Thule Velospace 918 Rack - Review

Jan 31, 2018
by Matt Wragg  
Thule Velospace


Towbar-mounted racks are not as common in Europe as they are in the US, Canada, and Australia. This is mainly because in Europe most people choose to drive cars, or if they need something sturdier, vans - neither of which tend to come with a ball hitch as standard. To upgrade to a ball-hitch can cost anywhere from around €250 up to well north of €1,000 - VW UK quoted £1200 for our Golf, but our local mechanic found an alternative that hit the €250 mark - so they are a significant investment before you even think about which rack to go for.
Details:

• Supports wheelbases of up to 1300mm
• Support tires up to 4.7"
• Ball and hitch mount-only
• Integrated locks
• Easy boot access while loaded
• 5-year guarantee
• MSRP: 499.95€
www.thule.com

When it comes to choosing a rack for high-end bikes, however, they are still far and away the best option - unquestionably offering better security for your bikes in-transit and a much lower impact on your fuel economy. For modern mountain bikes (read: long, low, slack), the Velospace is the best option from the Thule range. They describe it as a "Versatile bike rack for all types of bicycles – from e-bikes and fatbikes to small children’s bicycles (for 2 bikes)." They claim it is designed to support wheelbases up to 1,300mm, tires up to 4.7" and a total load of 60kg. We have been putting one through its paces for the last year.

Thule Velospace

Thule Velospace
Thule Velospace

Thule Velospace
(From top left, clockwise) The bikes sit in two suitably deep trays; Sturdy rubber straps then hold the tires - they are easily tightened with a ratchet mechanism; The release foot pedal to tilt the rack to access the back of the car; When the rack swings back, it reveals the solid construction of the base of the rack. its movement is limited by a steel cord on either side.

Features and Construction

Here in Europe, we don't have a proliferation of styles of hitch mounts.They are regulated by the European Union and only one style is permitted - the standard 50mm ball. The Velospace clamps onto the ball with a locking lever mechanism holding it in place. Inside the lever, there is a dial to increase or decrease the clamping force. It is worth noting that when the rack is locked on, it is virtually impossible for a would-be thief to attack the lock with a drill due to its placement. You simply cannot fit a regular drill into the space available.

Bikes are then initially secured onto the rack by two arms at around top tube height that are fitted with padded grips to minimize frame damage. Those arms can be easily removed for ease of storage or positioned to suit a particular bike. Once the grip is tightened onto the frame, it can then be locked in place by disengaging the mechanism to release the grip. At this stage, the bikes feel pretty solid on the rack, but they are then further secured by sturdy, plastic straps on the front and rear wheels.

One clever feature of this rack is the release pedal. When a rack is in its travel position, it you normally cannot open your car's boot - but with a quick step on this pedal, the whole rack tilts backwards to allow access. Fixation on each bike is so secure that they do not move when the rack is angled back..

Thule Velospace

Thule Velospace
Thule Velospace

Thule Velospace
(From top left, clockwise) The two gripping arms that secure the bikes to the rack. Both gripping arms have a locking head; At the mount, there is a clamping force adjustment for the rack to fine tune the balance between gripping force and ease of use; The main clamp locks to the ball hitch - both the gripping arms and the main clamp use the same key.


Performance

The Velospace assembles easily straight out of the box with nothing more than a 5mm Allen key. Two bolts hold the rear frame in place, then you simply clamp on the grips to hold the bikes and clip in a number plate. The ease of assembly means you can just as easily disassemble it for storage (it won't fit into my loft with the rear frame still attached) and it is very easy to switch number plates so you can use it on multiple vehicles.

Thule Velospace
It is no trouble to angle the rack to gain access to the boot, even when it is fully-loaded.

Mounting a single bike on the rack is utterly simple, however, when you go up to two (there is also a three-bike version available) it becomes a little trickier. The problem is the shape of the modern mountain bike. If we were still in the 90s and all bikes were still built as a conventional double-diamond, then this would not be a problem. However, in 2018 with the ever-proliferating shapes of carbon and hydro-formed aluminium the tubes don't line up the same way. I never got to the point where a bike couldn't be mounted securely, but it does require some thought and a little patience to find a way to position the rack to some frames. This was most noticeable when shuttling with two bikes, it's not just a case of throwing them on and go for the next run.

The rectangular metal arms are not something you would want to have rub against your frame on a long journey, so you'll want to fit your bikes properly - although it is testament to the security of the fixation of this rack, that even when the arms looked to be perilously close to the frame, they never did make contact in-transit. At this price, it would be nice if it came with a simple neoprene protector for that arm, something like a chainstay protector, just for the peace of mind.

The boot access mechanism is worth paying attention to. It needs to close with a definite click, or else it will swing down when you pull away (This is advice from experience). Fortunately, the rack is so robust and the fixation so secure, that the only thing damaged when this happened was my pride.

Thule Velospace
Thule Velospace
The contact points for the bike provide good security and have left no visible marks on the bikes.

The rack comfortably handled a wide range of tire sizes - the largest tire we tested it with was a 2.8" Schwalbe Magic Mary on a 40mm rim, which it handled perfectly. Although we didn't have a fatbike on hand to test Thule's claims, they assured us that it would hold a 4.7" tire. In terms of fixation, it performed flawlessly, even on sections of pre-Autostrada in Italy, where the speeds are high and the potholes are frequent and deep. One note of caution would be in regards to the claimed compatibility with 1,300mm wheelbases. At 5'9" it's not a problem that would keep me awake at night, but the large Canyon Sender I mounted on this rack, with a wheelbase of 1,272mm in the long setting, was perilously close to the limits of what the rack can take. The limiting factor was the plastic straps around the wheels, as they do not extend too far. You'll need to place the bike accurately to make sure you can fasten both wheels securely.. However, if you do have a bike much larger than this, you may need a different type of rack altogether, as the Sender was noticeably longer than the width of the VW Passat I drive (the Golf is my wife's car). You would end up with an alarming amount of bike hanging out on either side of the car.


How is it Holding Up?

After a year of wear and tear the Velospace is showing little sign of abuse and is working flawlessly. Being short of storage space (bikes take priority with our limited space), it has lived outdoors in the wind and the rain for the majority of the time, but it has not begun to corrode in any visible or functional manner. One of the big selling points on this kind of rack is the low impact on fuel economy. Certainly, if you stand a couple of bikes on top of your car you are going to notice it drinking fuel far more rapidly, and while the rear windscreen-mounted options maybe are comparable for fuel economy, I wouldn't let you mount my carbon trail bike on one. Ever. On a long run down through Italy the Velospace and two bikes (plus a heavily loaded boot) knocked around 5mpg from my fuel economy, which may be a worry if you're getting 30mpg or so from your vehicle, but with a modern diesel that will cruise at 50mpg+, it was not a big deal.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe Velospace is a very impressive rack and really, the only issues we can find with it are minor niggles, mostly down to user error. It's strong, secure and can fit a wide range of bikes on-board. What it is not, is cheap - and when you consider the potential cost of adding a towbar as well, it may not be a realistic option for many people. If you want to transport your bikes securely, it is definitely one of the best options out there right now. Matt Wragg



117 Comments

  • + 42
 There are so many great racks currently available that I'd pass on anything needing to clamp onto the frame.
  • + 6
 The oneup rack isnt legal in Europe and also not sold here unfortunately- as with most racks from the US- if you have an accident with it youre fkd Thule is pretty much the only way to go here- they are good quality but at a cost
  • + 1
 @NotNamed: Is there a law stating that the frame must be clamped? I have never heard of it.
  • - 26
flag Poulsbojohnny (Jan 31, 2018 at 12:49) (Below Threshold)
 SO glad I don't live in the nanny state.

It's unfortunate that you can't buy a proper hitch rack. Not only are they easier to use, they are far better for the vehicle due to their mounting mechanism. Bumpers really aren't meant to take a large load (shear or torque), which is probably why the load out on this rack is so low.

I have 2 inch receivers on both of my vehicles. Neither one cost more than about $150 and were easy to mount up. AND, I just got a new rack on Amazon for $255. Holds 4 bikes, but I will admit, doesn't have as good a frame securing mechanism. But, I'm happy with this arrangement vs paying an extra $300 or more to get Thule or Yakima.
  • + 1
 @NotNamed: what is the law in Europe regarding this? Super interesting...
  • + 4
 @Poulsbojohnny: it is not attached to the bumper, the tow bar is mounted on the chassis under the bumper.
Fold away mechanisms are also common here.
For european racks, this is the only choice. And you learn pretty quickly how to place the bikes after you try it for the first time.
  • + 2
 @jzPV: Ah, that makes much more sense. Older US cars and trucks actually had a hole drilled in them to attach a ball for very light towing. That's what I had envisioned!

So you are saying that even though it is chassis mounted, it still just has a ball on it and not a proper receiver?
  • + 3
 @bblaney372: I think in general it's: If the lights or licence plate is obstructed from viewing from behind, lights and license plate must be on the rack. Also if the rack (or any part of the bike) extends over ~0.5m behind the car there must be lights on it.
  • + 1
 @bblaney372:
I really dont know exactely- here in Austria you will need to get it checked (as it is not tested for EU-standards) so you will need 2 checks:One for safety and the other that the rack is equally made to/ passes EU- standards... this costs atleast 500€- if not more.

Otherwise most parts have a "EG- Betriebserlaubnis" which means that it is legal to use in most of European countries.

I had the same problem with a hitch for my MX5 - even Austria doesnt adopts test from Germany as there is a option in Germany to instal a hitch. I gave up- spending a lot of money (1500€) and even then its not sure that it will be legal.
  • + 1
 @NotNamed:
A hitch on an MX5 isn't exactly standard, so I'm not surprised they want to check it out before you go on the road with it...
  • + 1
 @NotNamed: Have a look at the company Uebler. They are the best in my opinion!

If you buy cheap stuff you always buy twice! get some quality and dont get mad with the shitty cheap ones.
  • + 10
 @Poulsbojohnny: I'll take expensive bike racks and the covfefe that comes with them, over Donald Trump any day of the week.
  • + 2
 My mate has this rack. On a very wet windy day the clamp came unclamped and we managed to drag my YT tues along the road on the handle bars with only the wheels still fastened for about 1km before we realised! It wore 100mm of my new carbon bars and wrecked the lever. The clamp is no good for modern big tube frames and the forks rub against the other bikes rear axle. Not a good design at all for modern mountain bikes.
  • + 1
 @NotNamed: the one Matt has needs a check in certain countries. The 13-pin version already has all the papers necessary. Just like Easyfold XT and G6
  • + 1
 @StraightLineJoe:
I also don't understand why people like this system. It's awkward to get that bar with the clamps through the frames (especially if you have the 3 bike version) and like you said, it doesn't clamp the frame very well unless you over tighten it and risk damaging the frame. There are also bike racks that clamp the seat post, which I think is much better: www.futurumshop.nl/img/9164002.jpg
  • + 0
 @lev3000: One word - Brexit!
  • + 1
 @cvoc: Spinder? Never heard. Does new long am bikes fit on that rack?
  • + 1
 @StraightLineJoe: @StraightLineJoe: sounds like you didn't read the instructions where it says "we recommend the use of a secondary bungee cord or cam strap to secure the bikes to the back frame"
Thule even sell these racks with a Thule branded ratchet strap just to loop around the frames and onto the rack...

regarding fork rubbing... yeah it happens if you dont spend the time to adjust the position of the bikes properly. I use mine to transport my road time trial bike, which is far more awkward than an MTB. Just learn how to position them!
  • + 1
 @robhill: so what you're saying it isn't a very good rack for mountain bikes unless you use another attachment method and spend time adjusting the bike position...! As cvoc says its hard to get the clamp through the frames as most shocks/linkages are in the way. If it was a well designed rack for modern mountain bikes non of the above problems would be an issue.
  • + 2
 @StraightLineJoe: no, what I'm saying is you didnt set it up right, or follow the instructions.
Your point is about as valid as if you said "this bike geometry is all wrong" and you were riding someone else's bike but you didn't change the seat position for example.
  • + 2
 @pakleni:
I've had the new Pivot Firebird on it without issue, so I'd say any modern bike should fit. Maybe you run into the limits if you have one of those ultra long bikes (e.g. Pole), but that's probably the same for any bike rack.
  • + 2
 @StraightLineJoe: the arms have clamps on both sides and you'll always find a good location for the arms to clamp on the bike and on the "arch" of the rack. If you are moving two bikes that belong to you and your spouse, best buddy etc.you'll learn how to mount them. Every single time someone with a Thule rack of this kind comes to pick me up it takes no more than 3 minutes to get the bikes on and secure them safely. So no. It's not as bad as some speculate. Especially that bullsht about "modern bikes" Well the bike that is hardest to mount into this is a E-Fatbike. But it gets on it. So modern DH and trail bikes are not that edgy for Thule.

If 1up or Kuat had tow bar mount version I'd take them over Thule risking fine for not having number plates and lights at the rearmost part of the vehicle, until then... sorry... Thule seems to win for me.
  • + 1
 @Poulsbojohnny:
Hey Septic..... Wind ya neck in....
Yeah, this shitty nanny state that takes care of you when you are ill and even provides you with an income in case you can't work if you break your neck whilst out riding.... Down with this, right?
  • + 10
 Did everyone commenting skip the part of the article where it is stated that this rack is designed for the European market where they are mandated, by law, to have a ball on the hitch?

"Here in Europe, we don't have a proliferation of styles of hitch mounts.They are regulated by the European Union and only one style is permitted - the standard 50mm ball. The Velospace clamps onto the ball with a locking lever mechanism holding it in place."

None of the other racks people are mentioning will work in Europe. This rack is a workaround for that craziness.
  • + 2
 Yes... then In Europe the rule about anything being behind your car is simple: lights and license plate as close to the rear end of a car as possible. One a-hole cop is all it takes to level out the price tag with 1Up and Kuat. Oh and Matt is cheating, he is using the 7-pin connector version which is 100£ cheaper than 13-pin with different lights. Theoretically a cop can have issues with lights on 7-pin version. Practically you buy the 7-pin and an adaptor 7-13 for 15£.
  • + 8
 @colemanb: yes and your cars have fajinas under fat rear ends, nuff said Wink
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
  • + 5
 I work at a bike shop and get amazing discounts on Yakima as well as Thule, I still paid full price for a 1up USA rack instead, I have yet to find a better rack for 95% of riders. However, if you shuttle, recon racks are your go to!
  • + 1
 I did the exact same thing. Couldn't get over all of the plastic on other offerings. The 1up was definitely worth double the price.
  • + 2
 @Lt-Scallywag: Well, they have plastic on the outside, but they are bombproof. My dad crash tested one of these Thule racks last summer when he was side swiped at 60mph. Two E-bikes on the rack, 1yr old car was totalled (had a twisted frame afterwards), but both the rack and the bikes were completely unaffected. Bikes stayed exactly where they should be during the whole crash (I saw the dashcam footage from a following car), didn't move at all.
  • + 5
 Racks sure are different in other parts of the world. For $600 or so here in the states you get a Thule that holds two bikes and that's about it. If you grab a Kuat you get a built-in workstand that isn't even stable enough to be useful. In Europe that much gets you a rack with built-in lights, a spot for a license plate, and a wheel so you don't have to manhandle your 45lb/20kg rack around all the time. Talk about civilized. It's also worth noting that racks attach very differently over there.
  • + 2
 I have a Thule Velocompact 927, very similar to this rack but for 3 bikes and it is absolutely superb. The clamps for the frame are not designed to hold the bike rigidly, the wheel straps hold the bike in place on the rack, the clamps are to stop the bike from moving around once in place, they also are lockable for extra security.

On our Alps trip last year we did a near 2000mile round trip with absolutely no problems whatsoever, the hinging rack meant we could get the dog out of the boot with no hassle when we stopped, the bikes were held securely and there was no marking or to either of the bikes.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/15573766

Yeah it was expensive, especially with the removable towhitch I needed as well but it performs superbly and I will never go back to a rear window mounted rack now.
  • + 1
 Thule can be tricky. I have a Golf VII that comes with a foldable hitch and integrated outlet in the hitch. Aftermarket solutions usually have the outlet separate from the hitch. Nowhere did Thule mention that their carriers won’t fit this kind of hitch. Thankfully someone on Amazon shared their experience.
Been using this for two years now, very happy with it: www.uebler.com/portfolio-item/x21s-x31s
Holds my friends Tues and my Glory just fine. Plus folds really small, I keep it in my trunk during summer to not having to lug it to my flat during rides.
  • + 1
 For a great rack option from a little known Australian manufacturer check out ISI Carriers. Mounting options for tow balls if needed. Great functionality, ground clearance, customer service and a bomber design. Ships internationally. I have no connection to the company apart from a recent purchase and couldn't recommend them enough.
  • + 1
 I had a thule 2 bike tow hitch rack 2012. In the end it was such a faff it was easier just to fold the seats down and take the wheels off the bikes and put them in with a yoga mat between them. Twos bikes, two riders safely inside the car. Cost zero time 5-6 mins.
  • + 1
 I don't care how careful you are, putting two bikes in a car repeatedly you will end up damaging something, mostly likely a brake disc if you're taking the front wheels off. Not to mention the mess/wear/damage to the car itself, nor the grievous injuries to yourself if you have a crash with a bike or two in the back. I put up with this method for about 18 months before caving and getting a Thule.
  • + 1
 What is needed is a similar system to the Yakima front loader that holds the front wheel and not the frame but a tow bar rack. I loved my Front loaders but had issues with the tightening red nut. I had to swap them for Thule's 591's. Still good but when they worked I much preferred the Frontloader's. My mate has had Frontloaders for years, never had an issue !
  • + 1
 I bought a Van to move my bikes, I have seen plenty of racks fall of cars and bikes from racks over the years, one of my bikes including the rack dropped of a friends car at 100km, my bike broke free when the rack hit the road and landed on it's wheels my bike when about 200m down the road into a bush and was undamaged, his bike was wrecked as it flipped down the road.
  • + 1
 @ seamus.... Don't let anybody tell you that grammar is overrated.
  • + 1
 Does anyone have any clue whether you can attach additional rail for 3rd bicycle to the 2 bike version? Thule states it is possible only for 3bike version to attach the 4th bike. But both racks have identical rear rail, that extra rail is being attached to. Thanks Wink
  • + 1
 IMO. Go for the 3 bike version. I have it, +the 4th bike rail. The reason is, that I think that you will have a hard time fiting three bikes next to each other. It's better to have the three version one + the fourth rail. Or at least get the frame holding bar for the fourth bike. And use it for the last (3rd) bike. It will be tilted, but it will help you tremendously when fitting the last bike because it will be further.
  • + 1
 @IluvRIDING: but it's doable with 3 bikes. I can't have 3+1 since then my V70 would exceed 6m (3x without additional rail is on the edge) then so if I come upon a picky person at the ferry they will charge me as for a minibus. If I would be going for 3x version I'd buy Easy Fold XT. I need a possibility to fit it into a quite loaded trunk (family holidays). Velospace 2x would fit just fine, 3x barely.
  • + 1
 I have a very similar rack, 948 Euroway. It's largely fine if you're transporting the same bikes, but it's a bit like tetris if you use someone else's bike. I have the 3 bike version and it's on my list today to see if I can actually fit three normal bikes on it. At the moment I mount two on it, but can't use the middle position. As for those suggesting the 1UP, well people read this website from outside the States, and living in NZ, hitch style mounts are very rare, mainly only on larger vehicles. Whereas towball are much more common.
  • + 1
 Interesting design, but I feel like they were trying to redesign something that didn't really need to be redesigned, and ultimately tried a little too hard. I find the style of this pretty fuggly especially compared to Kuat or Oneup. $499 retail!? That is $10 more that the Sherpa, and also 10lbs heavier.
  • + 2
 Reread the article, this is for euro market regulations.
  • + 3
 As the owner of a bright red 2 door golf, I'd suggest a oneup rack, which appears better in just about every way.
  • + 1
 This is for euro market regulations.
  • + 5
 Nice rack
  • + 1
 ISI Carriers. Had one shipped to the States and was a joy dealing with this company. Nothing better on the market. I'll say no more.
  • + 2
 Less air drag too, if you are not carrying you´re bikes on the top of the roof. Less noisier for sure also.
  • + 1
 Is the reluctance to put a carbon trail bike on a hitch rack driven by fear of getting rear ended? Would insurance cover damage done to a bike in the event of a crash?
  • + 1
 Your own insurance would not. The person that hit you, their liability coverage would owe for your car, the rack and the bike. Hope they have insurance.
  • + 2
 The reluctance isn't the hitch rack, "while the rear windscreen-mounted options" mean the rear window/bumper racks that beat the christ out of both your bike and car.
  • + 1
 A buddy of mine got rear ended with two bikes on the back of his sprinter in a oneup rack and they were totaled. The guy that hit him of course had no money, no insurance, and no license so my buddy had to get new bikes out of pocket.
  • + 1
 @batts65: This is only if you don't carry comprehensive, which, if you are dropping thousands on a bike, you should be able to afford...
  • + 1
 Got it. Thanks guys.
  • - 1
 Nope. Bikes and racks are not covered under an auto insurance policy. The only way is to have an additional homeowners/renters policy or an umbrella policy and open a second claim up. If you’re rear-ended, you might get lucky and get it covered. But if you back into something, your SOL.
  • + 1
 No, but they would have covered it if it was aluminum
  • + 1
 @BlurredLines hit the nail on the head, I don't trust them not to damage my bike.
  • + 1
 Just think, if US racks had lights on the back, you wouldn't be at such a high risk for crashing. No clue why they won't add them to hitch mounted racks. It's common sense!
  • + 3
 So... How are the formula forks?
  • + 1
 Good - I've been using various versions since 2014 and I rate them among the best out there.
  • + 2
 The winners of KUAT PiVOT from the Advent Calendar might want to trade for this!
  • + 1
 And now my 1up for life went out of the window - we're moving back to Europe and looks like, would be better to sell my beloved bike rack now rather then latter - bummer.
  • + 2
 ALLEGEDLY. LOL. "a modern diesel that will cruise at 50mpg+"
  • + 8
 The efficiency numbers are legit, it is the emissions numbers that are rigged.
  • + 0
 BMW 1 Series efficient dynamics does over 60mpg on most longer journeys. 78mpg coming back from work is my personal best.
  • + 0
 My Passat will happily sit at around 130km/h and do 50mpg fully loaded.
  • + 0
 @tom666: What are the speed limits where you are driving? Most of the time I'm doing 80mph on the highway where I live. It kills the gas mileage.
  • + 1
 @mattwragg: how many hectogallons per kilomile would that be?
  • + 1
 @tom666: my Taco gets about 15mgp on a good day.
  • + 1
 Can you even buy a diesel Passat in the US?
  • + 1
 @woofer2609: THIS IS THE CORRECT ANSWER! MUCH MORE STABLE!
  • + 0
 ..
  • + 1
 @Lt-Scallywag: Most of my drive home is between 40 and 60mph. That's where you get the best mpg. At 80mph it will still get mid 50s though. These modern diesel engines do amazing economy, particularly if they have "efficient dynamics" (BMW) or bluemotion (VW) type features.

@jamesbrant: 15mpg is pitiful. But if you need a truck where you live I guess that's the price you have to pay.
  • + 1
 the biggest trouble is everyone is able to buy keys for Thule as they are the same for few models
  • + 1
 There are different cylinders. You can buy a batch of cylinders though if you have more of their products and want to use only one key. You can also buy the proper key and cylinder to match what you already have. But obviously thieves go for the occasion and don't have time to order the right key when they see your car and want to steal your bike Smile .
  • + 1
 @vinay: no, they buy them in advance, it´s cheap and easy to carry and easy to plan when the parking lot near to bikepark will be full in season
  • + 1
 @bok-CZ: I don't think the idea of that locking system is that it's a full proof locking system. Its for if you need to leave the bikes out of your sight for a minute or two whilst you buy a parking ticket or run for a piss. You shouldn't be leaving your bikes on the back of your car and out of sight for a long period of time anyway. If you wanted to you'd have to chain/dlock them to each other, to the rack and to the towbar and even then it's a risk leaving them for very long.
  • + 1
 @tom666: totaly agree, but the fact the thief can have the same key means they dont need any time to break it, just open, so it barely gives you time to have piss. It would not be so difficult to set it with proper lock from manufacturing, thats my point. It is not a cheap option, so... Honestly in most of the places in Europe I would not leave my bike on rack for longer than 2 minutes even under chains
  • + 2
 MPGs? This is a Euro market specific product...
  • + 1
 UK uses MPG as well. Strangely enough, a UK gallon is different to a US gallon...
  • + 1
 I'm sorry, how much? I'd rather use my van
  • + 1
 Towbar? Towbar? Ohhh.... trailer hitch. Gotcha.
  • + 0
 Why would you pick this over the T2? It looks cheaper and is less well thought while keeping the same price point
  • + 1
 The T2 is a beast that prefers a 2" receiver. Can you mount a T2 on a car? I have a T2 mounted on a 4runner with a strong receiver. In the States you can get an 1" 1/4 mount, sometimes, but it hangs low in the back, and it's unsightly. What this article did not address was the different mounting system in Europe. They use a system with the support tucked higher and out of the way, and a ball at the end of a fish hook shaped pin. The pin is inserted upwards into the mount, not horizontally like the US (I don't know about Canada) system. Also, the rack in this article fits on a 50mm ball, and a proper 50mm ball is hard to find in America. A standard 2" ball is not the same as 50mm, and the profile at the bottom of the ball is different. So this Velospace 918 rack will not clamp properly on a 2" ball. These are good racks for the European system, and I think the Euro hitch system is superior for light duty, especially on passenger cars.
  • + 1
 I've wondered the same thing, why does this co-exist with the T2?
@jorukfundan the T2 is available with a 1 1/4" draw bar, so yes, you can mount it on a car.
  • + 1
 @m-t-g: As far as the T2 and the Velo 918 go, they are two different categories. The Velospace 918 is lighter, and lighter duty than the T2. I have a version of the Velospace 918, and it collapses in width when not in use. It is much easier to take on an off of the vehicle. I also have T2, and is heavier and better suited for a truck or SUV. Ultimately the T2 could handle more weight, especially with the two bike add-on. But sheesh, it is a pain to get on and off the truck. The Velospace 918 can take an additional bike, and I think it is the 928 that holds 3 bikes and can take one more, but they are all more compact than the T2. So you have to be shuffle things around to get the bikes to fit. They fit road bikes easier. The bigger racks like the T2 have more space between the bikes. I think this If I recall the Velospace 918 collapses in width, so you can remove it and then put it in the back of the car.
  • + 1
 @jorukfundan: Good to know, thanks.
  • + 0
 Better buy larger car, Town And Country of something like that and put bikes into a car..
  • + 1
 I did buy a larger, nicer car, which is why I don't want bikes trashing the interior.
  • + 0
 @mattwragg: You apparently bought too small car, in normal car bikes does not trash interior. Buy toyota sienna, honda odyssey, chrysler pacifica..
  • + 2
 Oneup for the win.
  • + 2
 Yup, once you've used one, you will be disgusted anytime you have to put your bike on any other kind of rack.
  • + 2
 They can't use them in the euro spec market.
  • - 3
 here's why "NOPE"
1. I think most of these companies work with either road bikes or very normal sized XC bikes. Try fitting a burly DH bike or Freeride frame in there with that set up.
2. Price. Dear good grief. calm down
3. Tow hitch on your sedan...yeah, cause you'll use it for so many other things...like towing your bass boat...right.
C'mon people work with us here.
  • + 1
 I have a similar rack from Thule and it's good.
But it's of 3 bikes so you can comfortably put on two bikes of any size and keep space between them.
And why not a tow hitch on a sedan? I have a tool-free detachable one and it's superb. I like these racks because even if you are able to fit the bikes inside your car or pickup, they take up a lot of space.
  • + 1
 @IluvRIDING: I guess most american sedans (even toyotas, hondas over here...etc) it's a full on procedure since the frame is quite different. hard to pay $13k for a car and then paying over $1k for a hitch (without the actual bike rack as well) is kind of "Off putting".
  • - 2
 @preach, It won’t work with a modern, playful trail bike with 1400 wheelbase but it works with every dh bike that sheep dentists are buying Wink
  • + 2
 @preach: the 1k hitch is bulshit do it yourself for £50 of a scrap heap...
  • + 4
 1. Agreed, hate anything that clamps onto a frame.

2. Not totally outta line if you look at the quality of Thule products ( I bought a Swagman instead, and the quality is good, but not as high)

3. People in all other parts of the world don't have the luxury of having the space to park a 1/2 ton truck, nor the ability to afford fuelling it, just to cart around a 32 pound bicycle or run to the store for a liter of milk. It's like saying you need 180mm of travel on your bike to ride on a bike path.

Small cars are actually used to tow things in other parts of the world (caravans, boats, etc.)

I tow my 12 ft aluminum boat w/ 8hp motor behind a 1600cc Nissan Micra. (Which isn't sold in the USA because it was deemed "too small"), or tow 2 dirt bikes behind the same car and mountain bikes on a roof rack.
U-Haul will install a hitch mount on most cars (Civics, Camry's, etc) for under $200.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: There are dentists specialized in sheep teeth? Should be a fine job. Sheep don't munch that much candy, do they? As long as it pays enough to get you a DH bike and sheep don't drop by for urgencies I'm sure they actually get enough time to ride these. Then again if one drops by, the other sheep will follow...

As for the tow hitch, my previous car (Peugeot 107) didn't have it as it wasn't certified to tow anything at all. You could get the tow hitch but it would then just be for a rack like this. We now have a Renault Clio. Still 900cc, with a tow hitch. I can get two bikes on the rack behind the car and two bikes on the roof. Still enough room inside the car for four adults and gear. Funny to read some here consider 1600cc small Wink .
  • + 3
 @preach So:

1) Did you not read the part of the review where I said I was carrying a Canyon Sender on this rack? That's about as big and burly as you're going to get. Or how about a pair of ebikes, which are bigger and heavier than most regular bikes.
2) I don't want to work out how much my Spark would cost at retail, probably high four figures, so it seems ridiculous to me not to invest in a good rack to look after it.
3) I got the towbar fitted to carry bikes, and occassionally to use as a parking sensor... although I may buy a small trailer for firewood this year too.
  • + 1
 @mattwragg:

2) Absolutely! I need a rack I can trust. If it breaks it would not only damage my bike but likely also my car and jeopardize who's riding behind me. And then I find myself somewhere stranded with no way to transport my bike too.
  • + 1
 @mattwragg: Anything with wheelbase under 1400 is unmodern and rideable only by sheep who know no better*. So is Canyon that is directly tkn'r'jaebs! Also time for you to buy a V16 Truck. You can fund it by towing people for money with your E-bike.

@vinay - sheep dentists ride fat bikes with 4" Wet Screams in order to get to their clients.They need big racks.
  • + 2
 I've used my VeloCompact with 200mm downhill bikes and 50lb ebikes. These racks are 10 times more sturdy than the shitty receiver mounted ones. The ball is bolted to the frame and the clamp doesn't just clamp the ball, it rests against the base of the hitch.
  • + 1
 3. Nobody drives sedans in Europe, just sayin'. Wink
  • + 1
 @bchorv: have you seen the latest Volvo S60XC? Raised 4x4 sedan is fkng special... this idea is actually dumber than a European SUV. That is effectively a raised, expensive, fuel eating, rolling over, pseudo 4x4 version of a wagons with handling and suspension that can be accurately described with only one phrase: "dead f*ck". if someone can explain what do I get with Audi Q8 that Audi A6 wagon doesn't give me, other than it blows my wallet and shortens my penis - thank you...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Well, it is definitely not the common sense what dictates the market Smile
  • + 0
 I drive a minivan. No way am I exposing $3k + bikes to the elements and eyes.
  • + 3
 Wut? It's a mountain bike. Are you afraid of getting it dirty?
  • + 1
 same. my bike and my kids' bike plus our gear, locked up tight for after ride tacos! I don't even take off the wheels.
  • + 1
 In the UK I can't get a hitch carrier that doesn't lock on the frame

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