Thought Experiment: What Would It Take to Build a Sub-7kg Mountain Bike Using Only Stock Parts?

Apr 28, 2021
by Alicia Leggett  

We have seen some amazing builds over the years from craftsmen like Dangerholm, who sand and shave their bikes down to their most minimalist, purest forms. Those bikes weigh in below 7kg or even close to 6kg through sheer obsession and meticulous customization. But bike parts keep getting better, and some niche components once limited to the tinkerers are now available to any dreamer or dentist who wants to do things the old-fashioned way: by spending lots of money.

So how light a bike could we build using only stock parts?

We set ourselves the challenge of putting together an imaginary sub-7kg bike. Many bike companies boast about hitting the sub-8kg mark when they release new top-end ultralight hardtails. But why stop there? How light could we go before we would need to start customizing in ways that I, for one, am entirely unqualified for? And most importantly, could we cut that weight while actually making it a bike we'd want to ride? We decided to find out what it would take.

Rules:

No Frankenbiking – all components must be stock.

For the purpose of this experiment, I didn't "build" my own wheel, mostly to see what the stock options were.

All parts had to be production models, available to the public.

The bike couldn't be too sketchy and had to somewhat balance light weight with decent performance.

All parts have to be at least somewhat intended for mountain bike use.

Any company had to be fairly reputable. While there are some cheap generic carbon options out there, they tend to be lacking in quality control, and that's not what we want.

Any company must have a legitimate website. Information about and access to each part must be readily available. No weird eBay stuff. An attempt to visit the company's website must not take me to a Viagra advertisement. (This happened with a surprisingly well-known company.)

Note: Not all actual weights were available. Some of these use claimed weights, some use actual weights if available, and some are educated guesses. Prices are the same way - in some cases, companies don't list MSRPs, so I went with what seems like average retail pricing from third-party sellers. In other cases, I used MSRPs, and I'm sure you could find better deals for some parts online. Just remember, it's an imaginary bike so it really doesn't matter.

Without further ado, here's an example of how one could build a bike under 7 kilograms (15.4 lb).



Frame: Mondraker Podium - 775g - $2899USD

Mondraker Podium

For the frame, the obvious choice was the world's lightest full-production hardtail frame, which weighs in at 775g. The Mondraker Podium has what the Spanish company calls "XC forward geometry," with a 68.5-degree head tube angle and a 444mm reach on the medium frame.

Wheels: Berd XC Series Carbon Wheels - 1140g - $1895


The Berd wheels are a little weird, but they're light as hell. While the string-like spokes may be polarizing, they weigh significantly less than traditional steel spokes and are said to be more durable. Since Daniel Sapp approved of the Atomik wheels with Berd spokes last year, I figured I'd suspend my disbelief and pick these wheels for the job.

The spokes are made of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, or UHMWPE, which is said to have nine times the strength-to-weight ratio of steel. They also supposedly provide better vibration damping, which does make sense and which Daniel's review validated.

So yeah, that might be a risk, but you have to take some risks to build a bike under 7kg.

Brakes: Trickstuff Piccola - 340g - $1082USD


Trickstuff's Piccola brakes are the lightest on the market, with the front brake weighing in at just 150g with the hose cut at 70cm. I estimated 360g for both brakes with hose. And what's more, they are said to actually work extremely well -- well enough that some EWS racers use them.

Rotors: Ashima Ai2 160mm 6 bolt - 73g each = 146g - $60USD


The entire brake setup on this bike is aesthetically beautiful, with the refined Trickstuffs matched with Ashima rotors so light they're barely there. These do heat up quickly, given the minimal braking surface, but thanks to the low mass, they also cool quickly.

Fork: RockShox SID SL Ultimate - 1326g - $799


As for a fork, we went with the lightest XC fork on the market. The RockShox SID SL Ultimate is a 100mm 29" fork with 32mm stanchions. That said, if we wanted to cut even more weight here, there are some great rigid carbon options and even a Lauf suspension fork that weigh in at under a kilogram. Still, we decided to stick along the lines of a traditional XC bike here and go with the telescoping option.

Tires: Schwalbe Thunder Burt LiteSkin 2.1 R (425g), Schwalbe Rocket Ron LiteSkin 2.25 F (520g) = 945g - $184USD


For the tires, the goal was to balance XC ability with weight. For a fast-rolling rear tire, the Thunder Burt fits the bill, while keeping the weight very low. On the front, it made sense to choose something a little more confidence-inspiring, and the Rocket Ron inspires just the right amount of trust while still being very much a lightweight XC tire.

The lighter, faster-rolling but less grippy Thunder Burt.

Grips: Extralite Hypergrip w/ plug ends - 12g - $19USD


Some grips have some heft, but these grips are not those grips.

Pedals: Crankbrothers Eggbeater 11 - 174g - $450


Another of the world's lightest. The Crankbrothers Eggbeater 11 pedals weigh half what most clips do, with a titanium body and steel spring.

Saddle: Syncros Belcarra R SL - 150g - $310USD


Assuming in this fantasy world the bike would actually get ridden, the saddle is no place to skimp. Yes, there are saddles that weigh less than 150g. These come to mind. That said, I went with something a little more mainstream, but still pretty damn light with the price tag to show for it.

Headset: Cane Creek AER Series II - 50g - $100USD


The Cane Creek AER headset is light as AER.

Top cap: OneUp EDC Top Cap - 4.2g - $25USD


This is a nifty solution for headset preload, and it shaves about 6 grams off the weight of a traditional star nut in addition to the weight of the top cap and bolt, giving you roughly 15g in leeway to eat 1/5 of a standard donut before your ride without worrying about weighing yourself down.

Seatpost: Schmolke 1k TLO Seatpost - 95g - $475USD


TLO stands for The Lightest One, which is what this is, as far as I can tell. The MTB version is slightly burlier than the road one (thank god), but not by much, weighing in below 100g, which is about the weight of a chihuahua puppy, among other things.

Seatpost clamp: Tune Würger Skyline - 4.5g - $90USD


This seatpost clamp uses no more material than absolutely necessary.

Stem: Extralite HyperStem Stealth 80mm - 69g - $208USD


Extralite is a no-bullshit Italian company that does exactly what the name suggests: Make extra light stuff. Based on how many World Cup XC racers run Extralight components, the performance seems decent too.

Handlebars: Extralite HyperBar 3 750mm - 98g - $208USD


Another light offering from Extralight.

Shifter: Shimano XTR 12-speed - 115g - $136USD


While AXS is all the rage these days, Shimano XTR still wins in the weight-saving department, even with cable and housing factored in.

Derailleur: Shimano XTR 12-speed - 240g - $243USD


Most of the weight savings of Shimano vs. SRAM here come from the derailleur, which does not have a battery weighing it down.

Derailleur hanger: SRAM UDH - 26g - $15 USD

Cassette: Garbaruk 12-speed 10-52 - 335g - $250USD


This cassette, made for Shimano XTR, actually costs less than a 12-speed XTR and weighs a bit less, too.

Chain: Shimano XTR 12-speed - 262g - $65USD

Shimano did a nice job on the XTR chain, so no need to look elsewhere.

Cable and housing: KCNC Titanium Cable and Fasi Turbo Plus housing - 45g - $100USD

Specialized cables and housing are for the real weight weenies.

Cranks: e*Thirteen XCXr Carbon Mountain Crank w/ e*Thirteen 32t UL direct-mount chainring - 385g - $463USD


The e*Thirteen XCXr cranks are the lightest carbon off-road cranks on the market, available for gravel and XC. We'll pair them with the e*Thirteen chainring but look elsewhere for a lighter bottom bracket.

Bottom bracket: BBinfinite BSA30 BB - 58g - $175USD

Another opportunity to shave a few grams.

Rear axle: Extralite Blacklock - 30g - $82USD

A stock thru-axle weighs upwards of 70g, so this is a nice reduction.

Sealant: 90g - $5USD

With narrow tires, 90g seems like an appropriate amount.

Rim tape: 15g - $5USD

I'm probably overestimating here, but who knows.

Valves: Colorado Composites 44mm Tubeless Valves - 8g - $22

It's a minor touch, but these do save 6-8g over standard brass tubeless valves of the same length. Plus, they're pretty.

Rotor bolts: Far and Near Titanium Rotor Bolts - 14g set - $50USD



The bottom line: Weight

Upon adding this up initially, I arrived at a bike that weighed 7.1kg. While that is insanely light and is significantly lighter than most World Cup XC bikes, I decided to go back and make a few tweaks to see if I could arrive at a sub-7kg build.

I made some changes and added things up again, and arrived at 6,952g.

That leaves another 48g for things like grease and cable ferrules.

If I wanted to keep shaving weight, the next step would be to start replacing steel bolts with aluminum and titanium ones, starting at the brake calipers. We're talking marginal gains here.

The bottom line: Money

The other piece of this is, of course, the price tag.

The full build comes out to $10,415. My takeaway from this is that hardtails seem to level out at around $10k. That is, yes, you technically could spend more on a bike build (and/or just buy a Levo eMTB and/or get a full suspension bike), but once you pass $10k, your bike really isn't getting lighter. (Though it probably is getting shinier and more worthy of living out the rest of its days in a museum rather than on the trails.)

But hey, if you want to build that bike, all power to you.



If you were to build a featherweight bike, what would you do differently?


319 Comments

  • 550 2
 If you like that, you'll be impressed by my attempt to build a 40lb bike with used parts. Its been hard to get that last ounce to get over the 40lb weight limit, but with some extra grease I think I've done it
  • 183 2
 A few litres of sealant in each tyre will do it.
  • 92 1
 About ~15 years ago, I remember being impressed that my buddy got his dh bike below 40lbs.
  • 96 0
 Have you tried using cushcore and tannus inserts in the same wheel?
  • 70 4
 Add a motor
  • 4 1
 @1Surfer1: beat me to the comment
  • 4 0
 this seems like way more fun
  • 3 0
 @dreamlink87
I did like that, and I am impressed. PB feature!
  • 16 0
 This. My current build is a parts build based on price and robustness. I’ve never weighed it for fear of knowing.
  • 17 0
 @steflund: Can confirm, used to have a pair of these circa 2006. And yes, user name checks out.
  • 6 0
 @steflund: BMW stuff always is so overbuilt it's both amazing and head-scratching. It will always remind me of the time when I was working at a bike shop in SoHo in early 2000s and one of the guys (Joe I think) brought in the BMW DH bike. I commented to a co-worker (apparently within ear-shot of Joe) that the bike was basically not designed well and that there had to be a better (lighter) way of designing a DH bike. Needless to say that did not go over very well. lol
  • 4 1
 @fartymarty: downhill tubes filled with sealant will also go a long way to get there
  • 3 0
 @steflund: aww that just gave me warm n fuzzy memories from another time .

I remember seeing a spooky hardtail being built up with shinburgers, profile cranks, 24” wheels on CK hubs, and monster Ts! The thing must’ve weighed a ton.
  • 2 2
 I think what needs to happen now is that @Alicia Needs to try and do this at half the cost of this build.

Add in the mix that it actually needs to be built within a timeline - scenario is a race date etc.
Frame and forks must be brand new but other components can be second hand from genuine sites.

Aaaaaaaaand go!

This is what “pinkers” will want to see.
  • 2 0
 @fartymarty: I use water instead of sealant. It's marginally heavier
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: I would be impressed if you got one under 50lbs that long ago!
  • 6 0
 @steflund: I remember there used to be 500g+ cnc-ed stem in the shape of monkey head some 15 years ago but I cannot find any pictures or even proof of its existence... any one remembers that?
  • 3 0
 Easy to do with a mid-school BMX: firstly, run two tyres on each wheel - a 1.5" inside something bigger. Then run 71 spokes. My friend never got punctures or buckled wheels.
  • 1 0
 Fill 'er up!
  • 1 0
 @kcy4130: pretty sure my Tues AL weighs over 40 lbs, it does after I unload my buddies TR11 anyway...
  • 3 0
 @rarrity: I just finished an overpriced (dumbest time ever to build a bike) Mega Alloy 290 XXL build with Lyrik fork, full XT build, and a carbon bar that weighs 38.5 lbs...I am running DH casing DHR/DHF tires w/ Cushcore.
  • 1 0
 @winko: was it the dirty dog reaper stem?

Also for curiosity’s sake, there’s the ‘fist of fury. see both here:

www.mtbr.com/threads/i-3-skulls.334450
  • 1 0
 Lol, I have a scale now, I have to weigh my bike. All I can guess, is that it's heavy. It feels heavy.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, it's 33.4 pounds, single crown, hardtail. Lol.
  • 2 0
 I started with a Madonna frame and the rest took care of itself. Now I'm chasing 45. N+5 is the new hotness in bikes. Get heavier or get left behind.

If you aren't checking the tongue weight of your hitch before you load your bike, you're doing it wrong.
  • 2 0
 @Kramz: I just weighed my hardtail. 35.3 pounds with cushcore and dd casing tires.
  • 145 0
 What would it take to build a sub 7k mtb? The money that was dedicated towards my child's college fund.
  • 152 8
 Why does your kid need to go to college?
  • 68 3
 @Fullsend2-13: the way things are going, you'll need an undergrad to serve coffee by 2035, so, I want my kids to go to college so they don't live with me for the remainder of their years.
  • 85 0
 @Fullsend2-13: I like to read this as a compliment, @dexterfawkes "Your kid is so smart, why would he need college? Great job parenting and setting up your youngster for a fulfilling life without college, you deserve to buy that bike."

Well there's my moment of optimism on the internet for the day - commence downvoting.
  • 23 1
 @skeeple: don't worry I know him plus that was a joke.

Also if you really want to you can get a great job without a college education.
  • 22 0
 @Fullsend2-13: only if you like working...
  • 2 1
 Don't leave some room for that new Specialized ebike
  • 2 0
 @Fullsend2-13: asking the real questions here!
  • 1 2
 I don't know about building from up but I know lots of bikes to buy full. The only problem is you have to know where to look. I found a tiny shop in West Virginia that I bought my bike from at the start of this year. The shop is called New River Bikes and they are getting bikes in the shop so definitely worth checking them out. I am so grateful for these guys getting a bike in so that I could upgrade from my twenty-year-old hardtail.
  • 14 3
 10k is not going to make a dent in college expenses. Not in the US, anyway. Might as well put it to use on a bike.
  • 25 4
 @rnayel: Screw college. The trades are where it's at. By the time that average college kid can graduate with $80k in student loans, the average trade apprentice will be making $50k with no student debt. Then, depending on the trade, 6 figure income after about 8 years if they're not completely incompetent. College is just an indoctrination factory these days. If your kid doesn't want to be a dr, lawyer, engineer, etc...it's just a huge waste of money.
  • 7 1
 @sempertubby: yeah. I have a research masters degree and too many books. When the pandemic hit it wiped my industry out, and all that high level education counted for nothing. Fortunately I’ve built & renovated all my life and was able to hire myself out as a handyman, and it saw me through the worst of it.
Much respect to trades
  • 5 0
 I dropped out of college after a year and currently live in a van and do trail work.. parents take that as you will @Fullsend2-13:
  • 3 0
 @sempertubby: Gotta agree with you there, mate. My mom signed me up for Running Start so I had the option to go to College early, I also had a College Bound Scholorship, and running start pays for quite a bit anyway. About two years, and maybe $400 out of pocket later I am onto my second job starting next Monday at $18 an hour machining.

Go to a Technical school, folks! I feel so bad about all the folks out there my age who are working retail, McDonalds, the gas station...
  • 1 0
 @Kieranf: I’m stoked people enjoy building trails despite the lack of monetary reward. Thank you.
  • 4 0
 @sempertubby: Agree, I have a Masters that cost a ton of money that I did because hey, you have to go to college if you want to be a success. At 30, I am quiting my job and going into something I need no degree for, just some industry knowledge and experience.

Unless my kids really want to become a Dr, Lawyer, [Insert other professional roles], I am not pushing the degree route unless they really want it.
  • 1 0
 @rnayel: haha the best reason for a child to go to uni. My kids are 2 and 5 Frown
  • 2 0
 @rnayel: correction, the remainder of YOUR years
  • 2 0
 @enduroelite: correction taken, the thought of losing one of my children is unspeakably horrifying.
  • 1 0
 @rnayel: I only have 1. 1 world to die for.
  • 1 1
 @Fullsend2-13: That's where the parties and young ladies are at.
  • 2 0
 @sempertubby: totally agree

-- lawyer who once had dreams
  • 1 0
 @rnayel: Hahaha, I took Architectural Technologies, and didn't graduate, and everyone I talked to afterwards, couldn't get a jerb. I was like, "WOW COOL!!!".
  • 87 7
 7Kg is 15.4324 Lbs for those who prefer freedom units. Even though light, it looks like a bike that could actually be ridden fairly aggressively, well, maybe not the tires, but the remainder of the bike looks fairly tough.
  • 50 3
 You´d think. My buddy recently built this exact frame with very similar build components for his return to XC racing. Modern full suspension is so efficient he got left on anything "washboard" as he bounced around and could not get the power through the rear wheel. It lasted one race and he decided to strip it and use the parts to lighten his existing short travel FS.

I guess if you were not racing there may be some fun had here - the sketchy, pin-balling, "bout to crash on every kicker" kind of fun. But an expensive experiment that my buddy regrets.
  • 11 0
 @Bustacrimes: It's mind boggling to me that this frame weighs about as much as a flimsy XC tire. I can see why your buddy was interested.
  • 48 0
 This is like car/truck enthusiasts who spend hundreds of thousands modifying a vehicle to chase an ever higher hp number on a dyno. All while making the actual vehicle completely unusable except maybe on a drag strip. It's a hobby for those who enjoy the process, rather than enjoy using the end product. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
  • 24 86
flag Molesdigmyjumps (Apr 28, 2021 at 8:32) (Below Threshold)
 Freedom units referring to USA presumably?
Those units standardised by the British 200 years ago and used every day in the UK?
Ill take it we are a free country but some North Americans (in the continental sense of the word) need to extract their tete from their derriere.
  • 77 32
 Blehh.....every time I hear the phrase "freedom units" I puke in my mouth a little bit.
  • 12 2
 As a 160lb male who has broken many carbon seatposts in his time, that seatpost is not going to last.
  • 11 0
 @Molesdigmyjumps: These units are working themselves free from UK, though we can't seem to shake miles, yards and feet free...
Maybe that's what @mayel from metric America meant Smile they're free to disappear to silly places
  • 30 1
 @Molesdigmyjumps: Tête prend un accent circonflexe sur le première e, and derrière prend un accent grave sur le second e, aussi, va te faire foutre.

As for the freedom units, it's a slight jab at the Americans who like to use pounds with no regard for the metric system. The British have a concept of metric to imperial translation, even though you throw stones in for good measure.
  • 6 0
 aggressive pavement
  • 10 1
 @Molesdigmyjumps: so whats this bike weigh in stone?
  • 37 5
 @rory: there are two kinds of countries on this planet. those that have been to the moon, and those that use the metric system.


*it's a joke. i know the metric system is better.
  • 5 0
 @Bustacrimes: I've started taking my gravel bike on a few tame XC trails. I imagined that its 20lb weight and stiffness would make up for the lack of suspension on my ~30lb Smuggler in overall speed on some really tame, flowy trails. At least on the climbs.

I was wrong.

After that experience, It doesn't surprise me at all to hear that a FS XC bike in the low 20lbs would be overall faster than a ~17lb hardtail. Especially when XC race courses are trending more and more technical.
  • 21 1
 @adamkovics: The computers used for the moon landing were all using metric.

Also a NASA 125 million dollar mars orbiter vanished due to failure to convert from SI to metric
  • 2 1
 @Bustacrimes: sorry, also not a thought experiment


@rory: pls deduct puke weight from system, unless swallowed
  • 1 2
 @JohanG: I’m usually around 200 pounds and I’ve never broken a Reverb, Transfer, or Oneup. Fingers crossed.
  • 4 1
 @rory: Freedom units
  • 12 0
 @adamkovics: Berma/Myanmar has been to the moon?

;-)
  • 12 0
 @JohanG: Wait, so you're saying that after the terrifying experience of breaking a carbon seatpost you decided to buy another one??
  • 5 0
 @JohanG: how are you breaking seat posts? I'm 205 and have yet to break one, even on a 19lbs rigid SS that saw more than its fair share of crashes. (it thought it was a trail bike).
  • 4 0
 @husstler: it’s mind boggling to me that this frame weighs almost half an enduro tyre!!
  • 7 1
 @akaluggage: hopefully we’ll keep becoming more and more metric unless Rees-Mogg has his way in which case we’ll be back to inches, feet, yards, ounces, pounds and doffing our caps to our gentried betters again
  • 2 0
 @adamkovics: interestingly NASA actually use the metric system and have since the 90s according to google.
  • 8 7
 Nobody went to the moon.
  • 2 1
 I would like to see a part 2 of this that attempts to build the lightest full sus bike with no compromised tires, brake discs, and shocks.
  • 13 0
 @Thirty3: Is that supposed to be funny? even Wallace and gromit have been there.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: about.95 stone, offhand, I think.
  • 4 0
 @Thirty3: Wallace and Grommit did...
  • 1 0
 @SprSonik: Two FSA K-force, one Syntace (made by Ritchey iirc), and a Schmolke. On a hardtail I really liked the compliance of the K-force but they kept cracking on the front edge of the post. Now I use droppers on full sus bikes.
  • 1 0
 @Thirty3: That's true. They just built this giant rocket that could go to the moon, but instead just launched it into space somewhere else so everyone thought they went to the moon. But we're smarter than that.
  • 1 2
 If you prefer "Freedom Units" your should be writing your converted weight in Pounds, Ounces and Fractions.
Decimalisation of something which is divisible by 16 smaller measures does not make much sense.
The accuracy of Imperial measurements comes from their use of fractions and being able to write very precise numbers without a million decimal places.
It typically halves the two measurements, ie 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16 etc. The imperial units are all random numbers per unit (12, 16 etc) as they are easily devisable by small amounts without the need for a calculator.

As for the Stones vs lbs argument; why Measure something in a smaller unit? You'd say America is ~2,800 miles across, not 4,928,000 Yards or 14,784,000 Feet
  • 1 0
 @Konda: True freedom units are measured in Big Macs, and just like you can't divide America you can't divide a Big Mac, so fractions/decimal and other French-Socialist nonsense isn't needed.
  • 52 0
 1. Get a drill. 2. Install drill bit into drill. 3. Dimple drill every part on your bike.
  • 45 1
 I prefer the sawzall technique, you can drastically reduce weight by removing a good foot and a half from the middle of your top tube and down tube.
  • 23 0
 Speed holes!!!
  • 16 0
 @FloridaHasMTBToo: How about just removing your own feet? It'll save at least 10lbs per side, and now you can have direct mount cleats!
  • 9 0
 @Angu58: you only need one kidney too, could probably live with one lung, remove a toe or too, thats got to be at least 1kg
  • 16 0
 @Angu58: If each of your feet weighs 10 pounds, I think you have bigger problems lol.
  • 10 0
 @Stoaks: This is an old joke: Do you want to lose 12lbs of unsightly fat? .... Just cut off your head.
  • 4 1
 @kcy4130: Mean-drunk dad joke.
  • 4 0
 Consume a ton of laxatives. ‘Shed’ a few pounds. Go ride
  • 2 0
 @BigPapi69: I'd say keep that 2nd lung. You are, after all, an XC racer!
  • 2 0
 @RayDolor: tbh i think one less lung is worth it, less weight so you wont have to breathe as hard
  • 2 0
 @nert: Whatcha doing to your car Homer?
  • 47 0
 I wanna see the heaviest bike we could build (no battery or motor)
  • 4 0
 I want to see the heaviest wheels that can be built and what it's like to ride that. Use lead to add some mass even.
  • 7 0
 @ryan77777: Finally some leading experiment.
  • 11 0
 That would actually be interesting, if you had similar rules for it has to be a currently available products from a reputable bike brand (no Marlboro Lights branded frames etc)

Then even more interesting would be to actually build both bikes and race them around a course with lots of ups and downs and see what the difference actually ended up being.
  • 20 0
 @ryan77777: fortus 30 rims (720g each)+ alpine spokes(7g each)+ brass nipples 65g+ cushcore(260g)+ onyx hubs (629g)+ schwalbe super downhill casing (1400g each) so around 5.3kg, it will be like a bullet on flat open sections Big Grin
  • 17 0
 Meta AM 29 with coil and CushCore. This was too simple Razz
  • 3 0
 I’ve got a few to enter into this contest.
  • 2 0
 @Patrick9-32: This would be PB's greatest day
  • 3 0
 @Noeserd: Woah! That would be really interesting to try.
  • 6 0
 Reminds me of the time Seth took a Walmart bike, filled the frame & bars with sand, and then put water in the tires:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=vq7fF0_AjW0
  • 3 0
 @ryan77777:
Back in the day if you wanted a wheel that would never bend or dent, you wanted FRX5’s
I believe it was just under 10 pounds for the wheelset
  • 6 0
 @lkubica: DH Assegais, AXS seatpost, FastFlex bars, that new XT 11 speed drivetrain. I just looked and you can still buy brand new Hussefelt stems!

I kind of want this bike...
  • 1 0
 @ryan77777: Solid cast iron wheels. Doesn’t seem like a bad option for all those “I don’t care about weight” people too.
  • 1 0
 @gibspaulding: Flex bards seems as great option, as their are heavier than usual bars, would have them but the price tag is too steep Smile 11 speed XT checked (ok, used to have it but after the cassette has worn out I bought a light all steel Chinese 11-46 and not only it was cheaper, weights 390g but also it works, amazing Wink ). Ok, so my bike could be like 500g heavier, but that's it Wink
  • 2 0
 Once had a kids 20inch wheel full sus bike come in for a new tyre when i worked in a bike shop, nearly fell over lifting it onto the stand. Got the scales out for curiously and after getting a hand to lift the bike and position it to stay balanced it came in at just under 40kg (thankfully the stands were rated to 50kg but damn they were flexing)! A 20 inch kids bike weighing 40kg is just mad. I have no idea what brand it was but I would just get that and call it a day on the heaviest bike contest
  • 1 0
 @RaceReadyBraking: I don't understand why parents would do that to their kids, how to make your kid think cycling sucks for life in one easy step.... you do get to save like 15 quid compared to a used bike though.
  • 2 0
 @ryan77777: Start with two tyres per wheel (thin tyre inside fat tyre), then go to 95 spokes per wheel as per some mid-school BMX wheels.
  • 1 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: Oh my god. I just looked those up - amazing! Need to see if I can buy a set.
  • 1 0
 @DarrellW: That's actually genius. Starting with a road tire and going up to 2.6", could probably even do 3 tires!
  • 5 0
 @DirkMcClerkin: @Patrick9-32 @steflund Stay tuned Smile Smile Smile If you come across some really heavy parts, feel free to send them my way. This one is way harder because no companies brag about how heavy their stuff is.
  • 1 0
 Time for a gravity bike build.... you save some weight by removing the gears, crankset etc... but they literally add weights to the bike for better handling and faster times:

www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/oct/02/we-live-for-gravity-biking-deadly-sport-is-way-of-life-in-medellin
  • 30 0
 Don't know why you're surprised at a Viagra ad. It's targeted marketing. If we've learned anything in the recent E-Bike craze, it's that MTBers appreciate help getting up.
  • 8 0
 @BonemasterJ 2 things: 1. comment gold. 2. Username checks out.
  • 2 0
 The electrical field coming from the battery kinda roasts the living daylights out of some very delicate organs. Hence Viagra.
  • 19 0
 You could save 100g instantly by spec'ing XTR 9000 11 speed shifter, derailleur, and SRAM 1199 cassette. Not everything has to be 12 speed.
  • 14 1
 Also you don't need brakes(ride it like a brakeless bmx), grips(you're already holding on for dear life), seat(you're going so fast that you don't need a seat or seat post in the way), and pedals(put a titanium bolt into the cranks and drill a hole through your shoe and now its clipless).
  • 24 0
 I agree completely. Also you don't need bars cuz you can just hold onto the stem unless you're weak I guess
  • 10 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: Just put a grip directly on the headtube.
  • 17 0
 @Negetiv: you grip the crown, its more aero.
  • 5 0
 Ha, you reminded me that I used to use road bar tape as grips on my XC rig, double wrapped in the middle for a bit of shape.
  • 3 0
 @RonSauce: Just go unicycle and hold the front wheel axle with your hands. No need for a fork or frame.
  • 3 0
 @Negetiv: I think some XC pro's actually did this but on the crown of the fork.
  • 12 0
 @thrasher2: I guess just get naked and run through the woods for ultimate weight savings.
  • 4 0
 @RonSauce: Yes, but you still need a handlebar, to, like, steer and stuff.....
  • 3 0
 @RayDolor: ill just direct myself with my weight weenie.
  • 3 0
 @RayDolor: real men put a vicegrip directly onto the steerer
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Had me laughing for hours
  • 17 0
 Huck to flat
  • 21 1
 More like huck to snap Smile
  • 1 0
 @Rigidjunkie: now that is a competition to root for.
  • 2 0
 We all want to see this haha
  • 13 2
 You spend all that time building out a killer build but then skimp HARD on that cassette just for weight, that cassette won't shift nearly as good as the XTR cassette. Could also go 11spd and save some weight.
  • 5 1
 I would have thought the 11-speed would have made much more sense given that its still available in the XTR offering and plenty capable for a 15 pound hard tail.
  • 22 1
 Except Garbaruk cassetes work really well.
  • 5 1
 @nozes: I used a Garbaruk cassette for a season. It was **not very good**.
  • 1 0
 not a craft beer just regular crappy XTR the racing standard.
  • 2 0
 agree 100%

11spd xx1 cassette is 260g
11psd xx1 trigger shifters 103g
11psd xx1 derailleur 240g (surprised that 12spd xtr is that light)
  • 2 0
 I wondered why there isn't some superlight weight weenie 10-46 11 or maybe even 10 speed cassette with the largest 4 cogs aluminium. There would be definitely a market for it.
  • 2 0
 @SickEdit: The Chinese brand ZTTO makes stuff like that. I presume they didn’t meet the criteria.
  • 2 0
 @Caddz: 11 speed still exists? No way you can actually use that anymore, it's ancient technology. Almost like putting friction shifters to your downtube. No reputable person would even mention that's an option.

*I use 11sp drivetrains on both of my MTB's and see no reason to "upgrade".
  • 2 0
 @hirvi:@hirvi: Long live 11 speed HG. 11/46 with a 28t front ring and 29" wheels.
Or the more recently available 11-51 and 30t front ring.
I hadn't used my Sram 10 toothed cog/30T ring combo in two years, except by mistake.
  • 12 1
 I thought this was going to be a weightweenie project.
Then I saw a 150 gram saddle...that's about double what a real WW would accept.
Check out gelucarboncreation.com/pt for the lightest saddles out there.
  • 3 6
 For weight and cost savings, a Tioga Weeny is one way to go (80g / $35):
bmxultra.com/news/product-spotlight-tioga-weeny-pivotal-seat

I've been riding this season with just a small kids saddle slammed all the way down and have been amazed at how little I've missed sitting down after the first week or two of getting used to using slightly different muscle groups and keeping my legs in a less rigid stance.

More and more the idea of bikes having saddles to begin with seems odd to me when I compare to other sports.

In other endurance sports like distance running or XC skiing, people would look at you like you're crazy if you suggested carrying extra weight in order to be able to sit down.

So why does every take it as gospel that you even need a saddle on a mountain bike?
  • 2 0
 @TimTucker: If the weight savings were worth the energy expenditure of bearing your own weight, I have to think that would already have happened in XC racing.

Now if you're talking about fitness, sure. When I don't have much time to ride I try to stay off the saddle to make the most of it, and build muscles for stand-up sports.
  • 5 0
 @TimTucker: I hope you are kidding. As a long term SS rider, I do plenty of standing on my rides, but that seat is still necessary. I couldn't imagine doing 30-40 miles without one.
  • 1 0
 You need a saddle to sop the seatpost going up your ar$e !!
@TimTucker:
  • 1 0
 @gcrider: But if you start from the assumption that you're not going to have a saddle, you can save weight by omitting the seatpost entirely.
  • 1 0
 @timeOday: I'd wager the biggest reason why it hasn't happened in racing is that the UCI are a bunch of stick in the muds who insist on doing things because "that's the way it's always been done"

UCI says you can't have bikes under a set weight limit... almost no one puts in the engineering effort to mass produce bikes under that limit even though we know it would be an advantage.

UCI says you have to have a saddle... almost everyone makes bikes with saddles.
  • 10 1
 Trickstuff brakes are not really available to the public. Last time I checked there was an 18-month waiting list and it was similar before the pandemic.
  • 29 1
 We Ship brakes to customers every day. Almost all of the are "the Public". The demand is huge. And we can't compeomise quality for quick growth. That would be selling out.
That is why there is such a long waiting list.

The quickest way to get the brakes is to order them and to not wait with it. Orders are served First in First out.
There is no payment requested before your Brake is ready to Ship. If you should Change your mind we can make changes to your Order during the waiting period or If you should Not want your Brake anymore you can cancel anytime whithout Charge.
  • 13 1
 @Trickstuff: So....everything he said was correct.
  • 9 0
 @JohanG: Yes he is correct. If you want them, you will have to wait for those brakes. I didn't mean to contradict @drjonnywonderboy . Facts are facts. Just giving a bit of background information
  • 1 1
 @Trickstuff: I'll slip you an extra 20 euros to put my order in the top 10% of the line.
  • 1 0
 @Trickstuff: how soon will r2 have any back in stock?
  • 1 0
 @Trickstuff: im not putting you guys down at all. I want your brakes as the reviews show the Maxima to be the most powerful , but 18 months is too long for me. I am blessed and in a very fortunate position to have the disposable income to buy Santa Cruz, Push, Chris King components etc and I would pay for your brakes and even wait 2-3 months, but 18 months is too long and I went for the second best and run the Magura Mt7s.
  • 10 2
 You forgot to add the $900m to free that ship in the Suez canal - you're not getting any of those parts till that's sorted...?
  • 6 0
 This guy catches up on his news monthly.
  • 3 1
 @BigMulaCeazy: Actually, seems you're the one who's behind. Yes, they physically freed the ship from the shore, but it's still 'stuck'. Egyptian authorities are holding it, and all of its cargo, essentially ransom until the $900m in fees are paid.
  • 2 0
 @TheLoamDeranger: Bastards. I mean, businessmen?
  • 6 0
 I like the Rotor Cranks at 360 grams. It's a high quality product.
I've ran 130 gram Chinese made seats for years in AM riding with no problems.
11speed Sram is all a 7 kg HT could ever need. The X01 cassette weighs like 243 grams or something.
Their is a German company that lightens 11 speed Shimano derailleurs to like 145 grams.
Alibaba Ti bolts could knock off another 60 grams or so less than $100.
  • 2 0
 I think the XX 10s cassette is 190g for the 10-36T, even less for the 10-34T! With a 36T chainring was all I ever needed for racing.
  • 1 0
 @bobthestapler: XC racing though?
  • 1 0
 @boozed: Yes. But were talking about a 7kg hardtail, so to me racing is the main focus of such a project.
  • 1 0
 @bobthestapler: Sure, it was the suggested gearing that threw me!
  • 10 1
 Ashima Rotors - great if you don't need to stop and enjoy being followed by packs of wild turkeys.
  • 2 0
 I run these rotors on my XC bike. They wear pads faster and make a slight buzzing sound under hard braking, but they bite great and are perfect for a XC race bike. I run the floating versions with AL spiders, cheap and work great.
  • 11 2
 Someone does not understand the term Stock.
  • 1 1
 LOL I was thinking the same - bikes with stock parts usually aren't gonna be light. Big Grin
  • 6 0
 my backpack would be heavier than that bike carrying a spare tire, sealant, one 24" tube and box cutter as a tubeless strip floor pump and ganja kit to ease the pain of tire repair.
  • 8 1
 I have learned through this project that lots of things are heavier than this bike
weightofstuff.com/common-items-that-weigh-about-7-kilograms
  • 5 0
 What blows me away is that the complete podium rr sl “stock” is 7.8kg $10,000

This kinda spits in the face of everybody who says you can’t build a bike for cheaper/better than complete (which I’ve known has been false forever)

Personally I’d change that carbon stick for a 500g dropper, but then I’d have to carry around the extra 300g of dollar bills I saved
  • 5 1
 1st, I'd start with a full sus trail bike frame I actually wanted to ride when I was done. Then, when I kept on making exceptions for things like dropper posts, real world tires, and 140mm+ forks... I'd give up on being a weight weenie and build a proper bicycle.
  • 5 1
 “ An attempt to visit the company's website must not take me to a Viagra advertisement. (This happened with a surprisingly well-known company.)”

Seems to me like a not insignificant portion of crowd who needs a 7kg bike also may be interested in Viagra.... I’d say Pfizer is getting the most out of their marketing money.
  • 6 0
 Thought experiment: how much do you not want to be doing work to be reading this article at work?
  • 5 0
 just drill it. You can either have a fast bike that could snap or a slow bike with no excitement.
  • 5 1
 I've done those calculations before builds a few times by weighing all the parts and supposedly getting an exact weight. After building, the bike is always heavier. DOH!!
  • 3 0
 But have you ever swapped a saddle, then gone back to the original saddle and now the bike weighs a little more?
  • 6 0
 My cassette is over 100g lighter than that. 10 speed for the win.
  • 1 0
 It’s astounding how blindly everyone is accepting the need for more speeds and teeth. Even if someone needs the dinner plate, I’m not even sure smaller steps are helpful for MTB given how often I dump the chain across 5 gears.
  • 2 0
 I’ve also tried to always look at weight and became bit of a weight weenie thinking I’d be faster uphill. But after riding a bike at 26lbs, xc tyres and 100mm travel and then trying a bike that’s 6lbs heavier, minions and 140mm, I learned weight isn’t always the first step to improve performance. The heavier bike had a steeper seat tube angle which just made it so dam comfortable to climb I could keep going and get more power without legs aching. Sure it would be even faster if I dropped weight.
  • 3 1
 this highlights how badly you get ripped off buying a complete bike. This component mix in a bike shop would have a $20,000 price tag. I know this is a hardtail but usually GX specd bikes sit around this price. Complete bikes always have one stand out thing to hook you in like carbon wheels OR a decent drivetrain OR a carbon cockpit and then they sucker punch you by getting the rest of the parts from f*cking dumpster.
  • 1 0
 Wait, what? GX sits at $10k?

Here: yeticycles.com/bikes/sb150

A Yeti (Yeti!) SB150 with XX1 AXS for 10,200.
  • 2 0
 my old trek 9.9 elite weighed in at about 6.5 kg, size medium, 26 inch wheels, rigid fork, 1x10, all the titanium and carbon. My new enduro, weighs in at almost 17 kg, size s5, 29 inch wheels, cushcore, fox 38, float x2, less carbon than I usually go for, because at the moment, its worth it to buy stuff that you can get multiples of, and will last, because parts are quickly getting harder and harder to find.
  • 4 2
 Some more ways to save weight:

Little to no tire sealant
All titanium bolts and only 3 rotor bolts
Grip tape instead of normal grips
Take some spokes out of the wheel
Titanium single speed
Cut down the bars as far as possible
Cut down the brake levers as far as possible
And sand the paint off of everything and just leave it all raw.
  • 2 0
 If you’re gonna be riding this with a 32 tooth chainring. Maybe go back to 11 speed. Pick up quite a few grams from a SRAM cassette. And can still pair it with an XTR derailleur.
  • 1 0
 If you are using BBInfinite (which are awesome) you could go ceramic and save more weight and have a more spinny BB.
Also Lindarets Titanium tubeless valves are lighter, prettier and have a wider bore so less likely to clog with sealant.
  • 3 2
 You might be able to get the bike under 7kg, but once you ride it you will quickly learn that lightweight components come at a big cost of durability and function

I learned from swapping back and fourth many times that the ashima ai2 rotors are trash compared to shimano rt-66 rotors. No reason to try and save a few grams at the cost of not actually being able to stop the bike.

Also how can anybody feel safe on a bike bike with 175 gram titanium pedals, 100 gram handlebar and 100 gram seat post? all points of contact could explode at any moment. A bike like this is best suited as a climbing bike. Believe it or not 5 lbs makes VERY little difference on your lap times
  • 1 0
 As to strength, this article failed to mention rider weight which obviously is a HUGE factor in whether featherweight components are for you!
  • 5 0
 I think most of those parts are probably a lot more durable than you'd expect. You'd throw out the pedals after one ride, not because they snapped, but because you'd realize you messed up by buying Eggbeaters...
  • 1 0
 Funny enough, I’ve never broken any lightweight bike part while riding, but I’ve broken a few bones while riding...
  • 2 0
 Cool article. Lets see something similar, and a ride report, on a 150-170mm Trail/allmtn/enduro bike that weighs 25 pounds and has at least EXO casing tires. Something you can smash hard and it'll hold up. Is it realistic?
  • 1 0
 @Bustacrimes
What FS CX bike is your buddy looking at the replace his lightweight hard tail?
I am on the fence about a new bike this year
(some are available if you know where to look), but a FS CX bike does look very interesting.
I wish I had my 2007 era Intense Spyder with 80mm of travel front and rear though with today’s tubeless wheels, a better rear shock and a dropper post. I tried a Scott Spark but it was not quite what I was looking for. Same for the Yeti.
  • 1 0
 Building a bike is beautiful. Even before the first day you ride it, it's full of memories.

I have a Spot Rocker that In built up with
RockShox SID race
SRAM XX1 carbon crank, XX1 rear 1x11
Absolute black oval chainring
XTR pedals
Bontrager KOVE XXX wheel Set c DT240 hubs
XT Brakes,
Carbon Handlebars, Seat post
Arione cx seat

Its the best (Hard tail) bike I've ridden, It's a time-machine. When I ride it I feel 10 years younger, every inch pushed forward by my legs is so instantly translated to forward momentum. The wheels are stiff as hell, It climbs like a goat. Its Laguna Seca blue with an orange seat .
  • 1 0
 You forgot a chain from what I can see.

My full suspension 29” Dean softailweighs in at 18.5lbs right now.
MSRP/PB classifieds price
Dean Duke Softail frame. $2,800/$300
Carbon fiber lefty XLR $1,495/$350
Dean Ti handle bars $300/$110
Airborne Ti layback seatpost $150/$20
DT Swiss XM1550 tricons $1,500/$150
XTR 9000 cassette $300/$100
Xt 11 speed shifter $125/$20
XTR clutched 11sp derailleur $300/$50
Fizik arione ksium saddle $120/gift
Racing Ralph tires $120/$50
ODI clamp on Grips $30/$10
Hope mono mini pros $600/$150
Factory Dean seat clamp
Hope ceramic bottom bracket $200/$75
HT ME03 pedals $170/$70
Bontrager stem $80/$20
Project 321 lefty conversion $100/50
Chris king headset $150/65
Kmc gold chain $70
MSRP $8610/Paid ~$1615
  • 5 0
 $1.50/gram.
  • 3 0
 Right, now we should see what the best value is for a light bike. I'd be you could build a 20lbs hardtail for half that cost. $5000/9071g = 55 cent/gram
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: Or, one could imagine the bike you'd have if you spent this rate per gram on a 15Kg trail or enduro bike...
  • 2 0
 "All parts had to be production models, available to the public."

I mean... If @brianpark has the STLs for his pedals up on Thingiverse.com that counts, right?
  • 3 0
 How about stating normal components weight like the headset and crankset especially for comparison?
  • 3 1
 I dunno, if you didn't spend hours and hours meticulously sanding things down, sourcing custom parts, and modifying everything, did you really earn this?
  • 1 1
 Its literally just a fantasy shopping list.
  • 4 0
 Fun and interesting read, thanks!
  • 4 2
 I'd be interested in what's possible with out using any carbon parts. Because you can't recycle carbon, it'll end up in a land fill.
  • 1 0
 *no actual carbon parts were used in this article
  • 1 0
 Most things that can be recycled end up in a landfill or incinerator anyway, so unfortunately, that won't make much difference.
  • 2 0
 @TBaldwin90: I'm pretty sure he was refering to aluminium and other metals which are indeed recycled because its cost is much lower compared to the production. Plastic on the other hand...
  • 2 0
 Wait don't Trek and Specialized both recycle carbon? If not I have no clue where my broken carbon wheel went when I sent it back to Trek for "recycling".
  • 2 0
 @TrekXCFactoryRacing: im pretty sure 90% of what I have sent out for recycling has just been thrown in a landfill/ocean.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Pretty certain you won't find too much carbon fiber at the bottom of the ocean. Believe it or not I don't think bike companies just pollute whenever they feel like it. My guess is that all the carbon ends up sitting in a warehouse until they actually figure out how to recycle it, as I've seen pictures of bins upon bins full of broken rims at Trek.
  • 2 0
 @TrekXCFactoryRacing: When carbon gets recycled, all the strands get shredded. In it's second life, it gets used as filler for non-structural applications.
  • 2 0
 @lihtan: and I think much to the disdain of manufacturers, some of that stuff does not get destroyed. There’s someone with drop tested mountain bike rims on eBay of various manufacture.

I bought 3 Used pro carbon fiber frames from some guy off FB marketplace for $250 yesterday, and he had no clue what they were really other than “expensive bike frames”. I’m guessing they were sent to be destroyed as one for sure was a sponsored riders bike.
  • 4 0
 Extralite wheels with Berd spokes is 995g with a 27mm internal width.
  • 1 0
 S-Works Romin Evo is 135g, reasonably durable for xc
  • 1 1
 sub-7kg - oh, for those US folks still in the Imperial measurements using pounds and British using stones, that's 15.4 US pounds. That's crazy for a mountain bike to be sub-23lbs! Can you even trust that the bike can last through the entire ride through rougher patches? You might as well ride paved paths or roads for something that light! Potholes might even break the wheels or frame!
  • 1 0
 147 g www.fizik.com/us_en/antares-versus-evo-00-adaptive.html?cId=93-item-211

ok so technically its a road saddle but whats the difference also it looks way cooler and the reviews are really good.
  • 2 0
 The ethirteen crank is lighter than Clavicula? I'd have to google it, but I thought Clavicula was the lightest. Saddle could have been a Tune Speedneedle.
  • 3 4
 If i'd have to build one i'd go with either scott or yeti(just because yeti u know Smile ), change the wheels to some pi rope wheels (really want to try them out) and change parts here and there, but the basic setup is good imo. Nothing is above trickstuff brakes Smile
  • 4 0
 Yeti's aren't that light in terms of frame weight.
  • 1 1
 @PHeller: I know but with other parts you still could save some weight. So I'd take the yeti because its a yeti, if i go for weight only i'd totally chose the scott scale with stripping the paint obviously.
  • 3 0
 next do the absolute heaviest bike you could build
  • 5 1
 Singlespeed
  • 3 0
 i was under the impression that XX1 mechanical was lighter than XTR
  • 3 0
 My XX1 shifter was 122g and derailleur was 269, so both slightly heavier than XTR, 36g total so relatively small difference
  • 1 0
 The cranks and cassette are lighter.
  • 5 2
 You could drop another half kilo by going to single-speed
  • 4 2
 Single Speed it! With such weight savings, you won't even need the extra gears!
  • 3 0
 get rid of the cranks and make it a push bike
  • 2 0
 @BigPapi69: or just be like Kris Holm and go full offroad unicycle.
  • 2 0
 can we build it and see how many whistler laps it takes Levy to experience a catastrophic failure?
  • 1 0
 I was just checking out those Garbaruk cassettes, def gonna upgrade when my e13 cassette and chain ring wear out again, better gearing steps, looks better and weighs less.
  • 2 0
 Most importantly lasts longer and works better.
  • 3 0
 Not approved by Schrödinger's cat
  • 2 0
 ...or maybe it is?
  • 2 0
 @woofer2609: and isn't.
  • 2 0
 Good way to start is not running stupendously heavy 12 speed drivetrain. You´re welcome.
  • 2 0
 For a real interesting project, let's build an under 7kg bike with parts that are actually in stock. Or and under 8kg...9kg?
  • 1 1
 Ooh - I LOVE this game... XD ...My rules would be a little different though - like what's the lightest All Aluminium Full Suspension MTB you can build using stock parts(I don't fancy carbon bikes - can you tell?)? =P
  • 1 0
 This would make a very nice gravel bike for where I live. Only thing is that it'll probably be a kg heavier in reality than with the listed weights.
  • 2 1
 The Rocket Ron and Thunder Burts are no longer available in the Liteskin pictured here. Schwalbe has moved to the Tubeless Easy versions.
  • 2 0
 @dangerholm, hold my beer, you got this
  • 3 0
 how do we win this?
  • 3 1
 27.5 wheels and tyres would be lighter
  • 1 1
 700c with 23mm tires
  • 1 1
 Do they not make a lighter stem of less than 80mm length? Seems like an easy place to further reduce weight and improve handling at the same time.
  • 3 0
 According to my calculations, if you keep shortening the stem into the negative length territory you can get to a 0 weight stem.
  • 1 0
 It'd be interesting to take this for a lap, I like underbiking harder trails to see how the hell my riding is doing.
  • 2 0
 You forgot to drillium everything!
  • 2 1
 Yawn... I'd like to see the Heaviest bike contest for every MTB category. Make pigs great again.
  • 1 0
 Dope EDC hack- now I can afford to mix some more star nuts into the ol snack pack!
  • 2 0
 Unicycle, half the bike, half the weight. Would I ride one, hell no.
  • 1 0
 I tried to think, but nothing happened... Apparently Pinkbike knows the feeling as well.
  • 1 1
 Weight matters. Finishing the race matters more. If your wheels explode or tire flats your day is over. Doesn't matter if its 8kg.
  • 1 0
 This makes me want to get going on a build I've been working on for years now
  • 2 0
 Okay now build it. For Win It Wednesday.
  • 3 1
 Now let's see 100 hucks to flat with it.
  • 1 0
 yes!
  • 1 0
 You'd save 10000 grams if you paid for this bike in 1 dollar bills. Pretty good deal if you ask me!
  • 1 0
 A lot of clothes on the rider and Shimano Deore and Crmo is a recipe for success. Because it makes you manly!
  • 1 0
 That Dangerholm guy is such a hack!!! @bicyclerider builds way cooler bikes!!! lol lol
  • 1 0
 Those grips look like they came off one of those cheap little scooters they sell at walmart.
  • 1 0
 @rnayel thank you very much, fellow human.
  • 2 1
 NO PARTS ARE IN STOCK so this whole thing is moot...
  • 7 0
 I think it's actually Mondraker!
  • 1 0
 @dangerholm where are you?
  • 7 10
 So,
- there are cheaper options of brakes with same or less weight
- I would day and night trade dropper and +500 gr weight penalty rather then right Seat-post under 100 gr;


Also I would say limiting budget within 5k (any random number) or so would be more interesting;
  • 27 0
 Please enlighten me about those cheaper and lighter brake options
  • 19 0
 @alicialeggett: Just run one! Half the price and half the weight! Easy peasy, fool!
  • 5 1
 @alicialeggett: I can't find how much it weighs but Hope makes that set of brakes where 2 calipers are operated via one lever. That's the only potentially lighter option I can think of
  • 2 0
 @alicialeggett: Be honest, how much of dangerholm's homework did you copy for this article? Only joking.
  • 2 2
 @alicialeggett: Formula R1 would be from top of my head
  • 1 1
 Adding a price point would definitely make this more interesting. A 4k and 6.5k option would be very interesting to see the difference of the 1.5k.
  • 2 2
 @alicialeggett: This would be a great competition to run. Set rules/budget, then let us vote on the 'winner' - 'which would you rather ride?'

Lightest all metal bike. Lightest bike under $5k, etc..
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh:
I have a pair, they’re really really light (and they’ve held up for 10+ years), but I’ve literally never weighed them or looked up their weight
  • 5 0
 @nickmalysh:
Formula R1R 267 grams
Trickstuff Piccola Carbon 158 grams
  • 2 1
 @macem: Magura MT8 SL are 195g with 2100mm hose! Trimmed down i'm sure they could get close.
  • 3 0
 @bobthestapler: well... close but not quite there.

195g is what I find on the Magura homepage. All actual measurements I can find are more like 225g for a brake with 2100mm hose and pads. Please correct me if I am wrong.
  • 1 1
 @macem: u put weight with 160 rotor for 1 brake and without for another
  • 2 1
 @macem: There's more than one iteration of Formula R1R. My R1R was 365g for both sides. MT8 Carbon is about the same, though the real bargain is MTS at 490g when it's available. I bought two complete sets at various times for $60. M9000 Race is 410g, but about $200 more on the used market.
  • 2 1
 Specialized S-Works Diverge?
  • 1 0
 Now we just need to add water bottles to make it ride better!
  • 2 1
 It would be nice to see a dropper as an option.
  • 4 0
 Not a chance. A dropper post will be weighed in pounds where the carbon rigid post will be weighed in grams.
  • 2 0
 Uh, single speed rigid?
  • 2 1
 "No Frankenbiking – all components must be stock"

so no bike then
  • 1 0
 kmcchain.us You will not be disappointed
  • 1 3
 Even dumber than the decade bike that’ll only be ridden a year.

Unless you can put out 6-7 watts per kg of body weight for an hour or so, having an ultralight bike is a waste of money.
  • 1 0
 Can I just get the Specialized Carbon balance bike and call it a day?
  • 1 0
 I'd be impressed if it was built with available in stock parts
  • 2 0
 My bike is lighter.
  • 1 0
 Now do most expensive MTB possible!
  • 2 2
 The LiteSkin tires won't hold sealant. You will have to choose the SnakeSkin (?) versions, that are heavier.
  • 1 1
 Mine always held sealant but not air. I'd have to stop in the middle of a three hour ride and pump them up haha.
  • 1 0
 18.8 lbs. and it has fork lockout.
  • 1 0
 what a way to ruin the bike putting the Oneup top cap?''''
  • 4 4
 A 32t Chainring on a superlight xc build. WTF
  • 1 2
 7,000 for a hard tail.... wow. I think I just threw up in my mouth a little.
  • 1 30
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Apr 28, 2021 at 8:44) (Below Threshold)
 Would be alot more interesting if it were a higher weight and use a full suspension bike or fs e bike instead. Hardtails are just...boring.
  • 1 2
 Making the bike is one thing... being able to ride it without snapping it is another thing
  • 1 0
 NiCe StEm Wink
  • 1 1
 I think I'd rather lose 15lbs and pocket the cash for a different build.
  • 1 0
 or a car, or an extension to the house.
  • 2 2
 No impressive thighs in hotpants, no care...
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