting outclassed on the regular. Every sport would be like 98% the same from a spectators viewpoint, and now just require athletes to use life shortening drugs.
  • 1 3
 @RonSauce: Guy I was joking jeez.
  • 2 0
 @Tmackstab: yeah I know, we have all heard Bill Burr by now.
  • 4 1
 Who cares it's roadbikes. Make a site called pinkroadbike.com for this boring crap.
  • 1 0
 @mcozzy: I think I’ll have to register cornflowerbluebike.com just in case…
  • 1 0
 Ah yes, the CX Worlds in 2016 at Zolder...the first U23 Women's race, overshadowed by the mechanical doping scandal; whatever happened to the winner of that race I wonder.......and the 4th placed rider....
  • 2 0
 What about checking what's in their blood? Doping is going on at A1 / A2 Cat racing in Ireland. The whole thing is a joke.
  • 1 0
 It's just a lot harder to catch. All PEDs have limited timeframes in which they are detectable in blood/urine and some of them are very short, there are probably some that are effectively undetectable unless you actually kick the bathroom door in while the athlete has the syringe stuck in their arm.

If people are doping in (relatively) lower level competitions, the money and resources required to have even a chance at catching some of them can be hard to find. Not saying we shouldn't try - we should try, of course - but you've gotta be realistic. If you charged everyone a thousand euro to enter the race in order to afford Olympic level doping controls, you'd have a lot fewer competitors and some of them would still get away with doping anyway.

A motor and battery are comparatively a lot easier to spot.
  • 13 14
 SO BASICALLY, THEY ARE LOOKING FOR E-BIKES.LOL DON'T GET CONFUSED PEOPLE. AN E-BIKE IS STILL A MOTORBIKE. DOESN'T MATTER WHAT YOU PUT ON IT, IT STILL HAS A MOTOR IN IT. AND IN THE WORLD OF CYCLING, HAVING A MOTOR ON YOUR BIKE IS CALLED CHEATING. IF YOU DON'T WANT TO PEDAL UP THE HILL THEN MAYBE YOU ARE IN THE WRONG SPORT ALTOGETHER. WHAT WOULD LANCE ARMSTRONG HAVE TO SAY ABOUT THIS TYPE OF CHEATING.... ALL THAT DOPE THEY PUT IN ME.....
  • 4 12
flag ilovedust (Jun 30, 2022 at 14:12) (Below Threshold)
 Well. What ever your view, an e-mtb is not a motorbike. Certainly in Europe where most things motoring are roughly aligned. Its only a motorcycle if it can self propel. E-mtbs are pedal assist ie they only move if you move. As for the rest, opinions opinions.
  • 2 9
flag Tigergoosebumps (Jun 30, 2022 at 14:53) (Below Threshold)
 E bikes are e awesome
  • 1 2
 So 2019.
  • 4 3
 Yes, I'm cheating in my non racing, non timed, solo ride through the woods to enjoy myself.
  • 3 0
 June 1 is not tomorrow blood.
  • 1 0
 what about scanning the bikes on the car hacks ???? you still then have the possibility to change your bike during the stage for whichever reason.....
  • 1 0
 Maybe their just superhuman like "Popeye" or maybe it's a combination of good dope and a Dura cell battery shoved up their backsides?...
  • 2 0
 Nothing to see here... Carry on www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAQMWoQSYIQ
  • 5 5
 This is so stupid. People were screaming about that one clip of the guy's wheel spinning after he crashed, and suddenly we're gonna x-ray everyone's bikes?
  • 12 0
 They have been checking bikes for a long time. Indeed the article says, "Checks have become commonplace at all UCI WorldTour events"


The article is announcing that the scale and nature of those checks is expanding.
  • 1 0
 @f*ckingsteve: oh dang. I didn't know about this.
  • 4 0
 @f*ckingsteve: is this recent? I f*cking despise articles with no dates. “in January” “ announced on Tuesday” could be 2012, 2022, I have no idea from that f*cking shithole outside site.
  • 1 0
 In 2016, they caught a racer in the Cyclocross Worlds using a hidden motor in her bike. Since then, there've been a few more in CX; don't know if they ever caught anyone in road racing. I'm thinking this xray thing is a reaction to years of uncertainty because people think it might be happening, because in happened in the past and enforcement was a bit cumbersome (infrared imaging, manual inspection, etc.).
  • 9 4
 There have been serious indication of mechanical doping in road racing since 2010. In the Ronde van Vlaanderen (Tour of Flanders) of that year, there was alot of scepticism around the winner, Fabian Cancellara.

He made an unexplainable bike swap right before the final and later on left Tom Boonen (one of the best one-day racers at the moment) looking like an amateur on the Muur van Geraardsbergen. One week later, pulled a similar number on him at Paris - Roubaix, a race that Tom Boonen won 4 times.
Cancellara never repeated similar feats later on in his career. He won races afterwards, but never as dominant as that year.
  • 4 0
 There are major bike brands that are actively working on and marketing products that incorporate small and relatively-hidden motors as part of the "light e-bike" market. I believe BMC just announced some of these models in the past few weeks, for example.

Seems sensible to begin checking bikes for compact components that add watts, especially in formats where the results are largely the result of minute differences in watts/kg ratios.
  • 4 4
 @Exbow: the accusations against cancellara didn't really make sense in respect to the way motors work.
  • 3 0
 @kevinturner12: Care to elaborate? "Motors work" by converting potential energy into power. As guiding principle, the application and availability of power is what wins road races.
  • 3 1
 @danielfloyd @Exbow watch at 28:30 Froome either kick in his motor or get it remotely activated on Ventoux in 2013. Completely unhuman acceleration. If you watch from a few minutes before you'll see. Second most obvious motor doping in history of cycling. (FYI - take watts/HR with grain of salt. Lots of contreversy around data leak, may or may not be true)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=52xv2Hg2fkI
  • 5 2
 @danielfloyd @Exbow watch at 0:50. Most obvious case of motor doping in cycling. Cancellera in Roubaix flips on his motor and instantly goes to warp speed with no discernible change in effort. This in 2010 the same year as the much more famous motor doping accusation on the Muur (Tour of Flanders). Roubaix one is way more obvious. Clearly he was using a motor doped bike in 2010 for the classics.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=TEFqL0mbazw
  • 2 1
 @f*ckingsteve: Love this excuse: “It wasn’t my bike, it was that of a friend and was identical to mine,” a tearful Van den Driessche told Belgian TV channel Sporza.

So the bike with the cheaty parts was IDENTICAL to - i.e.,100% the same as - the bike she was supposed to ride... which would therefore also have cheaty parts. Nice try.
  • 2 1
 @dr-airtime: I want to believe you, but there is nothing discernable at all in the 240p video!
  • 3 0
 @KJP1230: The accusations I saw, claimed that he accelerated without increasing cadence or changing gear. For this to happen the motor would have to provide all the power and Cancellara would have had to maintain his cadence perfectly as the resistance disappeared. The motors work as pedal assist so you still need to pedal faster or change gear if you want to speed up.
  • 3 0
 @Chippps: I find it strange that a 19-yo woman racer on a highly cutthroat national team got the ban and all of the team managers and mechanics who orchestrated this faced no consequences
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: motors work by converting electrical energy into kinetic energy. Power is a measure of the rate of conversion of one form of energy to another. Converting potential energy to kinetic energy is riding downhill.
  • 1 0
 @kevinturner12: The technical definition of a motor is a mechanism that converts energy to motive power. If you want the literal definition, here it is: "a machine, especially one powered by electricity or internal combustion, that supplies motive power for a vehicle or for some other device with moving parts."

If you want to be needlessly fussy, you could fault me for saying that the motor itself is converting the stored potential energy in a battery directly to power. To be reductive, the battery is a chemical storage medium for potential energy (this is why voltage that feeds the battery can also be described as "electrical potential"), with an ability to discharge (or convert) that chemically-stored potential energy when needed. This electrical energy is then applied via a circuit, through the motor, and results in an output of power so long as the motor is operating within time or applying force at a velocity (which is a function of time).

So sure. As long as the motor is not functioning across time, its output could be described as "energy", but that is a useless way to look at things because we operate and ride bikes in time. Hence, a motor is described by its function, or power. This is why motors are classified by their wattage or horsepower capacity, and not their E/t.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: ok, maybe I was being picky because I perceived your response as being condescending. You could have just asked what I meant. Anyway, I think my comments regarding cancellara still stand. What do you think?
  • 2 0
 There is no cheating in Nascar either.....
  • 2 0
 Yeahhhhhh June 1st!! nice first sentence typo
  • 2 0
 some times I get curious about the box on Bruni's demo
  • 2 0
 I think they all need a cavity search
  • 1 0
 Bring back pre-ban steroids!
  • 1 1
 Didn’t think to hoik Lance aside and you know ‘X-ray’ him

UCI = universal clown institute
  • 1 1
 Bullshit.. they found a electric motor inside of a tour de france race bike inside the seat tube before
  • 1 0
 I only watch for the Road Gap
  • 2 1
 'Mechanical Doping' is WRONG - race or not... =P
  • 2 1
 isn't road racing banned yet.......FACT: they all cheat at that level
  • 1 0
 But how else am I going to compete in the Tour?!!
  • 1 0
 Mechanical doping WTF. I guess cheaters will be cheaters
  • 1 1
 6% of DH racers don't know what mechanical doping is.
  • 1 2
 More of the “fairness” nonsense.

Seems to it’s be easier to game the system if you were to become transgendered Smile
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